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Full text of "History of the town of Jaffrey, New Hampshire, from the date of the Masonian charter to the present time, 1749-1880 : with a genealogical register of the Jaffrey families, and an appendix containing the proceedings of the centennial celebration in 1873"

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HISTORY 



OF THE 



TOWN OF JAFFEET, 



NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

From the Date of the JNIasoxian Charter to the 
Present Time, 

1749-1880; 



WITH A 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER 

OF THE JAFFREY FAMILIES, AND 

AN APPENDIX 

Containing the Proceedings of the Centennial 
Celebration in 1873. 



BY 



DANIEL B. CUTTER, M. D. 



'■'■The hills are dearest which otir childish feet 
Have climbed the earliest.'''' 



CONCORD, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY THE REPUBLICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION. 

1881. 



/-. 



J ^- 






PREFACE. 



After years of research we have at length published the 
History of Jaffrey. It has proved a work requiring much 
time and labor, from a want of records. Previous to the in- 
corporation of the town no records have been found ; conse- 
quently we have but little knowledge of the inhabitants. 
After the organization, a record was made of the votes of 
the town and officers chosen, but no report of their doings, 
only that the committee chosen to reckon with the select- 
men had attended to their duty, found all correct, and burnt 
their papers, thus destroying what should have been pre- 
served. We have found votes for raising money for various 
purposes duly recorded, but no record of the expenditures 
till 1793, when, for the first time, the invoice of the town 
was recorded, after a period of twenty years from the organ- 
ization of the town. From this time a record of the tax- 
payers was kept, amount of money raised, and how expend- 
ed, making a record full and complete. During the Revo- 
lution, the most interesting period of the history of the 
town, we have but a meagre record. The names of the sol- 
diers in service we obtained from the records of the state. 
No school report was recorded till 1820, consequently nothing 
is definitely known of the condition of the schools. A record 
of marriages, by Mr. Ainsworth, and of births was made, and 
a very few of deaths. But few headstones were erected pre- 
vious to 1800. Of the records kept by families, of the 
births, marriages, and deaths, many valuable ones have 
been found, while others had none, and consequently their 
genealogy could be obtained only in a broken and imperfect 
manner. 



4 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Such has been our field of labor, but we trust we have 
gathered from it much that will be interesting and valuable. 

In this enterprise the town has taken a deep interest ; 
raised money to aid in its completion, enabling us to furnish 
a valuable map of the town, a fine view of the mountain, the 
old church and school-house, and the portraits of individuals, 
which add much to the beauty and value of the work. And, 
while we feel proud of the liberality of our native town, we 
would not forget individuals who have contributed, with 
their pens and other means, efficient aid in the enterprise. 
Of these I would mention Benjamin Cutter, Esq., a vener- 
able citizen, now over 88 years of age, who has furnished 
much that is valuable from actual knowledge, being born 
and having always lived in town ; Joseph P. Frost, from 
whom I received the first invitation to write a history of the 
town ; Frank H. Cutter, Esq., who examined the state 
records ; George A. Underwood, chief-marshal at the Cen- 
tennial in 1773, for a complete history of the school-district 
in which he lives ; Mr. J. D. Gibbs, for a copy of his record 
of deaths since 1841 ; Peter Upton, Esq., for the presenta- 
tion of a fine view of the school-house at East Jaffrey, en- 
graved at his expense; Benjamin Pierce, Esq., for the pict- 
ure of the Granite State hotel, of which he is the worthy 
owner. To many others, too numerous to mention, who 
kindly furnished the genealogy of their families, we would 
tender our sincere thanks. We would also remember 
others, residents of other states and towns, who have gener- 
ously aided in the work : Hon. Frank J. Parker, of Boston ; 
Addison Prescott, Esq., of Topeka, Kansas ; Mrs. Elizabeth 
(Patrick) Lincoln, of Baltimore, Md. ; Lyman Spaulding, 
Esq., Medina, Mich. ; N. H. Cutter, Esq., Joliet, 111. ; Ezra 
S. Stearns, historian of Rindge ; C. A. Bemis, historian of 
Marlborough, N. H. ; Rev. Henry Shedd, Mt. Gilead, O. ; 
Rev. John M. Ellis, Oberlin, O. ; John W. Fyfe, m. d., Hart- 
ford, Conn. ; Rev. Andrew O. Warren, Montrose, Pa. ; and 
many others, who have in many ways aided and encouraged 
the enterprise. 

That the history may meet the expectations of all inter- 
ested in the town of Jaffrey is the hope and wish of your 
humble servant, d. b. c. 



CONTENTS 



Page. 

CHAPTER I. 
Location — Boundaries — Climate — Soil — Productions 9 

CHAPTER II. 

Masonian Proprietors — Grant of the Township — Survey — 
Report of the Surveyor 16 

CHAPTER III. 
First Settlers — Report of Gilmore, Grout, and Hale 27 

CHAPTER IV. 

Municipal History— Charter of the Town — Incorporation 
— List of Town and State Officers 38 

CHAPTER V. 

Travel — Highway — County Road — Third New Hampshire 
Turnpike — Monadnock Railroad 5° 

CHAPTER VI. 
Ecclesiastical History — Meeting-House 59 

CHAPTER VII. 
Ecclesiastical History 7° 

CHAPTER VIII. 
Education — Public Schools 81 

CHAPTER IX. 
List of College Graduates of the Town of Jaffi-ey 90 



6 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Page. 

CHAPTER X. 

Military History — First Military Company — Officers — Roll 
of Soldiers — Jaftrey and Rindge Cavalry Company — Ri- 
fle Company — Trainings and Musters 123 

CHAPTER XT. 
Revolution — War of 1812 — Mexican War — Civil War. . . . 131 

CHAPTER Xn. 
Mills — Manufactories and Artisans 145 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Miscellany — Hotels — Stores — Post-Office — Mail Stage — 
Banks — Sacred Music — Common — Sale of the Public 
Lands — Constitutional Convention — Delegates — Fires. . 149 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Invoice, 1793, First on Record — Money Raised — Highest 
Tax-Payers 161 

CHAPTER XV. 

Pauperism — Warning from Town — Board of the Poor sold 
at Public Vendue — Town Farm 167 

CHAPTER XVI. 

Cemeteries — Accidental Deaths — List of Persons whose 
Age exceeds Eighty Years 171 

CHAPTER XVII. 

Census of the Town, 1873, with the Location of the Inhab- 
itants 1 85 

CHAPTER XVIII. 
Conclusion 204 

Genealogical Register 209-526 

Appendix (Jaftrey Centennial) ... .527-643 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 

Rev. Laban Ainsworth 75 

Mrs. Mary Ainsworth 75 

John Conant • 254 

John Cutter 284 

Benjamin Cutter 388 

Calvin Cutter 100 

Daniel B. Cutter i 

Leonard R. Cutter 270 

Frank H. Cutter 535 

John Fox 327 

Abel Parker 108 

Mrs. Edith Parker 108 

Joel Parker 538 

Benjamin Prescott 442 

Samuel Ryan 450 

O. L. Spaulding 472 

Peter Upton 503 

First Meeting-House 59 

First School-House 50 

East JaftVey School-House 89 

Monadnock Bank 153 

Cutter Homestead 265 

Granite State Hotel 150 

View of the Mountain 10 

Map of the Town. 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



CHAPTER I. 

LOCATION— BOUNDARIES— CLIMATE— SOIL— PRODUC- 
TIONS. 

THE town of Jaffrey is situated in the southern part 
of New Hampshire, and is one of the most easterly 
towns in the county of Cheshire, within one town (Rindge) 
of the state line of Massachusetts, in latitude 42° 49' north, 
and longitude 72° 3' west from London. It is bounded, 
north, 113 rods by Marlborough, and 2,408 rods by Dublin ; 
east, 730 rods by Peterborough and 988 rods by Sharon ; 
south, 1,898 rods by Rindge and 603 rods by Fitzwilliam ; 
west, 349 rods by Fitzwilliam, 806 rods by Troy, and 501 
rods by Marlborough. It is fifteen miles from Keene, the 
shire town of the county ; forty-five from Concord, the cap- 
ital of the state ; and sixty-two from Boston, — seventy-eight 
by railroad. 

The form of the town is rhomboid, the boundary lines 
inclining about one and a half degrees east of north, and 
about eleven north of west. The area is about 22,000 acres : 
about 1,000 is covered with water, and the uninhabitable 
area of the mountain in Jaffrey is about 3,200 acres. The 
surface of the town is hilly and mountainous. The altitude 
2 



10 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

of the Centre is 1,057 feet above the level of the ocean, and 
East Jaffrey 1,032. 

The Grand Monadnock is situated in the north-west part 
of the town and south part of Dublin. Its highest peak is a 
little south of the line of Dublin, on lot 5, range i, in lati- 
tude 42° 51' 39" and longitude 72° 6' 30" from London, 
and has an altitude, according to Prof. Hitchcock, of 3,186 
feet above the level of the sea, and 2,029 feet above the 
centre of the town. When the town was first settled, the 
mountain was covered to its summit with forest trees, prin- 
cipally spruce, excepting a small peak south-east of the top, 
which was called the " Bald rocks." This forest was blown 
down by the wind about the beginning of the present cen- 
tury, and was soon afterwards destroyed by fire. The pres- 
ent growth of trees around the sides of the mountains is 
mostly maple, beech, and birch. On the summit grow a 
few Alpine plants and dwarf spruces ; on the declivities, 
blueberries in great abundance. 

The mountain has become a great place of summer resort. 
In 1873, centennial year, the number of arrivals at the Half- 
way House was 12,000. This house was built in 1873. It is 
large and commodious, and is well patronized during the 
summer season. A good carriage-road connects it with the 
public highway, and a convenient foot-path with the sum- 
mit, a distance of about one mile. From this elevated peak 
the surrounding country has the appearance of an extended 
plain, whose surface is studded with ponds and villages. In 
the north and west may be seen the dim outline of the 
White and Green Mountains, and a distinct view of the 
Kearsarge and Ascutney ; in the south the Watatic and 
Wachusett in Massachusetts ; in the east, Pack Monadnock 
in Temple and Crotched in Francestown. The rocky form- 
ation of the mountain is a hard variety of gneiss, a species 
of granite. On the east side, the ascent is abrupt, steep, and 
precipitous, while on the west side it is more uniform and 
gradual. The rocks on the west side have the appearance 



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MINERAL SPRING. II 

of having been made smooth by some grinding power, at- 
tributed to the effect of the vast mountains of ice which 
were driven over its surface during the glacial period. 

The inhabited portion of the town lies mostly east and 
south of the mountain. The surface is hilly, but none of 
the hills are of sufficient altitude to require any particular 
description. They are mostly large swells of land, arable 
on side and summit, on some of which are some of the best 
farms in town. The town is well watered. The numerous 
streams flowing from the mountain supply every farm with 
abundance of water. Those flowing from the east side 
unite in the south-east part of the town with a stream from 
Long pond, and form the Contoocook river, which runs 
north-east, and empties into the Merrimack above Concord. 
Those from the west side unite with the Ashuelot and Mil- 
ler rivers, which empty into the Connecticut. 

Most of the water-power in Jaffrey is on the Contoocook 
river. In East Jaffrey, on this river, are a cotton-mill, grist- 
mill, saw-mill, and a knife factory ; and on the road from 
there to Peterborough, a cotton factory and saw-mill. There 
are six ponds and part of another in this town. Three, — 
Thorndike, Frost, and Parker, — are in the north part ; and 
Gilmore, Hodge, Baker, and a part of Long pond, in the south 
part. The Thorndike pond is about 400 rods long and 140 
wide, and contains an island of about ten acres. It is the 
largest in town, and is known in Dublin as the Bullard 
pond. This pond, like the others, received its name from 
families residing on its border, — Joseph Thorndike, in Jaf- 
frey, and Simeon Bullard, in Dublin. Hence the different 
names in those towns. 

MINERAL SPRING. 

South-easterly from the mountain, on the old turnpike 
road, is a spring known as the Monadnock Mineral Spring. 
Its water is impregnated with carbonate of iron and sul- 



12 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

phate of soda, and was formerly considered a valuable rem- 
edy in many diseases. For a time it was quite a resort for 
invalids. Where the spring issues from the earth, yellow 
ochre exists in considerable quantities. The temperature of 
the water is high, and it never freezes. 

All the streams and ponds abound with fish. The most 
valuable are the trout and pickerel. The other fish are perch, 
shiners, suckers, eels, cat-fish or horned-pout, and minnow. 
Before the settlement of the town, wild animals were very 
numerous, consisting of the bear, wolf, catamount, wildcat, 
deer, and beaver, all of which have long since disappeared ; 
while the fox, rabbit, woodchuck, a variety of squirrels, 
raccoon, mink, and muskrat, still remain. The otter and 
the porcupine are occasionally seen. 

Among the early settlers the wolf was the most trouble- 
some and rapacious. For a long time the farmer was 
obliged to herd his cattle and fold his flock during the 
night, and even then they were not always safe. At one 
time, during the night, a wolf crept through a crevice in the 
wall under the sill of the barn of Thomas Mower, killed a 
sheep, feasted thereon, and was there found in the morning. 
He received the penalty of death for his temerity. Mr. 
Spaulding lost sixteen killed by wolves in one night. 

Bears were common, troublesome in cornfields, and some- 
times destroyed young cattle. Phineas Spaulding had a 
calf killed by one. Catamounts are said to have been 
found, but not in large numbers. George A. Underwood 
has kindly furnished a very interesting account of one killed 
by Joseph Hogg and another man, on a hunting excursion, 
before his settlement in town. To prevent the destruction 
of deer, officers called deer-reeves were chosen annually by 
the town, till 1786, for their preservation. A bounty was 
offered for the destruction of wolves in 1792; the last one 
offered was in 1799. After the destruction of the mountain 
forest by fire, the most rapacious wild animals disappeared. 
The beaver also left : civiUzation was destructive to his 



FORESTS AND WILD FRUITS. I3 

dams, the remains of which have been found in many places. 
A very interesting account of one is given by Mr. Parker in 
his centennial address. 

Birds were very numerous, much more so than they are 
now. The most troublesome were the crow and the crow 
blackbird. Very liberal bounties were offered at different 
times for their destruction, the last in 1799. The crow 
blackbird is now seldom seen. The crow remains, but no 
bounty is now offered for his head, as his destructive power 
among insects is believed to more than counterbalance his 
ravages in corn-fields. The diminution of birds has in- 
creased the ravages of insects, and laws for their preser- 
vation are much needed and should be enacted. 

When the first settlement was made the town was cov- 
ered with a dense forest. In the vicinity of the Contoocook 
river the growth of the white pine was very luxuriant ; the 
trees grew to an immense size, and had it not been for the 
Revolution the king of Great Britain would have had a large 
supply for His Majesty's navy. On the mountain and high- 
lands grew the spruce and the hemlock. Of the deciduous 
trees, the most numerous were the maples, beeches, birches, 
oaks, ashes, cherries, basswoods, and poplars. The rock or 
sugar maple was the most useful and abundant, furnishing 
an excellent quality of wood and timber, and a good sup- 
ply of sugar, — a great desideratum among the early settlers. 
The red and white maples were less common. The birches 
were the black, white, and yellow. Of the oak species, the 
red oak was the only kind in any degree prevalent. The 
altitude of the town would not admit of the growth of either 
the white oak or the chestnut. Of the ashes, the white 
grew on the hillsides, and the black in the swamps. 

The wild fruits, such as the blackberry, raspberry, straw- 
berry, checkerberry, high and low blueberry, and huckle- 
berry were found in many places very abundant. The low 
blueberry grew on the mountain and in some pastures 
around it; the high grew in swamps. 



14 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

The wild flowering plants were very numerous. They 
grew on the hillsides and in the valleys, in swamps and 
in meadows, in secluded spots and on roadsides, exhibiting 
every variety of color and beauty, making localities delight- 
ful that would otherwise appear forbidding and repulsive. 
The most beautiful of these flowers were the lilies, roses, 
and violets, of which there were many varieties. 

Situated on the Grand Monadnock plateau, at an elevation 
of 1,057 feet above ^^^ level of the ocean, the town of Jaffrey 
must have a climate of some severity in winter. In the 
neighborhood of the mountain the winds often blow with 
great power, and snow falls to a great depth, often remain- 
ing on the ground till late in spring. In summer the 
morning and evening breezes are cool and refreshing, mak- 
ing a very healthful and desirable location during that season. 
Jaffrey has always been regarded as the most healthy town 
in its vicinity, seldom visited by any epidemic. The longev- 
ity of its inhabitants has been great, as shown by the mor- 
tuary record of the state. By that it appears that more 
deaths of persons exceeding 100 years of age have occurred 
in this town than in any other in the state having the same 
number of inhabitants. Moses Stickney died 1852, aged 
100 years, 7 months ; Rev. Laban Ainsworth died 1858, 
aged 100 years, 8 months ; Sarah Byam died 1866, aged 102 
years, 2 months, 19 days ; Dorcas Rice died 1873, aged 104 
years, 4 months, 5 days. 

SOIL AND PRODUCTIONS, 

The soil, although the surface is rough and uneven, was 
originally very productive, yielding large crops with little 
cultivation. The principal business of the early settlers 
was the felling and burning of the forest trees, sowing the 
seed, and gathering the crops. A descendant of Phineas 
Spaulding writes, that on his farm it was not uncommon 
for a quart of seed to yield a bushel of wheat, and for herds- 
grass to grow higher than a man's head. The first crop 



SOIL AND PRODUCTIONS. 15 

raised on new cleared land was usually rye ; afterwards 
herds-grass and clover. When the stumps of the fallen 
trees became sufficiently decayed to admit of ploughing, 
Indian corn was raised in great abundance. The other 
cereals raised were wheat, barley, oats, buckwheat, &c. Of 
the vegetables raised, the potato was the most valuable, 
and most extensively used. The other vegetables were 
beets, carrots, turnips, onions, parsnips, pumpkins, squashes, 
cucumbers, and cabbages. Flax was raised for the manu- 
facture of clothing. Around the base, and high on the 
sides of the mountain, the pastures were excellent, and 
afforded an abundance of feed for cattle during the summer 
season. Large numbers were driven from Massachusetts 
every year and pastured therein, and however lean their 
condition on arrival, they were sure to be returned well 
fattened in the fall. 

Stock-raising and wool-growing were a great source of 
profit, such products always finding a ready market. The 
raising of pork and the products of the dairy were also 
valuable sources of revenue. The nearest market was Bos- 
ton, and in December, the farmers with their own teams, 
loaded with pork, poultry, butter, and cheese, could be seen 
on the way there, in company with each other, in large num- 
bers, loading back with salt, sugar, and such other necessa- 
ries as their circumstances required. But the scene has 
now changed ; — the fertility of the land has disappeared ; the 
rich pastures no longer exist ; the growth of clover and 
herds-grass is changed to one of white-grass, hardbacks, 
and ferns, and even those are fast yielding to the growth of 
another forest, which may again in time renovate the soil, 
and make it a fit residence for another generation. 



CHAPTER n. 

MASONIAN PROPRIETORS— GRANT OF THE TOWNSHIP- 
SURVEY— REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR. 

THE town of Jaffrey was granted by the Masonian 
Proprietors under the name of Middle Monadnock 
No. 2, November 30, 1749, to Jonathan Hubbard and thirty- 
nine others, residents of Hollis, Lunenburg, and Dunstable. 
The Masonian Proprietors were residents of Portsmouth 
and vicinity, twelve in number, who purchased of John Tuf- 
ton Mason, great-grandson of Capt. John Mason, for;^i500, 
his right and title to a tract of land lying in New Hamp- 
shire, granted to said Capt. John Mason by the Council of 
Plymouth in 1629. The purchase was divided into fifteen 
shares, of which Theodore Atkinson had three shares, Mark 
H. Wentworth two shares, and Richard Wibbard, John Went- 
worth, John Moffat, Samuel Moore, Jotham Odiorne, George 
Jaffrey, Joshua Pierce, Nathaniel Meserve, Thomas Walling- 
ford, and Thomas Packer one share each. Nine additional 
members were afterwards admitted, and the shares increased 
to eighteen. The new members were John Rindge, Joseph 
Blanchard, Daniel Pierce, John Tufton Mason, John Thom- 
linson, Mathew Livermore, William Parker, Samuel Solly, 
and Clement March. The territory is described as " ex- 
tending from the middle of the Piscataqua river, up the 
same to the fartherest head thereof, and from thence north- 
westward until sixty miles from the mouth of the harbor 
were finished ; also, through Merrimac river to the far- 
therest head thereof, and so forward up into the land west- 
ward until sixty miles were finished, and from thence over- 



GRANT OF THE TOWNSHIP. 1/ 

land to the end of sixty miles accounted from the Piscataqua 
river, together with all lands within five leagues of the coast." 
Immediately after the purchase, the above described tract 
of land was divided by the proprietors into townships. 
Those around the Monadnock hills, as the mountain was 
then called, were named Monadnocks, designated by num- 
bers, beginning with Rindge, which was South Monadnock, 
or Monadnock Number One ; Jaffrey, Middle Monadnock, 
or Monadnock Number Two ; Dublin, North Monadnock, 
or Monadnock Number Three ; Fitzvvilliam, Monadnock 
Number Four; Marlborough, Monadnock Number Five; 
Nelson, Monadnock Number Six ; Stoddard, Monadnock 
Number Seven ; Washington, Monadnock Number Eight. 
After the Revolution, a controversy arose concerning the 
western boundary of the Masonian Grant, between the 
proprietors and the state. A curved line was claimed by 
them, corresponding with the line of the sea-coast, while 
the state claimed a straight one. The state finally estab- 
lished a straight line extending from the south-east part of 
Rindge to a point near the south line of Conway, leaving 
the Monadnock townships, except a part of Rindge, beyond 
the limits of the Masonian grant. To make valid the grants 
of these townships, and others, the Masonian Proprietors 
purchased of the state the land in dispute for the sum of 
forty thousand eight hundred dollars. 

GRANT OF THE TOWNSHIP, 

Province of ) Pursuant to the Power and Authority 

New Hamps''. } Granted and Vested in me by the Proprie- 
tors of Lands purchased of John Tufton Mason Esq^ In the 
Province of New Hampshire by their Vote passed at their 
meeting held at Portsmouth in said Province, the i6"^ day of 
June 1749 I Do by these Presents on the Terms and limita- 
tions Hereafter Expressed give and Grant all the Right Poses- 
sion and Property of the Proprietors aforesaid unto Jonathan 
Hubbard Oliver Farwell Tho^ March, Elias EHot, James 
Stewart, John Kendall Joseph Blanchard Jun'' Barnabas Davis 
Will" Rindge Peter Powers Eleaz'' Blanchard — Paul March 



i8 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Tho' Parker Jun'' Benj. Bellows, Sampson Stoddard Daniel 
Emerson Josiah Brown, Stephen March^— Benj" Winn, John 
Scott, Sam^ Garish, John Hart, John Chamberlin, Joseph 
Winn Jun"^ Joseph Blodget Jun'' Sam^ Cumings, Mathew 
Thornton, John Butterfield, Will'" Garish, Nath' Pierce, Jon- 
ath" Cumings, John Usher, Joseph French, Peleg Lawrence 
Isaac Williams, David Adams, David Willson Randall 

M'^Daniel, Robert Fletcher Jun% Joseph Emerson To the 

said Joseph Blanchard Jun'' Three shares, to the said James 
Stewart Two shares, to Peter Powers Four shares to Benj" 
Bellows two shares, to Jonath" Hubbard Three shares, to Josiah 
Brown two shares. The others aforenamed one share each, of 
in or to that Tract of Land or Township Called the Middle 
Monadnock or No. 2 — Bounded as foUoweth beginning at the 
South West Corner of Peterborough Slip So Called, from 
thence Running North Eighty deg^ West Seven miles to a 
Hemlock Tree Marked, from thence Running North by the 
Needle five Miles to a Hemlock Tree marked, from thence 
Running South Eighty deg^ East Seven Miles to a Beach Tree 
Marked, in the West Line of Peterborough, from thence South 

by the Needle to the first Bounds Mentioned To Have and 

to Hold to them their Heirs and Assigns, Excepting as afore- 
said and on the following terms and Conditions (that is to say) 
that the whole tract of Land be divided Into Seventy one 
Equall Shares, and that each Share Contain three Lotts Equi- 
tably Coupled together, and drawn for at Dunstable — at or be- 
fore the first day of July Next in Some Equitable Manner — 
That three of the aforesaid Shares be granted and appropriated 
free of all Charge, one for the first Settled Minister in Said 
Township one for the Support of the Ministry, and one for the 
School there forever — one lott for Eacli Said three Shares to be 
first laid out in the most convenient place Near the Middle of 
Said Town, and Lotts — Coupled to them. So as not to be drawn 
fer — that Eighteen of the said Shares be Reserved for the 
Grantors of the Premises, their Heirs and Assigns forever and 
Aquited from all duty and Charge Untill improved by the 
Owner or Some Holding them Respectively, that the other 
Owners of the said Rights Make Settlement at their Own Ex- 
pense in the following manner Viz. All the Lotts to be laid 
out at the Grantees Expense, that all the Lotts in Said Town- 
ship be subjected to have all Necessary Roads lay'd out threw 
them free from Charge as Hereafter there Shall be Occasion — 
That within Four Years from the date hereof Forty of the 
Rights or Shares, belonging to the aforementioned Grantees 
Viz. Oliver Farwell Thomas March, Elias Eliot, John Ken- 
dall, Barnabas Davis, Paul March, Sampson Stoddard, Stephen 
March John Scott Sam' Garish John Hart John Chamberlain 



GRANT OF THE TOWNSHIP. I9 

Joseph Winn Jun'' Joseph Blodgett Jun'' Samuel Cumings, 
Mathew Thornton Will"^ Garish Nathi Pierce Isaac Williams 
David Willson, Rand' M'^Daniel, Robert Fletcher Jun"" Jona- 
than Cumings John Uslier Joseph French Peleg Lawrence, 
Joseph Emerson — One Settlement Each Josiah Brown two 
Shares, Benj° Bellows two Shares, James Stewart two Shares, 
Jonathan Hubbard tliree Shares, Peter Powers two Shares, 

Daniel Emerson & Thomas Parker one Settlement Each 

Be Enter'd upon and three Acres of Land at the Least Cleared 
inclosed and fited for Mowing or Tillage, and that within the 
term of Six Months then Next Coming there be on each of the 
Said forty Shares a House Built, the Room Sixteen feet Square 
at the least, fitted and furnished for Comfortable dwelling 
therein and Some Person Resident therein and Continue In- 
habitancy and Residence there for three Years then Next Com- 
ing with the Aditionall Improvement as aforesaid of two Acres 
Each Year for Each Setler. That Each of the Said Grantees 
at the Executing this Instrument pay twenty Pounds Old Ten"" 
to defray the Necessary Charges Risen and arising in Said 
Township to be deposited in the hands of Such Persons as the 
Grantees shall Chuse being a free holder and Resident in the 
Province of New Hampshire aforesaid. That a good Conven- 
ient Meeting House be Built in said Township as near the 
Center of the Town as maybe with Convenience — Within Six 
Years from this date and Ten Acres of Land Reserved for 
Publick Uses. That the aforesaid Grantees or their Assigns 
by a maj' Vote In Publick Meeting Grant and Assess Such 
further Sums of Money as they Shall think Necessary for Com- 
pleating and Carrying forward, the Settlement aforesaid. And 
any of the Grantees Exclusive of the three Publick Lotts, who 
shall neglect for the Space of three Months Next Coming 
after such assessment Shall be granted and Made to pay the 
Same, So much of Such Delinquents Right Respectively Shall 
or may be Sold as will pay the Tax and all Charges arising 
thereon — by a Committee of the Grantees appointed for that 
purpose. That all White Pine trees fit for Masting his Majes- 
tys Royall Navey Growing, on Said Tract of Land be and 
hereby are granted to his Majesty his Heirs and Sucessors 
forever. And in Case any of the Grantees Shall Neglect or 
Refuse to perform any of the Articles aforementioned he shall 
forfeit his Share and Right in Said Township and every part 
and Parcell thereof to those of the Said Grantees that shall 
have Complyed with the Conditions on their Part herein Ex- 
pressed, and it shall and may be lawfuU for them or any Per- 
son by their Authority to Enter into and upon the Right of 
such Delinquent Owner and any and every part thereof in the 
name of the Whole of the Settlers that Shall fulfill as aforesaid, 



20 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

and him to amove Oust and expell for their Use their Heirs 
and Assigns. Provided they settle or Cause to be Settled Each 
Such Delinquent Right within the term of one Year at the 
furthest from the Period that is by this Instrument stipulated to 
be done as the Condition of this Grant, and fully discharge and 
Comply v^'ith the whole duty such delinquent ought to have 
done, within one Year from time to time, after the Respective 
Periods thereof, and in Case the Said Grantees fulfilling on 
their part as aforesaid, Shall Neglect fulfilling as aforesaid the 
duty of any Delinquent Owner, nor he himself perform the 
same, that then such share or shares shall be forfeited Revert 
and belong to the Grantors their Heirs and Assigns to be 
wholly at their disposal, always provided there be no Indian 
War — within any of the terms and limitations aforesaid, for 
doing the Duty Conditioned in this grant and in Case that 
should happen the same to be allowed for the Respective Mat- 
ters aforesaid, after Such Impediment should be Removed- 

Lastly the said Grantors do hereby promise to the said 
Grantees their Heirs and Assigns to defend through the Law 
to King and Council if Need be, one Action, that shall or may 
be brought against them or any number of them, by any person 
or persons Whatsoever Claiming the said Lands or any part 
thereof by an}^ other Title than that of the said Grantors or 
that by which they hold and derive their's from provided the 
said Grantors are avouche'd in to defend the same and in Case 
on Finall Tryall the same shall be Recovered against the Gran- 
tors for the said Lands Improvements or Expense in Bringing 
forward the vSettlement, the said Grantees shall Recover noth- 
ing over against the said Grantors and further that the said 
Grantors will pay the Necessary Expense of time and Money, 
that any other person or persons shall be put to by any other 
suit or suits that shall or may be brought against them or any 
Number of them the said Grantees. For Tryall of the Title, 
before one suit shall be fully determined in the law, to which 
Premises Joseph Blanchard Agent for and in behalf of the said 
Grantors Have hereunto set my hand and seal this 30"" da}' of 
November in the 23'* Year of his Majestys Reighn Anno 
Domini 1749 

Joseph Blanchard (seal). 

A True Copy of the Grant of the Middle 
Monadnock Township or No 2 

attest Joseph Blanchard Jun. Prop. Clk. 

A true Copy examined 

attest Geo. JaflVey Prop CI 

I hereby certify that the above is a true copy of a Grant on the 
files of the Masonian Proprietors. 

J. W. Peirce, Prop. Clk. 



THE RANGES NUMBERED. 



21 






(il 




22 



22 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



This is a plan of the Middle Monadnock No. 2 Township. 
The Ranges are i6o Rods Wide, and the Lotts, One hundred 
Rods Wide and finished laying out the lotts in May 1750. 

Rob* Fletcher Jun"" Sur". 

A Coppy taken from the files of the Proprietors of the above 
Township. 

Joseph Blanchard, Prop"" Clk. 

A true Copy Examined Attest Geo. Jaflrey Prop" CI. 
A true Copy Examined Attest 

J. W. Peirce, Prop^ Clk. 

LIST OF THE PROPRIETORS OF MONADNOCK. 



A List of the Proprietors of the Monadnock 
Township. 



+^ 












J3 




. 








hfl 




(U 




<u 




1 




biD 




ftJO 




rt 


. 


c 


. 


c 


. 


u 





tU 





rt 





P 


^ 


Pi 


^ 


C^ 


Z 



c 



*William Parker Esq'' 

Jonathan Hubbard Jun 

Oliver Farwell 

Thomas March 

Ministry Lotts 

Elias Eliot 

James Stewart 

Ministers Lotts 

John Kendell 

Joseph Blanchard Jun'' 

Barnabas Davis 

William Rindge 

Peter Powers 

Eleazor Blanchard 

Joseph Blanchard Jun'' 

*Thomas Packer Esq 

*John Mofifatt Esq 

Paul March 

Peter Powers 

*John Wentworth Esq 

Thomas Parker Jun 

*Matthew Livermoore Esq 

Benjamin Bellows 

*Richard Wibird Esq 

*John T. Mason & *Jn''. Thomlinson Esq 

Sampson Stoddard Esq 

Daniel Emerson 

Josiah Browne 

Stephen March 

Benjamin Winn 

John Scott 

*Daniel Peirce & Mrs Mary Moore 



9 
10 

II 

12 

13 

14 

IS 
16 

'7 
18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 

6 

27 

28 

29 
30 
31 
32 



121 5 

12I 4 

12 

12 

12 

12 

II 

II 

II 

10 

10 

10 

9 
9 



13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
19 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
16 

15 
IS 
IS 
15 



3 
2 
6 
7 
7 
6 

5 
7 
6 

S 
4 
6 
6 
4 

S 
6 

7 
8 

9 

10 

8 
6 

S 
4 
3 
S 
3 
4 

S 
6 



6 

6 

14 

13 
12 

3 

3 

3 
I 

4 

2 

22 

3 
4 
4 
6 
I 
16 
I 

19 
I 

18 

18 

I 

17 

17 

19 

20 

19 

7 

18 

17 



8 

9 
I 
2 
I 
I 

3 

2 
I 
6 

3 
7 
6 
I 

2 

3 

7 
8 

ID 

8 

6 

10 

9 
9 
6 

4 
4 
3 
3 
7 



4 
2 

15 
II 

12 

8 

20 

12 

20 

2 

22 

21 

22 

16 

21 

I 

2 

2 

3 
21 
12 

14 
22 

II 
I 

21 

17 
18 
10 

5 

18 
18 



3 
I 

I 

2 

10 
2 
6 

9 
7 

2 
8 
7 

ID 

I 

10 

3 

5 

10 
10 

9 
8 

9 
4 
8 

4 
4 
I 

3 
8 
8 

7 
6 



LIST OF PROPRIETORS. 



23 



Samuel Garish 

*Theodore Atkinson Esq 

John Hart 

John Chamberlin 

Joseph Winn Jun'' 

*Sami Solly & *Clem' March Esq. 

*George Jaffrey 

Joseph Blanchard Jun"^ 

Joseph Blodgett Jun"" 

Samuel Cumings , 

School Lotts , 

Mathew Thornton Esq 

*Mark Hkg. Wentworth Esq 

John Butterfield 

Josiah Brown 

William Garish 

Nathaniel Peirce 

*Jotham Odiorne Esq 

Peter Powers 

Benjamin Bellows 

*Joshua Peirce 

Jonathan Cumings 

John Usher 

Jonathan Hubbard Jun'' 

Joseph French 

Peter Powers 

Peleg Lawrence 

Isaac Williams 

David Addams 

James Stewart., 

*Nathaniel Meserve Esq 

David Willson 

*John Rindge 

Randall McDaniel 

Jonathan Hubbard Jun'' 

*Joseph Blanchard 

Robert Fletcher ]mY 

Joseph Emerson 

*Thomas Wallingford Esq 



33 

34 
35 
36 
37 
138 

39 

40 

41 

42 
43 
44 

45 
46 

47 
48 

49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 

61 
62 

63 
64 

65 
66 

67 
68 
69 
70 
71 



15' 7 17 
15 8,19 
15 9 2 

15 10U4 

16 io|i9 



16; 
16 
16; 

15 
16 

16 
16 

17 
20 
18 

19 
7 
7 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 
9 
9 

10 
8 
8 
8 

5 

2 

2 
21 
22 

22 
22 
21 

3 
8 



19 

17 
5 

17 
7 

14 
7 
9 
9 

II 

20 

4 
8 

5 

3 

22 

19 
6 

9 

9 

3 

10 

7 



7 
7 

9 

10 

9 
6 

8 

10 
5 
3 
2 
6 
3 
5 

5 
5 
4 
5 
5 

9 
10 

10 

10 

9 
7 

9 

8 

ID 



i7;io 
10 10 

5 



3 

2 

I 

10 

21 

10 

14 
II 

4 
I 



22 

13 

20 
10 

13 

22 

8 
II 
II 

19 
21 

8 

I 

4 

21 

21 
5 
9 
9 

13 

18 

ID 

18 

2 

17 
II 

5 

5 
6 

3 
20 
20 
4 
4 
20 
18 



3 
6 
I 

8 

2 

10 

5 

3 

10 

I 

2 

5 
10 

2 

9 
8 
6 

7 
I 



3 

5 
I 

I 

4 

3 

9 
6 

4 
7 
9 
9 
4 
7 
8 
10 
4 



* Masonian Proprietors. 

A true Coppy of the List of the Proprietors of Monadnock 
Township Number two with the Number of Lotts belonging 
to each Proprietor as drawn by them the first Tuesday of June, 

^750- 

Attest Joseph Blanchard Jun"^ Prop' CP. 
A true Copy Examined Attest Geo. Jaffrey Prop'' CI 
A true Copy Examined Attest 

J. W. Peirce, Prop« Clk. 



In the copy of the list of the Proprietors and the lots 



24 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

drawn by them are a number of errors, notwithstanding the 
declaration of the Proprietors' clerk that the copy is a true 
one. 

By that record, lot number ten, range seven, was drawn 
by Joseph Blanchard, Jr., and Jona. Hubbard, Jr. ; lot num- 
ber fifteen, range five, was drawn by John Scott and Joseph 
Blodgett, Jr. ; lot number seventeen, range seven, by Dan- 
iel Peirce, Mrs. Mary Moore, and Samuel Garrish ; lot num- 
ber nineteen, range ten, by Mathew Livermore and Jona. 
Cumings ; leaving lots number nineteen, range one, lot 
number seventeen, range nine, lot number fifteen, range 
two, and lot number twenty, range one, undrawn. 

It seems quite probable that lot number nineteen, range 
one, was drawn by Jona. Cumings ; lot number fifteen, range 
two, by John Scott ; lot number seventeen, range nine, by 
Samuel Garrish ; and lot number twenty, by Jos. Blanchard, 
Jr., or Jona. Hubbard, Jr. 

PROPRIETORS MEETJNG, 

At a meeting of the Proprietors of Township situated in the 
Provence of Newhampshire Gowing west of Peterborough and 
adjoing thereto, Called middle monadnock No 2 Granted by 
the purchasers of John Tufton Mason Esq. of the right Granted 
to Capt. John Mason Late of London Deceased held at the 
house of Joseph French in Dunstable on Tuesday the sixteenth 
day of January 1749-50. 

Joseph Blanchard was Moderator 

Joseph Blanchard Jun"^, Prop"" Clerk was sworn to the 
Faithful Discharge of that trust 

Voted that each Right be Lay*^ out into three Lotts, that the 
whole of the Township be Proportioned so that each Right 
contain three Lotts, that the Rights be equal in quantity one 
with another 
Voted that Capt. Jona. Cummings and Capt. John Chamberlin 
be a Committee to lay out this town into Lotts and complete 
the same fit for Drawing, that they have 30.? Pr Day old 
tenor for their service and in case of inability of either of 
these Com"'® for W™ Spaulding and Thos. Patch Do the work 
as aforsaid. 
Voted that this Township be let out by the Grant to be Lay"* 



PROPRIETORS MEETING. 2$ 

out. Capt Peter Powers undertook the same, and was Ex- 
cepted by the Society upon Conditions of His paying Com^* 
Surveyor Choirnian &c. and all other Necessary Charges in 
Laying out s*^ Township and Preparing the same for Draw- 
ing the Lotts. To be completely Done by the last Day of 
May next. 

Voted that he have £550 old tenor for doing sd. work. 

Voted that Joseph Blanchard Esq. take the security of Capt. 
Peter Powers for the Performance of this work as aforesaid. 

Voted that £^20 old tenor be raised on each Right to Defray 
the charges of laying out and Deviding the s"* Township. 

Voted that Joseph Blanchard Esq. have £6 old tenor on each 
settling share for pi^ocuring the Grant. 

Voted that Joseph Blanchard Esq. be Treasurer for this So- 
ciety. 

Voted that this meeting be adjourned to the first Tuesday in 
June next to meet again at this place at ten O clock in the 
forenoon. 

The aforesaid Proprietors met according to the adjournment, 
Joseph Blanchard was moderator. 

Voted, that the meeting be adjourned to the second Tuesday in 
June, to meet again at this place at ten O clock in the fore- 
noon. 

The aforesaid Proprietors met according to the adjournment 
Joseph Blanchard Esq. was moderator the lots were drawn. 

Voted, that the Rights that were drawn by Joseph Blanchard 
for William Rindge and Eleazer Blanchard be excused from 
making Settlement on the other Shares until one year after 
the Township is Incorporated, and then to comply with the 
whole Duty that is enjoined on each settling share in the 
Grant. 

Voted, that six Rights more be freed from settlement as afore- 
said but all the aforesaid Shares are lyable to pay their pro- 
portionable Part of all necessary charges of said Township 
that the Privilege of the last six shares be sold to the High- 
est bidder and accordingly was sold in Publick at this meet- 
ing four of these Shares were sold to Peter Powers at £24 
each=i:£ 96-0-0. 

one to Josiah Brown for £24-0-0 
and one for £22=i£46-o-o 

Voted that the money raised on the afors*^ six Rights be De- 
posited in the hands of the Treasurer Chooesen for this so- 
ciety and that he pay the same to the first five men that go 
on with their Family's in one year this date and continue 
there the Space of one year and fulfill the first article of ye 

3 



26 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

grant and if five men goes on s*^ land as aforesaid, for each 
to have the ^ part of said money as aforesaid, and the rest 
to be disposed as the Proprietors shall see cause to order. 
Voted that Jacob Lawrence and William Spauldingbea Com^^ 
to lay out a road from No 2, (Wilton) throu Peterborough 
Slip to this Township, then the meeting was adjourned to 
thursday the eighth Day of Nov. next to meet again at this 
Palace at twelve O clock in the forenoon. 

The afor*^ Proprietors met according to adjournment and 
chose Maj. Jona Hubbard moderator and then 

Voted that W™ Spaulding and Jacob Lawrence Pursue their 
former Directions in respect of Roads. 

Voted that the method for calling Prop^ meetings for the Futer 
be as follows that the Requst of the owners of ten settling 
Shares made to the Prop's clerk he is hereby authorized 
and Impowered to Post said meeting Signifying the time, 
places on Occasion of S** meeting and that the meeting be 
Posted at Dunstable, Lunenberg and HoUis and that said 
meeting be posted fifteen days before said meetings are to be 
held. 

Voted that the meeting be held at Dunstable till ordered other- 
wise. 

Voted that Joseph Blanchard Esq. Benj Bellows and Capt Pe- 
ter Powers be a com*"^ to manage the Prudentials of this 
society any two of them agreeing. 

Voted that the Com^" give orders on the Treasury to the Peo- 
ple who have been Imployed in surveying this township. 

Voted that Capt. Jona Cummings Capt. Joseph French and 
Mr. Thomas Parker be a committee to examine the Treasury 
accounts then the meeting was Dismist. 
a true Enty &c. 

J. Blanchard Junr. Prop. Clerk. 



CHAPTER III. 

FISRT SETTLERS— REPORT OF GILMORE AND GROUT. 

Q^ ETTLERS on free Lotts in Monadnock No. 2. 

i^' on the first draught family M"^Neal i 

5*^" on the fith draught family Hale i 

8*** on the Eighth draught family Grout i 

20* on the twentieth two families Smiley & Hop° 2 

22 on the twenty second family Wright I 

29"^ on the 29*'' three settlers two families above measure 2 

71 on 71 draught a family Nichols i 

Families 9 

Settlers that abide constantly &c. on Settling Rights. 

6* on 6* draught a family Gilmore I 

7**^ on 7'*' two families Organ & Wallas 2 

II*'' draught family Taggott 

13*'' draught family Davis 

15* draught family Hunt 

18* Settler constantly no house much work done Gilmore 

26*'' draught family Mcalister 

28'*^ a family Turner W° 

29* a family Turner Sol 

42 draught family Little 

44*'' a family Walker 

47*'' a Constant Settler no house Grout 

48* a family Borland 

51*' a family Swan 

59*** a setder Hogg 

60*"^ a settler Wid. Henderson 

66* a settler Jo^ Turner 

69* a settler Davidson 

56''' a settler Harper 

20 



28 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

23*^ draught a settler improvements &c F. Wright i 



21 



70*'' draught purchased by myself & expected to ex-~) 

change one Lot for the Minister Lot upon which I i 

I now Dwell & have done thereon more than { — 

severall Duties J 22 

31 draught family &c Caldwell • i 



The above s'^ settlers 22 Rights from 40 

Remains 18 
ten more are priviledged 10 



Some beginings on settling rights &c. 

on second Draught some work Rie sowd Mitchell 

3*^ Draught some work Rie Raised house frame &c Homes 

19*'' some work done, about ten Loads of Hay cut yearly 

Gil more 
21 draught improvements sufficient Wright & Gilmore 
30* Improvements Little 
41 draught meadow fenced on 17-5 saw mill built on 22 ) 

int by Davidson meadow fenced by Turner Jos ( 

49 a few days cutting trees Glover 

62 some cutting down on Lot no 5 in 6 Range Hunter 
67* some work on all the Lotts Turner & Homes 
4 draught some cutting down Mitchel 



22 



10 



No meeting House built 

The above is a true account of the Settling Rights in Middle 
Monadnock No two carefully examined &c & Humbly sub- 
mitted by us Subscribors & Inhabitance 

John Grout 
Roger Gilmore 

Middel Monadnick No 2. March y® 10. 1769 

Gentlman Grant Tors Brother and I Bought y® Right that 
was Paul March January Sixtey Eaight and upon seaid Right 
Wee have goot Twenty Ackers of Land Clearied on seaid 
Right and his goot ye Timber for Hoss and wee Entend to 
Rais it this Mounth and Gentlmen wee Beg y^ faver of you as 
you are Men of Honnor that you would not Hurt us in Over 



REPORT OF ENOCH HALE. 29 

Entrest for we have don Ever Thing in our pow^er to Bring 

forward y* setlement of This Place 

John Gihnore 
Roger Gihnore 

(The Letter immediately above was pinned onto the paper 
from which the rest of this paper was copied — R, C. P.) 

A. true Copy 

J. W. Peirce, Prop^ Clk 



REPORT OF ENOCH HALE. 

An accompt of the Settlements in Monadnock No 2 in y^ Prov- 
ince of New Hampshire 

1 Dra* William Parker Esq — settled by Alexander M*=Neil 

2 Dra* Jonathan Hubbard Jun'' — settled by William Mitchel 

3 Dra* Olliver Farewell — settled by Robert Holmes 

4 Dra* Thomas March 

5 Dra* Ministry Right 

6 Dra* Elias Eliot — settled by John Gilmore 

7 Dra* James Stuart — Two Lotts — settled by Organ & Wal- 

lace 

8 Dra* Ministry Right 

9 Dra* John Kendle 

10 Dra* Joseph Blanchard Jun"" — priviledge Right — one Lott 

Improved by Robert Holmes 

11 Dra* Barnabas Davis — settled by Munroe & Fitch 

12 Dra* William Rindge 

13 Dra* Peter Powers — settled by Daniel Davis 

14 Dra* Eliezor Blanchard — priviledge Right — one Lott — Im- 

proved by James Nickels 

15 Dra* Joseph Blanchard Jun"' — settled by Ephraim Hunt and 

mills on y^ same 

16 Dra* Thomas Packer Esq 

17 Dra* John Moftatt Esq — one Lott Improved by Robert Wier 

18 Dra* Paul March — settled by Roger Gilmore 

19 Dra' Peter Powers — Priviledge Right — one Lott Improved 

by Roger Gilmore 

20 Dra* John Wentworth Esq — settled by William Smiley 

21 Dra* Thomas Parker Jun'' — Largely Improved by Wright & 

Gilmoi'e 

22 Dra* Mathew Livermore Esq — settled by Mathew Wright 
33 Dra* Benjamin Bellows Esq — settled by Leranus W^right 
24 Dra* Richard Wibard Esq — one Lott Improved by Joseph 

Caldwell 



30 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

25 Dra* John Tufton Mason Esq— settled by William Hodge 

26 Dra* Sampson Stodard Esq— settled by And^ ^PAllester 

27 Dra* Daniel Emerson — settled by James Nickels 

28 Dra* Josiah Brown— settled by William Turner 

29 Dra* Stephen March— Three Lotts— settled by Cristy, Rus- 

sel & Turner one being ment for Cumings Right 54 Drat 

30 Dra* Benjamin W^inn— Priviledge Right— a barn and Im- 

proved 

31 Dra* John Scott— settled by James Caldwell Jun' 

32 Dra* Peirce & Moore 

33 Dra* Samuel Garrish— settled by Jonathan Hopkinson 

34 Dra' Theodore Atkinson Esq 

35 Dra' John Hart Esq 

36 Dra' John Chamberlin 

37 Dra* Joseph Winn Ju" 

38 Dra' Solly & March Esq— one Lott Improved by George 

Warllace 

39 Dra' George Jaftrey Esq 

40 Dra» Joseph Blanchard Jun''— Priviledge Right 

41 Dra* Joseph Blodget Jun"-— settled by Thomas Caldwell— a 

saw mill 

42 Dra* Samuel Cummins— settled by John Little 

43 Dra* School Right 

44 Dra' Mathew Thornton Esq— settled by Thomas Walker 

45 Dra* M. Hunkin Wentworth Esq 

46 Dra' John Butterfield— Priviledge Right 

47 Dra' Josiah Brown 

48 Dra' William Garrish— settled by John Borland 

49 Dra* Nathaniel Peirce Esq— settled by Thomas Emery 

50 Dra' Jonathan Odiorne Esq 

51 Dra* Peter Powers — settled by John Swan 

52 Dra* Benjamin Bellows Esq 

53 Dra' Joshua Peirce Esq 

54 Dra' Jonathan Cummins— settled as above mentioned by 

Soloman Turner 

55 Dra'John Usher— settling Duty Don by Enoch Hale but no 

house 

56 Dra* Jonathan Hubbard Jun'— settled by John Harper 

57 Dra' Joseph French Esq -id- 1 

58 Dra* Peter Powers— settled by Jonathan Parker Privi Right 

59 Dra' Peleg Lawrence— settled by Joseph Hodge 

60 Dra' Isaac Williams— settled by James Caldwell 

61 Dra* David Adams— settled by Hugh Dunlap 

62 Dra* James Stuart— settling Duty Doing by David Hunter 

63 Dra* Nathaniel Meserve Esq 

64 Dra* David Wilson 

65 Dra* John Rindge Esq 



EARLY SETTLERS. 3 1 

66 Dra* Randel M'^Daniel — settled by Joseph Turner 
6"] Dra* Jonathan Hubbard Jun' — settHng Duty Don by Thom- 
as Turner 

68 Dra* Joseph Blanchard Esq — Well Improved by Thomas 

Davidson 

69 Dra* Robert Fletcher Jun'' — Settled by John Davidson 

70 Dra* Joseph Emerson — settled by John Groat 

71 Dra* Thomas Wallensford Esq 

The Rights that appeareth to be Delinquent are as followeth 
viz 

The 4 Dra' — Thomas March 
The 9 Dra* — John Kendle 
The 12 Dra* — William Rindge 
The 35 Dra*— John Hart Esq 

36 Dra* — John Chamberlin 
and 37 Dra* — Joseph Winn Jun' 
The 47 Dra* — Josiah Brown 
The 52 Dra* — Benja" Bellows Esq 
The 57 Dra* — Joseph French Esq 
and 64 Dra* — David Wilson — 

A True Accompt Err^ Excepted 
per me Enoch Hale 



a true copy 



J. W. Feirce Prop^ Clk 



EARLY SETTLERS. 



After the survey of the township and the division of 
it among the proprietors, to encourage settlement a bounty 
of ^142 was offered to the first five men who, with their 
families, should settle within one year from this date (June, 
1750) and remain one year, and in the same proportion to 
one or more families complying with the above condition. 
Whether any settlement was made does not appear from 
any known record. A traditionary report makes it appear 
that a family by the name of Russell (Joel Russell) did 
attempt a settlement in the south part of the town, and 
while there had a son born, who was the first white child 
born in the township. Whether he settled soon enough 
and remained long enough to receive the bounty does not 



}2 HISTORY OF JAFFKET. 

3.rTr.-r In 1752 we have a reliable account of a setUe- 
r-f - M:?e5 Stickney. Richard Peabody, and seven 

:: :..:,: . -c there Simon Stickney, son of Moses, 

wa; : :~ Derember 9, 1753, making him the first white 
c'z i- : :.- nrey, aside from the Russell tra :: : This 

5e::lement of Sticknev and others proved a failure, through 
:r:-r :: Indians, an i : .rvall left except a man known as 
C ; r : .1 - ? itts, pr the pioneer of Rindge. 

The "r?: zt-~\vz: 5v:.ement was made about 1758, by 
John Grout and John Davidson. Gr:u: settled on lot 20» 
range 10, and Davidson on lot 21, rsjige 3. Grout was a 
jHTominent man. He made, with G'"r-;-'e m early report of 
the settlement of the town to the p: rs. He died in 

1771. There is a tradition that he _- _-ried where the 
meeting-house was afterwards built John DaWdson re- 
mained a permanent settler, and died iniSii. Itis also 
reported as true that his eldest daughter, Betsey, was the 
first white child bom in Jaffrey. 

List of the pioneers of Jaffrey, per report of Gilmore- 
Grout, and Hale : 



John Boriand, 
Joseph Caldwell, 
:^ts CaldwelL 
James Caldwell, Jr., 
Thomas Caldwell. 

Chrysty, 

Daniel Davis, 
*Jos^h Donlap, 

*; ' ML 

T ison. 



*John Grout. 
Glover, 



♦John Harper, 
WTd. Henderson, 
♦Joseph Hogg, 
♦William Hogg, 
Robert Holmes, 
Jona. Hopldnson, 
David Hunter, 
£phraim Hunt, 
John litde, 
Andrew McAIister, 
.\Iex^ McXieU 
William ilitchel, 

Mnnroe, 

James Xidiols, 



'Organ, 

Jooa. Parker, 

Rnssel, 

*Wiiii2m Smiley, 
John Swan. 
•Joseph Turner, 
*WiIliam Turner, 
Thomas Turner, 
Solomon Turner, 

Taggot, 

George Wallace, 
Thomas Walker, 
Robert Wier. 
*Mathew Wright, 
Leranus Wright. 



EARLY =zr71E?5. 33 

The settlement of many c: :-e rrs: '- : :; ss of 

short duration. They seemed : :t : r :; - 7 ; 
fond of li\-ing in a forest. Mos: :; .rtrr. rr: 5 otcb-Irish 
from Londondeny. Of those who be:: t.- 

tlers, of that race, were John and Roger G ir 

Smiley, JosejA Turner, Joseph Hodge, V. i" 7 -_er, 
and \\illiam Hodge. After the incorxKr:.:: r. : r : r 
a large emigration from Massachusetts r: -. : - 
lands with all of the improvements, and becir t r :i- 

nent settlers of the town. 

Of the history of the settlers re- -ei : Gnu:. Gi'irore, 
and Hale, but little is kn : - .-. t:::i!' i"ir_r" -^e 

find the first on the list :. zt J^:- 7 _ He v.i^ i^e 

first settler in what is now East ':,-. _ .d built the first 
mills in that place. In 1778 he s : J. :i3 place to Deaix)n 
Eleazer Spofford ::' Dir.vers, and left town. 

Four families ;; :ae name of Caldwell, — ^James, Tames. 
Jr., Joseph, and Thomas, — ^were among the "rs: st: t- 
WTien the town was incorporated, the name : - - 

well appears on a committee chosen to prc:--r : r 

and Thomas Caldwell is representee in Hiie s rei iti as the 
owner of a saw-mill on lot number 22, : ^ 5. X: : 
more is known of the family of Caldwell. 

The name of Thomas Emery is four ■" 1-1 1'e's report as 
the owner of the right of Nathaniel P : r : : t : - ' -^^ :' 1 e z 

the lot on which was built the Millikez. :i.\; _, ^ic. 
the farm of John Felt, and now, 1873, Levi Brigban: :. .. 
also the farm of Clarence S. Bailey. 

Solomon Grout settled on lot 13, range 9, — :'-e Isi^r 
Bailey fam:. — Jini. was road surveyor in 1774 and se-;::r-i::z 
in 1776. 

A Wid- Henderson, by Gr:u: 1: 1 :: re s rerrr:. set- 
tied on lot 17, range 3, now the :.:r:.. :: 5 I- rr 1. 

Jonathan Hopkinson's place of senlr:ve::: :^ 

Robert Holmes was from Londonderr ::: er 

Abram settled in Peterborough "e settiea on ^ot 12, 



34 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

range 3, afterwards the farm of Joseph Thorndike, John 
Conant, and Frank H. Cutter. The first frame house in 
Jaffrey is reported to have been built on that farm, per re- 
port of Grout and Gilmore. 

David Hunter settled on lot 5, range 6, afterwards the 
farm of David Gilmore, Esq., now (1876) the farm of Mar- 
shal C. Adams. When the first military company was or- 
ganized he was chosen ensign. 

John Little settled on lot 15, range 4, now the farm of 
John Quin. He was highway surveyor in 1774. His suc- 
cessor appears to have been Simpson Stuart. 

Alexander McNeil settled on lot 12, range 5, and was, by 
tradition, the first inn-keeper in Jaffrey. From the town 
records he appears to have been quite a prominent man. 
In 1774 he was chosen one of a committee to procure 
preaching ; one of a committee to examine the accounts of 
the selectmen and constable ; and one of the committee to 
build the meeting-house. In 1775 he was one of the board 
of selectmen, and moderator of the annual town-meeting in 
1776. In 1779, at the annual town-meeting, the town voted 
that Alexander McNeil should not keep tavern. He proba- 
bly left town soon after. 

William Mitchel settled on lot 12, range 4, afterwards the 
farm of James Gage, and his son Jonathan Gage. Present 
owner, Michael D. Fitzgerald. In 1774 he was chosen 
auditor of accounts and deer-reeve ; in 1775, surveyor of 
roads and sealer of leather; in 1776, surveyor of roads. He 
probably left town in 1777 or 1778. 

Andrew McAlister settled on lot 14, range 4, afterwards 
the farm of John Briant, now owned by Samuel D. Jewell. 

James Nichols settled on lot 17, range i, afterwards 
owned by Benjamin Cutter, Benjamin Frost, John Frost 
and John Frost, Jr. ; now uninhabited. 

John Swan was owner of lot 6, range 4; lot 5, range 5 ; 
and lot 21, range 6. On which lots he settled is not known. 

Thomas Walker was owner of lot 16, range 2 ; lot 7, 



EARLY SETTLERS. 35 

range 6; lot ii, range i. On which he settled is not 
known. 

George Wallace, settlement unknown. 

Robert Wier settled on lot 6, range 5. In 1773, when 
the town was incorporated, he was chosen one of the audi- 
tors of accounts and highway surveyor ; in 1776 he was 
chosen town-clerk and first selectman. 

Leranus Wright settled on lot 14, range 8. His suc- 
cessor was Francis Wright, inn-keeper. When the town 
was incorporated, in 1773, the town-meeting was held at 
his place. The farm is now owned by Dana S. Jaquith, 

Most of the early settlers were born in the state of 
Massachusetts, some in Londonderry, N. H., some in 
England, and some in Ireland. David Bailey was born in 
England ; John Davidson and William Smiley in Ireland. 
They were a race of hardy adventurers, inured to toil and 
hardship, fit inhabitants for a new township. They were 
mostly young men, unmarried, in search of a future home. 
They made a purchase of land, cleared a few acres, built 
thereon a cabin or log house, returned to their original 
home, and there married and took with them their wives 
with their household furniture to the home in the forest, a 
bridal tour full of hope and expectation of a rich future re- 
ward — not only a reward of gold and silver, but one of a 
large progeny. In that they were not often disappointed, 
as the emigration from Jaffrey, in after years, to the states of 
Vermont, New York, Ohio, and most of the Western states, 
will abundantly verify. The sons and daughters of Jaffrey 
and their descendants may be found not only in town, but 
in most of the cities East and West, holding positions of 
wealth, honor, and trust. 

The life of the pioneer was one of hardship and toil. It 
had also its comforts and enjoyments. If it did not afford 
a life of ease, it did a life of health. If it did not furnish 
jewels or gold, it did, what was of more value in their esti- 



36 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

mation, like the Roman matron, a family of hale and healthy 
children. 

A very interesting account, given by Mrs. Sarah (Law- 
rence) Eveleth, in a letter to her nephew, John S. Lawrence, 
centennial year, relating to the early habits of the first set- 
tlers, is here given, in her own language. Mrs. Eveleth was 
a school-teacher in her younger days, and is now (1873) 
nearly 80 years of age. She writes from her own recollec- 
tion as follows : 

The first settlers fared very hard, worked hard, and their 
living was coarse and short. It consisted of bean porridge, 
Indian bread, johnny-cakes, and a few potatoes. Pies and 
cakes were a great luxury if they could get them, but they 
were "like angels' visits, few and far between." Their dress 
was made of coarse material, homespun and wove. Ladies 
wore dresses made of tow and linen, tight waist, skirt made of 
wool, open in front to the bottom and pinned behind. They 
wore a dress skirt, short loose gown, wool hats, and sometimes 
sun-bonnets, such as would cause a smile these good days. 
For church dress, they wore calico called chintz, wore mostly 
leather shoes, some had velvet. For an overdress, the ladies, 
if they had any, wore home-made cloth : some had silk. They 
wore skirts which came half way from the knee to the ankle, 
called long shorts, or cut shorts. 

The children, if they went to church at all, wore home-made 
cloth, with a handkerchief tied on their heads. In cold 
weather they wore a striped blanket over their shoulders. 
The men wore striped frocks and trowsers, cowhide boots 
if they could get them, otherwise shoes, with leggings in win- 
ter to keep out the snow. They had an over-dress made of 
coarse wool cloth, called great coats, which came down to their 
ankles. 

Their dwellings were mostly built of logs, with a stone 
chimney at one end, and a large fireplace, large enough to re- 
ceive wood four feet in length. The cellar and attic, if they 
had any, was reached by a ladder. The seats were made of 
blocks of wood, and table of a large log two or three feet long. 

Their mode of travel was at first by marked trees, on foot, 
and afterwards by sleds drawn by oxen. In winter they trav- 
elled on what they called snowshoes when the snow was deep. 
A man would take a woman behind him on the same shoes. 
She would take hold of his shoulders and step every time as he 
did, and travel a mile or more in that way. After a while 



EARLY SETTLERS. 3/ 

horses were used by those who were able to have them. By- 
using a saddle and pillion, two could ride on the same horse. 
In this way they went to church, funerals, parties, and to mill. 

Schools were taught in private dwellings. The first school- 
house in the district v\^as a rude affair, built by Samuel May- 
nard, at the expense of the district, witli a jackknife and gimlet. 
The first schools were taught by Rufus Houghton and Sally 
Lowe. 

The first cider-mills in the district were built by Kendal 
Briant and Benj. Lawrence. Before they were built, cider 
was made by pounding the apples in a wooden bowl, and 
pressing them in a cheese-press. 



CHAPTER IV. 



MUNICIPAL HISTORY— CHARTER OF THE TOWN— INCOR- 
PORATION— LIST OF TOWN AND STATE OFFICERS. 

IN 1773 the number of inhabitants in Middletown, as the 
town of Jaffrey was then called, was 303 ; number of 
families, 52. A petition was signed that year by the inhab- 
itants for a town charter, and presented to the royal gov- 
ernor, John Went worth, by Col. Enoch Hale, of Rindge, a 
man of high standing in official position, and previously 
a resident of the township. On the seventeenth day of 
August, A. D. 1773, a charter was duly granted by the said 
royal governor, with the advice of his council, at Ports- 
mouth, changing the original name Middletown, or Middle 
Monadnock Number Two, to Jaffrey, in honor of George 
Jaffrey, at that time a member of the governor's council, 
and one of the Masonian proprietors. Capt. Jonathan Stan- 
ley, father-in-law of Col. Hale, was authorized to call the 
first town-meeting within sixty days. After the incorpora- 
tion of the town the population increased with great rapid- 
ity. Large numbers, during and after the Revolutionary 
War, came from Massachusetts. In 1775, at the beginning 
of the war, the number of inhabitants was 351. In 1783, 
eight years later, it was 1,033; in 1790, 1,235 5 1800, 1,341 ; 
1810, 1,336; 1820, 1,339; 1830, 1,354; 1840, 1,411; 1850, 
1,497; i860, 1,452; 1870, 1,256; 1873, 1,288; 1880, 1,267. 



CHARTER OF THE TOWN. 39 



CHARTER. 

Province of New Hampshire. 
George the Third by the Grace of God of Great Britain 
France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith &c. 
To all people to whom these presents come, Greeting : 
Whereas our loyal subjects, Inhabitants of a Tract of Land 
within our Province of New Hampshire, aforesaid, commonly 
called and known by the name of Middletown or Middle Mo- 
nadnock No. 2, Containing by estimation about six miles 
square. Having humbly petitioned and requested us that they 
may be erected and incorporated into a Township, and enfran- 
chised with the same Powers and Privileges which other towns 
within our said Province by law have and enjoy. And it ap- 
pearing unto us to be conducive to the General good of our said 
Province, as well as the Inhabitants in particular, by maintain- 
ing good order and encouraging of the culture of tlie land, that 
the Same should be done : Know ye, that we, of our special 
Grace and certain knowledge, and for the encouragement and 
promotion of the Good Purposes and ends aforesaid, by and 
with the Advice of our Trusty and well beloved John Went- 
worth Esquire, our Governor and Commander in Chief, and of 
our Council of the same, have erected and ordained and by 
these presents, for us, our Heirs and successors, do will and 
ordain that the Inhabitants of the said Tract of Land and 
others, who shall improve and inhabit thereon hereafter, the 
same being butted and bounded as follows viz : Beginning at 
the South West corner of Peterborough Slip so called, from 
thence running North eighty degrees West seven miles to a 
Hemlock Tree marked, from thence running North by the 
Needle five miles to a Hemlock Tree marked from thence run- 
ning South, Eighty degrees East seven miles to a Beech Tree 
marked in the West line of Peterborough, from thence South 
by the Needle to the first Bounds mentioned ; Be and they 
are hereby declared to be a Town corporate, and are hereby 
erected and incorporated into a body Politick and corporate to 
have continuance forever by the name of Jaftrey ; with all the 
Powers and Authorities, Privileges, Immunities and Franchises, 
which any other Towns in said Province by Law hold and en- 
joy to the said Inhabitants, or those who shall hereinafter in- 
habit there, and their Successors forever, Alway reserving to 
us, our heirs and successors. All White Pine Trees, that are or 
shall be found being or growing within or upon said Tract of 
Land, fit for the use of our Royal Navy, Reserving also to us, 
our heirs and successors, the Right of dividing said Town, 
when it shall appear necessary and convenient for the Inhab- 



40 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

itants thereof. Provided nevertheless and tis hereby declared 
that this Charter and Grant is not intended, and shall not in 
any manner be construed, to affect the private Property of the 
soil w^ithin the Limits aforesaid. And as the several Towns 
vv^ithin our said Provence are by these Laws thereof enabled and 
authorized to assemble and by the Majority of the Voters pres- 
ent to choose all such offices and transact such affairs as in the 
said Laws are declared, We do by these Presents nominate and 
appoint Jonathan Stanley of said Town to call the first Meet- 
ing of said Inhabitants to be held within the said Town at any 
time within sixty days from the Date hereof, giving legal notice 
of the time and design of holding said meeting after which the 
annual meeting of said Town shall be held for the choice of 
said officers, and for the purjDOse afores'^on the last Thursday of 
March annually. 

In testimony whereof we have caused the Seal of said Prov- 
ence to be hereunto affixed. Witness our Governor and Com- 
mander-in-chief aforesaid, the seventeenth day of August, in the 
thirteenth year of our Reign Annoquedom i773- 

John Wentworth. 

By his Excellency's Command, with Advice of Council. 

Theodore Atkinson, Sec. 



ORGANIZATION. 

Provence of \ 
New Hampshire > Pursuant to the Charter of the Town of 
Cheshire, ss. j JaftVey in Said County of the seventeenth 

of this Instant August Consisting of that 
Tract of Land originally Called and Known b}- the Name of 
Middle Monadnock Number two in s*^ County. 
To me Directed by his Excellency the Governor and Com- 
mander in Chief in and over Said Provence, For calling the 
First meeting within sixty Days. 

These are therefore in his Majestys Name to Notify and warn 
all the Freeholders and other Inhabitance of s^ town, Qiialified 
to vote in Common affairs, to assemble and meet at the house 
of Francis Wright in s*^ town, on Thisday the Fourteenth Day 
of September Next Insuing, at two of the Clock in the after 
Noon, then and there to Proseed on the following articles, as 
the Law Directs. 

jstiy 'Yq choose a Moderator to Govern s*^ meeting. 
2'iiy To choose a town Clark, Selectmen, Constable or Consta- 
bles, Tythingmen and all other officers, Required by Law 
of said Province to be Chosen in s*^ town at the First meet- 
ing, All to be Sworn to the faithful Discharge of their Re- 



ORGANIZATION. 4I 

spective offices in all things to be Done and Performed by 
them as the Law of s"^ Province Directs. 
Given under my Hand and Seal at Jatirey Aug. 37, 1773- 

Jonathan Stanley. 

Jaffi-ey Sept. 14 1773. 

Then the Freeholders and Inhabitance of s** town being meet 

agreeable to the forgoing Warrant, 
i"'^' Choose Capt. Jonathan Stanley moderator to Govern s*^ 

meeting. 
2'^' Choose mr W™ Smiley Town Clerk. 

Choose Capt. Jonathan Stanley, First Selectman, 

mr. W™ Smiley Sec^ Selectman. 

mr. Phineas Spaulding third Selectman. 

Choose Mr. Roger Gilmore, Tythingman. 

Choose Hugh Dunlap and John Harper, Field Drivers. 

Choose John Davidson, Constable. 

Choose Roger Gilmore, Robert Wire and Samuel Sherwin 

a Committee to Count with the Selectmen and Constable. 

Choose David Allen W°^ McAlister ; Robert Wire, Eph- 

raim Hunt, W"' Turner and John Gilmore Soyvors 

Choose Mr. W"' Hogg and Mr Joseph Wright Fence Vew- 

ers. 

The First meeting Sep* 14, 1773. 

Province of \ To John Davidson Constable for the town 

New Hampshire > of Jatirey in the County of Cheshier and 
Cheshire, ss. j Province aforsaid. Greeting. 

You are hereby required, in his Majestys name, to warn 
all the Freeholders and Inhabitance of s** JaftVey (Duly 
Qiialified to Vote) to meet at the house of Francis Wright, 
Innholder, on Tuesday the twenty eighth of this instant 
Sept% at one of the clock in the afternoon, then and there to 
act on the Following Articles. 
I*' To choose a moderator to Govern s* meeting. 
2iy To see if they will vote a Certain Sum of money to lay out 

on the Rodes in s*^ Town. 
3^y To see what Method they will take to have the Gospel 

Preached among us. 
4'y To See How much money they will Raise to support the 

Gospel 
And when you shall have Performed the service herein re- 
quired of this Warrant make return to us and of your Doings 
thereon, at or before the s*^ twenty eighth Day aforsaid. 
Given under our hands and seal this fourteenth Day of Sept, 

1773- 

4 



42 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Cheshire ss. Sept. 28, 1773. In Obedi- f Jona. Stanley. ^ 

ence to the within Warrant, I have I W™ Smiley 'o 

warned all the Freeholders and inhab- \ Phineas Spaulding g- 
itance of s** town to meet at time and | to 

Place within mentioned. [_ "^ 

Pr. Me, John Davidson Constable. 

JaflVey Sep* 28. Then the Freeholders and Inhabitance of 
s"^ town being mett agreeable to the Foregoing Warrant, 
i^y Choose Capt. Jonathan Stanley moderator to govern s*^ 

meeting. 
2iy Voted Eighty Pounds L : M : to be worked out on the 

Rods. 
3'^' Voted that Capt. Jona. Stanley, Alexander Mc-Neill and 

Jeames Caldwell be a Committee to Provide supplies of 

Preaching for s*^ town. 
4'y Voted six Pounds Lawful Money to support the Gospel in 

said town. 
The second Town Meeting held in s** Town Sept. 28, i773* 

The town was now duly organized, and had power to 
make provision for the public wants, and compel every citi- 
zen to share in the expense. Of what was done previous 
we have no record, and it is quite doubtful whether any was 
ever made ; quite certain it is that they had not met the 
requirements of the grant, so far as it related to the build- 
ing of a meeting-house, as none appears to have been built. 
The business requirements of the town at this time related 
to the making of roads, building of a meeting-house, and 
the establishment and support of a public school. 

The following persons appear to have been voters at the 
time of the organization of the town : 

David Allen, Jona. Blodgett, Wm. Fisher, 

John T. Anderson, George Clark, John Gilmore, 

Stephen Adams, Jeames Caldwell, Roger Gilmore, 

Thomas Adams, Henry Coffren, Robert Gilmore, 

Jethro Bailey, Joseph Cutter, Hiram Greene, 

Isaac Baldwin, Daniel Davis, Oliver Hale, 

John Borland, John Davidson, John Harper, 

John Briant, Robert Dunlap, John Hanley, 

Kendal Briant, Hugh Dunlap, Elias Hathorn, 

Alpheas Brigham, Thomas Emery, Eben' Hathorn, 



TOWN-CLERKS. 



43 



Elred Hetrech, 
Jason Hemingway, 
W"' Hogg, 
Joseph Hogg, 
David Hunter, 
Epliraim Hunt, 
Ebn'' Ingals, 
Jona. Jewett, 
John Little, 
Alex'' Mc-Neal, 
W"^ Mc-Alister, 
Peter Mc-Alister, 
W'" Mitchell, 
Samuel Milliken, 



W™ Miliken, 
Dennis Orgon, 
Samuel Pierce, 
Jacob Pierce, 
Oliver Proctor, 
Jona. Priest, 
Daniel Priest, 
Daniel Priest, 2'^, 
W" Smiley, 
Jona. Stanley, 
David Stanley, 
Phineas Spaulding, 
Sam^ Sherwin, 
Joseph Thorndike, 



Joshua Thorndike, 
W" Turner, 
Joseph Turner, 
Nathaniel Turner, 
Simon Warren, 
Peter Warren, 
Isaac Wesson, 
Eph™ Whitcomb, 
Robert Wier, 
Mathevif Wallace, 
Sam^ Woodbury, 
Mathew Wright, 
Francis Wright, 
Joseph Wright. 



List of the moderators of the annual town-meetings, from 
the incorporation of the town, 1773, to 1880. 



Jonathan Stanley, 1773- 

Henry Coffeen, 1774. 

John Gilmore, 1775. 

Alex'' McNiel, 1776. 

Roger Gilmore, 1777. 

W". Smiley, 1778, '80. 

Joseph Bates, 1779, '81-2, '86. 

Benj. Prescott, 1783-4, '97. 

Jed^^ Sanger, 1785. 

Abel Parker, 1 787-8-9-90-1, '93, 

'96, '98-9, 1 80 1, '08. 
Phineas Spaulding, 1792. 
Joseph Thorndike, 1794-5. 
Simeon Butters, 1800, '03. 
Adonijah Howe, 1802, '06, '09-10- 

11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19. 
David Page, 1804-5, '07. 

TOWN-CLERKS. 

W". Smiley, 1773-4-5, '77, '83. Abel Parker, 1789. 

Robert Weir, 1776. Alex"" Milliken, 1790. 

Roger Gilmore, 1778-9, '95-6-7-8-9, David Smiley, 1803-4. 

1800-1. David Page, 1805. 

Adonijah Howe, 1 780-1 -2, '04, '06- Samuel Dakin, 1806-7-8-9-10-11- 

7-8, '91-2-3-4, 1802. 12-13-14-15. 

Jedediah Sanger, 1785. Oliver Prescott, 1816. 



Moody Lawrence, 1820-21. 
Edward Spaulding, 1822-3-4, '38, 

'41. 
Oliver Prescott, 1825-6, '32, '34, '39, 

'40. 
Luke Howe, 1827-8. 
W". Ainsworth, 1829-30-31. 
Asa Parker, 1833. 
John Conant, 1835-6-7, '42-3, '47, 

'49-50-1, '53-4-5- 
Stillman Clarke, 1844. 
John Felt, 1845-6, '48. 
Alonzo Bascomb, 1852. 
Charles H. Powers, 1856-7-8-9-60- 

1-2-3-4-5-6, '71-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-80. 
Fred W. Bailey, 1867-8-9-70. 



44 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



W"". Ainsworth, 1817-18-19-20-21. Jonas M. Mellville, 1840-1. 
Henry Payson, 1822-3-4. John Fox, 1848-9 '50-1-2-3-4-5-6-7- 

Thomas Adams, 1825-6-7-8-9-30-1-2. 8-9-60-1-2-3. 
Benj. Cutter, 1823-4-5-6-7-8-9, '42-3- Joseph P. Frost, 1864-5-6-7-8-9-70- 
4-5-6-7. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-80. 



SELECTMEN. 



Jonathan Stanley, 1773. 

Wm. Smiley, 1773, ""]"], '79. 

Phineas Spaulding, 1773. 

Henry Cofteen, 1774. 

Roger Gilmore, 1774, '78-9, '92-3, 

'95-6-7, 1 800- 1. 
William Turner, 1774. 
John Gilmore, 1775, '82. 
Alexander McNiel, 1775. 
Peter Warren, 1775. 
Robert Wier, 1776. 
Solomon Grout, 1776. 
Joseph Turner, 1776. 
Joseph Thorndike, 1777, '94. 
Daniel Emery, 1777, '81. 
Alpheas Brigham, 1777, '87. 
Joseph Cutter, 1777, '93. 
John Stanley, 1778. 
Abraham Bailey, 1778. 
Hugh Dunlap, 1779. 
Eleazer Spofford, 1780. 
Joseph Bates, 1780. 
James Hayward, 1780. 
Thomas Mower, 1781. 
William Pope, 1781. 
Benj. Prescott, 1782. 
James Stevens, 1782, 1800-1. 
Ebenezer Stratton, 1782. 
Adonijah Howe, 1785, '88, '92. 
Jedediah Sanger, 1783, '85. 
John Briant, 1783-4. 
Jereme Underwood, 1783, '90-1, 

'95-6-7. 
Thomas Adams, 1784, '89, '94, 

1802, '17-18-19-20, '26-7. 



James Gowing, 1784. 

Joseph Perkins, 1785, '91, '94. 

Abel Parker, 1786, '89, '91-2-3. 

Samuel Emery, 1786-7, '89. 

Oliver Hale, 1786. 

Alexander Milliken, 1786-7-8, '90. 

Silas Marshal, 1786. 

Samuel Buss, 1788, '95, '98. 

Simeon Butters, 1790. 

Moses Worcester, 1796-7, 1802. 

Daniel Parker. 1798-9. 

John Joslyn, 1798-9. 

Benj. Haywood, 1800-1, '34-5-6. 

Rufus Houghton, 1802, '06-7. 

David Smiley, 1803-4. 

Roger Brigham, 1803-4-5, '07. 

Jona. Fox, 1803-4-5, '08-9-10-11- 

12-13-14- 
David Page, 1805. 
David Page, Jr., 1806. 
Samuel Dakin, 1 806-7-8-9-1 0- 11 -12- 

13-14-15. 
David Gilmore, 1808, '17-18-19-20- 

1-2-3. 
Joseph Joslin, 1809-10-11-12-13-14, 

'22. 
Oliver Prescott, 1815-16-17-18-19- 

20-21, '28-9-30-1-2-3. 
David Jewett, 1816. 
Asa Parker, 182 1-2- 3-4-5. 
Levi Fisk, 1823-4-5, '28. 
Samuel Patrick, 1826-7, '29-30, '37- 

8-9-40. 
Oliver Warren, 1827, '35-6. 
John Conant, 1828, '31-2-3-4. 



TOWN TREASURERS. 45 

Edward Spaulding, 1829-30-1-2-3-4-John A. Prescott, 2d, 1858-9, '60. 

5, '41-2. Samuel Ryan, 1 859-60-1. 

John Felt, 1836-7-8-9. John Frost, 1860-1-2. 

John A. Prescott, 1837-8-9,41, '52-James R. Stanley, 1861-2-3. 

3-4. Benj. L. Baldwin, 1862-3-4. 

Labon Rice, 1840, '42-3, '05-6, '53-Frank H. Cutter, 1863-4-5. 

4-5. James L. Bolster, 1864-5-6, '71. 
Nehemiah Adams, 1840, '42-3-4. Jos. W. Fassett, 1865-6-7, "73-4. 

Oliver Bailey, 1841. Alfred Sawyer. 1866-7-8, '73-4-5. 

Gilman Mower, 1843-4. Henry C. French, 1867, '70-1-3. 

David Spaulding, 1844. Benj. Pierce, 1868-9. 

Ezra Baker, 1845-6-7-8. Marshal C. Adams, 1868-9-70. 

Robert Ritchie, 1845-6-7-8. Oliver P. Hunt, 1869-70. 

Rufus Haywood, 1847, '49- Jol^n M. Wales, 1872. 

Jona. J. Comstock, 1848-9-50. Addison Prescott, 1872. 

Oliver Bacon, 1849-50-1. Jos. P. Frost, 1874-5-6. 

S. B. Lawrence, 1850-1-2. Henry A. Turner, 1875-6-7. 

Asa Baker, 1851-2-3. Clarence S. Bailey, 1876-7-8. 

Wm. Lebonveau, 1854-5-6. John A. Cutter, 1877-8-9. 

Daniel French, 1855-6-7. Oscar W. Bradley, 1878. 

John Fox, 1856-7-8, '71-2-3. George A. Underwood, 1879-80. 
A. W. Spaulding, 1857-8-9. 



TOWN TREASURERS. 

Wm. Smiley, 1778. Edward Spaulding, 1835. 

Adonijah Howe, 1781-2, '86-7, '89, Ethan Cutter, 1836-7-8. 

'90-1, '99-1800-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9- J. M. Melville, 1839 to 1851, inclu- 

10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19-20. sive. 
Samuel Buss, 1783-4, '92, '93-4. John E. B. Jewett, 1858-9. 
Thomas Adams, 1795-6-7. Ebenezer Upton, i860. 

Oliver Prescott, 1821. C. H. Powers, 1861-2-3-4, '70-1-2-3 

Wm. Ainsworth, 1825-6-7-8-9-30- 4-5-6-7-8-9-80. 

31. Peter Upton, 1865. 

Asa Parker, 1832. Fred W. Bailey, 1866-7-8-9. 

Isaac J. Fox, 1833-4. 

List of representatives from the incorporation of the 
town to the present time, in the order in which they appear 
upon the record : 



46 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Henry Coffeen, May ii, 1775, to 
third Provincial Congress at 
Exeter. 

William Smiley, 1784. 

John Gilmore, 1785, '86. 



*Edward Spaulding, 1837-8-9. 
*Samuel Patrick, 1840. 
John Felt, 1841-2-3-4-5, '47. 
Laban Rice, 1846. 
Peter Upton, 1848-9-50. 
*John Fox, 185 1-2-3-4. 



Abel Parker, 1787, '91-2-3, '97, '99. 

Benjamin Prescott, 1790, '96, 1809, *David C. Chamberlin, 1856-7. 

10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17. *John A. Prescott, 1858-9. 

Joseph Thorndike, 1794, '95, '98, Charles H. Powers, 1860-1, '78. 

1800-1-2-3. Samuel Ryan. 1862-3. 

Adonijah Howe, 1804-5, 'i8-i9-20-2i.*FrederickW. Bailey, 1864-5, '68-9. 



David Page. 1806-7. 
Laban Ainsworth, 1808. 
*01iver Prescott, 1822-3-4-5-6. 
*Winiam Ainsworth, 1828-9-30. 
*Levi Fisk, 1831-2-3. 
John Conant, 1834-5-6. 



*Addison Prescott, 1866-7. 
*Benjamin Pierce, 1870-1. 
*Frank H. Cutter, 1872-3. 
*Alfred Sawyer, 1874-5. 
Joseph W. Fassett, 1876-7. 
Thomas Annett, 1879-80. 



State senators, natives of Jaffrey 



Asa Parker. 1826-7. 



Levi Fisk, 1835-6, 



Justices of the peace are appointed by the governor and 
council on recommendation of parties concerned. In 1785 
Roger Gilmore was recommended by a vote of the town, 
and was commissioned by the governor. The following list 
is given in the order of their appointment : 



Roger Gilmore, 
Abel Parker, 
Benjamin Prescott, 
Joseph Thorndike, 
Joseph Cutler, 
Alexander Milliken, 
Samuel Dakin, 
Robinson Perkins, 
William Ainsworth, 
David Gilmore, 
Edward Spaulding, 
Samuel Patrick, 
Benjamin Cutter, 
Samuel Foster, 



Laban Price, 
Hiram Duncan, 
Jonas M. Mellville, 
Peter Upton, 
Amasa Kennie, 
Stillman Clarke, 
Roderick R. Perkins, 
John A. Prescott, 
Nehemiah Adams, 
George Briant, 
Luther Cutter, 
Asa Baker, 
John A. Prescott, 2d, 
J. E. B. Jewitt, 



David A. Wood, 
Spencer L. Bailey, 
Guerley A. Phelps, 
Oscar H. Bradley, 
Geo. W. Todd, 
Joseph P. Frost, 
James L. Bolster, 
Henry B. Wheeler, 
J. W. Fassett, 
Alfred Sawyer, 
H. B. Aldrich, 
L. N. Willoughby, 
J. P. Frost. 



* Born in JafFrey. 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR. 



47 



Justices of the quorum : 



Asa Parker, 
Adonijah Howe, 
Oliver Prescott, 



Luke Howe, 
John Conant, 
Levi Fisk, 



Justices throughout the state : 

Abel Parker, John Fox, 

Frederick W. Bailey, Frank H. Cutter, 



John Felt, 
Alonzo Bascom, 
Addison Prescott. 



F. S. Pierce, 
F. B. Spalter. 



The chief magistrate of New Hampshire was styled 
president by the constitution adopted by the state in 1783, 
and governor by the constitution as revised in 1793. 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 







Votes. 






Votes. 


1784. 


Meshech Weare, 


17 


1788. 


John Sullivan, 


2 


1785. 


John Langdon, 


6 


1789. 


John Sullivan, 


46 




George Atkinson, 


29 


1790. 


John Pickering, 


25 


1786. 


John Langdon, 


40 


1791. 


Josiah Bartlett, 


69 


1787. 


John Langdon, 


68 




Joshua Wentworth, 


I 




John Sullivan, 


13 


1792. 


Josiah Bartlett, 


81 


1788. 


John Langdon, 


52 










VOTE 


FOR 


GOVERNOR. 




1793- 


Josiah Bartlett, 


41 


1806. 


Jeremiah Smith, 


64 




John T. Gilman, 


5 




John Langdon, 


24 


1794. 


John T. Gilman, 


57 




Timothy Farrar, 


9 


1795- 


John T. Gilmal^, 


61 




Robertson Perkins, 


9 


1796. 


John T. Gilman, 


62 ' 




Zacheus Witt, 


I 


1797. 


John T. Gilman, 


65 


1807. 


Jeremiah Smith, 


72 


1798. 


John T. Gilman, 


65 




John Langdon, 


26 


1799. 


John T. Gilman, 


72 


1808. 


Jeremiah Smith, 


51 


1800. 


John T. Gilman, 


100 




John Langdon, 


51 


1801. 


John T. Gilman, 


121 


1809. 


Jeremiah Smith, 


188 


1802. 


John T. Gilman, 


156 




John Langdon, 


23 


1803. 


John T. Gilman, 


145 


1810. 


Jeremiah Smith, 


219 




John Langdon, 


9 




John Langdon, 


45 


1804, 


John T. Gilman, 


168 


1811. 


Jeremiah Smith, 


200 




John Langdon, 


8 




John Langdon, 


40 


1805. 


John T. Gilman, 


223 


1812. 


John T. Gilman, 


203 




John Langdon, 


30 




Wm. Plumer, 


46 



48 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



1813. 


John T. Gilman, 


207 


1836. 


Isaac Hill, 


90 




Wm. Plumer, 


35 




George Sullivan, 


109 


I8I4. 


John T. Gilman, 


224 


1837. 


Isaac Hill, 


73 




Wm. Plumer, 


47 




Scattering, 


4 




Timothy Farrar, 


I 


1838. 


Isaac Hill, 


no 


I8I5. 


John T. Gilman, 


237 


1839. 


John Page, 


117 




Wm. Plumer, 


43 




James Wilson, 


174 


I8I6. 


James Sheaf, 


221 


1840. 


Edmund Parker, 


14 




Wm. Plumer, 


48 




John Page, 


n3 


I8I7. 


Jeremiah Mason, 


221 




Enos Stephens, 


152 




Wm. Plumer, 


48 


1841. 


Daniel Hoit, 


23 


I8I8. 


Jeremiah Mason, 


191 




John Page. 


99 




Wm, Plumer, 


48 




Enos Stephens, 


142 


I8I9. 


William Hale, 


138 


1842. 


John H. White, 


26 




Samuel Bell, 


21 




Daniel Hoit, 


39 


1820. 


Samuel Bell, 


35 




Enos Stephens, 


94 


I82I. 


Samuel Bell, 


no 




Henry Hubbard, 


80 


1822. 


Samuel Bell, 


95 


1843. 


Anthony Colby, 


92 


1823. 


Levi Woodbury, 


91 




Henry Hubbard, 


78 




Samuel Dinsmoor, 


49 




Daniel Hoit, 


34 


1824. 


Levi Woodbury, 


45 




John H. White, 


4 




David L. Morril, 


20 


1844. 


Anthony Colby, 


127 




Jeremiah Smith, 


65 




John H. Steele, 


97 


1825. 


David L. Morril, 


148 




Daniel Hoit. 


40 


1826. 


David L. Morril, 


no 


1845. 


Anthony Colby, 


115 




Benjamin Pierce, 


29 




John H. Steele, 


32 


1827. 


David L. Morril, 


2 




Daniel Hoit, 


23 




Benjamin Pierce, 


76 


1846. 


Anthony Colby, 


127 


1828. 


John Bell, 


64 




Jared W. Williams, 


n8 




Benjamin Pierce, 


63 




Nathaniel S. Berry, 


39 


1829. 


John Bell, 


64 


1847. 


Nathaniel S. Berry, 


34 




Benjamin Pierce, 


63 




J. W. Williams, 


131 


1830. 


Timothy Upham, 


173 




Anthony Colby, 


143 




Matthew Harvey, 


63 




Scattering, 


2 


I83I. 


Ichabod Bartlett, 


148 


1848. 


Jared W. Williams, 


126 




Samuel Dinsmoor, 


90 




Nathaniel S. Berry, 


184 


1832. 


Ichabod Bartlett, 


ng 


1849. 


Nathaniel S. Berry, 


38 




Samuel Dinsmoor, 


176 




Samuel Dinsmoor, 


114 


1833- 


Samuel Dinsmoor, 


126 




Levi Chamberlain, 


145 




Arthur Livermore, 


30 


1850. 


Levi Chamberlain, 


128 


1834. 


William Badger, 


n8 




Samuel Dinsmoor, 


lOI 


1835- 


William Badger, 


179 




Nathaniel S. Berry, 


42 




Joseph Healey, 


88 


1851. 


Thomas E. Sawyer, 


120 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR. 



49 





Samuel Dinsmoor, 


96 




George Stark, 


134 




John Atwood, 


42 


1862. 


Nathaniel S. Berry, 


197 


1852. 


Thomas E. Sawyer, 


119 




George Stark, 


122 




Noah Martin, 


115 


1863. 


Ira A. Eastman, 


115 




John Atwood, 


33 




Joseph A. Gilmore, 


180 


1853- 


James Bell, 


112 


1864. 


E. W. Harrington, 


114 




Noah Martin, 


96 




Joseph A. Gilmore, 


200 




John H. White, 


34 


1865. 


Frederick Smyth, 


178 


1854. 


James Bell, 


102 




E. W. Harrington, 


115 




Nathaniel B. Baker, 


94 


1866. 


Frederick Smyth, 


189 




Jared Perkins, 


42 




John G. Sinclair, 


123 


1855. 


Ralph Metcalf, 


127 


1867. 


Walter Harriman, 


189 




N. B. Baker, 


82 




John G, Sinclair, 


126 




James Bell, 


19 


1868. 


Walter Harriman, 


203 


1856. 


Ralph Metcalf, 


176 




J. G. Sinclair, 


133 




John S. Wells, 


107 


1869. 


John Bedel, 


104 




Ichabod Goodwin, 


12 




Onslow Stearns, 


179 




Scattering, 


I 


1870. 


John Bedel, 


95 


1857. 


William Haile, 


176 




Onslow Stearns, 


186 




John S. Wells, 


116 




Lorenzo D. Barrows, 


I 


1858. 


William Haile, 


175 


1871. 


James Pike, 


176 




Asa P. Gate, 


114 




James A. Weston, 


122 


1859. 


Ichabod Goodwin, 


191 


1872. 


James A. Weston, 


123 




Asa P. Gate, 


109 




Ezekiel A. Straw, 


210 


i860. 


Ichabod Goodwin, 


198 


1873- 


James A. Weston, 


104 




Asa P. Gate, 


^33 




Ezekiel A. Straw, 


181 


I86I. 


Nathaniel S. Berry, 


187 









CHAPTER V. 

TRAVEL— HIGHWAY— COUNTY ROAD— THIRD NEW HAMP- 
SHIRE TURNPIKE— MONADNOCK RAILROAD. 

PREVIOUS to 1800 the inhabitants travelled on foot, 
sleds, carts, and horseback. The sleds and carts were 
drawn by oxen. The men rode on saddles, and the women 
on pillions behind them. At a later period the side-saddle 
came into use by those who were able to own two horses. 
Phineas Spaulding, who lived in the west part of the town, 
brought his wife into town at the time of their marriage in 
a cart drawn by oxen. The Rev. Laban Ainsworth mar- 
ried Miss Mary Minot, of Concord, Mass., and performed 
his wedding tour on horseback. He was met on entering 
town by a numerous cavalcade of citizens, and escorted on 
the way to their future home. Wheel carriages drawn by 
horses were not in use till later than 1800. In 1804 the 
two-wheeled " shay," as it was then called, was taxed. The 
number taxed was five, owned by David Gilmore, Alexander 
Milliken, Robinson Perkins, Eleazer Spofford, and Joseph 
Thorndike : valuation of each carriage, from ^40 to $yo. 
Horse wagons made their appearance in 18 13 or 18 14. 
The owners were Captain Eber Lincoln and Abel Marshall. 
In winter a rude wooden sleigh called a pung, drawn by 
horses, was used. In 1802, the town provided a hearse for 
the conveyance of the dead to the place of interment, pre- 
vious to which they were borne on the shoulders of men. 
Wagons at length came into very general use. Their form 
and size were much better adapted to family use than the 



COUNTY ROAD. 5 I 

square top chaise. The old cumbersome chaise has long 
since disappeared, and but few now living have any recollec- 
tion of them. They were no doubt well adapted to the nar- 
row, ill-constructed roads of those times. 

When the grant of the town was made, in 1749, the 
grantors, at a meeting held in Dunstable, Massachusetts, 
appointed Jacob Lawrence and William Spaulding a com- 
mittee to lay out a road from No. 2 (Wilton) to Mid- 
dle Monadnock No. 2, through Peterborough Slip (Sharon). 
When the town was incorporated, in 1773, a county road 
passed through the south-west part of the town, from 
Rindge to New Marlborough. Of the locality and condition 
of other roads we have no knowledge. At the first town- 
meeting six road-surveyors were chosen ; and at a second 
meeting, held a few days later, ;£8o was voted by the town 
to be worked on the roads. At the annual meeting, 1774, 
nine road-surveyors were chosen and £80 of money raised. 
In 1775, ^£130 of money was raised, and eleven surveyors 
chosen. Transcripts of roads were made by the selectmen, 
and presented to the town for acceptance immediately after 
the incorporation of the town. The first one presented was 
from the county road to Fitzwilliam line. Eleven transcripts 
of roads were presented and accepted during the year 1774. 
The most important ones were as follows : 

From Borland's mills (East Jaffrey) to the town line of 
Rindge. 

From lot 4, range 10, to the county road leading from 
Rindge to New Marlborough. 

From Roger Gilmore's house, lot 13, range 6, to Bor- 
land's mills. 

From Joseph Hogg's, lot 10, range 9, to the county road. 

From the town line of Sharon, lot 22, range 5, to Roger 
Gilmore's, lot 13, range 6. 

From the centre of the town northerly to Wm. Mitchell's 
(now Michael Fitzgerald's), from thence to Joseph Thorn- 
dike's, now Frank H. Cutter's. 



52 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

In 1775 the following transcripts were presented and 
accepted : 

From John Borland's mills, by Long pond, to Eaton's 
mills, now Squantum. 

From Joseph Thorndike's house, now F. H. Cutter's, to 
Dublin line. 

From the common south to the river bridge, south-east 
by John Gilmore's to Rindge line. 

1778. From the meeting-house by the house of John 
Briant, east to John Davidson's (now Henry K. French's), 
to the town line of Peterborough, west of Thomas Turner's 
barn. 

From Oliver Proctor's house, on the line between lots 16 
and 17, range 8, to Borland's mills. 

From the bridge near Joshua Thorndike's, lot 11, range 
3, to the road leading to Joseph Cutter's, now the residence 
of Joel W. Poole. 

1779. From Dublin line, lot 17, range i, by the house of 
Benj. Cutter, now John Frost's, to Elijah Goodale's house. 

1 78 1. From Joseph Turner's house, lot 21, range i, by 
the house of Abel Parker's, to the road leading from Joseph 
Bates's to the meeting-house. 

1783. From the road leading by John Briant's to Peter- 
borough, east of said Briant's, by James Gowing's and Moses 
Stickney's, to Dublin line. 

1785. From Benj. Prescott's to Sharon line. 

1799. From Jonathan Emery's house, south-east to the 
county road. 

1 801. From the county road, near Alexander Milliken's, 
south 22° east to the county road near Daniel Priest's. 

1803. From the Carey house south by Abel Parker's, 
Samuel Dakin's, and Samuel Adams's, to the county road. 



COUNTY ROAD. 53 



HIGHWAYS. 



After 1800 but few new roads were called for ; some 
were discontinued, and new ones on better ground were 
substituted. After carriages came into general use, a 
necessity was created for better roads. In many cases hills 
could be avoided and other improvements made by chang- 
ing the locality of the road. In district No. ii.for many 
years the road to Dublin went over a very high hill, by the 
house of John Conant. In 1822-3, by the individual enter- 
prise of John Cutter, 2d, with a few others, the present fine 
level road by the residence of Joel H. Poole was built. 
Another, from the residence of William Hodge by Walter 
Carr's, lot 17, range 5, north to the road near the house of 
Roger Brigham, 1827; from Jacob Baldwin's, lot 18, range 
5, to west of Zebediah Pierce's, now Elijah Smith's, to the 
road leading to Peterborough ; from Samuel Foster's to the 
road leading by Jacob Baldwin's to Zebediah Pierce's, 1824 ; 
from the road running north of Laban Rice's, lot 13, range 6, 
to the road that leads to John Briant's, lot 14, range 4, 
1838 ; from Calvin J. Parker's, lot 20, range i, to Dublin line, 
built 1834; from the old factory down to the Cheshire fac- 
tory, 1838; from Cheshire factory to Peterborough line, 
1841. 

COUNTY ROAD. 

The old county road from Rindge, through the south- 
west part of Jaffrey to Marlborough, did not meet the wants 
of the town. The public good required one through the 
centre, from Marlborough to the county line of Hillsbor- 
ough. At a town-meeting, held May 16, 1785, an article 
was presented to see if the town " will petition the Quarter 
Sessions for a county road through the town of Jaffrey to 
the county line of Hillsborough, and act thereon as they 
think proper." 

The town chose a committee of three, — Jedediah Sanger, 



54 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Benjamin Prescott, and Roger Gilmore, — to join a committee 
from Rindge to petition for said road. At the next annual 
town-meeting, March 30, 1786, Jedediah Sanger, Roger Gil- 
more, Benjamin Prescott, William Pope, and Joseph Bates 
were chosen to meet the court's committee at Marlbor- 
ough. The town also voted to expend one half of the mon- 
ey raised for the benefit of roads on the county road, " if the 
said road should be laid out by the court's committee;" and 
Benjamin Spaulding and Benjamin Prescott were chosen 
surveyors to see the same expended. 

At a town-meeting, held Sept. 15, 1788, a committee of 
eleven were chosen to meet the New Ipswich committee, 
and view the county road through Jaffrey. 

At a town-meeting, August 27, 1792, the town voted to 
have all persons living on the county road, and south of it, 
work out their tax on the same. 

At a town-meeting, October 27, 1792, the town voted to 
raise a sum of money in particular, to be expended on the 
county road. 

Voted £100 to be laid out on the s'^ road. 

At the same meeting the town also voted to raise ^£200, 
to be laid out on the road from Marlborough line, by the 
meeting-house to Rindge line, on the road to New Ipswich. 

From the acts of the town, it appears that the county road 
cost more for repairs than all the other roads in town, and 
even then it did not meet the requirements of the public 
travel. At a town-meeting held September 2, 1793, an arti- 
cle was presented, — 

To see what the town will do in regard of the bill of indict- 
ment found against this town, for the neglect of the repairs of 
the County road. 

Voted that the Grand Juryman be Directed to settle the bill 
of indictment at the next Court. 

It cost but little to accept of transcripts of roads as pre- 
sented, which required no money for building the road or 
for damages, when it was expected that the inhabitants 



TURNPIKE. 55 

living thereon would make such roads as suited their own 
convenience, and keep them in such repair as would meet 
their present wants ; but a county road, laid out for public 
travel, required a construction and condition based on 
different principles. 

TURNPIKE. 

The difficulty and wants attending a public highway 
probably gave rise to the building of a turnpike, to be sup- 
ported by toll. Accordingly a petition was presented, and 
a charter was granted December 25, 1799; the road was 
built the following year. Many of the inhabitants who had 
means, took stock in the enterprise, among whom was Col. 
Benjamin Prescott, who was a director and contractor. 
The road had a power in its operations highly beneficial to 
the interests of the town. It diverted the travel from the 
neighboring towns, and increased the same ; it increased 
the business of inn-keeping, and enabled the inhabitants to 
carry with their own teams the surplus products of their 
farms to market. 

After the road was built, it was the common practice for 
almost every one, when the first snow fell in December, 
with his own team to carry his products of pork, poultry, 
butter, and cheese to the Boston market. It was not un- 
common to see from twenty to forty teams in company, 
thus loaded, on their way to Boston, over the turnpike, from 
towns above. A line of stages was also established, by 
Dearborn and Emerson, from Boston to Walpole, through 
Jaffrey, in 1803 ; also a post-office in the winter of 1801, 
Peter Lawrence, postmaster. 

The enterprise was successful for a time, but its success 
encouraged other towns to get roads of like character char- 
tered, which divided the travel and ruined the stock. In 
1822 it was practically abandoned, the town voting to keep 
the road in good repair, providing the said turnpike shall 
become a free road. This was the end of toll-gates on the 



56 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Third New Hampshire Turnpike. At first the town voted 
to keep the turnpike road in repair, on the above conditions, 
for two years; and at the annual meeting in 1824 it voted to 
accept of the turnpike through Jaffrey, and keep the same in 
good repair without hmitation of time. The town, from the 
beginning and ever afterwards, was unfriendly to the exist- 
ence of a turnpike. Its gates exacting a fee for travel were 
very distasteful. When the petition for a turnpike was first 
presented to the town at a meeting of the same, Nov. 18, 
1799, by an article to hear and consider the substance of a 
petition and order of court thereon, respecting a petition of 
Frederick W. Geyer and others, concerning a turnpike road 
from Bellows Falls to Massachusetts line, and act thereon 
as should then be thought proper, the town voted to pass 
over the article. 

At a town-meeting, held Aug. 8, 1800, there was present- 
ed an article, — 

To see if the town will give up to the turnpike corporation 
in this State so much of the old road as is necessary to be used 
for s** Turnpike road. Voted to pass over the article. 

Town meeting, Nov. 17, 1S02 : 

Art. 2. To see if the town will agree to move the gate that 
is erected across the River bridge or build a bridge across the 
river on the same ground where the old bridge stood on the 
road leading from Jaffrey meeting-house to New Ipswich and 
act thereon. 

Voted that the gate be moved off the bridge south of Dea. 
Spofford's mills. 

Voted that the Corporation have thirty days to move s*^ gate 

Reconsidered and Voted that if s'' Corporation do not move 
off s*^ gate immediately after the tenth day of Jan. next, then 
the selectmen are directed to move s** gate. 

Town-meeting, March i, 1803: 

Art. 15. To see what order the town will take upon the gate 
that is erected across the dam near Dea. Spoffoi'd's. 

Wee the inhabitants of the town of Jaffrey, having taken into 
consideration the conduct of the Proprietors of the third N. H. 
turnpike road in fixing a turnpike gate on the public traveled 



TURNPIKE. 57 

road, (being so before at the time s*^ Proprietors were incorpo- 
rated) at the bridge or dam across the river near Dea. E. Spof- 
ford's ; that s'^ gate was set upon s'' road in violation of the act 
of incorporation, wliich expressly forbids them to erect any 
gate on or across any part of any road, which was at that time 
used and occupied as a public highway ; and as this town did 
at a public meeting in Nov. last vote that in case said Propri- 
etors should not remove s*^ gate by the tenth of Jan. then next, 
which was in our opinion showing great lenity to s*^ Proprie- 
tors, that then and in that case Lt Thomas Adams, Capt Rufus 
Houghton and Lt. Moses Worcester, being then Selectmen be 
directed to move s*^ gate off from said road or highway, who 
have shamefully neglected their duty therein, and have suffered 
said gate to remain to this present time tho in Justice to the 
said Moses Worcester the inhabitants do hereby declare that 
they are satisfied that he would have done his duty had he been 
assisted by the other Selectmen. The inhabitants of s*^ town 
farther taking into consideration the pernicious consequences 
which will arise from any set of men having such influence 
that the laws of the State cannot be duly executed, do view it a 
duty incumbent on them to oppose the arbitrary power exer- 
cised by the Proprietors of the third N. H. turnpike road in 
their erecting and keeping s'^ gate across the public road at the 
bridge or dam aforesaid ; therefore Voted the present Select- 
men (David Smiley, Roger Brigham and Jona. Fox) be direct- 
ed, and it is hereby solemnly enjoined upon them to re- 
move the gate aforesaid with everything apertaining to the 
same, which said inhabitants view to be a public nuisance 
within twenty-four hours from this time ; and again in case 
said Proprietors shall again have the temerity to erect another 
gate on or across any part of the public road thro' this town 
which was used as such before s'* Proprietors were incorpo- 
rated, then and in that case the said selectmen are hereby en- 
joned to remove the same as often as there shall be any gate 
erected as aforesaid ; and the s'* inhabitants hereby pledge 
themselves that they will support and save harmless the 
Selectmen for doing their duty as prescribed in this vote, and 
to that end the inhabitants afor^*^ do hereby fully authorize and 
impower their Selectmen in case they should be prosecuted by 
s*^ Proprietors for removing s*^ gate or gates as directed by this 
vote to assess any sum or sums of money on the inhabitants 
aforesaid which they may deem necessary (not exceeding one 
thousand dollars, without farther directions from the inhab- 
itants of this town) to defray their expenses in defending them- 
selves against such prosecution or prosecutions, and commit 
said assessments to the collectors, with sufficient warrants to 
collect the same agreeable to law. 
5 



58 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

May 13, 1S03. Art. 3. To see if the town will give any 
directions in regard to the defence of the action of the Proprie- 
tors of the third N. H. turnpike against the Selectmen of Jaf- 
frey or act any thing relative to the same. 

Voted to pass over the s'* article. 

Jan. 27, 1804. Received of the town of JaftVey forty-five 
dollars in full, for money expended by me in defence of the ac- 
tion of the Proprietors of the s** N. H. Turnpike road against 
David Smiley, Roger Brigham and Jona. Fox for removing 
the gate near Dea. Spoti'ords. 

David Smiley. 

Nov. 5, 1804. Art. 5, to see if the town will quitclaim so 
much of the old County road as is covered by the turnpike to 
the Corporation of the third N. H. turnpike road- 
Voted to pass over the article. 

Aug. 29, 1808. Art. 3. To see if the town will give liberty 
to the Proprietors of the third N. H. Turnpike Corporation to 
erect a gate on the Bridge by Dea. Spoftbrds. 

Voted to pass over the article. 

The gate was erected in the town of Sharon, where it re- 
mained for many years, when it was removed to New Ips- 
wich, near Barrett mountain. 

RAILROAD. 

In 1864 the legislature enacted a law allowing towns 
and cities to make gratuities for the purpose of building 
railroads, by a vote of two thirds of the legal voters present 
at any town-meeting legally holden for that purpose. In 
accordance with that law, at a town-meeting, held March, 
1867, the town voted a gratuity of five per cent, on the val- 
uation of the town for that year to the Monadnock Railroad 
Company, to enable them to construct a railroad from Win- 
chendon, through Jaffrey, to Peterborough. Vote for the 
gratuity, 207 ; against it, 79. The road was completed, and 
opened for business June 6, 1871. The first trip from Win- 
chendon to Jaffrey was on November 22, 1870. 



CHAPTER VI. 

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY— MEETING-HOUSE. 

THE Masonian grant or charter required that a good, 
convenient meeting-house be built within six years 
from the date of the charter, and made provision for that 
purpose by a gift of three hundred acres of land. No meet- 
ing-house appears to have been built when the town was 
organized. The next year after, on the 26th day of April, 
the matter of building a meeting-house was brought before 
the town. The town voted " to build one on the common, 
near the senter this and the ensuing year." 

Voted, s*^ house is to be forty feet wide, Fifty-five in Lenth. 
Posts twenty seven feet in Lenth. Roger Gil more, William 
Turner Alex" Mc-Neil a Committee to see the same affected, 
the above Committee to Vendue s'^ house to the last bider. 

At a meeting in July following, the town 

Voted " to Reconsider their vote in Building a meeting- 
house also their vote in Chose of Committee, then Voted s'^ 
meetinghouse Sixty feet in Lenth, Forty five wide, the Posts 
twenty seven feet in Lenth also Voted to have a Porch at each 
end of s*^ hous. 

Voted Mj". Roger Gilmore Mr. Will™ Turner, Mr. Mathew 
Wallace be a Committee to see the work affected in Building 
s*^ house. 

Voted that the Com^" shall Expose s*^ house to sail at Public 
Vendue by the first Wednesday of Sept next, also Voted that 
the Great timber of s'^ house be hewed by the first day of 
Decem"" next, also voted Fifteen Pounds L. M. towards build- 
ing s** house, to be Paid by the first day of December Next, 
also Voted that s*^ house shall be Raised by the Middle of June 



60 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Next at the towns Cost. Voted sixty Pounds to be Paid by 
the middle of June next towards building s*^ house. Also 
Voted that the whole cost shall be Paid by the first of June in 
the year 1776 as the afors'd house shall be Finished. That the 
Fraim be well under Pined with good stone and lime, and the 
outside all well Compleated, and CoUored like Rindge meting- 
house, and lower floor lead Duble, and Pulpit like that in 
Rindge meting house all the above work compleated by the 
middle of June 1776." 

At the next annual meeting, March 30, 1775, the town 

Voted to Sell Lot No. 4 in the 6* Range, No. 12 and 20 in 
tlie first Range to Pay some of the Cost in Building the meet- 
ing house, and chose William Smiley, John Gilmore Roger 
Gilmore a Com^* to make sail of the aforsaid Lots, also voted 
to sell the aforsaid Lots at Publick Vendue, to the highest 
Bidder, also Voted to sell the Pew Ground in the meeting- 
house in s"^ town, to pay the first cost in Building the meeting- 
house at Public Vendue. Voted the building Com'^'^ Provide 
all things necessary to rase s*^ meetinghouse at the town cost. 

In December of the same year the town 

Voted to sell Lot No 14 R 2 for tlie Benefit of a school in 
s*^ town. Voted to Hire the mony the afors*^ Lot shall be sold 
for, to Pay in Part the Charges in Building the meetinghouse 
and pay the use of s*^ money anuly to support a school in s*^ 
town. 

It would seem from the following vote that the committee 
chosen to sell the public lands had failed to do it. 

" Voted to Dismiss the Com*"^ chosen to sell the Public land, 
and choose Capt Jona. Stanley Mr Roger Gilmore Mr W™ 
Turner a Com'^'^ to sell all the Publick Land Voted to be sold, 
at Private or Public sale as they think proper." 

In 1776 there is no record of anything being done in re- 
lation to the meeting-house. In 1777 the town voted " to 
finish the meeting-house this year." In 1778, April 2, — 

" Voted to build the Body Seats. Chose Simeon Stickney, 
Joseph Bats & Daniel Emery a Com*^^ to Effect the same." 

Apr. 20, Voted thirty Pounds to Build the Body Seats, also 
chosen Sam^ Adams & Jonathan Stanley to lay out the meet- 



MEETING-HOUSE. 6 1 

inghouse ground. Voted to have 12 pews on the South End 
of the two squares of the meetinghouse Ground. 

Nov. 26, Voted to finish the meetinghouse this year and 
next. Chose Eleazer Spofford, Joseph Bates, Phineas Spauld- 
ing and John Cutter a Com'^'^ to effect the same. 

Voted to Finish the Pews and sell them. 

In 1779, Jan. 14, the town 

Voted to sell the Pews to the hiest Bidder that belongs to 
the town, Except them that do not belong to the Society, or 
that have been against paying anything towards building the 
house. 

Voted that the purchaser of the Pews shall pay one third 
part of the price down, another third in six months and the re- 
mainder when the Pew is finished. 

Chose William Smiley Vendue Master. 

Voted, that the Vendue of the Pews begin on Thursday the 
21 of Jan. inst at nine of the Clock before noon and the Vendue 
Master deliver up what money he gits to the Committee. 

Voted to finish the Pews with Banisters, and to have one 
Pew less on the wall on tlie West side of the Pulpit. 

Voted that if any man Neglects to pay the first payment, his 
vote shall afterwards be taken no notice of, but the pew expos- 
ed to sale again, and if any man pay the first and second pay- 
ments and Neglect to pay the third, he shall forfeit all he has 
paid, and his Pew exposed to sale again. 

Voted eleven Pews to be on the south side of the gallery on 
the wall on the south side of the house and seven on each Gal- 
lery on the wall of the two ends of the house and two on each 
corner of the front Gallery. 

Voted to hang the seats with hinges. 

May 23, 1779, Notice is hereby given to the inhabitants of 
Jaffrey that the sale of the Pews that remain unsold, likewise 
the sale of all such Pews as the former Purchasers thereof who 
have not fulfilled the articles of sale for the pews in the meet- 
inghouse, will be on Wednsday the ninth day of June next, at 
two of the clock in the afternoon at the meetinghouse. 

W" Smiley, Vendue Master. 

In 1780, Mar. 30, Art. 3 of the warrant, — 

To see if the town will make any allowance to Capt. Henry 
Cofteen for the Barrel of Rum that he paid for, which was ex- 
pended at the Raising of the meetinghouse. 

Voted that the Selectmen settle with Capt. Cofl[een in behalf 
of the town. 



62 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



PEW-OWNERS, 1780. 



1. Roger Gilmore, Esq., 28. 

2. Capt. Joseph Cutter, 29. 

3. Ig" Joseph Wilder, 30. 

4. Doct. A. Howe, 31. 

5. Joseph Brooks, 32. 

6. Capt. Benj° Spaulding, 33. 

7. Lt. Moses Worcester, 34. 

8. Oliver Bailey, 35. 

9. Phineas Spaulding, 36. 

10. Phin** Spaulding, 2>7- 

11. Capt. Jos. Perkins, 38. 

12. John Davidson, 39. 

13. Jos. Thorndike, Esq., 40. 

14. Capt. Jona" Stanley, 41. 

15. Lt. Joseph Bates, 42. 

16. Eg" Alexander Milliken, 43. 

17. Thorndike and Page, 44. 

18. Lt. William Turner, 45. 

19. John Gilmore, 46. 

20. Isaac Bailey, 47. 

21. Capt. Daniel Emery, 48. 

22. Dea. Daniel Emery, 49. 

23. Thomas Mower, 50. 

24. Robert Harkness, 51. 

25. Lt. John Harper, 52. 

26. Capt. Samuel Adams, 53. 

27. Eleazer Spofford, 



Lt. James Stevens, 

Capt. James Gage, 

Benj" Nutting, 

Simon Warren, 

Oliver Proctor, 

Eleazer Spofford, 

John Briant, 

Rev. Laban Ainsworth, 

Abel Parker, Esq., 

Dr. A. Howe, 

Lt. Sam^ Buss, 

Eleazer Spofford, 

Nathan Hall, 

Benj" Dole, 

John Kent, 

Lt. Jacob Pierce, 

Wid^' Lois Stanley, 

Joseph Turner, 

Samuel Pierce, 

Capt. Sam' Adams, 

Ebn"^ Stratton, 

Eg" Francis Wright. 

Peter Jones, 

Dea. William Smiley, 

Nehemiah Green, 

Oliver Hale. 



PEWS IN THE GALLERY. 



1. Lt. Jereme Underwood, 

2. Ebn'' Thompson, 

3. Abram Ross, 

4. Charles Davidson, 

5. Doct. A. Howe, 

6. Daniel Priest, 

7. Jona. Priest, 

8. Kendal Pierson, 

9. Capt. Joseph Perkins, 
ID. Lt Sam' Buss, 

11. Benj. Whitmore, 

12. Eleazer Spofford, 

13. David Cutter, 



14. Doct. A. Howe, 

15. Collins Hathorn, 

16. Josiah Belknap, 

17. Nehemiah Green, 

18. Samuel Stanley, 

19. Daniel Priest, 

20. John Buckley, 

21. Sam' Adams, 

22. Isaac Bailey, 

23. Abijah Carter, 

24. William Emery, 

25. Lt. Thomas x^dams. 



Recorded August 30, 1791. 



by Ado'^ Howe, Town Clerk. 



Width, 



MEETING-HOUSE. 
West Porch. 



63 



45 feet. 



M 



ON 



vO 



O 



vO 00 



as 



00 






^ 





4^ 
1-0 




vO 




1— ( 


4i 


On 
(0 


-1^ 


00 







to 
to 



to 



to 
-1^ 



to 



to 

ON 



East Porch. 



OJ 



OJ 

o 



to 

NO 



to 

00 



to 



CO 

on 



a 
■a 



After the sale of the pews followed the payment for the 
same. We have no record of the price of pews sold at pub- 
lic vendue, and can only judge of their value by the record 
of the sale of a pew, — No. 16, Dunlap to Pope, — for ten 
pounds ($33.34); one, Arthur Taylor to Spofford, No. 39, 
and one, Jonathan Taylor to Robert Harkness, No. 24, for 
ten pounds each ; two pews, Adams to Thorndike and 
Page, one on the lower floor. No. 26, and one in the gallery, 
No. 2, for fifteen pounds, — probably ten pounds for the 



64 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

lower pew, and five for the one in the gallery. That there 
were some delinquent payers for pews bought at the vendue 
appears by a vote of the town, Sept. 17, 1789, "that the 
Com*^'^ appointed to Finish the meeting-house, post those 
pews that are unpaid for, for sale the first monday of Oct 
next, unless paid for before." As we have no record to the 
contrary, it seems quite likely that payment was duly made. 
In 1 78 1, a committee of three, viz., William Pope, Dr. A. 
Howe, and Nehemiah Greene, was chosen " to recon with 
the building committee." In 1784 another committee, viz., 
Daniel Emery, John Gilmore, and James Cowing, was 
chosen for the same purpose, and quite likely met with the 
same result. In 1787, Sept. 3, the town 

Voted not to Except the finishing of the in.side of the meet- 
inghouse. 

Voted to refer the settlement with Mr. Adams to the old 
Com*^* chosen for that purpose. 

No settlement being made, in 1789, Dec. 21, the town 
again 

Voted not to Except of the meetingliouse as it is now fin- 
ished, and also Voted, to choose a Com^" to settle with Capt. 
Adams if they can agree, and if not, to have power to Refer 
the matter to Referees. Chose Esq. Parker, Dea. SpofFord and 
Capt. Spankling for said Committee. Voted that if Capt. 
Adams will not settle nor Refer the said matter that the said 
Com'^'' have power to prosecute his bonds to final Judgment 
and Execution. 

In 1792, August 27, the town 

Voted to have a box put to the meetinghouse with a glass 
door for the purpose of putting the town Notifications into. 

In 1796, August 29, the town voted two hundred dollars 
in part towards underpinning and repairing the meeting- 
house. A committee of three, — Dr. A. Howe, John Cough- 
ran, and Dea. E. Spofford, — had been appointed at a pre- 
vious meeting to ascertain what repairs were necessary ; 
among which a good underpinning of hewn stone, fifteen 
inches thick, and that the house be painted with a light 



MEETING-HOUSE. 65 

Stone color, was recommended by the committee and 
accepted by the town. A committee of three, — Dr. A. 
Howe, Jereme Underwood, and Roger Gilmore, — was 
chosen to repair the house. 

In 1798, March 6, the town voted to paint the meeting- 
house, and raised one hundred and sixty-seven dollars and 
sixty-seven cents for that purpose. The house was painted 
probably for the first time, as we have no record of any 
money having been previously voted for that purpose. The 
meeting-house was raised in 1775 and finished in i799- a 
period of twenty-four years. It was built after the style of 
the day, with square pews ; a gallery on three sides of the 
house, supported in front by fluted pillars ; a pulpit, built 
after the English style, high and dignified in appearance, 
reached by two flights of stairs, with a pew in front for the 
elders, and a slip for the deacons ; over the pulpit was a 
sounding-board of huge dimensions, suspended from the 
timbers above. The house was entered by two porches, one 
at each end of the house, and a front door. In the gallery 
was a tier of pews next to the walls of the house, twenty- 
five in number, in front of which on a lower platform oppo- 
site the pulpit were seats for the choir, and also free seats 
on the east and west sides, which were usually occupied by 
the younger portion of the congregation. 

The pews in the lower part of the house were divided 
into body and wall pews. The wall pews were raised one 
step higher than the body pews. They were all about five 
feet square, with a seat on two sides, and room for a chair 
in the centre, usually occupied by some elderly lady belong- 
ing to the family. The seats were hung on hinges, for the 
purpose of raising them during prayers, making the standing 
position less tiresome during their continuance. The only 
evil growing out of their use was the discordant noise occa- 
sioned by their fall at the close. 

In front of the pulpit, looking to the front door, the aisle 
was wider than the others ; hence it was called the broad 



66 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

aisle. The pews on this aisle were considered more valua- 
ble than the others. Near the pulpit, in front of the body 
pews, were free seats, usually occupied by poor and aged 
people. These were the first seats built in the house, and 
for a time were occupied by the congregation. The increase of 
population, however, created a want of more pews, and con- 
sequently the seats were removed and pews built in their 
places. The proceeds from the sale of the pews were used 
in the purchase of a bell in 1823. Cost of the bell in Bos- 
ton, ^440.30. 

No provision was made for warming the house till about 
18 18 or 1820, when a stove was placed in the broad aisle, in 
front of the pulpit, and the heat carried by a funnel attached 
to the front of the galleries around the house. Previous to 
this no fire was used in the house except in foot-stoves 
carried by old ladies. At intermission, or noon-time, in 
winter, the female portion of the congregation retired to 
some neighboring house, where provision was made for their 
warmth by a good fire, from which they filled their foot- 
stoves for afternoon service. The men and boys went to 
the hotel, or tavern, as it was then called, and spent their 
noon-time in drinking flip and warming up for the afternoon 
service. The boys, if not allowed to drink, had the benefit 
of a good fire, which they carefully improved while the 
fathers were drinking. 

From this time (1800) but little appears on the town 
records relating to the meeting-house till after the passing 
of the toleration act in 1819. Previous to the passage of 
this act the minister was settled and supported by the town. 
Every person, irrespective of his religious belief, was taxed 
for that purpose. After its passage each individual was 
taxed as before, but had the privilege of appropriating it for 
the support of the minister of any religious denomination. 
This condition of things gave rise to a question relating to 
the occupation of the meeting-house. This question was 
settled by a vote of the town, April 20, 1822, " to allow each 



MEETING-HOUSE. 6/ 

and every religious denomination in Jaffrey to have the use 
of s** house on sabbath days in proportion to the valuation 
of their property." The town also voted " to repair s^^ house, 
and chose Dea. David Gilmore, W™. Hodge, Dr. A. Howe, 
W™ Dutton & Sam^ Patrick a Com*^® to examine the house, 
and report." May 6, 1822, the committee made the follow- 
ing report : *' That in their opinion the s'^ house is worth re- 
pairing. That it will be necessary to strip the clapbords 
from the body of the house, and new clapboard, trim and 
paint the same." The report was accepted, and the sum of 
three hundred dollars raised to defray the expense in part of 
repairing the meeting-house, and the selectmen were author- 
ized to contract for the repairs and superintend the same. 

The town also voted " that individuals may have liberty 
to put up a belfry at the west end of the meeting-house and 
hang a bell in the same, provided, it does not enhance the 
expense of repairing said house." The belfry was built by 
subscription, and in 1823 the town furnished a bell. 

At the same meeting the town voted " that each and 
every religious society in Jaffrey report to the selectmen 
the names of all those belonging to their society who pay 
taxes in Jaffrey." Also, voted " that each society of Chris- 
tians in Jaffrey may claim their right to the s*^^ house, agree- 
able to the vote of the town, as soon as it shall have been 
repaired." 

In 1823, at the annual meeting, the following was pre- 
sented : 

These Certify that we the subscribers are of the Baptist de- 
nomination and mean to support the Gospel Ministry in that 
order and request the Town Clerk of JaftVey to record our sev- 
eral names on the town book as belonging to that denomina- 
tion as we wish not to be taxed for the support of the Rev. 
Laban Ainsworth. 

Abel Parker Nathan Hunt Tliomas French Jr. 

Alpheas Crosby Benj" Prescott. Daniel Emory 

Benj Haywood Jr Joseph Joslin Azeal Gowing 

Eldad Prescott Thomas French Berzilla Stickney 

Simeon Blanchard Paul Hunt Moses Stickney 



68 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Luther Guy 
Cummings French 
Rob' Goff. 
Wilder Joslin 



Moris Hunt 
Levi Johnson 
Paul Hunt Jr. 
W'" Walton 



Aaron Bolster 
Reuben Nutting 
Mark Morrell 
Joseph Joslin Jr. 

Recorded Mar. 27 1S23 

by Henry Payson \ ^, , 
( Clerk 



UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY OF JAFFREY, 1 823. 

Edward Perkins Daniel Adams, Jr. Benj. Prescott, Jr. 

John Stone Charles Witt Benj. Cutter 

Oliver Bailey Thomas Taylor Sam' Foster 

Isaac Jewell Sewal Gould Eliot Powers 

Oliver Jewett Daniel French Sam' Stratton 

Roger Brigham Gershom Twitchel William Dean 

Levi Fisk John Cutter James Ingalls 

Oliver Warren William Hodge Sam' Buss 

John Gilmore Daniel Adams Benj Lawrence, Jr. 

Cotton Tufts James C. Smith Nath. Cutter 

Ithamer Lawrence Adams Fisk Elijah Wellman, Jr. 

Recorded by 
Mar. 31, 1823. Henry Payson ( Town 

\ Clerk. 

Zimri Whitney says he is a Methodist and intends to pay for 
the support of their preaching. 

Jaftreyjuly 7, 1823. 

A Unitarian society was afterwards formed, under the 
leadership of John Conant, Esq., which had but a short 
duration, and he afterwards joined the Baptist church. In 
1829 each society occupied the church as follo\vs, viz. : 

Congregationalist 21 Sabbaths. 

Baptist 9 " 

Universalist 13 " 

Unitarian 9 " 

The division and occupancy of the church did not meet 
the wants of the rehgious societies ; consequently the Bap- 
tists, in 1830, built a meeting-house at East jaffrey, and in 
1 83 1 the Congregationalists built one in the Centre. 



MEETING-HOUSE. 69 

The Universalists having now the whole possession of 
the house, found it too large for their convenience, and in 
1844 built one for themselves at East Jaffrey. 

From this time the old meeting-house was no longer used 
by the town for religious worship, but only for town pur- 
poses, till 1870, when the town voted to raise the sum of 
^1,000 to defray the expense of finishing a hall for the pur- 
pose of holding town-meetings, and a room for a high 
school, provided individuals would subscribe a sum sufficient 
to complete the same. The sum was raised and the house 
altered, and one term of the high school taught therein 
each year. 

In November, 1872, the town, by their vote, accepted the 
sum of ^944, the gift of John Conant, Esq., as a basis of a 
perpetual fund for the purpose of keeping the house in good 
repair. In case of failure or neglect on the part of the 
town to keep in good repair the said house, the said fund 
shall be given to District No. 7 for the same purpose. 



CHAPTER VII. 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 

PROVISION was made in the grant of the town for 
the settlement of a minister. Three hundred acres 
of land was reserved for the first settled minister by the 
Masonian Proprietors. Immediately after the organization 
of the town, at the second meeting of the town, six pounds 
lawful money was voted to support the gospel. A com- 
mittee of three, " Capt. Jonathan Stanley, Alex'' Mc. Neil 
and James Callwell were chosen to Provide supplies of 
Preaching for s*^ town." The same amount of money was 
raised in each of the two following years. In 1776 and 
1777 fifty pounds was raised each year, — a large increase, 
apparently, but not in reality, owing to the depreciation of 
the currency. Lt. Daniel Emery, Lt. William Turner, and 
Capt. Roger Gilmore were chosen a committee " to provide 
supplies of the Gospel this year." The town also voted that 
young men supply the pulpit. In settling a minister at that 
time it was a matter of interest for the town to settle a 
young man, as the first settled minister was to be the recip- 
ient of the three hundred acres of land granted as afore- 
said. 

In 1778 the town voted lOO pounds for preaching, and 
chose John Briant, Nehemiah Green, and Benj. Spaulding a 
committee to procure preaching. In June of that year the 
town 

Voted that the Com*^ of supplies of preaching should agree 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. /I 

with Mr. Jona" Allan to siiply us, after he has preached six 
Sabbaths at Harvard, provided the above Com'^^ should apply 
to him within four weeks after he goes away. 

In September an article in the warrant for a town-meet- 
ing was presented, — 

To see if the town vv'ill pass a vote to give Mr. Jona" Allan 
a Call to settle in the ministry in this town ; and if voted, to 
Chose a Com''® to Eflect the same, if not voted, to see if the 
town will agree to hear Mr Allan any longer. Voted, that so 
much of this article as included giving Mr Jona*^ Allan a call 
should be omitted at the present and that the Com''"= should pro- 
vide other supplys of preaching. 

Nothing more appears on the records relating to Mr. 
Allan, and nothing further is known to us of his history. 
In November, same year, the town 

Voted to hear Mr Reed until the next annual meeting, and 
instructed the Com'^'' to bring in their accounts at that meeting. 

In 1779 the town granted ;^200 for the support of preach- 
ing, and appointed William Turner, Daniel Emery, and 
James Gage, committee, and instructed them not to hire a 
candidate for more than one month without a vote of the 
town. In November, same year, the town 

Voted not to hear Mr Stearns for all the supplies we are to 
have this fall, also voted that the Com''® use their discretion in 
procuring further supplys of preaching providing Mr Colby 
Cannot be had. Voted two hundred pounds to defray the 
Charge of further supplys of preaching. 

At an adjournment of the same meeting, the town voted to 
hear Mr. Colby for further supplys of preaching also voted to 
have Mr. Colby come here to preach by the first of IMarch next, 
or sooner if he can be had. 

Voted to chose a Com®" of four to Treat with Mr Colby con- 
cerning further supplys of preaching. Chose James Haywood, 
Peter Mc-Alister, John Gilmore and Eleazer Spoftbrd for said 
Com*"®. 

Voted that in Case Mr Colby cannot be had, the Com®® 
should procure other supplies of preaching. 



72 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

In 1780, March 30, the town raised ;!^iooo for preaching, 
and appointed Roger Gilmore, Thomas Mower, and John 
Gilmore, committee, and voted "that the s*^* Com*'^ do not 
employ one man more than one sabbath, without a vote of 
the town." In May a church was incorporated. 

INCORPORATION OF THE CHURCH, MAY 1 8, I78O. 

The Church of Christ in New Ipswich, the Church of Christ 
in Rindge and Dublin by their Pastors and Delegates met at 
JaflVey in consequence of letters missive from the covenented 
Brethren in said town at the house of Adonijah Howe on May 
iS, A. D. 17S0 for the purpose of assisting in forming a church 
in s*^ place. Upon enquiry made of the Covenenting Brethren 
present whether it was their desire, that tlie Churchs convened 
should form into an Ecleastical Council and proceed to the 
Business for which they were desired to engage. 

Voted in the affirmative. 

The Churches there present according to desire 

Voted they would form into an Ecleastical Council. 

Voted The Rev Mr Farrah Moderator of the Council and 
Rev. Mr Brigham scribe. 

The covenenting Brethren then presented to the Council the 
form of covenant which they had under consideration, to which 
covenent (for substance) they asserted to the Council they all 
agree**. Then Voted to adjourn the Council till after the pub- 
lic exercise. 

The Council then met according to adjournment when the 
form of the Covenant as it was Signed was read to the Cov- 
enenting Brethren to which they voted their consent. 

The Council then voted their approbation of the covenant 
under Consideration. 

Previous to the signing of the Covenant the Covenanting 
Brethren exhibited their letters of dismission and Recommend- 
ation from the Churchs to which they respectively belonged 
which were voted satisfactory to the Council. And after ad- 
dressing the Father of Mercy and the fountains of Grace for his 
presence and blessing to attend the service transactions, the 
covenanting Brethren respectively set their names to the 
covenant, and were all acknowledged by the Council to be a 
regular church of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

The Counsil then dissolved 
A true Copy from the original 

Attest Benj. Brigham scribe to s** Council 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 



73 



Members of the church 
May 1 8, 1780: 

Kendal Briant and 
John Briant 
Daniel Emery 
Eleazer Spofford 
John Combs 
James Gage 
Oliver Proctor 
Isaac Bailey 
Isaac Baldwin 
John Wood 
Nehemiah Greene 
James Haywood 
Jona" Priest 
Ephraim Whitcomb 
Jei-eme Underwood 
John Eaton 
William Slack 



at the time of its incorporation, 



Wife Mary (Martin) 

Wife Jane 

" Mary (Flint) 

" Bathsheba 

" Sarah (Lamson) 

" Elizabeth 

" Susanna 
Wife 
Wife 
Wife 

Wife Keziah Heywood 
Wife 
Wife Elizabeth 

" Lucy (Wheat) 



The next candidate was Mr. Caleb Jewett. In 1780, 
June I, an article was presented to the town, — 

To see if the town will employ Mr. Jewett any longer than 
four sabbaths, that he is engaged for. 

The town 

Voted to hear Mr. Jewett more if he can be obtained. 

Voted that the Com**^ treat with Mr Jewett to come to us 
again to Preach on Probation in Order to give him a call. 

Sept. 4. Art. 2. To see if the Town will Concur with the 
Church in giving Mr. Jewett a call to the work of the Gospel 
Ministry in this place. Voted to concur. 

Voted to Give Mr. Jewett for a salary seventy pounds L. M. 
for three years to come, then eighty pounds annually as long as 
he is the Gospel Minister of said town. Also voted to give 
him Lot No II in the 6"^ Range No. 3 in the 2** Range and one 
hundred pounds instead of another Lot to which the first set- 
tled minister was by the Charter intitled and two acres of land 
west of the road and South of the Common provided he settles 
in town. 

Chose Daniel Emery, Elea"' SpofFord, Thomas Mower, 
Adoni*^ Howe and John Gilmore a Com^^ to Draught a Call and 
Lay it before the town and if Excepted to present the same to 
Mr. Jewett. 

6 



74 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

The meeting was then adjourned, and on meeting again 
according to the adjournment, the town 

Voted to Except the Call Draughted by the Com*'' and sign 
the same in behalf of the town. 

Why Mr. Jewett did not accept the call does not appear 
on the records. Caleb Jewett, a. m., the son of James and 
Martha (Scott) Jewett, was born at Newbury, Mass., and 
died at Gorham, Maine, April i6, 1802, aged 49 years. He 
graduated at Dartmouth college, 1776; studied divinity; 
was ordained pastor of the Congregational church at Gor- 
ham, Nov. 5, 1783 ; married Betsey Bacon, of Bradford, 
Mass., November, 1783. 

In 1 78 1, February i, the town voted " the Com®® for hire- 

ing Preaching shall get it as soon as they can." In March 

the town 

Voted 2000 pounds for preaching, and also to hire Mr 
Walker this year, and Chose John Briant, Eleaz"" Spoflbrd and 
James Cutter to procure preaching. 

At a town-meeting in August an article was presented, — 

To see if the town will hire Mr. Goodale any longer. 

Voted to hire Mr. Goodale two sabbaths more. 

,\rt 2, to see if it is the mind of the town that any Proper 
measures shall be used to give Mr. Goodale a call to the work 
of the ministry. 

Voted to dismiss the art. 

In December, same year, at a meeting of the town, an 
article was presented, — 

To see if the town Doth incline to hear Mr. Ainsworth any 
more. 

Voted to hear Mr Ainsworth longer. 

At the annual meeting, March, 1782, Mr. David Stanley, 
Capt. James Gage, and Mr. Thomas Adams were chosen a 
committee " to suply the Desk." 

In April, same year, the town " voted to hear Mr Ains- 
worth on probation ; in Order to give him a call." In July, 
the town 




AUiertype; Forlios Co., Boston. 



MARY (MINOT) AINSWORTH. 







Alliertypc: Forhis Co., Boston. 



REV. LABAN AINSWORTH 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 75 

Voted unanimously to Concur with the Church and Give 
Mr. Laban Ainsworth a Call to the work of the Gospel Minis- 
try in this town. 

Chose John Gil more, Joseph Bates, Eleaz"" Spoftbrd Moses 
Worcester and Abel Parker, Com'"' to Draw up articles con- 
cerning the encouragement the town will give Mr. Ainsworth 
to settle with us in the Ministry and report. 

Report. 

We the aforsaid Com'^'^ think the first minister should have 
the North end of the two Sentre Lots, also the mountain Lot, 
(No. 3, Range 2,) and in money thirty Pounds and to quit- 
claim his right to Lots disposed of belonging to the first minis- 
ter. 

Voted, that the Com*^ report be given to Mr Laban Ains- 
worth for an incoragement to settle with us in the ministry. 

Voted to give Air Ainsworth as a Salary seventy Pounds 
while he supplies the Desk in this town. 

In September, the town 

Voted to grant Mr Ainsworth liberty annually to visit his 
Friends twice each year of two Sabbaths at each time, if he ac- 
cept the call of the town. 

Voted to alter the sentence in a former vote, to as long as he 
is the Gospel minister of s'^ town ; instead of while he supplies 
the Desk in s*^ town. 

In November, 1782, the town 

Voted that the Ordination of Mr Ainsworth be the second 
Wednesday in December next. 

Chose Mr. E. Spofibrd Lieut. Emery and Mr John Gilmore 
a com*'' to Provide for the Council on s"^ day. 

Chose Samuel Parce, Capt. Spaulding, Nathan Hall, Lt. 
Buss and Samuel Emery, to take care of the meeting house on 
s** day. 

Result of the Ordaining Council 1782, Dec. 10. 

Newhampshire Jeftry Dec. 10"^ 1782 
At an Ecclesiastical Council being convened by letters mis- 
sive from the Chh of Christ in the town aforsaid to assistance 
in setting apart for the work of the gospel ministry, Mr Laban 
Ainsworth, their pastor elect, were present the following chh's. 
represented, The Chh. of Christ in New Ipswich, Fitzwilliam, 
Dublin, Keene, \A"oodstock (Con) Ashford (Con.) and Tem- 
ple. 

1 Made choice of Rev. Mr. Farrar, Moderator of s*^ Concil. 

2 Noah Miles Scribe — having called upon God for direction — 
proceeded. 



76 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

r Examined a copy of the procedings of the Concil in forming 
the Chh. 

2 The call and oflers made to Mr. L. Ainsworth for his en- 
couragement by the Chh. and freeholders of s*^ Town 

3 His answer to their call. In the affirmative. 

4 His Confession of Faith. 

5 He presented himself for examination to answer such ques- 
tions as might be proposed to him. He exhibited several 
pieces of his sermons. 

6 Opportunity given for objections. 

7 Adjourned till Wednesday ye. ii''' at 9 o'clock. 

8 Wednesday ye. 11*. Having met according to adjournment. 

1 Mr Ainsworth received as a member of the Chh in conse- 
quence of a letter of recommendation from the Chh. of Christ 
in Woodstock. 

2 Unanimously agreed to proceed to ordination. 

The Parts. 
The introductory prayer to be performed by Noah Miles : 
the sermon to be delivered by Rev*^ Mr Farrar : the ordaining 
prayer by Rev*^ Mr Hall : the charge by Rev'^ Air. Brigham : 
the right hand by the Rev*^ Mr. Judson : the concluding prayer 
by the Rev"^ Mr. Sprague. 

Copied from an attested copy, signed, 

Noah Miles, Scribe. 

Mr. Ainsworth continued in service for a period of nearly 
fifty years. In 1831 Rev. Giles Lyman was ordained as a 
colleague, and preached in town till 1837, when, on account 
of ill-health, he asked and received his dismission. He re- 
moved to New York ; afterwards preached in Ashburnham 
and Gardner, and in 1841 removed to Marlborough and 
preached there twenty-eight years ; then left on account of 
ill-health, and removed to Winchendon, where he died No- 
vember 16, 1872, aged 70 years. Mr. Lyman was born in 
Belchertown, Mass., March 16, 1802 ; graduated at Am- 
herst 1827, and at Andover Theological Seminary, 1830. 
He married, Dec. 14, 1835, Louisa Whitney, of Winchen- 
don. 

Josiah D. Crosby was settled in 1838, and dismissed in 
1850. 

Leonard Tenney, settled 1845, dismissed 1857. 



BAPTIST SOCIETY. ^7 

John S. Batchelder, settled 1858, dismissed 1865. 
Rufus Case settled 1868, removed 1875. 

DEACONS. 

Daniel Emery, Eleazer Spofford, William Smiley, 

Jesse Maynard, David Gilmore, Abel Spaulding. 

Richard Spaulding, Gurley A. Phelps, 

In 1850 a second Orthodox Congregational Society was 
formed and a church incorporated the same year, and a 
meeting-house built at East Jaffrey. 

MINISTERS. 

Feb. 28, 185 1, Rev. J. E. B. Jewett preached, and was or- 
dained Sept. 26, same year; dismissed July 13, 1852. 

George A. Adams, F. D. Austin, Silas W. Allen. 

D. N. Goodrich, William H. Dowden, 

DEACONS. 
Liberty Mower, Isaac S. Russell. 

BAPTIST SOCIETY. 

The Baptist Society in Jaffrey was formed in April, 1820, 
and in 1829, April 6, the following notice was published in 
the Kee7ie Se7itinel, viz. : 

We Benjamin Prescott, Alpheas Crosby, Paul Hunt, and 
others, have formed ourselves into a Religious Society, by the 
name of the First Baptist Church and Society in Jatfrey, and 
are hereby known by that name. 

Joseph Joslin, Clerk. 

The church was formed in 18 14, May 28. Previous to 
this time the Baptists of Jaffrey, Rindge, New Ipswich, 
Temple, and Sharon belonged to a church of that order in 
Temple, which church voted, May 3, 18 14, to divide and 
form two churches, one in New Ipswich and one in Jaffrey. 
The Baptists of the towns of New Ipswich, Temple, and 



7S 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



as many as chose in Sharon, became members of the church 
in New Ipswich ; and the Baptists of Jaffrey, Rindge, and 
such as chose in Sharon, became members of the church in 
Jaffrey. The members of the church in Jaffrey were as 
follows : 



Benjamin Prescott, 
Abel Parker, 
Moses Hale, 
Joseph Joslin, 
Thomas French, 



Alpheas Crosby, 
Isaac Kimball, 
Joel Adams, 
Rachel Prescott, 
Sybil Hale, 



Elizabeth Newell, 
Hannah Davis, 
Sally Stevens. 



On the 28th of May, 18 14, the above members met at the 
house of Joseph Joslin, and organized by choosing Benj, 
Prescott moderator, and Joseph Joslin clerk. It was then 
voted to hire preaching every third Sabbath during the 
year ; to give ordained ministers $3 per day; Benj. Prescott 
and Thomas French to be a committee to procure preach- 
ing, and Abel Parker, treasurer. Fifty dollars was voted to 
be raised for that year, and that the church should hold its 
meetings in the school-house in District No. i. March 12, 
1818, the church voted to employ Elder Parkhurst once in 
two months the ensuing year. April 14, 1825, it voted to 
have Brother Cummings two Sabbaths every two months. 
On Feb. 13, 1826, it was decided to have preaching twelve 
Sabbaths in the year; in March, 1827, two Sabbaths in 
that year ; and in March, 1830, it was decided to have 
preaching regularly, and a minister settled over them, and 
Calvin Greenleaf was installed pastor June 25, 183 1. 

The number of members of the Baptist church at the 
formation, 1814, was 13; in 1851, 165; in 1866, 113; in 
1870, 91. 



Benjamin Prescott, 
Joseph Joslin, 
John Sanderson, 
Josiah Mower, 



DEACONS. 

William E. Goodenow, Levi Pollard, 
Oren Prescott, Joseph Joslin, Jr. 

David Chadwick, 
Oliver Prescott, 



MEETING-HOUSE. 79 



PASTORS. 

John Parkhurst, i8i8. A. E. Reynolds, 1866-1869. 

Elder Cummings, 1825. E. J. Emery, 1869-1871 ; settled 

Calvin Greenleaf, 1831-1835. in Swanzey. 

Appleton Belknap, 1835-1846. J. S. Haradon, 1873; ^^- ^^S- 4' 

E. H. Bailey, 1846-1861 ; d. Jan. 1875. 

4, 1868. Leonard J. Dean, 1875 ; a graduate 

Franklin iMerriam, 1862-1865. of Newton Theological Seminary. 

Preachers licensed by the Baptist church of Jaffrey : 

Isaac Kimball, John Nutting, William Button. 

Wm. C. Richards, Joseph Pollard, 

MEETING-HOUSE. 

The meetings of the Baptist church and society were held 
as voted, in the school-house in District No. i, till 1822. 
After the passage of the toleration act by the legislature in 
1 8 19, the Baptists were no longer taxed for the support of 
the minister settled by the town, but had the privilege of 
using the same for the support of the one of their choice. 
The use of the meeting-house for public preaching was, in 
1822, also divided by the town among the different denom- 
inations of Christians according to the valuation of their 
property. From this time the Baptists occupied the house 
their proportion as assigned till 1830. 

On the 5th of February, 1829, the church voted to build 
a meeting-house near the house of Mr. Melville, and chose 
Benj. Prescott, Joseph Joslin, and David Chadwick a com- 
mittee for that purpose. The house was raised on the 25th 
and 26th of June, 1829. The house was completed and 
ready for use June 12, 1830. June 30, 1830, the house was 
dedicated. The dedication sermon was preached by Elder 
Fisher, of West Boylston, Mass. In 1873 the house was 
repaired, with the addition of a vestry, and such other im- 
provements as were deemed necessary. 



80 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



LEGACIES. 

John Conant, ;^ 1,000. 

Dea. John Sanderson, 1^900. 

Samuel Ryan, ^1,000. 

UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY. 

The First UniversaHst Society, Jaffrey, N. H., was organ- 
ized Nov. 16, 1822. Capt. John Stone was chosen modera- 
tor ; Caleb Searle, clerk ; John Cutter, treasurer ; Mr. John 
Cutter and Col. Oliver Prescott, committee. Notice of the 
organization was published in the New HainpsJiire Sentinel, 
printed at Keene. 

PASTORS. 

Delphus Skinner, 1824. C. C. Clark, 1854, 1855. 

Warren Skinner, 1826. N. R.Wright and Andrew O. War- 

J. D. Williamson, 1830. ren, 1855, 1856. 

Robert Bartlet, 1833-1835 or 1836. E. W. Coffin, 1857-1867. 

J. V. Wilson, 1835-1838. J. P. McCleur, 1869, 

Stillman Clark, 1839-1851. W. J. Crosby, 1870, 1871. 

S. W. Squires, 1852, 1853. James H. Little, 1875. 

A church was formed in 1858, and numbers at this time 
{1878) 48 members. A Sunday-school, organized in 1845, 
numbers 60 members. They have also a ladies' circle, for 
benevolent purposes. 

MEETING-HOUSE. 

The present meeting-house was built in 1844, and a bell 
placed in the belfry in i860, and one of superior tone in 
1870. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

EDUCATION— PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

THE system of free schools was early adopted in Massa- 
chusetts, and by it introduced into New Hampshire 
during her jurisdiction. New Hampshire, on becoming a 
state, adopted her laws for their support. In the grant of 
the town of Jaffrey the Masonian Proprietors made provi- 
sion for the support of a free school by a gift of three hun- 
dred acres of land. In 1775, two years after the incorpora- 
tion of the town, eight pounds was raised for a school, to be 
divided into five parts. In December of that year the town 
voted to sell one of the school lots, and to use the interest 
on the proceeds of the sale for the support of a school. In 
1777 the town voted to pay the interest of ^100 for two 
years for the use of a school ; in 1778, £\2\ in 1779, 
;^200 (depreciated currency); in 1781, £1000 \ in 1783, 
;^50 ; in 1785, ^50 ; in 1786, £10 ; in 1787, ^40 ; in 1788, 
£\o\ in 1789, ^50; in 1790, ^40; in 1791, £6o\ in 
1792. ;^65 ; in 1793, ;^8o ; in 1794, ^80; in 1795, ;^200 
Federal money ; afterwards the town raised what the law 
required. 

After the vote of the town in 1775 to divide the money 
into five parts, no other division appears to have been made 
till 1778, when it was voted to divide the town into eight 
districts ; in 1779, into ten districts. In 1786 it was again 
voted to divide the town into eight districts. In 1791 the 
town voted that the school-districts remain as they were at 



82 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

first. No further alteration was made in the number of 
districts till 1795, when a district was taken from No. 7, and 
numbered 11. These districts were without metes and 
bounds till 1828, when a committee was chosen to effect 
the same. 

The districts were numbered as they now are, beginning 
with the south-east district, which was numbered i. There 
were five districts on the south line of the town, three from 
the west through the centre, and three on the north line of 
the town, — eleven in all. 

School-houses were almost unknown to the first settlers. 
Their schools were taught in private houses ; — in district 
No. 3, in the house of James Stevens ; in No. 5, in the 
house of Phineas Spaulding ; in No. 10, in the house of 
Alpheus Crosby. No attempt on the part of the town was 
made to build school-houses till 1788. The town then voted 
that each school-district should build a school-house within 
eighteen months ; and in case of neglect on the part of any 
district the selectmen were authorized to build at the ex- 
pense of the district. The number built by this vote is not 
recorded : probably not many, if any : it was easier to vote 
than to build. In 1791 the town voted ;;^I35, to be laid 
out in building school-houses, and chose a committee for 
that purpose ; but this committee was no more successful 
under this vote than the selectmen were under the other. 
But little was done by the town in building school-houses, 
but to vote and reconsider, till 1795, when the town voted 
that the selectmen assess the money to complete and finish 
the ten school-houses in town as soon as the committee 
ascertain the sum, and also the uncollected balance of the 
;^I35 formerly voted to build school-houses. In October of 
the same year the town voted that the selectmen be directed 
" to assess one half of the sum each undertaker is to have 
for building and finishing the school-house this year, and 
the other half next year." In 1796 the town voted to build 
a school-house in district No. 11, which cost $116.16. 



SCHOOL-HOUSES. 83 

The job of building and finishing the ten school-houses 
was sold at public vendue for the sum of eight hundred and 
eighty-six dollars and eighteen cents. From the building 
committee's report, it seems that the cost of each house was 
about one hundred dollars, and if took from 1788 to 1797, a 
period of nine years, to build and finish them. They were 
small, rude affairs, about twenty feet square, with three 
small windows of fifteen lights each, of seven by nine glass- 
The seats extended across one side of the house, with a 
narrow alley between them, and a table for the teacher's desk, 
and warmed by an open fire-place. In the middle district 
the house was a little larger, with more seats and larger 
windows. The houses were built of the best material, as 
luniber was very abundant, but the workmanship was coarse 
and rough. The houses were built by the side of the road, 
with no play-ground but the road itself. 

In some of the districts the location of the school-house 
was not easily made, as no road run through the centre, and 
consequently the house could not be built there : hence a 
controversy arose in relation to the location. To settle such 
matters of disagreement, the town appointed a committee 
of three, — Roger Gilmore, Adonijah Howe, and Samuel 
Buss, — for the purpose of locating houses. The committee 
made some locations, but none were satisfactory, and the 
houses in districts Nos. 6, 9, and 1 1 were settled by a vote 
of the town. In the centre district the location was made 
by a special committee chosen by the town. The location 
made was very near the south-west corner of the burying- 
ground. It was afterwards changed for one near the resi- 
dence of J. D. Gibbs. The old academy building was after- 
wards taken for a school-house. In district No. 9 the 
school-house was built in several locations, but none were 
satisfactory, which ultimately led to a division into two 
districts, now numbered 9 and 13. 



84 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

SCHOOL-TEACHERS. 

Of the early teachers but little is known. Some of the 
early settlers had been engaged in the business of school- 
teaching previous to their settlement in town ; — in District 
No. 5, Phineas Spaulding ; in No. 9, Abel Parker ; and 
others probably in other districts. The earliest record of 
money paid teachers was in 1790 : 

Gave Reuben Briant two orders for keeping school in the 
North East District, and Asa BuUard eight orders for keeping 
school. 

In 1793 we find the following receipts, given that year: 

March I, 1793. Received Seven Pounds four shillings in 
full for teaching school three months in the center District Pr 
me Luke Lincoln 

March 4, 1793. Then rec*^ of the Selectmen of JaftVey three 
pounds in full for boarding school Master twelve weeks. Pr 
me Jacob Danforth 

March 4, 1793. Then rec** of the Selectmen of Jaftrey three 
pounds twelve shillings in full for my son Amos Parker keep- 
ing school six weeks. Pr. me. Samuel Parker. 

Rufus Houghton was a teacher in districts Nos. 3 and 10 
for many years. Samuel Litch was the most distinguished 
among the early teachers. He taught the school in his own 
district nineteen years, many years in the centre district, 
and in many other districts. His pupils not only feared but 
loved him, and always remembered his services with grati- 
tude. 

In the second generation were many distinguished teach- 
ers, who made it a business of teaching school in the winter 
for many years. Among them appear the names of Asa 
Parker, Edward Spaulding, and Thomas Adams. 

The distinguished female teachers were Sally Stevens, 
who taught fourteen summers in her own district ; Hitty 
Brooks, who married Samuel Pierce ; Maria Blanchard > 
and Sarah Robbins, who has taught forty terms of school. 



SCHOOL-BOOKS. 85 



SCHOOL-BOOKS. 

Samuel Litch, the most distinguished of the early school- 
teachers in Jaffrey, in lecturing on that subject at a public 
meeting, said that the first books in use by our public 
schools were the New England Primer, Psalter, and the New 
Testament. For the more advanced scholars the Bible was 
used. In 1720 the Youth's Instructor was introduced, a 
book of 144 pages, divided into three parts: Part I, Reading 
and Spelling; II, Letters and Punctuation; III, Arithmetic. 

The first arithmetics were those of Bonnycastle and 
Emerson ; also one called the Young Man's Companion. 

At a later period Dilworth's, Percy's, and Webster's 
spelling-books, Scott's Lessons, American Preceptor, Under- 
standing Reader, Columbian Orator, Pike's and Adams's 
arithmetics, Alexander's and Murray's grammars, Morse's 
and Cummings's geographies. 

The selectmen, previous to 1738, were ex officio the man- 
agers of the public schools. They received the money 
raised, and hired the school-teacher, subject to the vote of 
the town. In 1782 the town voted not to hire a master by 
the year. In 1786 the town voted that the selectmen pro- 
vide school-masters for the districts. In 1788 the town vot- 
ed to hire a master for one year. In 1792 the town voted 
to hire four school-masters for five months and one for 
six months the present year, to keep school three months in 
the middle district and two months in each of the other dis- 
tricts. In 1788 the town voted to divide the money among 
the districts according to poll and estate. In 1795 the town 
voted that the money be equally divided. In 1796 the 
money was divided among the school-districts according to 
the sums each district pays. This method continued in 
practice till 1828, when the selectmen were authorized to 
make the division of school-money. In 1798, at the annual 
town-meeting, agents, one in each district, were chosen by 
the town to receive the money and expend the same for 



86 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

schooling, hire the teachers, and manage the affairs of the 
districts. In 1828 the metes and bounds of the districts 
were fixed, and each district became a body poHtic, and 
chose its own agents. Previous to 1808 their agents were 
subject to the supervision of the selectmen, agreeable to the 
vote of the town, passed May 28, 1801. 

Voted, That the several Agents or Superintendents of the 
several School-houses in the town for the time being be at all 
times amenable to the Selectmen for all tlie money or orders 
they may receive for the purpose of schooling, and if the same 
be not laid out for the purpose of schooling according to law the 
Selectmen are hereby directed to call such money out of the de- 
linquents agents hand and to cause the same to be duly laid out 
for the benefit of the inhabitants for which it was originally de- 
signed, and in any case any of the Agents or Superintendents 
aforsaid shall not do their duty faithfully, the Selectmen for the 
time being, on complaint made to them, are hereby authorized 
on considering all the circumstances, to abrogate any particular 
act or acts, of such Agents or Superintendents. 

The selectmen were by this vote ex officio superintending 
school committee. To this committee the Rev. Mr. Ains- 
worth was added, at the annual town-meeting in 1807. In 
1809 a committee was chosen, — Rev. Laban Ainsworth, 
Samuel Dakin, Jonathan Fox, and Joseph Joslin, — who have 
the honor of being the first superintending school commit- 
tee. They were known at this time as inspectors of schools. 
Their first report was in 1820. The committee chosen that 
year were Rev. Laban Ainsworth, Samuel Litch, and Luke 
Howe. The law requiring a superintending school commit- 
tee was passed in 1808. 

The first report of the school committee on record was 
made in 1820. 

SCHOOL REPORT, iSzO. 

To the town of Jaftrey, their committee appointed to inspect 
their schools respectfully report. 

That we have visited generally the schools near the opening 
and close of each school, except those, of which we had no 
information at their commencement or ending. 



SUPERINTENDING SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



87 



That Students in Geography have excelled and those in 
Arithmetic and Grammar have gone behind those who have 
studied the same sciences in former schools. 

In the art of reading and writing, we have observed many 
grades from many laudible specimens to those in which very 
little progress was discernable. 

From the great diversity of Books used in vSchools Teachers 
are put to great inconvenience ; they are compelled to make as 
many Classes as there are different authors brought to school 
or require the parents to purchase new books. To remedy 
this evil, a convention of teachers did unanimously recommend 
Scott's Lessons, Columbian Orator, and American Preceptor, 
with Cummings Geographv and Atlass. 

While we have generally been gratified in observing com- 
mendable zeal and exertion in the Teachers for the benefit of 
their pupils. We have nevertheless thought it important that 
agents should cautiously avoid employing those of an oposite 
character. 

In visiting the schools, we could not avoid seeing, that 
intentional injury had been done to School-houses. We have 
seen where a house has not suffered by the injuries of time, 
yet have been rendered cold and uncomfortable by ill-intended 
violence. 

All of which is submitted by, 

Laban Ains worth, 
Samuel Litch, 
Luke Howe. 

Voted to accept the above report. 



SUPERINTENDING SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Laban Ainsworth, till 1820. 
Thomas Adams, 18 16-17. 
George W. Adams, 1854-6. 
Frank D. Austin, 1860-1-2. 
E. K. Bailey, 1847-9-50-2-3-4-5-6- 

7-9- 
Frederick W. Bailey, 1866-7-8. 
John S. Batchelder, 1859-60-61-2-3 
Appleton Belknap, 1838-9-40-5. 
Rufus Case, 1869-70. 
David C. Chamberlin, 1855. 
E. W. Coffin, 1859-60-1-2-3-4-5. 
J. D. Crosby. 1838-39-40. 



Stillman Clarke, 1839-40- 1-2-5-6-7- 

9-50. 
Benjamin Cutter, 1835-6. 
Samuel Dakin, 1809-11-13. 
Enville J. Emery, 1872. 
Jonathan Fox, 1809. 
John Fox, 1830. 
D. N. Goodrich, 1873. 
Calvin Greenleaf, 1831-2. 
Luke Howe, 1819, '20-25. 
J. S. Haradon, 1874. 
J. E. B. Jewell, 1851-2. 
Joseph Joslin, 1809. 



88 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

F. Kendall, 1855. G. A. Phelps, 1858, 
Samuel Litch, 18 13-1 5-17- 19-20-6- Oliver Prescott, 1827. 

'41-2-5-6. Edward Spaulding, 182 1-5-6-7, 

Giles Lyman, 1832-37. David Spaulding. 1831-5-6, '41-2. 

Parker Maynard, 1825. S. W. Squire, 1853. 

Franklin Merriam, 1864. Leonard Tenny, 1846-7-9, '50-1-2- 
Asa Parker, 1835-6. 3-4-6-7. 

C.J. Parker, 1835-6. George A. Underwood, 1855. 

Samuel Patrick, 1826-7. J. V. Wilson, 1837-8. 
Clarence E. Parks, 1871. 

PRIVATE SCHOOL. 

In 1795 an attempt was made to establish a private 
school, and a bond given, signed by Rev. Laban Ainsworth, 
Eleazer Spofford, Roger Gilmore, Joseph Cutter, Adonijah 
Howe, Benj. Cutter, Samuel Adams, William Pope, and 
Joseph Thorndike for that purpose. Each individual was to 
pay ten pounds L. M. ($33.33) towards erecting a suitable 
house, and the town, at the annual meeting, March 3, 1795, 
voted to give them a lease of a location west of the meeting- 
house. No house appears to have been built, but a school 
was opened under the instruction of Joseph Dillon, which 
after a short time closed. 

ACADEMY. 

March 12, 1805, annual town-meeting. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will take any shares in the Acad- 
emy to be built in this town or give any land on which to build 
a house. 

The town voted to give David Page, Jr., and others who 
are or may become Proprietors thereof, a piece of land 
southerly of Mr. Ainsworth's, not exceeding one acre and 
a quarter, and chose a committee of three to stake out the 
same and give a lease to the proprietors for a term not ex- 
ceeding 999 years, on condition that the proprietors will 
outlay and set up a school, and continue the same five years 
in seven. Chose Roger Gilmore, Abel Parker, and Benja- 
min Prescott, committee. 




UJ 

(T 
u. . 

h- 

<5 
D - 

XT' ^ 

X 

u 

01 



MELVILLE ACADEMY. 89 

A school was taught by Josiah Forsaith, from 1807 to 
1809, inclusive. He then went to Newport, N. H., and the 
school closed and the land was not leased. 

MELVILLE ACADEMY, 

In 1832 the academy known by the above name was in- 
corporated. The grantees were Asa Parker, Luke Howe, 
and John Fox. It was named in honor of Jonas M. Mell- 
ville, who made a very liberal donation in aid of the enter- 
prise. In 1833 a suitable building was erected, which is 
now (1873) used for a school-house in District No. 7. 

The school was opened in the fall of 1833, under the in- 
struction of Horace Herrick, principal, and Miss Aureha 
Townsend, assistant. He remained till 1836. 

The following individuals were afterwards employed as 
teachers : Roswell D. Hitchcock, William Eaton, Harry 
Brickett, Charles Cutter, David C. Chamberlin, Sarah 
French. The academy continued in operation till the es- 
tablishment of the Conant High School. 

In 1868, John Conant, Esq., of Jaffrey, gave the town the 
sum of $7,000, the interest of which is to be used for the 
support of a high school in said town. The town-house in 
the centre of the town was altered and repaired to meet the 
wants of the town. The lower story is used for the school, 
and the upper one for a town hall. In 1872 the school was 
opened for instruction. It has two terms in a year, — one at 
East Jaffrey, and one at the middle of the town. 



CHAPTER IX. 



LIST OF COLLEGE GRADUATES OF THE TOWN OF ^AF- 

FREY. 



DAVID Smiley graduated at Harvard college in 1796. 
He studied law and opened an office in Jaffrey in 
1801 : was the first lawyer who settled in that town. In 
1806 he removed to Grafton, N. H., and continued in the 
practice of his profession till his death, May 19, 1845, aged 
']6. His son, Jas. R. Smiley, is now (1873) a medical practi- 
tioner in North Sutton, N. H. While in Jaffrey he held 
the offices of town-clerk, selectman, and others. 

Robertson Smiley, brother of David, graduated at Dart- 
mouth college in 1798. He studied divinity, and was set- 
tled in Springfield, Vt., Sept. 22, 1801 ; dismissed Oct. 26, 
1827 ; remained in town, and died June 26, 1856, aged 80. 
He married and had several children. Has a son, David, 
who is now (1876) a resident of Springfield, and a daugh- 
ter, Sarah, who married Sawyer, and resides in Alton, 

111. 

Abner Howe, son of Dr. Adonijah Howe, was born in 
Jaffrey, Oct. 14, 1780; graduated at Dartmouth college in 
1801 ; studied medicine with Benj. Rush, at Philadelphia, 
Pa., and Prof. Nathan Smith, m. d.. of Dartmouth college, 
graduating M. B. 1803. He commenced practice at Jaffrey, 
but soon removed to Beverly, Mass., where he died May 18, 
1826, aged 45. He was a man highly esteemed, both as a 
citizen and as a physician. 



COLLEGE GRADUATES. 9I 

Edmund Parker graduated at Dartmouth college in 1803. 
He read law, and began practice at Amherst, 1807; repre- 
sented it in the New Hampshire legislature eleven years, — 
in 1813, 1815, and from 1817 to 1825 ; was its speaker in 
1824; removed to Nashua in 1835 ; became agent of the 
Jackson Manufacturing Company, and afterwards president 
of the Nashua & Lowell Corporation ; represented Nashua 
in the New Hampshire legislature five years ; was also a 
trustee of Dartmouth college from 1828 to 1856, and a 
member of the Constitutional Convention, 1850. He was 
appointed Judge of Probate for the county of Hillsborough 
in 1830. 

William Pope Cutter, son of Nathan and Polly (Pope) 
Cutter, was born June i, 1785, and died at Shoreham, Vt, 
July 8, 181 5, He graduated at Dartmouth college in 1805 ; 
studied medicine, and settled in Shoreham, Vt. ; married 
Prudence Evans, March 24, 1808. 

Henry Thorndike, son of Joseph and Sarah Thorndike, 
was born in Jaffrey, and died in Bromfield, Ohio, March 22, 
183 1, aged 50. He was a graduate of Dartmouth college 
in the class of 1809. He read law with Hon. Caleb Ellis or 
Hon. George Baxter, of Claremont ; practised in Boston 
from 1812 to 1813, then at Fitzwilliam ; removed thence to 
Thorndike ; pursued his profession there, and was also an 
iron-founder. He married Harriet Dustin, daughter of Dr. 
Moody Dustin, of Claremont ; married, 2d, Lucy, daughter 
of John H. Sumner, of Claremont, Aug. 3, 1826. 

William Ainsworth, son of Rev. Laban and Mary (Minot) 
Ainsworth, graduated at Dartmouth college in 181 1. He 
read law with Samuel Dakin at Jaffrey, and Judge Barnes, 
of Tolland, Ct. ; began practice at Jaffrey ; was its repre- 
sentative in the New Hampshire legislature three years, 
and in 1831 removed to New Ipswich, and was cashier of 
the Manufacturers' Bank in that place till his death, June 
14, 1842. Mr. Ainsworth represented the town of New 



92 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Ipswich in the New Hampshire legislature in 1841 and 
1842, and died while attending the session at Concord. 
Mr. Ainsworth was a man whom the people delighted to 
honor. He loved his fellow-citizens ; and in the practice of 
his profession, he did all in his power to prevent litigation. 
He practised not so much for money as for the pleasure and 
happiness of teaching men how to settle their controversies 
without destroying friendship. Modest and unpretending 
in his manners, always exemplary in his conduct, strictly 
honest in his deal, he could not otherwise than secure in a 
high degree the love and respect of his fellow-men. He 
lived beloved and died lamented, and will long be remem- 
bered with love and gratitude by the inhabitants of his 
native town. 

Jonas Cutter, son of John and Abigail (Demery) Cutter, 
was born March 6, 1791, and died at Savannah, Ga., Oct. 7, 
1820. He graduated at Dartmouth college in 181 1 ; studied 
medicine with Dr. Amos Twitchell, of Keene, and Dr. Na- 
than Smith, of Hanover, and at Yale Medical College, grad- 
uating M. D. in 1 8 14; began practice at Meadville, Pa. ; re- 
moved to Litchfield, Ct., and from thence to Savannah, Ga., 
in 181 5, where he was highly esteemed for his medical 
skill. On occasion of a fearful epidemic in Savannah, all 
the physicians save himself left the city. He fell a victim 
to his professional duty. 

Luke Howe, son of Dr. Adonijah and Sarah (Ripley) 
Howe, born March 28, 1787, graduated at Dartmouth col- 
lege in 181 1 ; read law with Samuel Dakin, of Jaffrey, 
Hon. Samuel C. Allen, of New Salem, Mass., and Hon. 
Nathan Dane, of Beverly, Mass. ; began practice in Jaffrey 
in 1814 ; left his profession, and studied medicine at Boston 
and Dartmouth college, graduating m. d. in 1818 ; settled in 
Jaffrey, and became a distinguished physician in that place ; 
president of the New Hampshire Medical Society. He 
published essays on scientific subjects, and introduced 



COLLEGE GRADUATES. 93 

many improvements in surgical instruments. As a citizen, 
he was interested in everything calculated to improve the 
condition of society ; was superintendent of public schools, 
and for many years post-master. 

Joel Parker, a. m., ll. d., son of Hon. Abel and Edith 
(Jewett) Parker, was born at Jaffrey, Jan. 25, 1795 ; gradu- 
ated at Dartmouth college in 181 1. He read law with 
his brother, Hon. Edmund Parker, at Amherst ; went into 
practice at Keene, September, 1815 ; represented the New 
Hampshire legislature in 1824, '25, and '26 ; was afterwards 
associate justice of the Superior Court of New Hampshire, 
Jan. 8, 1833, and chief-justice thereof June 25, 1838 ; was a 
trustee of Dartmouth college from 1843 to i860, and its 
Professor of Medical Jurisprudence from 1S47 to 1857; 
served as chairman of the commissioners to revise the New 
Hampshire laws, in November, 1840 ; was appointed Royall 
Professor of Law at Harvard University, Mass., Nov. 6, 1847. 
Judge Parker has published, exclusive of law reports and 
periodical essays, a charge to a grand jury, including brief 
memoirs of Chief-Justice Richardson, and an oration before 
the Phi Beta Kappa Alpha of New Hampshire, in 1856. He 
married Mary Morse, daughter of Elijah Parker, of Keene, 
Jan. 20, 1848. 

Nehemiah Cutter, son of Joseph and Rachel (Hobert) 
Cutter, graduated at Middlebury college in 18 14, and 
M. D. at Yale in 1817. He commenced practice in 
Pepperell, Mass.; became a distinguished physician, and 
founded a private asylum for the insane, which continued 
in successful operation during his lifetime. In this enter- 
prise he was a pioneer, and his estabhshment was probably 
the first of its kind in this country. 

Dr. Cutter was an active member and a deacon of the 
Orthodox church, taking a deep interest in its prosperity ; 
he took a highly prominent part in the erection of a new 
ecclesiastical edifice. As a patron of education, he con- 



94 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

tributed largely of his own means for the founding and sup- 
port of an academy in Pepperell. Self-possessed on all 
trying occasions, even in temper, social and affable to dis- 
tinction, he acquired a powerful and salutary influence over 
the minds of his patients. His interest in the public wel- 
fare rendered him greatly beloved, and his loss was sincerely 
regretted. 

Levi Spaulding, son of Phineas and Elizabeth (Bailey) 
Spaulding, graduated at Dartmouth college in 1815 ; studied 
divinity at Andover Theological Seminary, graduating in 
1818 ; was ordained as a missionary at Salem, Mass., Nov. 
4, 1818 ; sailed from Boston, June 8, 1819; arrived at Cey- 
lon, East India, Feb. 18, 1820 ; visited the United States in 
1864, and was honored with the degree of s. t. d. by 
Dartmouth college, in 1864. He died June 18, 1873, aged 
82 years. 

Luke Ainsworth Spofford, son of Dea. Eleazer and Mary 
(Flint) Spofford, graduated at Middlebury college in 1816; 
studied divinity at Andover, Mass.; settled in Gilmanton, 
and afterwards in Brentwood, Lancaster, and Atkinson ; was 
afterwards a missionary, and resided in the Western states. 
He died at Rockport, Ind., Sept. 27, 1855. He took a deep 
interest in the cause of Christianity, and labored with much 
zeal in his profession. 

James Howe, son of Dr. Adonijah and Sarah (Ripley) 
Howe, graduated at Dartmouth college in 18 17; taught 
one year at Concord ; studied divinity at Andover, graduat- 
ing in 1821 ; was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
church at Pepperell, Oct. 16, 1822 ; died July 19, 1840, aged 
44. He was highly esteemed by his fellow-citizens, and 
greatly beloved by the church, whose membership, during 
his pastorate, was increased from about seventy to four 
hundred. 

Joseph Fox, son of Jonathan and Sybil (Jackson) Fox, 
graduated at Dartmouth college in 18 18. He was a teach- 



COLLEGE GRADUATES. 95 

er, and a man of much promise. He died at Savannah, Ga., 
Sept. 23, 1820, aged 23. 

Henry Shedd, son of John Haskell and Susanna (White) 
Shedd, fitted for college at New Ipswich academy 1820-22, 
under the instruction of Amasa Edes ; graduated at Dart- 
mouth in 1826. While an undergraduate he taught school 
in the winter season in New Ipswich, Westminster, Mass., 
Hanover, N. H., and Springfield, Mass. ; completed his 
three years course of study in Andover Theological Semi- 
nary in 1829 ; was ordained as a Presbyterian Home Mis- 
sionary in Boston, Sept. 24, 1829. After he was licensed to 
preach by the Presbytery of Newburyport, he assisted Rev. 
N. Bouton, of Concord, N. H., in preaching. May and June, 
1829; settled as a home missionary in Mt. Gilead, Ohio, 
December, 1829; was missionary and pastor in that place, 
in all, twenty years ; was pastor also eight years at Pleasant 
Valley, O., three years at Marysville, O., while supplying a 
number of other churches in connection with the three 
above mentioned. During the last fourteen years he has 
been without pastoral charge, residing in Mt. Gilead, and 
preaching considerably to vacant churches in the vicinity. 

Alvah Spaulding, son of Dea. Abel and Lucy (Pierce) 
Spaulding, fitted for college at Kimball Union Academy, 
Plainfield, N. H. ; graduated at Amherst in 1832; studied 
divinity at Andover ; was settled pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church in Cornish, N. H., remaining there twenty- 
five or thirty years ; he then removed to Wethersfield, Vt., 
and was installed pastor of the Congregational church in 
that place. He died May, 1868, aged 61. He married, 
Nov. 17, 1835, Ambra Tower, of Fitzwilliam, who survives 
him. He was faithful in the discharge of his duty, and was 
much beloved by his congregation. 

Daniel B. Cutter, son of Daniel and Sally (Jones) Cutter, 
fitted for college at Kimball Union Academy, Plainfield ; 
graduated at Dartmouth in 1833 ; studied medicine at Har- 



9^ HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

vard and Yale colleges; graduated m. d. at Yale, 1835 ; 
commenced practice at Ashby, Mass., in 1837; removed to 
Peterborough, N. H., where he has since been engaged in 
the practice of his profession. For the last four or five 
years he has been compiling a history of his native town. 
As a citizen, he has taken a deep interest in the affairs of 
the town ; was for many years superintendent of the pub- 
lic schools, moderator of town-meetings, and representative 
in the state legislature. 

Frederick S. Ainsworth, son of William and Mary M. 
(Stearns) Ainsworth, graduated at Dartmouth college in 
1840 ; studied medicine at Harvard Medical school, grad- 
uating M. D. in 1844; was two years in Paris, France, pur- 
suing the same studies ; began practice in Boston, and is 
now (1873) there ; was for a time Professor of Physiology 
and Pathology in Berkshire Medical school at Pittsfield, 
Mass., and a surgeon and physician in the U. S. service in 
the war of the Rebellion. 

David Chadwick Chamberlin, son of David and Abigail 
(Chadwick) Chamberlin, graduated at Amherst college in 
1840 ; was principal of Mellville academy, and preceptor of 
the high school in Winchendon, Mass. ; represented the 
town of Jaffrey three years in the N. H. legislature. He is 
now engaged in farming in his native town. 

Charles Cutter, son of John and Betsey (Crosby) Cutter, 
was born Feb, 12, 1822; graduated at Dartmouth college in 
1842. He was several years engaged in teaching in Jaffrey 
and Peterborough, and also in South Carolina, in Beaufort 
and Darlington districts; then lived in Jacksonville, Fla., 
studying and teaching horticulture. He is now (1873) a 
proprietor of a public house at Campton, N. H. He mar- 
ried Sarah A., daughter of Joseph and Sarah D. Joslin, of 
Jaffrey. 

William Dutton, son of William and Nabby (Smith) Dut- 
ton, graduated at Brown University, Providence, R. I., 1842 ; 



COLLEGE GRADUATES. 97 

taught in Kalamazoo, Mich., and died 1846, aged 30. He 
was a man of much promise, and highly esteemed. 

Edward Stearns Cutter, son of Daniel and Sally (Jones) 
Cutter, graduated at Dartmouth college, 1844; was princi- 
pal of Peterborough academy, 1844- 1846 ; read law with 
James Walker, Esq., of Peterborough, and Hon. Daniel 
Clark, of Manchester ; began practice at Peterborough in 
1849; removed to Amherst in 1858; became clerk of the 
supreme judicial court for Hillsborough county, and is now 
(1873) a counsellor-at-law in Boston. He was popular as a 
teacher, stood high as a lawyer, and was highly esteemed 
as a citizen. 

John Millot Ellis, son of Seth B. and Lucy (Joslin) Ellis, 
was born in Jaffrey, May 27, 1831 ; graduated at Oberlin 

college in 185 i ; was principal of ; filled 

the chair of Ancient Languages in Mississippi college for 
three years ; studied theology in New York city and Ober- 
lin, completing his course in 1857; ^^^s appointed Professor 
of Greek in Oberlin college, which chair he filled till 1866, 
when he was appointed Professor of Mental Philosophy and 
Rhetoric, which position he now occupies. Soon after 
completing his theological course he was ordained as a min- 
ister, and has preached more or less regularly ever since, 
supplying the pulpit of the Second Congregational church 
in Oberlin for several years, and churches in Cleveland, 
Painesville, and Austinbury for some months, and other 
churches in the vicinity for shorter times. He has been a 
member of the city council, and mayor ; is a member of the 
executive committee of the college. He has written some 
for periodicals, and published occasional addresses. 

Isaac Jones Cutter, son of Daniel and Sally (Jones) Cut- 
ter, graduated at Dartmouth college in 1852 ; read law with 
his brother, E. S. Cutter, of Peterborough, and John Quincy 
Adams Grif^n, of Charlestown, Mass. ; began practice in 
Boston in 1855, where he now lives. 



98 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Samuel Horatio Ellis, son of Seth B. and Lucy (Joslin) 
Ellis, was born in Jaffrey, April 25, 1833 ; graduated at 
Oberlin college in 1853, and died while studying the profes- 
sion of medicine. 

Oliver L. Spaulding, son of Lyman and Susan (Marshall) 
Spaulding, was born in Jaffrey, Aug. 22, 1833 ; graduated 
at Oberlin college in 1855 ; studied law, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1858 ; was elected regent of the State Univer- 
sity of Michigan for six years. In 1862 he was commis- 
sioned captain in the 23d regiment Michigan infantry in 
U. S- service ; he was soon made major, and subsequently 
held the commission of lieut.-colonel and brevet brigadier- 
general. He was mustered out of service July, 1865, and 
commenced the practice of law at St. Johns. In 1866 he 
was elected secretary of state; reelected in 1868. 

Frederick William Bailey, son of Edward and Sarah 
(Hayden) Bailey, graduated at Dartmouth college in 1862 ; 
taught in Richmond in 1862 and 1863 ; read law with 
Wheeler & Faulkner at Keene ; was two terms at the 
Albany Law School ; began practice in Jaffrey ; repre- 
sented the town in the state legislature 1864-5-8-9; was ad- 
mitted to the New York bar May 4, 1865, and to the New 
Hampshire bar in October, 1865 ; began practice at East 
Jaffrey in March, 1866; moved to Keene, and died April 
27, 1870. He was a man of much promise, and no doubt 
would have taken a high stand in his profession. 

Melemas D. Stone graduated at Dartmouth college in 
1870. 

John H. Fox graduated at Dartmouth college, studied 
law, and has opened an office at East Jaffrey. 

List of lawyers and ministers, natives of Jaffrey, not in- 
cluded among the college graduates, who settled in other 
towns : 



LAWYERS, MINISTERS, AND PHYSICIANS. 99 



LAWYERS. 



Robert Gilmore. 

George Gilmore settled in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MINISTERS. 

Adonijah Cutter studied divinity at Bangor Seminary, 
Maine ; settled in Strafford, Vt., Hanover, N. H., and Nel- 
son, where he died July 19, i860. 

Andrew O. Warren studied divinity, and settled in 
McDonough, Upper Lisle, and Southville, N. Y. ; now re- 
sides in Montrose, Pa. 

E. S. Foster studied divinitv with Rev. O. A. Skinner, 

■J 

D. D., of New York ; settled in South Hartford, N. Y., 
Abington, Mass., Cuttingsville and Chester, Vt., Claremont, 
N. H., Middletown, Conn., and Winchester, N. H. 

PHYSICIANS. 

Natives of Jaffrey, not included among the college grad- 
uates, who settled in other places : 

Francis Smiley, son of Dea. William Smiley, studied 
medicine, and settled in Elba, N. Y. ; d. March 23, 1844, 
aged 85. 

Josiah Hale, son of Oliver and Mary (Wilder) Hale, stud- 
ied medicine, and»settled in Brandon, Vt. ; married Rhoda 
Greene. 

Mark Snow, son of Samuel Snow, studied medicine in 
Rochester, N. Y. ; began practice in the state of Ohio. In 
1820 he removed to St. Francisville, La., and, after a resi- 
dence of four years, removed to Jefferson county. Miss. 
In 1827 he removed to Hinde county ; was a pioneer set- 
tler, acquired a very extensive practice, and became a dis- 
tinguished physician. In May, 1844, while at Vicksburg 
for the purpose of obtaining a fresh stock of medicine, be- 
ing weary, he laid down at night-fall on a sofa in the parlor 



100 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

of the hotel and fell asleep. While in that condition he was 
robbed, stabbed in the neck, and thrown from the window. 
The robber made his escape and was never detected. 
The doctor was maimed for life, and was ever after unable 
to endure the fatigue incident to his profession. He died 
May 12, 1866. 

Kimball Frost, son of Benj. and Rachel (Kimball) Frost, 
studied medicine with Dr. David Carter, of Marlborough, 
N. H., and completed his course of study at Dartmouth col- 
lege. To meet the expenses of his education he was from 
time to time engaged in teaching public schools, and took a 
high rank as a teacher. He began practice in Marlborough, 
and after remaining there several years he removed to 
Swanzey. While in Marlborough he was commissioned 
captain of the state militia. In 1834 he removed to Dela- 
ware county, Iowa, and in 1867 to Lincoln, Nebraska, 
where he died Nov. 23, 1870, aged 80. 

Calvin Cutter, son of John and Polly (Batchelder) Cutter, 
studied medicine with Dr. Nehemiah Cutter, of Pepperell, 
Mass., and attended medical lectures at Bowdoin, Dart- 
mouth, and Harvard colleges, and received the degree of m. 
D. at Dartmouth in 1832. He began practice at Rochester, 
N. H. In 1833 he attended a course of lectures in the Uni- 
versity of New York, and the next year settled in Nashua 
and remained there three years. He thefi removed to Do- 
ver, where he practised three years. He then became a 
public lecturer on anatomy, physiology, and hygiene, and 
visited all parts of the United States. In 1847, he published 
a work on physiology, a text-book for schools, which was ex- 
tensively used for that purpose, not only in this country, 
but by the missionaries in Turkey, Syria, and India. In 
1 86 1 he became surgeon of the 21st Massachusetts Infantry, 
and was in service three years, being twice wounded in the 
field. He was a man of enterprise and skill, and one who 
delighted in a life of well-doing. 



PHYSICIANS. lOI 

John Fox, son of Jonathan and Sybil (Jackson) Fox, 
graduated m. d. at Dartmouth college in 1835. [See Gen- 
ealogical Register.] 

Thomas H. Marshall, son of William and Sarah (Cutter) 
Marshall, received his early education in the district schools 
in his native town. After studying two or three terms at 
New Ipswich academy, he commenced the study of medi- 
cine with Dr. Luke Howe, of Jaffrey. He attended medical 
lectures at Bowdoin college, at Dartmouth college, and at 
Harvard University. In 1835 he graduated m. d. at 
Dartmouth college, and began practice in Fitzwilliam. In 
1837 he removed to Mason Village, now Greenville, and 
continued the practise of his profession with marked suc- 
cess till his death, Dec. 16, 1872, aged 66. Dr. Marshall 
was a man highly respected by his fellow-citizens, who hon- 
ored him with official trust. He represented the town in 
the state legislature, and was a member of thfe state senate. 

Orville P. Gilman, son of Daniel and Mary B. (Stickney) 
Gilman, graduated at Dartmouth college in 1837; settled 
in Salem, Vt., and died there in 1863. 

Benoni Cutter, son of John and Polly (Batchelder) Cut- 
ter, studied medicine and graduated at the Medical college 
at Woodstock, Vt., in 1838. He began practice in Webster, 
Me. He was extensively engaged in the business of his pro- 
fession, when his health failed, and he died Sept. 4, 185 1. 
He was a man of much promise, and left a wife and three 
children to mourn his loss. 

Frederick Augustus Cutter, son of Joel and Mary S. 
(Jones) Cutter, studied medicine, and was for many years 
engaged in active practice at Mullica Hill, N.J. He estab- 
lished a wide reputation, and died Dec. 28, 1869, leaving a 
wife and two children. 

Amos S. Adams, son of Thomas and Sarah (Sawtell) 
Adams, studied medicine, and settled in Lynn, Mass. 



102 HISTORY' OF JAFFREY. 

Adonijah Woodbury Howe, son of Dr. Luke and Mary 
(Woodbury) Howe, studied medicine, and graduated m. d. 
at Dartmouth college in 1851 ; began practice at Dunstable, 
Mass., where he now (1876) resides. 

Granville G. Corey, son of David and Betsey (Winship) 
Corey, studied medicine, and graduated m. d. at Dartmouth 
college in 1857, and was successfully engaged at Greenville 
in the practice of his profession till his death, Oct. 19, 1878. 
He was highly respected. 

John Conant Felt, son of John and Hulda (Conant) Felt, 
was a dentist ; settled in Orange, Mass., and died Jan. 28, 
1874. 

RESIDENT LAWYERS OK JAFFREY. 

David Smiley removed to Grafton, N. H., 1806. 
Samuel Dakin came from Mason in 1801 ; removed to 
Utica, N. Y., 1815. 

William Ainsworth removed to New Ipswich, 1831. 
Albert S. Scott removed to Peterborough, and died there. 
Clarence A. Parks removed to Boston, 1874. 

LIST OF PHYSICIANS WHO HAVE PRACTISED IN TOWN. 

Adonijah Howe (Dr.) was born in Brookfield, Mass., and 
came to Jaffrey in 1776, and was the only physician in town, 
with one exception, for a period of over thirty years. Of 
his early history and educational advantages we have but 
little knowledge, but from his success in practice and his 
popularity as a physician, we have no doubt he was well edu- 
cated for that day. He was also a farmer, and one of merit, 
and a man that was much employed in the business trans- 
actions of his day. He was for many years moderator of 
the town-meetings, town-clerk, assessor of taxes, and town 
treasurer. He represented the town in the legislature a 
number of years; was appointed justice of the peace, — 
an office of distinguished honor in those days. 



PHYSICIANS. 103 

Willis Johnson (Dr.) was born in Sturbridge, Mass., Dec. 
21, 1786. He studied medicine with Drs. Carroll, of Wood- 
stock, Ct., and Sethbridge, of South Brimfield, Mass. ; began 
practice in Jaffrey in 1807; removed to Peterborough in 
1809, 3^"*^ Mason in 18 14, where he spent the remainder of 
his life in the practice of his profession. 

Abner Howe, m. d. [See College Graduates.] 

Adonijah Howe, m. b., son of Dr. Adonijah and Sarah 
(Ripley) Howe, studied medicine with his father, attended 
medical lectures at Hanover, and received the degree of 
M. B, in 1812. He began practice in Jaffrey, and contin- 
ued the same till 18 15, when he died. He was a man of 
promise. 

Luke Howe, m. d. [See College Graduates.] 

Darwin C. Perry, m. d., born in Orwell, Vt., April 22, 
1807 ; came to East Jaffrey about 1832 ; removed to Wood- 
stock, Vt., in 1836, and was connected with the medical 
college as a lecturer, when he died Nov. 22, 1837. He was 
a man of talent, and would have been a distinguished phy- 
sician if his life had been spared. 

Amasa Kennie (Dr.) came to Jaffrey soon after the death 
of Dr. Luke Howe in 1841, and remained there in practice 
till 1850, when he removed to Vermont; married; one 
child, Charles E., died Jan. 21, 1845, aged 2 years, 4 months, 
6 days. 

Stephen L. Richardson (Dr.) settled in East Jaffrey as a 
physician about 1836; after a short practice his health 
failed and he left town, and died soon after ; last ta.x, 1841 ; 
married, Sept. 22, 1840, Mary Ann Bullard. 

Roderick R. Perkins (Dr.) was his successor at East 
Jaffrey about 1842 ; after a short time of practice he died, 
Feb. II, 1853, aged 36 years ; married Eliza Smith, daugh- 
ter of Samuel Smith, of Peterborough ; one child, Ida L., 
died Nov. 26, 1862, aged 11 years. 



104 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Dr. Andrew J. Gibson was in town in 1852-3-4. 

Gurley A. Phelps, m. d., a native of Vermont, graduated 
from the Castleton Medical college in 1848. He began 
practice in Hancock, Vt. ; removed to Jaffrey in 1849, 
where he has since remained in the successful practice of 
his profession. He married, April 10, 185 1, Adaliza, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Cutter, Esq., who died June 3, 1852, leaving 
one child, Grace Mina, born April 12, 1852 ; married, second 
wife, Nancy B. Stoughton, of Gill, Mass. ; — three children, 
Charles S., born i860; Mary E., born 1863; William S., 
born 1868. 

Oscar H. Bradley, m. d., was born in Vermont in 1826 ; 
studied medicine with Dr. Amos Twitchell, of Keene ; re- 
ceived the degree of m. d. at Dartmouth college ; settled in 
East Jaffrey about 185 1. He soon acquired an extensive 
practice, and has become a leading physician in this sec- 
tion. He has accumulated in his business a large amount 
of property, and is a prominent man in the town. He 
was an active leader in the railroad enterprise, and is one 
of the directors. He is also a director in the Monadnock 
National Bank, and president of the Monadnock Savings 
Bank. 

DISTINGUISHED MEN. 

Extract from a sermon preached by Rev. Leonard Ten- 

ney, at the funeral of the Rev. Laban Ainsworth, March 20, 

1858: 

The Rev. Laban Ainsworth was born in Woodstock, Conn., 
July 19, I7S7- By his parents he was early consecrated to God 
in Christian baptism. When a mere child, by reason of a 
severe sickness, he lost the use of his right arm. It was ever 
after a weak and withered limb. As he was thus partially 
disabled from prosecuting the ordinary business of active life, 
his parents cheerfully consented to his obtaining a collegiate 
education. Accordingly he was fitted for college ; and, after 
remaining some weeks at Hanover, he entered the sophomore 
class at Dartmouth in 1775. At the end of three years he 
graduated, and then commenced the study of theology. 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. IO5 

It was on Commencement day, in 17S1, that a committee ap- 
pointed by this town met him in Hanover and engaged him to 
preach. Late in the summer of that year, he began to officiate 
in his sacied calling with this people. The First Congrega- 
tional church in Jaffrey was then in its infancy, it having been 
organized May 18, 1780. It is not difficult to understand how 
acceptable he was at this early day to the citizens of the town, 
when we read the expressive language of their official acts. At 
a town-meeting, called December 17, 1781, it was " Voted, to 
hear Mr. Ainsworth longer." " Voted^ to hear Mr. Ainsworth 
till he can conveniently go his journey and then return to this 
town." At another public town-meeting, held April 23, 1782, 
there is this record : " Voted, to hear Mr. Ainsworth upon pro- 
bation, in order to give him a call." At a town-meeting, July 
8, 17S2, " Voted, unanifnously , to concur with the church and 
give Mr. Laban Ainsworth a call to the work of the gospel 
ministry in this town." They pledged him " as a salary, annu- 
ally, £70 as long as he shall be the minister of this town." 
They also proffered him " liberty to visit his friends twice each 
year, of two Sabbaths each time, if he accepts the call that is 
given him." These were the final conditions of the settlement. 
On the loth of December, 1782, an ecclesiastical council was 
convened '' to afford assistance in setting apart " the candidate 
" for the work of the gospel ministry." After hearing the 
parties and examining the candidate, the council adjourned to 
the following day, when, upon reassembling, they proceeded 
with the ordination services. Thus it appears that in these in- 
troductory movements, neither the town nor the candidate was 
in haste. It was not till he had preached here three or four 
months that the hearers took any vote on the question of his 
staying. Nor was it till four months later that they expressed 
a desire that he should remain as a candidate for settlement. 
By this time they were cherishing a desire to retain him, so 
that when he had been with them almost a year, the differing 
sentiments of the people becoming more and more united, they 
were prepared to give him a unanimous call to become their 
pastor. Here is manifest a careful deliberation which gave 
promise of a permanent ministry. Nor was that promise un- 
fulfilled, for he has been the minister of this church more than 
seventy-six years and a half. During nearly half a century he 
was without a ministerial helper ; but since that time three 
young men have been associated with him as colleagues, and 
been dismissed : and now the senior pastor is dismissed, and 
called to his rest. 

Though I have not been summoned before you to-day to pro- 
nounce his eulogy, I should do injustice to my own sense of 

8 



I06 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

duty were I wholly to forbear speaking of his worth. In doing 
it very briefly, I must confine myself principally to what I have 
known of him during the last thirteen years. What impressed 
me first was his peculiarly venerable appearance. He was then 
87 years of age. He had a full, muscular frame, a head slightly 
bald, with snowy white locks hanging over his shoulders, and 
a dress corresponding with his age, yet reminding one of a 
generation for the most part passed away. 

What I next observed was his aftable and courteous man- 
ners. He was graceful in his movements, social in his nature, 
and always ready to make a fit reply to whatever might be 
said. Though he knew well how to utter the language of 
severity, how to administer a just rebuke, how to make a 
keen and sarcastic criticism, yet he greatly excelled in the 
power to please and instruct in the social circle. The gentle- 
ness of his manner of receiving company, of welcoming them 
to the hospitalities of his home, of taking leave of them at their 
departure, is what many of us delight to remember ; and to the 
young minister who labored bv his side during these thirteen 
years, he manifested the kindness of a father, with the forbear- 
ance and courtesy of a constant friend. 

I early noticed, also, his peculiar simplicity and propriety in 
the use of words. He rarely hesitated for a choice of language, 
and the very expression which was wanted came at his call. 
This gave him great abilit}' to amuse, to inform, to impress, or 
to influence the human mind. Nowhere else was this perti- 
nence in the choice of language so observable as in his prayers, 
and conversations on the subject of religion. To this fact my 
attention has often been called by the aged people who long 
waited on his ministry. 

He was evidently a man of intellectual strength and sound 
judgment. Even amid the infirmities of age, there were per- 
ceptible distinct signs of a former greatness. 

It has been gratifying to notice that with the gradual weak- 
ening of his intellectual powers, he has steadily maintained a 
fondness for the doctrines and precepts of God's word. When 
incapable of taking any care of his temporal concerns, he would 
express a sensible opinion in what relates to the kingdom of 
God. And when his intellect became so enfeebled that he 
could not speak connectedly on ordinary topics, he would ofter 
prayer with no wandering or repetition, and impart Christian 
counsel with correctness. And when his memory so failed him 
as to become wholly untrustworthy concerning passing events, 
he would repeat passages of Holy Writ without mistake. 

We have noticed that he was a man remarkably guiltless of 
aftectation himself, and intolerant of it in others. In conversa- 
tion, he rarely alluded to what he had done, or to what he had 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. 10/ 

been. Whatever we learned from him of his personal history 
was the result of a direct effort to call him out. He was no 
egotist, nor was he so much inclined to speak of his own 
thoughts and emotions as would have been agreeable to his 
friends. Hence a stranger, or a visitor for the day, might find 
no direct access to his inner life and experience. Of his indi- 
vidual relation to God he always spoke with much caution. 
He discovered such perfect holiness in his Maker, and so much 
imperfection in himself, that he thought, should he ever be ad- 
mitted into the home of the holy, it would be through the infi- 
nite riches of divine grace, in Jesus Christ. I have seen him 
when lying so ill that both he and ourselves thought his re- 
covery doubtful. On such an occasion I once inquired of him, 
" Is the gospel which you have preached to others now pre- 
cious to you .?" He replied, "It is, and I hope to be saved 
through it." Last June, as the Cheshire County Conference of 
Churches was about to meet in Rindge, I inquired of him what 
message he would like to send to the good people at that 
meeting. After a little thought, he said, " Tell them I am 
going steadily down towards the end, but not without hope." 
We love to remember the tenderness of his affection towards 
his brethren in the ministry, and his strong desire that they 
should maintain in their niinistrations the integrity of divine 
truth. He felt that we were in danger of setting too little value 
on the form of sound words, and of accommodating our style ot 
preaching to the standard of the age rather than to that of the 
Bible. He used to say, — " We want in the pulpit plain, sound 
doctrine, even if men scorn it. It is better than some pleasing 
error that shall lead the soul to ruin." The Bible has been his 
daily companion in the house of his pilgrimage. For years 
that book, in the French language, was the solace of his hours 
of solitude. Whenever it was not in his hand it always lay 
upon the table beside him. And when his eyes grew dim, he 
has felt the need of having members of his family spend hours 
each day in reading to him. During the last two vears we 
have seen increasing evidence that he was approaching the end 
of his earthly course. But on the 19th of July he was able to 
meet us in this house, while we attempted to celebrate his one 
hundredth birthday. Since then, the decay of his faculties has 
been more rapid. His physical strength has failed, and his in- 
tellect become shattered ; and although, in his weakness, he 
durst not confide in the truest and most faithful of his earthly 
attendants, he never, for a solitary moment, lost confidence in 
God. And when his memory became so enfeebled that he 
could not recall the names of his nearest kindred, nor recognize 
the countenances of his most familiar friends, he did not forget 



I08 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

the name of Jesus, nor did he cease to speak of him in the hm- 
guage of afljction. But the close, so long delayed, has at 
length arrived. The last struggle in his warfare is past, the 
last step in his pilgrimage has been taken, the last eftort to keep 
the faith in this world of trial is over. On Wednesday, the 
17th of March, at the age of one hundred years, seven months, 
and twent3'-e;ght days, he turned away from the scenes of his 
earthly conflicts, to take possession of the awards which the 
Lord, the righteous Judge, had prepared for him. His end 
was peace. On the Saturday before his death he led the devo- 
tions of the family in prayer. In this, his final audible petition 
at the throne of grace, he sought a special blessing on himself, 
and on her who has had the particular care of him for many 
years. The day before his decease he signified a desire that 
she should read to him, when he listened with eagerness to the 
90th and 103d Psalms. From that time he remained in a state 
of perfect quietness through the following night, when, at six 
o'clock in the morning, without the least manifestation of pain, 
he fell asleep. 

" Life so sweetly ceased to be, 
He lapsed into eternity." 



ABEL PARKER. 

Hon. Abel Parker, son of Samuel Parker by his second 
wife, Mary (Proctor) Robbins, was born in Westford, Mass., 
March 25, 1753. At the age of fourteen he removed with 
his father to Pepperell, Mass., and was enrolled in 1774 in 
Capt. John Nutting's company of minute men, attached to 
the regiment of Col. William Prescott. On the 19th of 
April the alarm was given that the British troops were 
marching into the country, and Nutting's men were collect- 
ed as soon as possible to oppose them. Parker was plough- 
ing in the field about a mile from the house, and did not re- 
ceive the alarm in season to start with the company, but, on 
hearing it, he left his oxen in the field unyoked, ran home, 
seized his gun and Sunday coat and started upon the run, 
passed the Groton companies, and reached his own at Gro- 
ton ridges. The company was too late to share in the 
glory of that day ; but on arrival at Cambridge, Parker 









■>?•- 



DISTINGUISHED MEN, lOQ 

enlisted in the same company, under Col. Prescott, until 
January following, and was stationed at Cambridge. 

On the evening before the battle of Bunker Hill, a de- 
tachment was ordered to take that place. Parker was not 
included ; but he was so desirous of participating in active 
service that he gave his ration of spirit to a comrade, and 
obtained by exchange a share in the battle, in which he re- 
ceived a severe wound in the leg from a musket-ball, which 
his descendants still possess. The ball passed between the 
bones of the leg without breaking either, and was flattened 
to nearly one half of its original diameter. He remained 
in the fort till orders were given to retreat, when, with the 
aid of two soldiers, he left the field amid a volley of bullets 
which killed a man on each side of him, and one passed 
through his shirt. With the aid of those men he continued 
his retreat till he reached the guard, who refused to let his 
men pass till persuaded of the impossibility of his going 
without aid, when he let one of them accompany him. 

On pursuing his way to Cambridge, he came to a chaise 
in which were two wounded men. He seated himself on 
one of the shafts, and in that way was carried to Cambridge, 
while the soldier who so faithfully assisted him returned. 
It was always a matter of regret that he did not learn the 
names of those men who so faithfully assisted him. In two 
months he recovered from the effects of his wound, served 
the remainder of the time for which he enlisted, and then 
returned to his farm in Pepperell. 

In July, 1776, he enlisted as a sergeant in Capt. Job 
Shattuck's company. Col. Reed's regiment, of Littleton, to 
serve at Ticonderoga. While there he formed one of a party 
for the purpose of storming a British fort at Putman's Point. 
But the British retreated, before their arrival, to Crown 
Point, and from thence to Canada. When his term of ser- 
vice ended he returned to his farm, and married Edith, 
daughter of Jedediah Jewett, of Pepperell, October 14, 
'^717^ — a religious woman, of vigorous intellect and marked 



no HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

character. After his marriage he again enlisted into mili- 
tary service in Rhode Island and New York, and held com- 
missions as ensign and lieutenant. 

On the 5th of May, 1780, he removed to Jaffrey, and set- 
tled on lot 20, range i,at that time an unbroken forest, and 
cleared his farm himself with such assistance as he could 
obtain. He resided on this farm till 1807, when he re- 
moved to the centre of the town, — leaving his son Asa 
the farm, — where he spent the remainder of his days, living 
to the age of 78 years. He was a man tall and stately in 
appearance, dignified in his manners, grave in his deport- 
ment, and had a commanding influence that but few men 
possess. He held many offices of dignity and confidence 
in town and state ; represented the town several years in 
the legislature ; judge of probate twenty years ; sat in the 
convention which adopted the Federal constitution ; voted 
for John Quincy Adams in the electoral college of 1824. 

In 1 81 2 he was appointed post-master, and discharged 
the duties of that office for five years. He was also a re- 
ligious man, and in 1780 made an open profession of his 
faith ; was a life-member of the N. H. Bible Society, N. H. 
Missionary Society, Tract Society, and the Cheshire County 
Bible Society. 

ISAAC PARKER. 

Hon. Isaac Parker was born in Jaffrey, April 14, 1788, 
and died in Boston May 27, 1858. At the age of nearly 15, 
Jan. 31, 1803, he entered the country store of David Page 
and Luke Wheelock, at Jaffrey. After remaining there a 
period of three years, he removed, Aug. 29, 1806, to Middle- 
bury, Vt., still in the employ of the same firm. After the 
death of Mr. Wheelock the business of the store there was 
prosecuted under his immediate supervision until he attain- 
ed his majority in 1809. He was then established in busi- 
ness with Samuel Smith, in Keene. The firm name there 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. Ill 

was Parker & Hugh, his active associate being one Dr. 
Hugh, of Keene. 

The term of Mr. Parker's residence in Keene included the 
three years of the second war with England, and we might 
expect that the son of his father would feel moved by the 
military impulse of the times. Accordingly we find him 
connected with the Keene Light Infantry, an independent 
company, of which he was commissioned captain, June 7, 

1813. 

Sept. 12, 1 8 16, he was commissioned brigade major and 
inspector of the 5th brigade N. H. M. It is said that his 
inspections were rigid and careful beyond precedent. Col. 
Marshall P. Wilder yet remembers that, on his first parade 
as a private soldier. Major Parker inspected the detachment. 

November 17, 18 12, Mr. Parker married Sarah, daughter 
of Rev. Laban Ainsworth and Mary (Minot) Ainsworth, by 
whom he had four sons and four daughters, two of whom 
were born in Keene. 

In 18 1 7 he left Keene, and commenced his business life 
in Boston as a partner with Silas Bullard, under the firm 
name of Bullard & Parker, at 31 Central street, but soon 
withdrew, and, associating with himself Mr. Jonas M. Mel- 
ville, the firm of Isaac Parker & Co. was formed, for the 
transaction of a commission business for the sale of Ameri- 
can goods at 6 Broad street. 

As a clerk with Page & Wheelock Mr. Parker had ob- 
served the first germs of the American manufacturing in- 
terest, and a considerable part of his business at Keene had 
consisted of manufacturing and selling domestic goods. In 
1810 he was present at the starting of the Peterborough 
Factory, of which he was then part owner, and in which he 
retained an interest through life. The embargo and the 
war which succeeded it gave a forced impetus to American 
manufacturing, and many factories which seem now exceed- 
ingly small, but which were then of considerable import- 
ance, sprang into existence. Until the close of the war the 



112 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

demand for the products of these factories was suflficient to 
ensure their ready sale at the works ; but when foreign com- 
petition became possible, more efficient means were required 
to distribute these products. 

The Boston Directory for 1817 contains the names of 
two firms (Samuel Adams & Co. and Oilman Pritchard & 
Co.) described as dealers in American goods ; and that for 
1821, the next of which any copy is extant, contains the 
titles of five firms similarly described, including that of 
Isaac Parker & Co. The concerns that preceded them 
proved quite ephemeral ; but that which Mr. Parker estab- 
lished in 1 8 19, under the style of Isaac Parker & Co., and 
continued as Parker & Blanchard (Abraham W. Blanchard), 
Parker, Blanchard & Wilder (Hon. Marshall P. Wilder), 
Parker, Wilder & Parker (William A. Parker), and Parker, 
Wilder & Co. (Samuel B. Rindge, Ezra Farnsworth, and 
Francis J. Parker), still continues under the latter title the 
business which he founded ; but the amount of the sales of 
one of those earlier years has often been exceeded by 
the business of a single day in the later history of the 
house. To sell by the single piece or " bolt " was the rule 
at the first, the sale of an entire package the exciting ex- 
ception. The space occupied for a salesroom on Broad 
street was not greater than that included by the counting- 
rooms of the present firm. 

Although devoting himself to business interests and fam- 
ily affairs, Mr. Parker did not refuse to bear his part in pub- 
lic duties when summoned to them. He was a member of 
the Common Council of the city of Boston in 1824-5-6, 
again in 1832, and yet again in 1838-9-40, serving on the 
Standing Committee on Finance, and in the last two years 
as chairman on the part of his branch of the Joint Commit- 
tee on the Introduction of Water, — a matter at that time of 
the highest interest in the politics of the city. Jonathan 
Chapman (mayor in 1840) was second on this committee 
in 1839. Mr. Parker served also three years as a repre- 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. II3 

sentative from Boston in the House of Representatives of 
the Massachusetts legislature, 1830-1, 1831-2, and 1842. 
He was a director in several business corporations, one of 
the original trustees of Mt. Auburn cemetery, trustee under 
the mortgage of the Sullivan Railroad in New Hampshire, 
and for the last sixteen years of his life president of the 
Traders' Bank. His death was the result of an accident, by 
which he was thrown from his carriage ; and thus, after a 
brief illness, and without any of that failing in faculties 
which often precedes and clouds the closing years of men's 
lives, he passed from earth into paradise, and is now with 
God. 

The Honorable Marshall P. Wilder, who knew Mr. Par- 
ker from early life, and who was associated with him as a 
partner for more than twenty years, in a note to the present 
writer thus sums up the character of his friend : 

As a merchant and citizen of Boston, the memory of Isaac 
Parker will be cherished by all who knew him. In all the 
relations of life, whether public or private, he had the reputa- 
tion of a high sense of honor and unbending integrity. His 
moral, political, and religious sentiments were matters of fixed 
and controlling convictions. He was always anxious to do 
right and to be just. He was very considerate, conservative, 
and cautious, but having come to a conclusion, he was as im- 
movable as the granite hills of his native state. He was very 
industrious, systematic, and punctual, and dispatched business 
with facility, but never without deliberation. He had at heart 
the best interests of humanity, and was ever ready to bestow 
his influence for the improvement of those around him. He 
was eminently a peace-maker, never having controversies, if 
possible to avoid them, and was anxious to do to others as he 
would have them do to him. Mr. Parker was remarkable for 
the uniformity of his character, and he will long be remem- 
bered in the annals of Boston as one of her distinsuished mer- 
cliants, as one of her pioneers in the traffic in domestic fabrics, 
and as one notable for his integrity, firmness, and good judg- 
ment, — in short, as an enlightened merchant and a Christian 
gentleman. 

F. J. p. 



114 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



LEVI SPAULDING. 



The subject of this sketch, Rev. Levi Spaulding, was born 
in Jaffrey, Aug. 22, 1791. He was one of eleven children. 
His father, Phineas Spaulding, being one of the earliest set- 
tlers in the west part of the town, had originally built a log 
hut, but, at the time Levi was born, had removed from that 
into a frame house, consisting of two rooms and an unfin- 
ished attic. As the boys grew old enough, one half of this 
attic was appropriated to them as a sleeping apartment, and 
many were the jokes emanating therefrom. One particu- 
larly stormy night they tried their powers at rhyming, when 
Levi perpetrated the following, which was received with 
shouts of applause by the rest : 

"The howling blast sweeps o'er the roof 
While I 'm secure within, 
While in the bed I warm my hoof 
And out of bed my chin." 

He was early noted for fearlessness and determination. 
If his mind was made up, it was almost impossible to alter 
his decision or let any obstacle prevent the accomplishment 
of his plans. At the age of five or six, he with his father 
and brother Daniel was in the fields one day, when a young 
colt, that had never been broken either to harness or saddle, 
came near them. His father stood a few minutes rubbing 
the loose hair from the colt, when Levi begged to be put 
upon his back. Not thinking but what he could easily take 
him off, the father complied. No sooner did the colt feel 
the boy's weight upon his back than he sank nearly to the 
ground and coming up with a bound, started on a run round 
the pasture. Nothing daunted, Levi clenched his hand 
into the colt's mane and resolutely held on until he had run 
twice to the bars and back again, a distance of about a 
hundred rods, when, finding he could not throw the boy, he 
came to Mr. Spaulding's side (who stood pale with affright) 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. II 5 

and permitted him to take the child off. When about 
ten or twelve, his father slipped upon the door-rock while 
rolling in a large back-log for the fire, and broke his knee- 
pan. This, of course, disabled him for a long time. Ed- 
ward, the oldest brother who was at home, was at the time 
sheriff for the county, and consequently obliged to be away 
a great many days ; therefore the care of about twenty 
horned cattle, thirty sheep, five or six pigs, with two or 
three horses and colts, devolved upon Levi and his brother 
Daniel, neither over fourteen. In 1808 or 1810 he was 
studying with Rev. John Sabin, of Fitzwilliam, preparatory 
to entering Dartmouth college, which took place about 
181 1 ; he remained there four years, and graduated in 181 5 ; 
he graduated from Andover in 18 18. In May, 18 19, he 
was married to Miss Mary Christie, of Antrim, sister to 
Daniel M. Christie, one of his classmates, and since then 
quite a prominent lawyer in Dover, N. H. "June 8, 1819, 
they embarked on board a vessel bound for Ceylon, where 
they arrived Dec. i, 1819; arrived at Oodooville, June 15, 
1820; Manipay, Aug. 25, 1821 ; Tellipaly, Aug. 25, 1828 ; 
Oodooville, March 8, 1833 ; and commenced the American 
Ceylon Mission, Madura, in India, in the year 1834." In 
August, 1865, he writes, — "By the grace of God the marble 
at Brother Oliver's grave made a missionary of me" (refer- 
ring to an older brother who was drowned while in college 
at Dartmouth). In another letter, dated Jan., 1862, we find 
the following : 

Until Mr. Knight left us in 1S38, I had considered myself a 
simple Tamil preacher. I had even then prepared the Village 
School Book series which were then and since in use. When 
Brother K. left, I was requested to compile a purely Tamil 
Dictionary. This was done in the short space of about three 
years, and published in 1S43. I then worked day and night. 
As soon as that was through the press, I was requested to 
prepare the English and Tamil Dictionary, which I did with 
the same diligence and success. This left the press in 1S43 ; 
and a new edition of this was prepared soon after my return in 
1847, and left the press in 1852. Soon after this I was engaged 



Il6 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

in revising our Tamil Bible. In the mean time I wrote tracts, 
as my preaching tours suggested, now about fifty in all. I 
then, from time to time, prepared the manuscript for a Tamil 
Union Dictionary ; — this is all but two or three sheets through 
the press, and will, I think, be the last great work I shall 
attempt of this kind. I have almost never lost a day by my 
own sickness since I have been in India. My great object is 
to keep unto the end my original consecration, and to live and 
labor and rest with those to whom I was sent by Him who 
called me. 

In May, 1872, he writes to his brother Daniel, — 

I still remember old times, when you and I were students 
under Father vSabins ; when you decided to provide for your- 
self, and I, a poor homespun boy, dreamed of filling Oliver's 
place at college. Had I known the world as now I know it, 
my heart would have failed me. I knew I had not his talent, 
but my love and respect for him stimulated me to try; so I 
worked my way through college. Then the Lord took me up, 
and his command, " Go teach all nations," sent me to Jafiua, 
Ceylon, among a people I had never heard of, a people of a 
strange speech and stranger customs. Idols, though a vanity 
and a lie, were the objects of worship and superstition. Not a 
real Christian native in the land, nor a Christian book, and but 
one or two native women who could read. Here I have been 
ever since 1S19-20 (save the three years when on Mary's ac- 
count I visited America). When I came all our roads and 
highways were either foot-paths, or gutters for the waters to 
run in and off. People were lazy, given to and fond of wick- 
edness and lawsuits, and the revenue was very little. Now 
the mud house is exchanged for stone or brick. Agriculture 
then was neglected, but now old fields are cultivated, and new 
wells dug, and new gardens occupied. Roads checkering the 
whole district are macadamized, so that the bandy wheel runs 
as smoothly as on an iron rail. Most of the men can read, and 
some hundred women have been educated. Now, we have 
dictionaries and a pretty good supply of common-school books, 
and a good stock of Bibles and tracts, with religious reading, 
all in Tamil. Hundreds can speak English, or, more probably, 
thousands. We have well educated native pastors, lawyers, 
doctors, engineers, interpreters, and overseers, besides many 
writers in courts and cutcheries. Now, Daniel, you need not 
think that I have done all this, but I have lived to see it, and 
have taken a part in some of these branches. In all I have 
done, dear Mary has been my right-hand man, both in counsel 
and in work ; has done more and suffered more than I. 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. II 7 

Praised be God for the assurance that tliose who die in the 
Lord are not lost : " their works do follow them." 

They had two children, who were early sent to this coun- 
try to be educated. Their son, Edward M., found a home 
with his uncle on the old farm at Jaffrey, and eventually 
went South as a physician, where he died about the close of 
our War of the Rebellion. Their daughter, Mary Elizabeth, 
was adopted by a Mr. Abbott, and finally married one of the 
Abbott family, who have written so many pleasant histories 
for the young. Many other letters, received from time to 
time, express the same interest in the cause to which he de- 
voted his life and all he had. On the i8th of June, 1873, 
he passed away, and we copy the following from a paper 
printed at Ceylon : 

It only remains that we should say a few words on the clos- 
ing scene. Mr, Hastings writes, — " You will be sorry to hear 
that Mr. Spaulding is no more with us. He died yesterday, 
the iSth, at about 10 130 A. M. He had been confined to his 
room for about two weeks, though he had been gradually fail- 
ing for months. His end was peace. He retained liis faculties 
until about an hour before he breathed his last. His has been 
a wonderful life. For more than fifty-three years lie has been 
laboring as a missionary. During that time he visited Amer- 
ica but once, and was absent about three years. If he had lived 
until August he would have been 83 years of age. Mrs. Spauld- 
ing is sustained in this affliction, is calm and resigned, patient- 
ly waiting for the summons to call her to join him, with whom 
she so long lived and labored, in the heavenly home." " He 
was buried in a coffin that was made of planks, kept by himself 
in his godown, since the year 1842, for the purpose, with his 
initial and date, showing his willingness and readiness to meet 
his Creator." Another correspondent writes, — " The good old 
man passed away with a smile on his face. The coffin was 
borne to the grave by twelve native ministers, and they, as well 
as the large attendance of their Christian countrymen present, 
are not likely to forget venerable Father Spaulding's last 
charge to them, delivered through Mr. Howland on that solemn 
occasion : ' Consecrate everything that is yours to Christ, and 
ask nothing in prayer which you will not devote to Him.' 
Truly, with such words before us, and in the face of the exam- 
ple left by Levi Spaulding, we may feel that ' he, though dead, 



Il8 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

yet speaketh ' to all who may hear of him and his work, no 
less than to his missionary brethren and his adopted country- 
men." 

After his decease his wife resided with the family of Rev. 
E. P. Hastings, Batticotta, until her death, which took place 
Oct. 28, 1874, a little more than a year after that of her ven- 
erable companion. 

Extract from a memoir of Hon. Joel Parker, ll. d., by 
Emory Washburn, Bussey professor in Dane Law School : 

The subject of this notice was born in JaftVey, N. H., whose 
history he commemorated by an address on occasion of the cen- 
tennial celebration of its settlement, in 1873. His birth occur- 
red Jan. 25, 1795- His father was an early settler in that town, 
having removed there from Pepperell, Mass. He was of that 
class of intelligent and independent farmers from whom have 
sprung so many of the leading and influential men of New Eng- 
land. He was himself a leading man in the county in which 
he resided, and, among other places of honor and trust, held 
the office of Ji'f^g^ of Probate for that county. One of his 
sons was a prominent lawyer in Amherst, N. H., and also held 
the office of Judge of Probate in that county. It was in his 
office that his brother Joel read law as a student. 

Joel Parker was graduated at Dartmouth college in iSii, in 
the same class with Chief-Justice Shepley, of Maine. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1S15, and established himself in practice 
of the law in Keene. The rank he early attained in his profes- 
sion may be inferred from his appointment to the bench of the 
Superior Court of New Hampshire in the year 1833. In 183S 
he was promoted to the place of chief-justice of that court, and 
held the office until 1S4S, when he resigned it, and in the same 
year became a professor in the law school of Harvard Univer- 
sity. He resigned this place in 1868, and from that time till 
his death, August 17, 1875, he was actively engaged in the 
management of his own business affairs. These were the only 
offices of importance which he held at any time, except of that 
of a representative for two years in the legislature of New 
Hampshire, and of a commissioner for revising the statutes of 
New Hampshire, and a like service in Massachusetts ; though 
it should be added that he held the professorship of Medical 
Jurisprudence in Dartmouth college from 1845 to 1857, ^"^^^ ^ 
like professorship in the Medical College of New York, and 
gave one or more courses of lectures upon the Constitution in 



DISTINGUISHED MEN. IIQ 

Dartmouth college, and in the Columbian Law School in Wash- 
ington. His official honors, as well as duties, it will be per- 
ceived, were connected almost entirely with law and its admin- 
istration. His Alma Mater conferred upon him the degree of 
LL. D. in 1S37, ^^^^^ Harvard in 184S. He was a member of 
the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 1859 was 
elected a member of tlie Massachusetts Historical Society, 
which he held till his death. 

We have said that his life was a busy one ; and, though he 
left no one considerable work to indicate the extent to which 
he contributed to general literature, or that of the law, the 
number of his publications, if collected, would form several 
good-sized volumes. The number and extent of his judicial 
opinions, while occupying a seat upon the Bench, are in them- 
selves an evidence of his unwearied diligence in the thorough- 
ness of his investigations, and the fulness and clearness with 
which he prepared and published these opinions. Such was 
the case, also, while connected with the law school, as was 
shown by the number of special and occasional lectures upon 
subjects connected with the topics of which he was treating in 
his regular courses, which had assumed more than ordinary 
importance from the circumstances of the times. Several of 
these were afterwards published, and are valuable as able and 
original discussions of the matters of which they treat. So, as 
a member of the Historical Society, his contributions to its 
proceedings were able, interesting, and exact ; always thorough, 
and, as far as possible, exhaustive. 

His thoroughness of investigation rendered him a safe and 
reliable contributor to the resources of local history ; and 
among the last of his contributions to this class of literature 
was the address, of which we have spoken, on the occasion of 
the centennial celebration of his native town, in 1S73, in which 
the freshness and playfulness of forty run through the pages 
which he penned when close upon the confines of fourscore. 
Nor do the publications mentioned embrace all the elaborate 
and well-considered productions of his pen. But they are 
sufficient to justify the qualities of diligence and thoroughness 
which have been ascribed to him, as characteristics of his 
habits of thought and life. A perusal of his published works, 
including his opinions as a judge, would enable one to go 
deeper into the character of his mind than can be done in a 
brief biography, and detect some of the sources of that power 
and efficiency which he brought to bear upon any subject in 
which his judgment and convictions were enlisted. 

As a judge, he listened patiently and courteously, and formed 
his judgments after careful, thorough, and impartial examina- 



120 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

tion of the whole subject before hun. He borrowed no 
opinions upon doubtful matters at second hand, but went ov^er 
the necessary processes of analysis and generalization for 
himself, till he came to a conclusion which satisfied his own 
understanding. And, when he had reached that point, he 
never stopped to ask how it chimed in with the present popu- 
lar sentiment, or the traditional notions of the past. If he 
believed, upon investigating for himself, that these were mis- 
taken, he did not hesitate to say so in terms of unequivocal 
significance. And when, in the performance of an official 
duty, it became necessary to act up to his convictions, it mat- 
tered little with whom or with what power he found himself at 
issue. He had too much self-respect to forget what was due 
to courtesy in the manner and language of a discussion, but it 
was not difficult to understand that he knew no compromise 
with right and duty. 

The numerous opinions which he has left in the published 
volumes of the reports of the court of New Hampshire, many 
of them calling for a high measure of sound learning and pro- 
found analysis, when taken in connection with the uniform 
testimony of the bar of that state, and of those who knew him 
in his judicial capacity, to his fairness and impartiality, leave 
little occasion to enlarge upon his eminent qualifications for 
that office, or the high reputation he earned during the fifteen 
years that he occupied the bench. 

Of his faithfidness and ability as a legal instructor in his 
office of Professor in the Law School, little need be said beyond 
the fact that he brought to it the same habits of diligence, 
careful preparation, and a thorough mastery of his subjects, 
which he had shown as a lawyer and a judge. As new sub- 
jects and questions of interest arose, he gave them the attention 
which their importance deserved, and not only gave his class 
the benefit of his research, but in several instances, as has 
already been stated, embodied his views in a printed form. 
The many hundreds who shared his instruction with that of the 
other teachers in the School, and are now scattered through 
the Union, would, I am confident, pay a willing tribute to his 
learning, his courtesy, and his generous sympathy in whatever 
concerned their progress and their ultimate success in life. 
The relation that has always subsisted between the students 
of that school and its instructors has been that of friendship 
and mutual respect, united to a desire to communicate and 
receive instruction ; and it lost none of its characteristics so 
long as Judge Parker held the office of Royall Professor in that 
institution. And the fruits of his long and active experience 
in the profession could hardly have failed to give an added 



DISTINGUISHED MEN, 121 

value to the learning which he gathered from the books, in 
giving instruction to his pupils. His associates, moreover, in 
the instruction, found him an earnest and interested co-laborer 
in whatever tended to advance the interests of the school. 

Of iiis services as a member of the Historical Society, 
enough appears upon the pages of their Proceedings, and the 
printed volume of their Lowell Lectures, to justify a claim for 
him of having collected and preserved much valuable learning 
and sound philosophical thought. They give unmistakable 
evidence of the same thoroughness of research and preparation, 
and the same clearness of conception and statement, which 
distinguished whatever he undertook or accomplished. 

As a constitutional lawyer, while he did not belong to the 
school of strict constructionists, he had for the Constitution 
itself a profound veneration and respect. And when in the 
conduct of our civil war he saw what he regarded a departure 
from the true construction of that instrument, he did not 
hesitate to point out in their true light what he deemed would 
be the etiect and consequences of such departure. Among the 
subjects to which he devoted time and attention during this 
conflict were those of the Right of Secession, Habeas Corpus, 
and Martial Law, the Case of the Trent, and Liternational 
Law, the Character of the Rebellion, and the Conduct of the 
War ; and upon each of tiiese he has left publications which 
will loner survive the causes and occasion which brought them 
out. They are full and exhaustive upon the subjects of which 
they treat, and deserve a place among the permanent constitu- 
tional literature of the country. 

Among the characteristics of Judge Parker's mind, which 
ought not to be passed unnoticed, was one which could hardly 
have been anticipated, when contemplating him as the cau- 
tious, critical, and exact lawyer and judge ; and that was his 
love of poetry, and his keen relish of the beautiful and tender 
in it, as well as of the heroic and descriptive. He was at home 
in Shakespeare, and had ready at his command a rich store of 
treasured poetical thought, which he had gathered from a 
frequent perusal of some of the choicest English and American 
poets. But it was only among his familiar friends that he 
indulged in any thing like a free use of what he had gathered 
from a department of literature which, apparently, lay outside 
of his ordinary line of thought and duty. 

Somewhat late in life he married Miss Mary M. Parker, a 
daughter of his former partner in business, who with two of 
their children, a son and daughter, survive him. In private 
life, his influence and example were always in a right direc- 
tion. Li his benefactions, he was wise as well as liberal, and 

9 



122 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

many were the sharers in the aid and encouragement which he 
cheerfully bestowed upon such as deserved them. His home 
was to him a place of special and ever-growing attraction ; and 
he manifested his taste, as well as a desire to make it every 
thing that a home should be, by the pains and money which 
he expended upon it. In his intercourse with others he was 
genial, free, and aftable, and could unbend to playfulness and 
familiarity without compromising either dignity or self-respect. 
The cheerfulness and urbanity with which he always greeted 
his friends and associates added much to the pleasure of his 
society as a man of liberal culture and broad experience, and 
marked him out as a man whom it was a privilege to know, 
and one not easy to forget. 

His life was one of protracted usefulness and honor, and 
closed suddenly, at last, without any sensible decay of his 
active powers, or his lively interest in the events which were 
passing around him. And though, as has been said, such a 
biography can have but few salient points of attraction, it is 
eminently fitting that his associates of the Historical Society 
should record this simple tribute to his memory. 



CHAPTER X. 

MILITARY HISTORY— FIRST MILITARY COMPANY— SECOND 
COMPANY— OFFICERS — ROLL OF SOLDIERS - JAFFREY 
AND RINDGE CAVALRY COMPANY— RIFLE COMPANY- 
TRAININGS AND MUSTERS. 

IN the settlement of this country a military organization 
was an unavoidable necessity for mutual protection, not 
only against the native Indian, but in settling many con- 
troversies among themselves. Much has been written and 
said about peace on earth, and in our own days organizations 
have been formed to promote that condition of things, but 
all in vain ; the formation of a well-organized militia is 
found to be the most effectual in securing that desired con- 
dition. 

A military organization was formed in New Hampshire 
previous to 163 1, and was called into service that year. In 
1635 a large amount of military goods was imported for 
military organizations. During the French and Indian 
wars every man became a soldier and every house a garri- 
son. In 171 8 the militia law required all persons from six- 
teen to sixty years of age, except negroes and Indians, to 
perform military service. In 1776 the soldiers were classi- 
fied : the able-bodied men from sixteen to fifty constituted a 
training-band, and those from fifty to sixty-five an alarm 
band ; one for active and continued service, and the other 
for sudden emergencies. The early military laws of New 
Hampshire required every male inhabitant from sixteen to 
sixty years of age to own a musket, bayonet, knapsack, car- 
tridge-box, one pound of powder, twenty bullets, and twelve 



124 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

flints. Every town was required to keep, in readiness for 
use, one barrel of powder, two hundred pounds of lead, and 
three hundred flints, besides spare arms and ammunition 
for those too poor to own them. In the town of Jaffrey, 
previous to the Revolution, there was no military organiza- 
tion. In 1775, after the battle of Lexington, an order was 
received from congress to organize a company ; and on the 
26th of June, that year, at a meeting of the town legally 
warned, a company was organized by the choice of the fol- 
lowing officers : 

Henry Coffeen, Captain. David Hunter, Ensign. 

Roger Gilniore, ist Lieut. Peter Warren, Clerk. 

John Stanley, 2d Lieut. 

This organization remained till 1785, when two compa- 
nies were formed by vote of the town, designated by the 
names of East and West companies, one belonging in the 
east and the other in the west part of the town. Their mil- 
itary coats were faced, one with red and the other with yel- 
low trimmings. This organization continued till 18 14. 
Previous to 1820 we have no military record, and what 
knowledge we have of the commanding officers has been 
obtained from the town record and gravestones. The first 
name on the town record dignified with the title of cap- 
tain was Jonathan Stanley, who warned the first town-meet- 
ing in 1773, before any company in Jaffrey had been formed. 
He was probably commissioned while a resident of Rindge. 

Captains. 1800. Daniel Emery. 

1776. Henry Coffeen. John Joslin. 

1778. Roger Gilmore, iSoi. Edward Perkins. 

1781. Benj. Spaulding. 1803. Josiah Mower. 

1781. William Pope. 1803. John Tilton. 

1782. David Page. 1806. Samuel Dakin. 

1786. Benjamin Prescott. 1806. Moses Cutter. 

1787. Joseph Perkins. Rufus Houghton. 
1790. Joseph Cutter. Eber Lincoln. 
1793. James Stevens. Joseph Cutter, Jr. 
1793. James Gage. 



ROLL OF SOLDIERS. 



125 



Captains, 3d Co., 12th Regt. 

1820. Thomas Dinsmore. 
Isaac Jewell. 
Benj. Lawrence, Jr. 
John M. Maynard. 
Wilder Joslin. 
William Putman. 
Caleb Cutter. 
Orford Capron. 
Luther Cutter. 
Sylvester B. Lawrence. 
George Briant. 



Washington Davis. 
Charles A. Stearns. 
John Frost. 

Lieutenants. 

Nathan Blodgett. 
Aaron Sawtell. 
Daniel French, Jr. 
Charles Cutter. 
Albert Pierce. 
Jona. Page. 
Willard G. Jones. 



A List of the mens Names belonging to the Training Band 
In the town of Jaftrey June ye 14, i784- 



Sarg. Eph"" Whitcomb, 
Sarg. Moses Woster, 
Sarg. Daniel Emory, 
Sarg. Elias Whitney, 
Cor. Jonath Taylor, 
Cor. Nathan Cutter, 
Fif. Vinton Barns, 
Fif. Gauden Davis. 
Jeams Gowing, 
Moses Stickney. 
Barnabas Wood, 
Thomas French, 
Daniel Wight, 
Jeams Hall, 
Benj'^. Frost, 
Elijah Goodale, 
Amos Boynton, 
John Pushee, 
Thomas Fisk, 
Benj. Gowing, 
Will'" McAlister, 
John Butters, 
Abel Parker, 
Jeams Turner, 
Jeams Davidson, 
John Davidson, Jun^ 
Nathan Chamberlin, 
Joseph Chamberlin, 
John Wood, 
Whitcomb Powers, 
Simeon Butters, 
Jeams Haywood, 
John Chamberlin, 
John Davis, Jun'', 



Andrew Davis, 
Will'" Davis, 
Noah Emory, 
Philip Adams, 
Thomas Adams, 
Joseph Bates Jun\ 
Simson Steward, 
John Briant, 
Nehemiah Green, 
Jacob French. 
Jonath Dean, 
Jesse Snow, 
Collens Hathorn, 
Collens Hathorn, Jun^ 
Benja. Jaquith, 
Benja. Jaquith, Jun'', 
Samuel Stanley, 
Hugh Dunlap, 
Jeams Dunlap, 
John Joslen, 
Zebediah Densmore, 
Simeon Burt, 
Paul Fitch. 
Benja Haywood, 
Zacheus Witt, 
Jonath Esterbrooks, 
David Stratton, 
Oliver Gould, 
Jeams Cutter, 
Peter Davis, 
David Eaton, 
George Atridge, 
Jacob Pairce, 
John Hale, 



Samuel Pairce, 
Cotton Whiten, 
Oliver Hale, 
Asa Prieast, 
Abijah Carter, 
Isaac Baley, Jun'", 
Abner Jackman, Jun"", 
David Chad wick. 
Simeon Ingals, 
Bezelel Sayer, Jun'", 
Rufus Sayer, 
Nathaniel Sayer, 
David Lasa, 
Eben'' Jaquith, Jun% 
Samuel Jaquith, 
Eben'" Hathorn, Jun"", 
John Dun, 
Jeames French, 
Samuel Batcheldor, 
Robert Harkness, 
Ezra Stiels, 
Samuel Adams, 
John Bockley, 
Moses Peabody, 
Josiah French, 
Thomas Dutton, 
Joseph Hodg, 
Samuel Emory. Jun'", 
William Emery, 
Thomas Dunshee, 
Thomas Holt, 
Daniel Priest, 
Abraham Roos, 
Simeon Whitcomb, 



126 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Simeon Warrin, 
Ezra Wilder, 
Silas Wilder, 
Thomas Emery, 
Joseph Horton, 
Alpheas Brigham, 
Will'" Marshall, 
Silas Marshall, 
Jonath Stanley, Jun'', 
Sargent Page, 
William Woster, 
Didley Gifen, 
Phineas Spaulding, 
Aaron Rider, 
Moses Rider, 
Peter Nuss, 
Eben'' Ingals, 
Eben'' Thompson, 
John Osgood, Jun"", 
Asa Thompson, 
Jonath. Preast, 
John Whippel, 
Joseph dimming, 
Richard Davis, 
Ezra Turner, 
Samuel Blood, 



Laban Ripley, 
Simeon Nutting, 
David Avery, 
Benj. Dole, 
Moses Stickney, Jun'', 
Samuel Ober, 
Nathaniel Hardy, 
Samuel Jewett, 
Abraham Hadley, 
John Stone, 
David Baley, Jun', 
Nathan Hall, 
Joseph Brooks, 
Isaac Proctor, 
Ephraim Adams, 
Seth Harrington, 
Joseph Cutter, 
Moses Cutter, 
Robert Gilmore, 
Joshua Thorndike, 
Mathew Davis, 
Nathan Boynton, 
Simeon Davis, 
Aaron Taylor, Jun'', 
Solomon Wood, 
Thomas Mower, Jun'', 



Oliver Baley, 
Levi Baley, 
Samuel Swett, 
Jonath" Emory, 
Peter Farmer, 
Thadeus Blodget, 
Jesse Jaquith. 
Barnabas Cutter, 
Jeams Smiley, 
John Henderson, 
Joseph Danford, 
Will"^ Orsgood, 
Eleazer Davis, 
Nath Turner, Jun'', 
Peter Bates, 
Robertson Perkins, 
Nathan Brooks, 
Jeams Hall, Jun"", 
Jacob Baldwin, 
Wright Brigham, 
Benj" Jewett, 
David Jewett, 
Samuel Stiles, 
Peter Beman, 
Jeams Gage. 



JAFFREY AND RINDGE CAVALRY. 

A company of cavalry, the members of which belonged 
to Jaffrey and Rindge, was organized previous to 1795, and 
the following persons were commissioned as captains, be- 
longing to Jaffrey : 



Alpheas Crosby, 
Asa Parker, 
Parker Maynard, 



Samuel Patrick, 
John Stone, 
Abijah Pierce, 



Moses Cutter, 
Calvin J. Parker, 
Reuben Pierce. 



RIFLE COMPANY. 

This company was organized by the consent and agree- 
ment of the officers and inhabitants of the town of Jaffrey, 
during the year 1814. In February of that year the com- 
panies met and made choice of Oliver Warren, Thomas 
Adams, and Edward Bailey, as officers of the ist Rifle 
Company, 12th Regiment. Oliver Warren was chosen 
captain, Thomas Adams lieutenant, and Edward Bailey 



ROLL OF SOLDIERS. 



127 



ensign. Adams and Bailey were afterwards chosen cap- 
tains. From the organization of the company till 1820, no 
formal record of the proceedings of the company has been 
found, therefore the date of the commissions cannot be 
giv^en. From that time a full record has been kept, with the 
dates of their commissions. 

CAPTAINS OF THE RIFLE COMPANY, 182O. 



Feb. 28, 


1820. 


David Chadwick. 


Aug. 


20, 


1839. 


John A. Cutter. 


Sept. 6, 


1824. 


John Milliken. 


June 


5, 


1840. 


John A. Prescott. 


Mar. 16, 


1825. 


John A. Prescott. 


Apr. 


19' 


1842. 


Rufus Haywood. 


Apr. 16, 


1827. 


Abner Bailey, Jr. 


Apr. 


24, 


1843. 


Charles Stevens. 


July 30. 


1830. 


David H. Gilmore. 


Apr. 


20, 


1844. 


James L. Bolster. 


Aug. 30, 


1833- 


Oliver Bailey. 


Apr. 


17. 


1847. 


John Towne. 


April 4, 


1835- 


Gilman Mower. 


Mar. 


30, 


1848. 


Lewis L. Pierce. 


Aug. 4, 


1836. 


Liberty Mower. 


Aug. 


31, 


1848. 


Geo. A. Underwood 


Jan. II, 


1839. 


Charles W. Pierce. 


Feb. 


26, 


1851. 


A. A. Marshall. 



This company had the honor of being considered the best 
drilled one in the I2th Regiment, and was always the first 
on the field muster-days. 

TWELFH REGIMENT. 

The 1 2th Regiment included the towns of Jaffrey, Rindge, 
Fitzwilliam, Troy, Marlborough, Dublin, Roxbury, and Nel- 
son It was one of the best regiments in the state, and was 
usually mustered in the town of Troy. This was done in 
the month of September. The regiment was inspected by 
the regimental inspector, and reviewed by the brigadier- 
general and staff. The following persons, residents of Jaf- 
frey, held the commission of colonel in that regiment : 



Benjamin Prescott, 
Josiah Mower, 
Oliver Prescott, 
Whitcomb French, 
Oliver Bailey, 



COLONELS. 

David H. Gilmore, 
Isaac J. Fox, 
Gilman Mower, 
Calvin J. Parker, 
Charles A. Jewell, 



Charles W. Pierce, 
George Briant, 
Wm. Lebourveau, 
James K. Stanley. 



128 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

LIEUT.-COLONELS. 

John M. Maynard. Caleb Cutter, Sylvester B. Lawrence. 

Abner Bailey, 

The requirements for military service were all citizens, 
except negroes and Indians, between the ages of eighteen 
and forty-five years, to be completely armed and equipped 
at their own expense, and perform military duty without 
pay one half day in the months of May and September, and 
one day for a general muster in some place selected by the 
colonel of the regiment within its limits. The town fur- 
nished rations for that day, or paid each soldier fifty cents. 
On muster-days each soldier was required to furnish him- 
self with twenty-four blank cartridges for a sham fight. 
Trainings and musters were great holidays, and were hailed 
by men and boys with peculiar delight, especially the days 
of general muster. The displays of uniforms, implements 
of war, and the martial music, had their peculiar charms. 
The following poetic effusion, which years ago appeared in 
print, aptly describes an old-fashioned muster: 

INSPECTION GENERAL. 

Ere dawn of day the soldiers come, 
With horn and bugle, fife and drum, 
Bassoons and flutes, clarionettes, 
Harps, tabors, trumpets, and fiageletts. 
Guns, belts, and bayonets, cartouches. 
Canteens and knapsacks, bullet-pouches, 
Spare flints and priming-wire. 
Cannon and cutlass, match and fire, 
Pistol and broadsword, all prepared 
For bloody fight or cautious guard, 
As their superiors directed, 
Armed and equipped, to be inspected, 
With every implement that might 
Be used in sham or rea/ fight. 
And thus accoutred, until eight 
For further orders they must wait ; 
When, lo ! the Adjutant appears 
With warlike brow and powdered ears, 
Huge frizzled whiskers, and a phiz 
Which indicative surely is 
That martial courage is comprest 
Within his abdomen and breast. 



INSPECTION GENERAL. 1 29 

At first his duty Is to see 

The posting of each company 

Conformably to modern rules 

In vogue at military schools, 

Where warlike tactics are or should 

Be to perfection understood. 

Now to be formed to be inspected 

As is by statute late directed : 

In peace or war, for sport or fight. 

The mounted troops must have the right, 

And next to them the cannoniers, 

The light troops next, and grenadiers, 

And then the mighty floodwood force. 

The greencoats on the left, of course. 

And thus the Adjutant had placed ''em. 

Wheeled his way in front and faced 'em, 

Roared out. Present ! when there advanced 

Three horsemen ! Swift their chargers pranced, 

(And whether borrowed, or their own, 

Of little consequence if known, 

Are they but fleet, of carriage gay. 

And bear their burden through the day) 

To whom the courteous Adjutant 

Presented formed the regiment. 

'Twas Col. Shell and Col. Bo7nb 

And Major Morter that had come. 

As law directs, with sword in hand. 

To show their boots and take command. 

To them the troops the whole extent 

From right to left their arms present. 

And thus await the Coloners word 

To shoulder, hook, and handle sword. 

At length, like thunder from the cloud. 

The Colonel sounded long and loud, 

'Tention the Whole ! The whole were still ; 

The mandate came most terrible. 

Next. Shoulder Arms! was heard afar; 

Bright gleamed each implement of war, 

As to the shoulder from Present, 

They moved throughout the Regiment. 

Twas Order, Ground, Take up. and then — 

Attention : Shoulder Arms again. 

With As You Were when a mistake 

He or a soldier chanced to make. 

But who comes dashing down the gap. 

With each a feather in his cap. 

With pistols armed, and swords of steel. 

And spur attached to either heel, 

To prick their steeds to bloodless fray. 

Or speed their flight to get away ? 

Ah ! His, I ween, the Brigadier, 

'Mid smoke and powder, void of fear; 

'Tis he, the General and his suite, 



130 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Come down to number and compute 
Defects in those who are not equipt, 
And have delinquents fined or whipt, 
Review the troops, find fault, or praise, 
Just as they feel on muster-days. 

The Inspector now begins his work. 

To examine pistol, sword, and dirk, 

Peeps into every cartridge-box. 

Sees all their guns and tries their locks, 

A lusty shake gives each canteen, 

(To see what it contains, I mean,) 

Each knapsack's contents knows, and sees 

Each soldier's priming-wire and fuse : 

His duty well performed, and then 

Remounts old Rosinante again. 

When the inspection and review 

In hurly-burly has gone through. 

The General's Aid must bear his thanks 

In marshal word to all the ranks. 

The Aid advanced about a pace, 

In front the soldiers face to face. 

And thus with thundering voice addressed 

The troops, according to request : 

" Brothers in arms ! 'tis not expected. 
Nor has the General directed. 
That I should long harangue to you, 
Here for inspection and review. 
But, merely as good soldiers merit, 
For warlike discipline and spirit. 
Present the General's thanks sincere 
To every fellow-soldier here. 
He 's much delighted to review 
Troops so well disciplined as you. 
Nor doubts that, should a foreign band 
Invade by water, air, or land. 
Or e'en domestic factions rise 
To take the nation by surprise. 
You'd rise indignant, one and all, 
And fight and conquer, run or fall. 
'Twas troops high spirited like you 
Got Boney down at Waterloo." 
He bowed, he closed, his filly wheeled, 
And with the General left the field. 
The soldiers now, through all the ranks, 
With cider, bread, and bullock shanks, 
To brace their stomachs up for fight. 
Are quickly served from left to right. 
And yonder see the bush-walled fort 
Prepared by men for boyish sport : 
Sure that of course must next be took 
'Mid roar of cannon, fire, and smoke. 
The sham begins, which long ago 
You had a history of, you know. 



CHAPTER XI. 

REVOLUTION— WAR OF 1812— MEXICAN WAR— CIVIL WAR. 

SOON after the organization of the town, the controversy 
between Great Britain and her colonies culminated in 
open hostilities. On the 19th of April, 1775, a detachment 
of British troops, under the command of Col. Smith and 
Major Pitcairn, was sent to Concord to destroy some mili- 
tary stores in that place. The alarm was spread far and 
wide, and the people rushed from all sections to the scene 
of action. It did not, however, reach the town of Jaffrey in 
season to enable the inhabitants to be in the conflict. Many 
went, however, and afterwards enlisted into service. John 
Harper, Stephen Adams, Benj. Dole, John Dole, Dudley 
Griffin, Jacob Pierce, and Joseph Wright enlisted in Capt. 
Philip Thomas's company from Rindge, of which John 
Harper was lieutenant. Harper, Pierce, the two Doles, and 
Dudley Griffin were in the battle of Bunker Hill, and met 
with losses for which they were afterwards remunerated. 
Others probably enlisted into other companies, as sixteen 
were reported as being in service at that time. But little 
preparation on the part of the town appears to have been 
made previous to this time. There was no military organi- 
zation, and the town had but recently complied with the 
requirements of the provincial law in procuring a certain 
amount of powder, lead, and flints. 

The first act of the town relating to this controversy on 
record was in September, 1774. In the warrant for a town- 
meeting, Sept. 7, of that year, was the following article : 



132 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

To take into Consideration what is Best to be Done in 
Regard of the Request sent to this town by the Committee of 
Correspondence from Portsmouth in Regard of our Charter 
Privileges. 

The town Choose Mr. Henry Cofteen, Mr. William Smiley, 
Mr. Roger Gilmore to Draw a Covenant to be Signed by all 
who Stand to Maintain the Priveleges of our Charter. Said 
meeting adjourned to the 27"' day Sept Next at one of the 
Clock after Noon. 

No report of the action of that committee has been found 
on record. 

In January, 1775, at a town-meeting called for that pur- 
pose, an article was presented, — 

To See if the town will pass a Vote to Establish Certain 
Votes and by Laws Concluded and Resolved by Committees 
from a Number of towns Within this County assembled at 
Keene on Wednesday the 28"^ Day of December last, and if 
Voted to Choose a Committee to Officiate in vSaid Business 
and chose a Commissioner to attend the Sessions to have the 
above Resolves approved, also To Agree on a Method to Pay 
the Committee and Commissioner for their Service. 

The town Voted to Establish all the by Laws and Resolves 
made by the s*^ meeting and choose Mr. Jona. Stanley John 
Gilmore and Phineas Spaulding Com^® to officiate in sd Busi- 
ness and Daniel Davis Commissioner to attend the Sessions 
s'^ Laws and Resolves approved, also Voted the Cost be paid 
by the town. 

What the by-laws and resolves were does not appear to 
have been publicly made known. In February, same year, 
the town 

Choose a Committee of Inspection agreeable to the articles 
of the Continental Congress, Viz : Henry Coffeen Roger Gil- 
more Daniel Twiss Jethro Bailey and William Turner At 
the same meeting the town Voted to Provide a towns Stock of 
Powder Lead and Flints according to Law. 

May II, the town Voted Capt. Henry Cofleen a Depatie to 
attend the Congress at Exeter. 

This congress was convened for the purpose of assuming 
the government of the state, and to make provision for the 
management of its affairs. It was called the " Provincial 



REVOLUTION. 133 

congress" in distinction from the Continental congress. 
After the organization of this body, the royal governor, John 
Wentworth, prorogued the assembly and left the state. By 
it post-ofifices were established, the inhabitants enumerated, 
number determined allowing a representative, and commit- 
tees of supplies and safety appointed. The town of Jaffrey, 
not having the required number of inhabitants, was not 
again represented except in connection with other towns. 

June 26, 1775, a military company was organized by 
order of congress. 

August 21, the town voted to " bye a towns stock of salt 
for the present year." 

In 1776, at the annual meeting, the following town offi- 
ces were chosen : Alexander McNeill, moderator ; Robert 
Wier, town-clerk ; Robert Wier, Solomon Grout, and Joseph 
Turner, selectmen. Excepting the choice of officers no 
record has been found, consequently the acts of the town 
that year relating to the Revolution are buried in oblivion. 
To this time the terms of enlistment had been three months ; 
it was now changed to three years, or during the war. The 
state of New Hampshire was divided into seventeen regi- 
ments, and a colonel appointed over each regiment, and re- 
quired to furnish his proportion of soldiers. The towns of 
Jaffrey, Rindge, New Ipswich, Peterborough, Temple, Fitz- 
william, Dublin, Marlborough, Stoddard, Packersfield (Nel- 
son), Washington, and Sharon constituted the fourteenth 
regiment. The colonel of this regiment was Enoch Hale, 
of Rindge, appointed Nov. 2, 1775. 

In 1777 New Hampshire was required to raise three regi- 
ments for three years, or during the war. The commanders 
were Joseph Cilley of Nottingham, Nathan Hale of Rindge, 
and Alexander Scammel of Durham, all under the command 
of Brigadier-General Poor ; place of rendezvous, Ticon- 
deroga. 

The town of Jaffrey was required to furnish fourteen 



134 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

men. A town-meeting was held on the 27th of March for 
that purpose, and the town 

Voted one hundred dollars to each man that will List into 
the service for three years viz : 14 men. 

The following persons enlisted per Col. Hale's report. 

Stephen Adams James Reed Thomas Wheelock 

Hart Balch William Redfield James Turner 

John Cox Michael Silk 

John Dole Peter Tozer For one Year 

John Lake Henry Thompson Nathan Fisk 

Francis Mason Isaac Wisson 

In May, Gen. Burgoyne arrived at Quebec with an army 
of over seven thousand men. With an addition of two 
thousand Canadians and Indians, he soon after advanced to 
Crown Point. The country was alarmed ; more men were 
called for ; twelve men were required of the town of Jaffrey 
for immediate service. On the 8th of May, at a meeting 
called for that purpose, the town 

Voted a bounty of four pounds per month, to each man that 
will go Volunteer to the number of twelve men, one half paid 
down. 

At a meeting held on the 15th of the same month, the 
town 

Voted that the IMilitia Officers hire the men required for ser- 
vice not to exceed 100 Dollars to each man or Draft as they 
think proper. 

The most important events of the year 1777 were the cap- 
ture of the army of Burgoyne, and the taking of Philadel- 
phia by the British. 

The capture of Burgoyne led to the acknowledgment of 
the independence of the United States by the French. A 
treaty of alliance was made on the 6th of February, 1778. 

In 1778, February 4, the town chose Daniel Emery, Capt. 
Gilmore, and Jonathan Stanley to be a committee to hire 
soldiers for the army. At the annual meeting Roger Gil- 
more, John Stanley, and Abraham Bailey were chosen 



REVOLUTION. 135 

selectmen, and Daniel Emery, Roger Gilmore, Jonathan 
Stanley, Joseph Bates, and William Turner a committee of 
inspection. 

The military operations this year, of importance, were the 
battle of Monmouth, the expedition to Rhode Island, the 
massacre of Wyoming, and the taking of Savannah by the 
British. 

In 1779, March 25, at the annual meeting, Roger Gil- 
more, Hugh Dunlap, and William Smiley were chosen 
selectmen, and Eleazer Spofford, Joseph Bates, and Daniel 
Emery, committee of safety. 

June 17, William Turner, Adonijah Howe, and Daniel 
Emery were chosen to hire four men, at their discretion, 
for continental service. Five hundred men were required 
of the state ; four was the quota of Jaffrey. 

In August, at a town-meeting, the following article was 
presented : 

To see if the town will Come into some Method to Raise 
four men for Continental Service for one year, and Choose a 
a Com^* for that purpose, and grant Money if found Necessary. 

Voted to Come to an Everage, and chose William Smiley, 
Phineas Spaulding, James Gowing, Eleazer Spofford, and 
Abraham Bailey to bring the town to an Everage. 

The important events of this year were the taking of 
Stony Point by the Americans under Gen. Anthony Wayne, 
the defeat of the Indians by Gen. Sullivan, the burning of 
Portsmouth, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Gosport, Va., by the 
British under Gen. Mathews, and Fairfield, Norwalk, and 
Greenwich, R. I., by Tryon. The British not only acted 
the part of marauders in destroying property, but counter- 
feiters in making money. Spurious bills of their make 
were scattered over the country, which destroyed the value 
of the paper medium. At the close of the year a dollar in 
specie was worth forty in continental bills. It could be 
used to pay debts, but not to buy provisions. Congress 
finally decided to allow them to pass for their market value, 
and they soon become worthless. 



136 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

1780 Annual Meeting 
Eleazer Spoftord, Joseph Bates and James Haywood, select- 
men Daniel Emery Eben"' Spoftord and Roger Gilmore, com*'^ 
of Safte}' 

The paper medium having no longer any practical value, 
the government was obliged to make specie the medium of 
trade, or its equivalent in provisions at certain fixed prices. 

In July, 1780, the following article was presented to the 
town : 

To see what should be the most Proper Method for the Se- 
lectmen to Provide this towns Proportion of Beaf for the army. 

Voted that the Selectmen Provide the towns Proportion of 
Beaf with specie or money and assess the town for the same. 

The year 1780 was one of reverses. South Carolina was 
overrun by the invading armies. In May Charleston sur- 
rendered with the forces under Gen. Lincoln. In Septem- 
ber, Arnold committed treason. 

17S1. Feb. I 

Voted to Choose a Comittee to hire Soldiers. Chose James 
French, Moses Worcester and Zachens Witt, the meeting was 
then adjourned to Next Monday. Then met. Com'^'^ Reported 
No men. Voted, to class the town. Voted, that the selectmen 
class the town to hire Continental Soldiers. Chose William 
Smiley a Com** to assist the selectmen. 

Annual Meeting 

Mar. 29. Daniel Emery, Thomas Mower, William Pope 
Selectmen. Voted to class the town to Hire Continental 
Soldiers. Voted that the assessors class the town according to 
the Precept from Court. Voted that the Classes be immedi- 
ately assessed to hire Continental men by Request and that the 
assessors do it. 

July 13. Voted that the selectmen assess the Inhabitants of 
sd. town a certain sum in silver money or grain equal thereto, 
to Purchase their Qiiota of Beaf for the army. Chose Capt. 
William Pope to Purchis s** Beaf. 

Voted 700. hard Dollars or 700. bushels of Rye to Purchs s** 
Beaf. 

Oct I Voted that the Selectmen Purchis the Rum sent for 
by the General Court for the use of the Continental army the 
best way they can, or get a man to Do. it. 



SOLDIERS OF THE REVOLUTION. 



137 



Voted to appoint two Places to Receive the Grain viz : Jon- 
athan Jevvetts and Eleazer Spotl^brds. 

The most important event during the year 1781 was the 
surrender of Cornwallis. 

Last call for Soldiers. 

1 782, Ap. 23, Art. 2. To see what the town will Do in re- 
gard of Procuring two men for the Continental army sent to 
this town for, by the General Court of the State. 

Voted, that the Selectmen hire one man for the Continental 
Army for three years or During the war. 

This neglect or refusal to furnish the required number 
on the part of the town subjected them to a fine of forty 
pounds, which was afterwards paid by the town in 1791. 

The important event of 1782 was the signing of a formal 
treaty of peace in November, and in 1783, Sept. 3, a defini- 
tive treaty of Versailles, by Adams, Franklin, Jay, and 
Laurens on the part of the Americans, and Oswald on the 
part of the British, by which the thirteen united colonies 
were admitted to^be "Free, Sovereign, and Independent 
States." 



Soldiers of the Revolution, state report 



Ephraim Adams, 
Samuel Adams, 
Thomas Adams, 
George Atrldge, 
Daniel Avery, 
Joseph Bates, 
Jona. Blodgett, 
John Briant, 
Alpheas Brigham, 
Asaph Brigham. 
Joseph Brooks, 
Simeon Burt, 
Joseph Cutter, 
Moses Cutter, 
Nathan Cutter, 
James Cutter, 
John Davidson, 
10 



Mathew Davis, 
Jona. Dean, 
Benj. Dole, 
John Dole; 
Hugh Dunlap, 
Daniel Emery, 
Daniel Emery, Jr., 
James French, Jr., 
Robt. Gilmore, 
John Gilmore, 
Dudley Griffin, 
Jacob Gould, Jr., 
John Hale, 
Lieut. John Harper, 
Daniel Harper, 
Eben'r Hathorn, 
James Haywood, 



EbenV Ingals, 
Benj. Jaquith, 
John Mathews, 
William McAlister, 
Samuel Ober, 
William Osgood, 
Benj. Prescott, 
Moses Peabody, 
Joseph Perkins, 
Jacob Pierce, 
Kendal Pierson, 
William Pope, 
Jona. Priest, 
Asa Priest, 
Oliver Proctor, 
James Reed, 
Abraham Ross, 



138 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Bezaleel Sawyer, 

Jesse Snow, 

Michael Silk, 

William Smiley. Jr., 
d. in service, at Ti- 
conderoga, 1776. 

Phineas Spaulding, 

Benj. Spaulding, 



Jona. Stanley, 
Samuel Stanley, 
James Stevens, 
John Stone, 
Benj. Stone, 
John Taggart, 
Jona. Taylor, 
Peter Tower, 



Lieut. William Turner, 
-Samuel Wier, 
Joseph Wilder, 
Ezra Wilder, 
Ephraim Whitcomb, 
Elias Whitney, 
Cotton Whiton, 
Francis Wright. 



Soldiers of the Revolution not included in the state re- 
port, who settled in town during or after the war : 



Stephen Adams, 
Lieut. Oliver Bacon, 
Isaac Bailey, 
Isaac Bailey, Jr., 
Hart Balch, 
Jacob Baldwin. 
Lieut. Sam'l Buss, 
John Cox, 
Thomas Dutton, 
William Emery, 
Samuel Emery, 
Nathan Fish, 
Thomas Fisk, 



Jonas Gerry, 
Thomas Goff, 
Nathan Hunt, 
John Lake, 

Lieut. Benj. Lawrence, 
Francis Mason. 
Lieut. Abel Parker, 
Whitcomb Powers, 
William Redfield, 
Joseph Robbins, 
Moses Stickney, 
Moses Stickney, 2d, 
Samuel Stickney, 



David Stratton, 
James Turner, 
Henry Thompson, 
Lieut. Jereme Under- 
wood, 
Isaac Wesson, 
Silas Wilder, 
Abel Winship, 
Ithamer Wheelock, 
Thomas Wheelock, 
Jpseph Wright. 



WAR WITH GREAT BRITAIN. 

In 1794 a war was apprehended between England and 
the United States. A controversy had for a long time ex- 
isted between the two nations, in relation to the confisca- 
tion of property belonging to the loyalists during the Revo- 
lutionary War ; the holding possession of forts on the fron- 
tiers by the English ; and their arrogant pretensions in re- 
gard to navigating the sea. Congress passed bills laying an 
embargo for thirty days for erecting fortifications, for rais- 
ing a provisional army, and for organizing the militia. 

In 1795, Jan. 9, at a town-meeting held on that day, an 
article was presented to see what encouragement the town 
will give, in addition to the act of congress, to the soldiers 
now called for, if they should be called into active service. 



SOLDIERS OF THE REBELLION. 1 39 

Voted to give each Soldier, in addition to what Congress 
gives, three pounds per month as wages. 

Voted to give each Soldier two Dollars when he appears 
Completely equiped and produces a Certificate from his com- 
mander to that etlect, to as many as is this towns proportion of 
the eighty thousand men, called for by Congress. 

Soldiers who enlisted : 

Samuel Buss, James Gowing, Samuel Stanley, 

John Coughran, Parker Maynard, John Stewart, 

Nathan Cutter, Josiah Mower, Amos Stickney, 

John Dutton, Edward Perkins, James Turner, 

Charles Davidson, Joseph Perkins, John Whipple. 

Robert Gilmore, Samuel Pierce, 

David Gilmore, Paul Ross, 

In 1795 a treaty was negotiated with Great Britain by 
Mr. Jay, which, against the will of the people, was accepted 
by the senate, and received the signature of the president, 
thus preventing a war for the present. 

WAR OF 18 1 2. 

In 18 1 2, June i8, war was declared against Great Britain 
by the United States. 

On the 14th of September of the same year, a town-meet- 
ing was duly called, and the following was presented for the 
action of the town : 

In order that the sense of the town might be obtained in re- 
gard to the present calamitous war with England, a motion 
was made and seconded, that all those who are against the 
present war, should go to the east side of the broad aisle and 
all those who are in favor of the present war should go to the 
west side of the same aisle. 

The vote was taken pursuant to this motion and the Inhab- 
itants by a great majority moved to the east side of the broad 
aisle, leaving only about ten or twelve on the west side, some 
of whom declared they did not vote at all ; and it was judged 
that nearly or quite two hundred and twenty voters were 
present. 



140 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



William Pope, Eleazer Spofford and 



were chosen 

a Committee to nominate and report three persons who shall 
be a Com^^ of Delegates on the part of this town in a County 
Convention, there to aid and assist in devising and adopting 
such constitutional measures in regard to the perilous situation 
of the Country as shall be deemed expedient. The Com''* of 
Nomination reported the names of Laban Ainsworth, Benj. 
Prescott and Samuel Dakin, who were unanimousl}' chosen 
Delegates for the purpose aforsaid, to whom were added by 
vote, Adonijah Howe, Benj. Kingsbury & W™ Stevens. 

Oct. 15, 1S14. At a town-meeting held on that day it was 
voted that, in addition to the sum allowed by Government to 
the soldiers who have volunteered and gone to Portsmouth, the 
town will mai^e up each ones wages fifteen dollars a month. 
Also voted that there be three hundred Dollars assessed on the 
inhabitants of this town, and collected for the above purpose. 

Soldiers who were in service at Portsmouth. 
Oliver Warren — Captain 



Daniel Adams, 


rec $11.20. 


Robt Goff, 


rec $9.33 


Thomas Chadwick, 


10.69. 


Henry Hapgood, 


16.12, 


David Chaplin, 


11.20. 


Stacy Hodskins, 


16.12, 


Ethan Cutter, 


4.50. 


Moses Hunt, 


16.12 


Isaac Cutter, 


20.78 


Abel Nutting, 


16.12 


Samuel Dutton, 


11.00 


Philip Peak, 


11.29, 


James Eaton, 


11.20. 


Moses Pierce. 


11.20, 


Walter Eaton, 


11.20. 


David Savvtell, 


11.20, 


Austin George 


10.44. 


Samuel Stratton, 


^3A3 



WAR WITH MEXICO, 1 846. 



David Cutter, 



SOLDIERS. 

George F. Cutter. 



CIVIL WAR. 

On the outbreak of the civil war in 1861, and during its 
continuance, the town of Jaffrey responded to the call for 
soldiers, and raised the following bounties : 

Oct. 34, 1861, the town voted to furnish the families of 
volunteers from four to twelve dollars per month during the 
time they were in service. 



SOLDIERS OF THE REBELLION. I4I 

Sept. 13, 1862, the town voted one hundred dollars bounty 
to all nine months men, and also voted to aid the families of 
such as belonged to the town. 

Sept. 18, 1863, the town voted a bounty of three hundred 
dollars to drafted men, or those who furnished substitutes. 

March 8, 1864, the town voted nine months men pay for 
ten months' service. 

June 23, 1864, the town voted three hundred dollars to all 
men who may be drafted into the service of the United States, 
on being accepted. 

March 12, 1865, the town voted to pay any citizen of the 
town the sum of six hundred dollars, who will enlist into the 
service of the United States for one year or more, on being 
accepted. 

The number of men who enlisted, and were in service, 
was 151 ; the number killed in battle, 5 ; number who died 
in service, 23. 

Charles W. Webster, Quartermas- Charles Baker. 

ter 14th Reg. John F. Berry. 

C. Frederick Webster, ist Lieut., Christopher Bartenback, 14th Reg., 

14th Reg., promoted to Quarter- Co. G. 

master. Hiram Bennet, Troop B. 

Spencer L. Bailey, 2d Lieut., 14th John F. Briant, 2d Reg., Co. A. 

Reg. Edmund Brady, 9th Reg., Co. B. 

Charles W. Adams, 2d Reg., Co. James T. Brown, 14th Reg., Co. G. 

A. Samuel L. Bolles, Troop C. 

Lysander A. Adams, 6th Reg., Co. Alonzo Butterfield. 

F. Henry Buckwould, i6th Reg., Co. 

John O. Adams, a marine, died at F. 

Portsmouth. Jacob Buckwould, 14th Reg., Co. 

Ben. Abanton, 9th Reg., Co. L G. 

Warren F. Allen, 6th Reg., Co. F. Charles A. Carter, 14th Reg., Co. 
Henry A. Atherton, 6th Reg., Co. G. 

E. Oscar Eugene Carter, died. 
Calvin Bailey, 6th Reg., Co. F. John Caldwell, 8th Regt., died. 
Spencer L. Bailey, 14th Reg., Co. Daniel M. Colburn, 9th Reg., Co. 

F. L 

Almon W.Bailey, i6th Reg., died. Lysander J. Coudray, i6th Reg., 
Harvey N. Bailey, Troop D. Co. F. 



142 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Edwin R. Cutter, 14th Reg., Co. G. Charles D. Kimball, i6th Reg., Co. 
Edward E. Cutter, 14th Reg., Co. F. 

G. Elisha A. Kingsbury, 6th Reg., 

Gustavus A. Cutter, 14th Reg. Co. E. 

John C. Cummings, i6th Reg., Dexter B. Knowlton, i6th Reg. 

died. Joseph S. Lucy, 6th Reg., Co. F., 

John W. Darling, died. died. 

Frank DeWier. David W. Lacy, i6th Reg., Co. L 

Fred. Donaldson, Troop C. Charles D. Law, 14th Reg., Co. G. 

Charles W. Diamond, 2d Reg., Co. John Leathers, 14th Reg., Co. G. 

C. George F. Lowe, 14th Reg. , Co. G. 

James Dadwell, 6th Reg , Co. E. Andrew Lindsay, i6th Reg., Co. F. 
Morty Downs, loth Reg., Co. K. George H. Long, Troop D. 
James R. Douglass, Troop D. Jerome W. Leighton, 5th Reg., 

Charles D. Emery, 14th Reg., Co. Co. F. 

G. Alvin H. Martin, 14th Reg., Co. 

Charles Farouch, nth Reg., Co. C. G. 
Luther W. Fassett, 1 6th Reg., Co. Charles B. Merrifield, 14th Reg., 

E. Co. G. 

Danvers C. Fassett, Heavy Artil- John McCunn, Troop B. 

lery. Lawrence Montgomery. Troop H. 

Jsel E. Fassett, 14th Reg., Co. E. Henry F. Morse, 14th Reg., Co. G. 
John Flynn, nth Reg., Co. C. Nahum W. Mower, 14th Reg.. Co. 

John Frost, 14th Reg., Co. G. G. 

George Gilmore, 9th Reg. Thomas S. Mower, 14th Reg., Co. 

Wm. T. Gleason, 6th Reg., Co. L G. 
Wm. H. Goodrich, 5th Reg., Co. Barnard Mulligan, Troop A. 

H. Charles H. Nutting, 14th Reg. 

Theodore Hanscomb, 6th Reg., Edward N. Nutting, i6th Reg., 

Co. H., promoted to Captain. Co. F. 

John S. Hartwell, 14th Reg. Jacob Newel. Jr., i6th Reg., Co. 

John H. Hartwell, 2d Reg., Co. A. F. 

John Hecker. Henry C. Osburn, 14th Reg., Co. 

Horace J. Hill, 3d Reg., Co. L G. 

Peter Hogan. James E. Petts, 14th Reg., Co. G. 

William Hoyt, nth Reg., Co. L Samuel Paine, nth Reg., Co. C. 
Andrew Johnson, 9th Reg., Co. K. Albert S. Pierce, 14th Reg. 
Robert Jones, Troop. Henry Pierce. 

Joseph R. Joslin, 2d Reg., Co. H. Gurley A. Phelps, 14th Reg. 
Henry H. Joslin, 2d Reg., Co. H. Joel H. Poole, 14th Reg., Co. G. 
Joseph H. Joslin, 2d Reg., Co. A. John W. Poole, 14th Reg. 
Albert N. Joslin, 5th Reg., Co. F. Ivers E. Pollard, 14th Reg., Co. G. 
John F. Kidder, 6th Reg., Co. E. Levi Pollard, 2d Reg., Co. A. 



SOLDIERS OF THE REBELLION. I43 

Oren D. Prescott, 14th Reg., Co. Charles M. Smith, 14th Reg., Co. 

G. G. 

George P. Preston, 6th Reg., Co. Samuel A. Stratlon, 6th Reg., Co. 

K. F. 

Leonard Rand, 14th Reg., Co. C. Ira Smith, i6th Reg., Co. I. 

Jonas C. Rice, 14th Reg., Co. G. Aaron Smith, 8th Reg. 

Herbert C.Richardson, 14th Reg., Henry Stevens, 6th Reg., Co. C. 

Co. G. Josiah Stebbins, i6th Reg., Co. F. 

George VV. Richardson, 14th Reg., George Steele, 6th Reg., Co. F. 

Co. G. Philip Stedman, 6th Reg., Co. D. 

Darius P. Richardson, 14th Reg., Levi E. Stedman, nth Reg., Co. 

Co. G. D. 

Edmund F. Ritchie, 2d Reg., Co. Elbridge G. Tarbox, 4th Reg., 

A., died. Co. L 

Henry Ritchie, 6th Reg., Co. E., Jackson Taggart, died in prison. 

died. Martin Tehu, Troop C. 

Darius Ritchie, i6th Reg., Co. L Henry A. Thompson, wounded. 

George C. Ritchie, i6th Reg., Joseph S. Thompson, 5th Reg., 

Co. L Co. K. 

Abram Robins. Francis Thompson, 6th Reg., Co. 

William B. Robbins, 9th Reg., F. 

Co. G. Henry A. Turner, 14th Reg., Co. 

Alfred Robbins, 14th Reg., Co. G. G. 

William H. Rolf, 14th Reg., Co. Albert S.Verder, 6th Reg., Co. E. 

G. Charles W. Verder, 14th Reg. 

Benj. Sanford, 6th Reg., Co. D. Sylvanus W. Waters, 6th Reg., 

Charles A. Sargent, nth Reg., Co. K. 

Co. C. Charles Wilson, 7th Reg., Co. D. 
Grenville Shedd, 14th Reg., Co. G. John Wilson, nth Reg., Co. C. 
Leonard E. Spaulding, 14th Reg., Frank Wetherbee, Sharp-shooters. 

Co. G. • George F. Wilbur, Troop B. 

Austin A. Spaulding, 14th Reg., Edwin F. Wheeler, i6th Reg., 

Co. G. Co. F. 

Leander Spaulding. John F. Wheeler, i6th Reg., Co. 

Alfred Spaulding. F. 
Daniel W. Stevens, 6th Reg., Co. F. 
Henry A. Smith, 14th Reg., Co. 

G., died. 

Soldiers in service for other states : 

Clarence S. Bailey, Captain Massachusetts Cavalry. 
Henry H. Cragin, Ohio Volunteers. 
Wm. L. Cutter, Iowa Cavalry. 



144 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Benj. F. Lawrence, Massachusetts Battery. 
Lucius Upton, Massachusetts Battery (died). 
John R. Verder, Connecticut Volunteers. 

Number of soldiers in service, 151. 
Soldiers killed in battle : 

2d Reg., Luther W. Fassett, at Evansport, Va., April 2, 1862. 
6th Reg., Sylvanus C. Waters, at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1864. 
Sharp-shooters, Frank Wetherbee, at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1864. 
2d Reg., Henry Ritchie, at Pegram House, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. 
14th Reg., Charles Carter, at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. 

Number killed in battle, 5. 

Soldiers who died in service. 

8th Reg., Joseph Caldwell, at Thibodeaux, La., 1S62. 

2d Reg., Joel E. Fassett, at Jaffrey. 

2d Reg., Edmund Ritchie, at Philadelphia, Oct. 2, 1862. 

14th Reg., Charles D. Emery, at Washington, Nov. 14, 1863. 

14th Reg., Henry A. Smith, at Poolsville, Md.. Jan. 7, 1863. 

14th Reg., Charles M. Smith, at Poolsville, Md., Jan. 12, 1863. 

i6th Reg., Almond W. Bailey, at New Orleans, June 7. 1863. 

i6th Reg., John C. Cummings, at Mound City, Oct. 23, 1863. 

i6th Reg., John W. Darling, at Butte la Rose, La., May 17, 1863. 

i6th Reg., Jacob Newell, Jr., at Baton Rouge, La., April 15, 1863. 

Cavalry, Hiram Bennet, at Point Lookout, Md., Sept. 11, 1864. 

9th Reg., Daniel M. Colburn, Va., Nov. 29, 1864. 

9th Reg., Charles A. Sargent, at Salisbury, N. C, Oct. 23, 1864. 

14th Reg., Leonard Rand, at Camp Parapet, May 28, 1864. 

Henry H. Cragin, 1864, an Ohio volunteer. 

Cavalry, Jackson Taggart, at Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 21, 1864. 

Grave No. 9,460. 
John Q. Adams, at the Marine Hospital, 186-. 
Lucius Upton, Aug. 7, 1864, — Mass. Battery. 
Sth Reg., Albert N. Jo.slin. 
6th Reg., John F. Kidder, at Alexandria, Va., Nov. 11, 1862. Grave 

No. 425. 
Cavalry, Harvey N. Bailey, at Westford, Mass., March 8, 1865. 
5th Reg., Joseph S. Lacy, at Yorktown, Va., May 11, 1862. 
Oscar Eugene Carter, died. 

Number died of disease, 23. 



CHAPTER XII. 

MILLS, MANUFACTORIES, AND ARTISANS. 

DURING the early settlement of the town a report was 
made to the Masonian Proprietors relating to the set- 
tlers and improvements made, in which two saw-mills and 
one grist-mill are mentioned — one saw-mill on lot 22, range 
5, now owned by O. J. and A. S. Raymond, and the other 
two in what is now called Squantum. In a report of Enoch 
Hale another saw-mill is mentioned on the same stream 
south of the Raymond mill, owned by Thomas Caldwell. 
The mill at Squantum was built by Ephraim Hunt, who 
removed to Rindge, and the mill afterwards had several 
owners, among which were John Eaton, James Cutter, Sewal 
Gould, and others. The mill on lot 22, range 5, was built 
by Thomas Davidson, afterwards owned by David Chamber- 
lin, Upton, and others. 

The next saw- and grist-mill was built by John Borland, 
at what is now East Jaffrey. In 1778 he sold the same to 
Deacon Eleazer Spofford, who was the leading man in that 
business till 181 3, when he sold his farm to Daniel Adams, 
and his mills and water-power to a company, who in 18 14 
built a factory for the purpose of spinning cotton yarn. This 
yarn was made into a cloth by the hand-loom. The other 
mills were, one south of the meeting-house, built by William 
Davidson, and one at the spring village by Abram Bailey. 
On the site of the last mill there was afterwards erected a 
woollen mill by Edward Bailey, which, on being burnt, was 
supplanted by a wooden-ware establishment. 



146 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



For 1833 a saw-mill was also built by John Hodge on a 
stream running from Hodge pond to the Contoocook river. 
It was burnt in 1836, rebuilt, and went into disuse in i860. 
A fulling-mill was built by Josiah Belknap at an early date, 
near the site of the Wm. Davidson mill. He removed to 
Springfield, Vt., about 181 8. A fulling-mill was built at East 
Jaffrey by Joseph Lincoln, and afterwards owned for many 
years by Samuel Foster. It is now used for a knife fac- 
tory, A mill was built by a corporation called the Chesh- 
ire mills, afterwards owned by Alonzo Bascomb, now used 
for the manufacture of paper pulp. On or near the site of 
the first cotton-mill built in Jaffrey, Alonzo Bascom built 
the present large brick mill now owned by White Brothers. 
A starch-mill was built at Squantum, and burnt Jan. 2, 
1839, with Samuel Abbot in it. 

Various kinds of business have been carried on in different 
parts of the town, independent of water-power, as will be 
seen by the following list of individuals engaged in the sev- 
eral operations : 



Axes. 
Jacob Danforth, 
Artemas Lawrence, 
John Saunders, 
John Stone. 

Baker. 
Samuel Batchelder. 

Baskets. 
James French. 

Blacksmiths. 
Daniel Adams, 
Jonas Adams, 
Henry W. Atherton, 
Erastus Benton, 
Samuel Briant, 
John Briant, 
Kendall Briant, 
James Butler, 
Orford Capron, 



David A. Coburn, 
Edward A. Coburn, 
Frank Coburn, 
Aaron Coburn, 
Joel H. Cutter, 
Jacob Danforth, 
John Fife, 
Ira Gardner, 
Benj. Haywood, 
Thomas W. Hale, 
Elijah Hathorn, 
Ebenezer Hathorn, 
Frank Hathorn, 
Collins Hathorn, 
Luther Hemmingway, 
Thomas Holt, 
Elijah Jaquith, 
Eliphalet Johnson, 
Artemas Lawrence, 



Moses Pierce, 
David Priest, 
Abel Pollard, 
John W. Poole, 
John Saunders, 
Joseph Smith, 
Frank Smith, 
Abner Spofford, 
John Stone, 
William Stearns, 
Isaac Whitney. 
Boxes. 
Thomas Annette, 
Daniel Emery, 
Edwin Mann, 
Gilman Mower. 

Bricktnakers. 
John Cutter, 
James George, 



ARTISANS. 



147 



Roger Gilmore, 
Oliver Jewett, 
Abel Shedd, Jr., 
Thomas A. Stevens. 

Broadcloth . 
Edward Bailey, 
William Buckley. 

Brooms. 
William Mower, 
Solomon Rand. 
Brushes. 
Peter Phelps. 

Cabiiiet Makers. 
John Buckley, 
Eber Lincoln, 
Cotton Tufts. 

Carriages . 
Edward Bailey, 
Martin Blodgett, 
Charles Hanscom, 
WiUiam Kimball, 
Nahum W. Mower, 
Jonathan Stanley. 
Carpenters. 
Samuel Adams, 
Thomas Dinsmore, 
William Dutton, 
Seth B. Ellis, 
Jedediah Foster, 
Joseph P. Frost, 
Albert Frost, 
Henry C. French, 
David Gilmore, 
Benj. O. Hale, 
Joseph Hodge, Jr., 
Nath'l N. Laws, 
Samuel Patrick, 
Joel O. Patrick, 
Eliakim Reed, 
Samuel Sanders, 
Vryling D. Shattuck, 
Abel Spaulding, Jr., 
Richard Spaulding, 



Erastus Spaulding, 
Eri Spaulding, 
James Stevens, 
Amos Stickney, 
James Streeter, 
John Towne, 
John Towne, Jr., 
Liberty Towne, 
Sylvester Towne, 
George Towne, 
Levi R. Towne, 
Jereme Underwood, 
John Underwood. 
Carpet Cloth. 
Samuel Foster. 

Cloth Dressers. 
Josiah Belknap, 
Samuel Foster, 
Joseph Lincoln. 

Clock-makers., 
Peter Davis, 
Robinson Perkins. 
Clothes-pins. 
Perkins Biggelow, 
Edward Bailey, 
Hunt, Sawyer & Pres- 
cott. 

Chair-makers. 
Eber Lincoln, 
Paul Nelson. 

Coopers. 
Elbridge Baldwin, 
John E. Baldwin, 
Levi Fisk, 
Adams Fisk, 
Paul Hunt, 
Asa Sawyer, 
Uriah Sawyer, 
William Stevens, 
Abraham Wilkins, 
Jona. Wilkins. 

Comb-maker. 
Levi Johnson. 



Earthen-ware. 
Samuel Dakin & Co. 

Hatters. 
Abel Ames, 
John Ross, 
Joseph Weeks, 
Richard Weeks. 

Hay Rakes. 
Josiah Ingalls. 

Linen Wheels. 
John Coughran. 
Malt. 
Benj. Prescott. 

Painters. 
Nath. Clark, 
Howard C. Hunt, 
Paul Nelson, 
Fred. J. Stevens, 
Frank P. Wellman. 

Potash. 
Samuel Adams, 
Isaac J. & John Fox, 
William Lacy, 
Henry Payson, 
Joseph Thorndike, 
Thorndike & Page. 

Pi inter. 
Salmon Wilder. 

Pmnps. 
James Davis, 
Thomas Frost, 
Lyman K. Farnum, 
Freeborn Raymond. 

Saddlers. 
David Page, 
Simon Warren. 

Shoemakers^ 
Abel Ames, 
John A. Allen, 
Simeon Blanchard, 
Nath. Breed, 
Hiram Borden, 
Samuel Buss, Jr., 



148 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Thaddeus Blodgett, 


Nath. Thomas, 


Gunsmith. 


Nathan Blodgett, 


Christopher C. Tracy, 


John S. Dutton. 


Lewis Carey, 


Daniel Twiss, 


Tat I tiers. 


Josiah Carey, 


John Wright. 


Samuel Foster, ist 


Elijah Carey, 


Shoe -pegs. 


tanner in Jaffrey. 


Luther Cutter, 


Perkins Bigelow. 


1789. John Cutter, 


Caleb Cutter, 


Shingles. 


1 8 18. John Cutter and 


Nath. Cutter, 


Orlando Cragin, 


son, 


David A. Cutter, 


George F. Gilmore, 


1834. Benj. Cutter, 


George Fairbanks, 


Eleazer W. Heath, 


185 1. Julius Cutter, 


Charles Farns worth. 


John Hodge, 


Amos Fortune, lot 17, 


Thomas French, 


Paul Hunt, 


range 6. 


James R. French, 


Rufus Sawyer. 


Thomas Tyler, lot 17, 


Luke French, 


Sleighs. 


range 6. 


J. D. Gibbs, 


Daniel Adams, 


Daniel Gilman. 


Nehemiah Green, 


Parsons Darling, 


Trays. 


Robert Harkness, 


Josiah Ingals. 


John Grout, 


Benj. Lawrence, 


Steelyards. 


Orlando Cragin. 


Moody Lawrence, 


Ebn'r Hathorn, 


Wooden Shovels. 


Almon Mower, 


Hiram Dean. 


John Briant. 


Thomas Perry, 


Potato Starch. 


Wooden Ploughs. 


Asa Jones, 


Oliver and Eldad 


Daniel Adams, 


Joseph Joslin, Jr., 


Prescott, 


Jesse Maynard. 


Geo. W. Richardson, 


Samuel Abbot. 


Watches. 


Laban Rice, 


Stone-maso7is. 


Thomas French, 


Abel Smith, 


James Butler, 


Joseph Haywood, 


James C. Smith. 


Jona. J. Comstock, 


Laban Rice, 


Asa Snow, 


David Gilmore, 


Jonas C. Rice. 


Joseph Snow, 


Joseph Joslin, 




Amos Tenney, 


Oliver Warren. 





CHAPTER XIII. 

MISCELLANY — HOTELS — STORES — POST-OFFICE — MAIL 
STAGE— BANKS— SACRED MUSIC — COMMON — SALE OF 
PUBLIC LANDS— CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION DELE- 
GATES—FIRES. 

PUBLIC houses, for the entertainment of travellers, 
were first known as inns. Alexander McNeil was, by 
tradition, the first inn-keeper in the town of Jaffrey. His 
house was located between the centre of the town and the 
house of Vryling D. Shattuck. The first town-meeting was 
held at the inn of Francis Wright, lot 14, range 8, now the 
residence of Dana S. Jaquith. License to keep tavern was 
granted by the town with the approbation of the selectmen. 
The first license on record was dated Sept. 18, 1792. 

This may certify that M"" Jacob Danforth has our aprobation 
and Liseuce to keep a Tavern in the house he now occupies 
in JaftVey. P"" 

Abel Parker \ Selectmen 

Adonijah Howe > of 
Roger Gilmore ) Jaftrey. 

Danforth tavern was one of the most prominent public 
houses in the town, and is now the only one among the 
early licensed ones in use. Jacob Danforth was the first 
proprietor. He left about 181 1, and David and Elias Pierce 
were his successors. About 18 14 Asa Brigham became 
the owner, and remained such till about 18 19. In 1816, 
Dec. 16, the house was burnt, and in 1817 a new one built. 
The same is now owned by Jonas Cutter. Since Mr, 



150 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

Brigham left, the tavern has been kept by Luke Sweetser, 
Joel O. Patrick, Ethan Cutter, and James Cutter. 

A tavern was kept north of the meeting-house from 1795 
till 1798 or 1799, by Benjamin Cutter, and in 1802-3-4 by 
Joseph Cutter, his brother. 

A tavern was kept by Moody Lawrence and Isaac J. Fox, 
in the house now owned by Asa Nutting. 

The first noted tavern built west of the centre was that 
of Alexander Milliken, near the mountain ; afterwards kept 
by his son John, who left town about 1823. 

In 1796 Capt. John Joslin opened a public house near 
the Monadnock Mineral Spring, and remained its proprie- 
tor till 1805. 

Benj. Prescott (Col.) was a popular tavern-keeper in the 
house where his son Eldad afterwards lived. 

Oliver Prescott built a large brick tavern on lot 22, range 
9, John H. Loring, proprietor. Kendall N. Davis, present 
owner. 

The first tavern at East Jaffrey was kept by Zadoc Chap- 
man about 1824; Abijah Pierce, 1830; N. R. Corning, 
1859, who built the Granite State hotel, afterwards kept by 
Henry B. Wheeler, C. H. Brooks, and John M. Wales, when 
the house was burned. In 1877 the present house was 
erected by Benjamin Pierce ; proprietor, Rodney Brown. 

Many others were licensed, but were kept for only a short 
time, the list of which is as follows : 

David Sherwin, Jona. Fox, Peter Lawrence, 

Joseph Thorndike, Nathan Hunt, John Tilton, 

Levi Raymond, George Barrett, Benj. Kingsbury, 

Charles Davidson, Robinson Perkins, David Jewett, 

Aaron Rider, Samuel Minot, Ens' Gilmore, 

James Mann, Edward Perkins, Isaac Jewell. 

MERCHANTS. 

There is a tradition that the name of the first merchant 
or storekeeper in the town of Jaffrey was Breed. 



I 



t— c 

o 






en 
H 

W 

q 

w 
r 

w 

> 

C/2 







POST-OFFICE. 



151 



The first names on record are Joseph Thorndike and Da- 
vid Sherwin, in 1793. Thorndike was taxed for stock in 
trade, amount, £60 ; — Sherwin, amount, £'^o, that year. 

List of traders from 1793 to 1876, with the years of 
trade. 



Joseph Thorndike, 1793-1805. 
David Sherwin, 1793. 
Levi Raymond, 1794. 
Benjamin Cutter, 1795-97. 
George Barrett, 1799. 
Peter Lawrence, 1800. 
Samuel Minot, 1801. 
Benj. Kingsbury, 1802-1806. 
David Page, 1 803-1 805. 
Daniel Emery, 1806-1807. 
Luke Wheelock, 1806-1807. 
James Henderson, 1807-1809. 
Goodell & Hosmer, 1 808-1 809, — 
(Abishai Goodell, Eben'r Hosmer. 
Francis Fletcher, firm of Fletcher 

& Smith, 1809-1812. 
Jonathan Wheelock, 1810-1812. 
John Gilmore, 1814-15, 1819-24. 
Henry Payson, 1815-1824. 
Asa Brigham, 1816-1818. 
Peter Clark, 1816. 
Amos Tenney, 1817-1822. 
John Milliken, 1818-1820. 
Joel O. Patrick, 1821-1828. 
Caleb Searl, 1823-1827. 
William Lacy & Co., 1827-1834,— 

(Lacy, Cutter & Sweetzer.) 



John Wright, 1826-1835. 

Lacy & Cutter, 1835-1838. 

William Lacy, 1 839-1856. 

Lacy & Son, 1857-1859. 

James Lacy, 1859. 

John M. Maynard & Co., 1827. 

L J. & John Fox, 1828- 1831. 

Hiram Duncan, 1832-1840. 

Mellville & Howe, 1833. 

Charles J. Fox, 1834. 

Jason Moar, 1834-1835. 

Arad Adams, 1836. 

Perkins Biggelow, 1836. 
)Myrick, Smith & Co., 1836-1839. 

Joseph Myrick, 1840. 

Alvah J. Perkins & Co., 1837. 

Peter Upton & Co., 1841-1850. 

Joseph Wilson, 1841-1842. 

Richardson Biggelow, 1842. 

Samuel Smith, 1843-1846. 

Eleazer S. Foster, 1846. 

Foster & Brown, 1 047-1 849. 

Eben'r Upton & Co., 1851-1860. 

Charles H. Powers. 

W. L. Goodnow & Co., 1874. 
- Union Co. 

Joseph T. Biggelow, 1872. 



POST-OFFICE. 

Owing to the fire which burned the Department building 
at Washington, D. C, Dec. 15, 1836, in which the earliest 
books of this office were destroyed, the exact time of the 
establishment of the post-office in Jaffrey cannot be ascer- 
tained. The first quarterly accounts began April i, 1801. 



152 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Peter Lawrence was the first post-master. The ofiEice was 
probably established during the winter of 1801. 

POST-MASTERS. 

Peter Lawrence, rendered accounts, April i, 1801. 
Samuel Dakin, '• " July i, 1802. 

Abel Parker, " " April i. 1812. 

Luke Howe, appointed post-master, Dec. 5, 18 16. 
William Lacy, " " Jan. 24, 1842. 

In 1846, April i, the name of the office was changed to 
Factory Village, and located in that place. 

Alonzo Bascom was appointed post-master, April i, 1846. 

On the 8th of December, Factory Village was changed to 
East Jaffrey. 

Alonzo Bascom, appointed post-master, Dec. 8, 1846. 
Lewis L. Pierce, " " May 8, 1849. 

Ebenezer Upton, " " Dec. 20, 1849. 

Alonzo Bascom, " " April 11, 1853. 

Peter Upton, •' " April 13, 1861. 

The ofiEice at Jaffrey was reestablished Nov. 6, 1846. 

Ethan Cutter was appointed post-master Nov. 6, 1846. 
Gurley A. Phelps, " " July 23, 1861. 

Upton and Phelps are the present incumbents (1880.) 

MAIL STAGE. 

The first mail stage. Dearborn & Emerson, proprietors, 
was established from Boston to VValpole and return once a 
week. The first day it went to New Ipswich, the second 
day to Walpole, and returned to Boston on the two fol- 
lowing days. It was a small coach, drawn by two horses. 
As the business increased more horses and a larger carriage 
were used, till a daily express line was established from Bos- 




< 

<: 

o 

I— t 

< 

o 
o 

Q 

< 

o 



SACRED MUSIC. 153 

ton to Keene. This line of staging did good business till 
the Cheshire Railroad was built, when the line was changed 
from Jaffrey to Winchendon, in a two-horse coach. The 
Monadnock Railroad obviated any further necessity for 
stage-coaches, and the business is done from East Jaffrey 
to the centre of the town in a two-horse wagon. 

BANKS. 

The Monadnock State Bank was incorporated in 1850; 
capital, $50,000. John Conant was chosen president and 
Peter Upton cashier. Directors, John Conant, Benjamin 
Cutter, Jonas M. Mellville, James Scott, Rufus Haywood, 
Samuel Ryan, Jr., Solomon Allen. In 1855, John Fox was 
chosen president, and in 1857, James Scott, of Peter- 
borough. In 1865 the Monadnock National Bank was 
incorporated ; capital, ;$ 100,000. James Scott was chosen 
president ; Peter Upton, cashier. Directors, James Scott, 
Benjamin Cutter, Samuel Ryan, Arad Adams, James L. 
Bolster, Joseph T. Biggelow, John Conant. Benjamin Cut- 
ter was chosen president in 1870. Cashier, Peter Upton. 
Directors, Benjamin Cutter, James Scott, Samuel Ryan, 
Arad Adams, John Fox, Joseph T. Biggelow, John Conant. 

I MONADNOCK SAVINGS BANK. 

3 Incorporated 1869. President, Oscar H.Bradley; treas- 
.. urer, Peter Upton. Amount on deposit (1880), $297,583.88. 

Trustees, Oscar H. Bradley, Benjamin Pierce, James S. 

Lacy, Zebulon Converse, Franklin H. Cutter, George A. 

Underwood, Benjamin L. Baldwin, Charles Cutter, John B. 

Shedd, Charles H. Powers, Joseph T. Biggelow, John Fox, 

Dexter Derby. 

SACRED MUSIC. 

Singing constituted a part of religious worship in the 
early settlement of New England. The Book of Psalms, by 
Henry Ainsworth, in prose and verse, published at Amster- 
dam in 1612, was the one in general use among the Puri- 
II 



154 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

tans. The singing was done by the congregation standing 
and facing the minister. The psalm was first read by him, 
and afterwards repeated, line by line, and sung as read by 
the congregation. The deacon, instead of the minister, 
sometimes read or tuned the psalm ; hence it was called 
" deaconing the psalm." 

In 1778, before the incorporation of the church, or the 
settlement of a minister, the town chose William Smiley 
and David Stanley to read the psalm, and Jonathan Priest, 
Abraham Bailey, and Daniel Stanley to tune the psalm. 

In 1787 the manner of singing was changed. The sing- 
ers were seated in one place by themselves instead of being 
mixed with the congregation. The town at that time 

Voted to Grant the two middle body seats below, men and 
womens side, lor the Singers. 

It also 

Voted to sing a Verse at a time, once in the forenoon and 
once in the afternoon after exercises. 

Voted that Jacob Baldwin assist Eleazer Spofford to tune 
the Psalm, and in his absence or inability to set it. 

In 1 791 the singers were seated in the gallery, by vote of 
the town. 

March i, 1791, the town 

Voted to grant half of the Front Gallery for the Singers and 
take it out of the Senter. 

In 1792, March 6, the town 

Voted to annex the womans seats in the front of the Gallery 
to the Singers Seats. 

In 1802, March 2, the town 

Voted to raise forty dollars towards hiring a singing master 
for the purpose of mstructing schools. 

Voted a committee of three to expend the same ; Chose 
Samuel Dakin, Rulus Houghton, and Cap' Pope Com®*'. 



PUBLIC COMMON. 155 

Rec. of the Selectmen, forty dollars in full for teaching sing- 
ing school for the year 1S03. Samuel Dakin. 

At what time instrumental music was brought into use 
does not appear on record — probably about 1800. The in- 
troduction of those instruments was not at first very favor- 
ably received by the older members of the congregation, but 
time and the influence of the younger portion overruled, 
and at length they became very acceptable. The flute, 
clarionette, bassoon, trombone, and violin were the first that 
came into use, followed by the bass-viol, by some called 
"Dagon," by others the " Lord's fiddle." The early singers, 
as appears in the records, were found among the families of 
the Stanleys, Baileys, and Priests, afterwards the Spoffords, 
Baldwins, and Dakins. Dakin, as it appears by the records, 
was the first teacher of a singing-school in the town. 

PUBLIC COMMON. 

Provision was made by the Masonian Proprietors, in the 
grant of the township, by a reservation of land, for a public 
common on which to build a meeting-house, enclose a pub- 
lic burying-ground, and also a place for military trainings 
and reviews. 

The common or public square included an area of about 
ten acres, measuring about forty rods on each side, situated 
on the north end of lot 12, range 6. On the north central 
part of the lot was the burying-yard, front of which were 
the meeting-house and public common. 

In 1791, Aug. 3, a survey was made, bounds established, 
and a transcript made, by John Gilmore, Roger Gilmore, and 
Samuel Buss, a committee chosen by the town for that pur- 
pose. 

TRANSCRIPT OF THE COMMON. 

We the Subscribers, being appointed a Committee to lay out 
the common in s"^ town, have preceded thus : Beginning at the 
north west corner of the common ; at a stake and stones on the 
west side of the Road in the line between the fifth and sixth 



156 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Range in Lot No. 12, in the sixth Range of Lots in Jaffrey 
aforesaid, from thence South one Deg. west forty rods Pacing 
seven links, to a stake and stones, from thence South eighty one 
Deg. and fift}' min. East, forty rods to a stake and stones ; from 
thence north one Deg. East forty rods to a Stake and Stones in 
the said Vine between the fifth and Sixth Range ; from thence 
north eighty one Deg. and fifty min. West, forty rods and seven 
links to a Stake and Stones being the Bounds first mentioned. 

John Gilmore 



Jaffrey, Aug. 3, 1791. 



Roger Gilmore > Com** 
Samuel Buss } 



PUBLIC COMMON. 




Rev. L. Ainsworth's. 



In 1787 the town voted to sell the land lying east and 
west of the burying-ground, and appointed a committee for 



1 870 




JAFFREY MILLS 

KAST JAFFliEX :Nr.Il. 



— ^: 



WHITE BROTHERS 



PROPRIETORS 



SALE OF PUBLIC LANDS. I57 

that purpose. The lot east was sold to Benj. Cutter ; west 
lot to Dr. Howe. {In 1798 the town voted to sell the land 
west of the county road, at public vendue.) That part of 
the common south of the turnpike was sold afterwards. 

When the" town voted to build the meeting-house on the 
common in 1774, it also voted to pass over an article to see 
in what manner the town will proceed to clear the common 
to set their meeting-house on. The next year the town 
voted to work on the common on the first Monday in May. 

In 1 78 1 the town voted that each highway surveyor, with 
his district, work one day on the common. In 1787 the 
town appointed a committee to let the job of clearing a 
part of the common to the lowest bidder. In 1792 the town 
voted to raise £s^ to finish the common ; and in 1798 the 
town voted that the town should turn out and level the 
common gratis, on the second Wednesday in June, and that 
they should come in the morning. 



SALE OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

In the grant of the township the town received of the 
proprietors six hundred acres of land for certain specified 
purposes, and this land was disposed of at different times 
by vote of the town. 

In 1775, to meet the expense of building a meeting-house, 
the town voted to sell lot 4 in the 6th range, lots 12 and 20 
in the ist range, and lot 14 in the 2d range, and appointed 
a committee for that purpose, with authority to sell at pub- 
lic or private sale. 

In 1778, the town 

Voted to sell to Samuel Adams the land lying east of the 
Common. 

In 1783, the town 

Voted to sell four acres for j£3o L. M. to Rev. Laban Ains- 
worth, on which to build a dwelling-house. 



158 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

In 1787, the town 

Voted to sell lot 16 range 3 lot 13 range i and that part of 
the common which lies on the east and west sides of the bury- 
ing ground. 

In 1798, the town 

Voted to sell that piece of common land at Capt. Adams old 
potash at public vendue. 

In 1808, the town 

Voted one half of an acre to Levi Johnson it being a part of 
the ministerial land. 

In 1833 a committee was appointed to sell the public 
lands belonging to the town, and use the proceeds of the 
sale in purchasing a farm on which to support the poor. 

The proceeds of the sale per report of Com^'^ was $2381.17. 
A farm was purchased of Capt. Samuel Patrick for which the 
town paid $2291.53. 

{Oliver Prescott 
John Conant Co 
Edward Spaulding 



j-jjce 



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. 

During the Revolutionary war, a convention of delegates 
from the several towns was held at Concord, for the purpose 
of forming a plan of government. 

In 1778, April 20, Phineas Spaulding was chosen a dele- 
gate to a convention to be holden at Concord for that pur- 
pose. 

In 1779, Sept. 7, the town 

Voted that mr. Phineas Spaulding should sit as a member 
in the convention to be holden at Concord on Wednesday the 
22 of September instant. 

In 1781, May 28, 

Voted to send one man to Convention to joyn in forming a 
New Plan or System of Government. 

Voted that mr William Smiley be the man, also in Nov. 
same year he was again elected. 



BUILDINGS BURNED BY LIGHTNING. 159 

In 1788, January 14, the town 

Voted to send a man to the Convention to approve or disap- 
prove of the Federal Constitution. 
Chose Lieut. Abel Parker. 

In 1 79 1, August 8, the town 

Voted to send a man to set in convention. 
Chose Roger Gilmore Esq. 

In 1S50, Nehemiah Adams, delegate. 
In 1S76, Benjamin Pierce. 

Sept. 7, 1779, Voted to Reject the plan of government. 
35 for rejection no one for it. 

Sept. 15'^ 1783. 24 men voted to establish the last Plan of 
Government and one against it. 

In 1793 Aug. 37 twenty voted against the amendments of 
the state Constitution and four for it. 

In 1S51, March 11, the vote of the town for amendment was 
a majority for the ist 7th Sth 9th 14th 15th articles of amend- 
ment. 



BUILDINGS DESTROYED BY FIRE. 

House of Rev. Laban Ainsworth, burned Feb. 13, 1788. 

House of John Butters, on lot 20, range 4, burned Jan. 7, 
1794. 

School-house in district No. 5, burned in 1793. 

School-house in district No. 9. 

Asa Brigham's tavern-stand, burned Dec. 16, 1816. 

Store of David Page. 

House of David Cutter, near Monadnock Mineral Spring, 
burned 1823. 

House on the town farm, burned 1825. 

John Milliken's store, lot 5, range 4. 

Bailey's mills, lot 7, range 5. 

John Stone's blacksmith shop, lot 8, range 6. 

Cheshire Factory, burned 1828. 

House of David Corey, in school-district No. 11. 

John Cutter's house, school-district No. 6. 



i6o 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Caleb Cutter's, school-district No. ii. 
Starch factory, burned Jan. 2, 1839. 
James Henderson's, school-district No. 7. 
Mountain House, burned Oct. 6, 1866. 
Granite State Hotel, burned March 25, 1875, East Jaffrey. 
National Bank, " 

Second National Bank, " 

House of Rebecca Bacon, burned March 25, 1875. 
Bradley & Co.'s stocking-mill. East Jaffrey. 
Gilman Mower's shop, " 

Hanscomb's paint shop, " 

A barn on the Roger Brigham farm. 

A saw-mill owned by John Hodge, burned 1836, in dis- 
trict No. 3. 

BUILDINGS BURNED BY LIGHTNING. 

A barn of Abel Cutter's, district No. 10. 

A barn of David Corey's, district No. 11. 

A barn of Joseph Hodge's, district No. 3. 

A barn of Edward Spaulding's, district No. 5. 

Two barns on the farm formerly owned by Asa Baker. 



CHAPTER XIV. 



INVOICE, 1793, FIRST ONE RECORDED— MONEY RAISED- 
HIGHEST TAX-PAYERS. 



T 1ST of tax-payers in 1793, the earliest on record : 





£s.d. 




^s.d. 


Thomas Adams, 


2-18- 8 


Samuel Briant, 


I- 8- 


Daniel Adams, 


0- 4- 


Alpheas Brigham, 


2-16- 8 


Samuel Adams, 


i-ii- 


Joseph Brooks, 


2- 6- 


Silas Adams, 


I- I- 9 


John Buckley, 


0-19- 


Jonas Adams, 


I- 9- 


Simeon Bullard, 


0- 7- 6 


Joseph Adams, 


0-12- 


Moses Burpee, 


1-18- 4 


Daniel Avery, 


o-io- 


Ebenezer Burpee, 


0-18- 4 


Oliver Bacon, 


1-14- 2 


Samuel Buss, 


2- 7- 6 


Oliver Bailey, 


1-19-10 


John Butler, 


1-3- 6 


Isaac Bailey, 


0-17- 


Simeon Butters, 


I- 9- 4 


Isaac Bailey, 


I- 4- 2 


John Butters, 


I- 3- 6 


Samuel Bailey, 


0-13- 


Samuel Carey, 


o-io- 


Joseph Bates, 


I- 9- 2 


Josiah Carey, 


I- 5-10 


Peter Bates, 


1-18- 6 


Jonah Carter, 


1-12- 


Jacob Baldwin, 


I- 4- 


Alpheas Crosby, 


I- 7- 2 


Josiah Belknap, 


I- 8- 8 


David Chadwick, 


2- 8-10 


John Billings, 


0- 5- 8 


Josiah Chamberlin, 


o-io- 


Jona. Blodgett, 


1-18- 8 


Aaron Colman, 


I-II- 7 


Jona. Blodgett, Jr., 


0-12- 


John Coughran, 


2- 2- 2 


Thaddeus Blodgett, 


o-io- 


James Coughran, 


0-13- 


Amos Boynton, 


0-17- 4 


William Coughran, 


o-io- 


Moses Boynton, 


0-17- 4 


Joseph Cutter, 


4-12- 4 


Nath. Boynton, 


O-IO- 


Moses Cutter, 


I- I- 8 


Nath. Breed, 


I-I2- 8 


David Cutter, 


I- 4- 3 


John Briant, 


2- 8- 8 


Nathan Cutter, 


0-13- 


Thomas Briant, 


I- 4-10 


John Cutter, 


0-15- 



l62 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 





^s.d. 




;^S. d. 


Jacob Danforth, 


I- O-IO 


Benj. Frost, 


0-12- 10 


John Davidson, 


2- 9- 2 


James Gage, 


2- 3- 2 


Thomas Davidson, 


I- 5-6 


John Gilmore, 


3- 8- 8 


James Davidson, 


0-13- 


Roger Gilmore, 


3-I7-IO 


Charles Davidson, 


I- 9- 3 


Robert Gilmore, 


I- 2- 8 


Thomas Davidson, 


0-15- 8 


David Gilmore, 


O-II- 6 


Andrevir Davis, 


2- O-IO 


Simeon Gilson, 


o-ii- 4 


Richard Davis, 


I- 7- 2 


James Gowing, 


i-ii- 2 


John Davis, Jr., 


I- 4-10 


Azeal Gowing, 


o-ii- 


William Davis, 


o-ii- 6 


Jesse Gould, 


o-io- 


Mathew Davis, 


0-15- 9 


Wid. Mary Gould, 


I- I- 6 


T. Gordon Davis, 


I- 4- 7 


Nehemiah Green, 


1-13- I 


Jona. Dean, 


0-16- 6 


Dudley Griffin, 


3-16- 6 


Hiram Dean, 


o-io- 


Benj. Haywood, 


2-11- 2 


Man' Divol, 


I- O-IO 


Oliver Hale, 


1-12- 7 


Benjamin Dole, 


3-14- 4 


Amos Hale, 


0-17- 


Samuel Douglas, 


1-17- 9 


Abraham Hadley, 


I- 2- 6 


Thomas Dunshee, 


1-9-6 


Robt. Harkness, 


3- 5-6 


Thomas Dutton, 


2-11- 3 


Ebenezer Hathorn, 


1-16- I 


Moses Eames, 


i-ri- 8 


John Harper, 


2-10- 4 


Daniel Eaton, 


0-13- 6 


Samuel Haselton, 


O-IO- 


Daniel Emery, 


I- 5-6 


Joseph Hogg, 


2- 7- 6 


Daniel Emery, Jr., 


1-18- 


James Houghton, 


1-16- 2 


Jonathan Emery, 


I- 7- 6 


Eph. Hartwell, 


0-16-10 


William Emery, 


1-12- I 


Wid. Sarah Hathorn, 


0- 7- 6 


Samuel Emery, 


I- 7- 4 


Joseph Horton, 


i-io- 8 


Noah Emery, 


1-16- 4 


Adonijah Howe, 


1-17- 8 


Asa Evans, 


0- 6- 4 


Nathan Hunt, 


I- 2- 6 


Joshua Eveleth, 


0- 9- 4 


Paul Hunt, 


0- 4- 


Silas Fairbanks, 


o-io- 


Daniel P. Hill, 


2- 0- 8 


John Farley, 


0- 4- 


Daniel Ide, 


0- 9- 4 


Joseph Farnsworth, 


O-IO- 


Josiah Ingals, 


I-IO-IO 


Thomas Fisk, 


2- 9- 6 


Wid. Simeon Ingals, 


0- 9- 2 


Asa Fisk, 


O-IO- 


Ebenezer Jaquith, 


I- 6-10 


Paul Fitch, 


2- 6- 2 


Ebenezer Jaquith, Jr., 


1-0-4 


Moses Flint, 


O-IO- 


Samuel Jaquith, 


I- 4- 4 


Amos Flint, 


I-18- 2 


David Jewett, 


2- I- 


Joseph Fox, 


0- 7- 8 


John Joslin, 


1-16- 


Amos Fortune, 


0- 9- 9 


Capt. Joseph Joslin, 


1-13- 


Thomas French, 


I- I- 2 


Joseph Joslin, 


I- 3- 3 


Daniel French, 


0-19- 8 


John Joslin, 


O-IO- 


John French, 


2- 0- I 


Samuel Joslin, 


1-6-3 



LIST OF TAX-PAYERS. 



163 





^s. d. 




^S.( 


d. 


John Kent, 


I- 0- 


Rufus Sawyer, 


2- 3- 





Samuel Kindle, 


0- 7- 


Samuel Sargent, 


2-19- 





David Lacy, 


I- 4- 2 


David Sherwin, 


I- 8- 





Benj. Lawrence, 


i-io- 6 


(Stock in trade, £30.) 






William Marshall, 


2- 0- 2 


William Smiley, 


2-11-1 


[I 


Samuel Maynard, 


3-15- 6 


James Smiley, 


0-19- 





Jesse Maynard, 


0- 5- 6 


Samuel Snow, 


0-17- 


6 


William McAlister, 


1-15- 


Asa Snow, 


I- 2- 


2 


Amos Merritt, 


I- 4-10 


Joseph Snow, 


O-IO- 





Elijah Miles, 


0-18- 


Eleazer Spofford, 


4-6- 


6 


Alexander Milliken, 


3- 2-6 


Benj. Spaulding, 


2- 9- 


8 


Thomas Mower, 


2- 2- 6 


Reuben Spaulding, 


0-14- 


6 


Josiah Mower, 


I- 7- 2 


Moses Spaulding, 


O-IO- 





Benjamin Nutting, 


1-12- 8 


Phineas Spaulding, 


2-16- 


2 


Amos Noyes, 


I- 0- 6 


Elijah Stanley, 


0- 8- 


8 


Abel Parker, 


1-18- 4 


Wid. Lois Stanley, 


I- I- 


6 


Samuel Parker, 


i-ii- 4 


Wid. Sybil Stanley, 


1-15- 


4 


Asa Parker, 


o-io- 


William Stevens, 


2-11- 





Samuel Patrick, 


2- 5- 


James Stevens, 


2-17- 


2 


Seth Payson, 


0- 6- 4 


Moses Stickney, 


i-ii- 


8 


Joseph Perkins, 


3-14- 


Lemuel Stickney, 


0-16- 


6 


Robinson Perkins, 


I- 4- 2 


Samuel Stickney, 


2- 4- 


6 


Moses Perkins, 


0-16- 


Amos Stickney, 


i-ii- 


6 


Moses Peabody, 


0-19-11 


Simpson Stewart, 


i-ie- 





Daniel Perry, 


I- 7- 


Joseph Stewart, 


1-14- 





Samuel Pierce, 


1-15- 3 


David Stratton, 


0-12- 





Jacob Pierce, 


2- 4-10 


Phineas Tyler, 


i-ii- 


I 


Samuel Phelps, 


I- 6- 8 


Nath. Tyler, 


O-IO- 


I 


Whitcomb Powers, 


0-15-10 


Peter Temple, 


I- s- 





Paul Powers, 


I- 8- 


Joseph Thorndike, 


4-10- 


4 


William Pope, 


3-10- 2 


(Stock in trade, ^60.) 






Benj. Prescott, 


4- 2- 2 


John Taplin, 


O-IO- 





Jona. Priest, 


2- 6- 4 


Asa Thomson, 


0-19- 


8 


Daniel Priest, 


1-13- 


Eben. Thomson, 


I- 7- 


8 


Oliver Proctor, 


1-13- 8 


Jere Towns, 


0- 2- 


4 


John Pushee, 


0-12- 


Wm. Turner, 


2- 5- 


2 


Levi Raymond, 


0-19- 4 


James Turner, 


0-17- 


6 


Jonson Richardson, 


o-io- 


Thomas Turner, 


0-12- 


2 


Aaron Rider, 


4- I- I 


Wid. Mary Turner, 


0-18- 


8 


Abraham Ross, 


2- 8- 


John Turner, 


0- 5- 





Calvin Russell, 


O-IO- 


Daniel Twiss, 


I- 5- 


2 


Samuel Sanders, 


0-19- 6 


Jere Underwood, 


2- 4- 


4 



164 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 





^s. d. 




^s.d. 


John Ware, 


0-13- 4 


Ephraim Whitcomb, 


1-16-10 


Simon Warren, 


1-14- 6 


Wid. Whitcomb, 


I- 3- 2 


Elijah Welman, 


0-15- 8 


John Whipple, 


1-12- 4 


Elijah Wiles, 


1-18- 


Cotton Whiton, 


0-16- 


Joseph Wilder, 


I- 6-10 


John Wood, 


2- 8- 6 


Ezra Wilder, 


1-18- 6 


Moses Worcester, 


2- 8- 2 


Silas Wilder, 


I- 4- 


Wm. Worcester, 


1-13- 8 


Winchester, 


I- 2- 2 


Francis Wright, 


2-10- 4 


Zacheus Witt, 


1-17- 4 







INVOICE, 1793. 



Number 


of polls, 


230 


Acres of 


mowing. 


653 


<( 


horses. 


123 


( ( 


ploughing. 


136 


(( 


cows, 


393 


i k 


pasturing. 


800 


ti 


oxen. 


198 


(( 


wild land. 


5.509 


1 1 


yearlings, 


330 








4 ( 


2 years old, 


309 








<( 


3 years old. 


244 










MONEY RAISED TO PAY TOWN CHARGES. 




1778. 


^50 


1798. 


$250 


1819. 


$650 


1779. 


200 


1799. 


250 


1820. 


800 


1780. 


10,000 


1801. 


350 


1821. 


400 


1781. 


25,000 


1802. 


300 


1822. 


200 


1782. 


300 


1803. 


250 


1823. 


950 


1783- 


300 


1804. 


300 


1824. 


300 


1784. 


100 


1805. 


400 


1825. 


700 


1785. 


30 


1806. 


400 


1826. 


700 


1786. 


30 


1807. 


400 


1827. 


1,161.20 


1787. 


20 


1808. 


400 


1828. 


1,010 


1788. 


40 


1809. 


1,100 


1829. 


809 


1789. 


40 


1810. 


1.339 


1830. 


500.25 


1790. 


40 


1811. 


800 


1831. 


500 


1791. 


40 


1812. 


700 


1832. 


600 


1792. 


50 


1813. 


300 


1833- 


824 


1793- 


60 


1814. 


400 


1834. 


650 


1794. 


150 


1815. 


700 


1835- 


1,100 


1795- 


$300 


1816. 


750 


1836. 


1,000 


1796. 


333 


1817. 


500 


1837. 


600 


1797. 


250 


1818. 


331 


1838. 


200 



HIGHEST TAX-PAYERS. 



165 



1839. 


$800 


1848. 


$1,000 


1857. 


$1,200 


1840. 


600 


1849. 


450 


1858. 


700 


I84I. 


500 


1850. 


300 


1859. 


400 


1842. 


700 


I85I. 


300 


i860. 


800 


1843. 


700 


1852. 


200 


1861. 


800 


1844. 


1,000 


1853. 


200 


1862. 


1,000 


1845. 


900 


1854. 


200 


1863. 


1,000 


1846. 


800 


1855. 


350 


1864. 


1,000 


1847. 


300 


1856. 


1,200 


1865. 


3,520 



The earliest invoice on record in the town of Jaffrey was 
that of 1793. The ten highest tax-payers were as follows: 



1793. 




1800. 






£s.d. 


Joseph Cutter, 


$20.96 


Joseph Cutter, 


4-12- 4 


Benj. Prescott, 


17.71 


Joseph Thorndike, 


4-10- 4 


Eleazer Spofford, 


16.03 


Eleazer Spofiford, 


4- 6- 6 


James Stevens, 


13-63 


Benjamin Prescott, 


4- 2- 2 


Joseph Thorndike, 


13.12 


Aaron Rider, 


4- I- I 


Jona. Fox, 


10.44 


Roger Gihnore, 


3-17-10 


Alexander Milliken, 


10.24 


Dudley Griffin, 


3-16- 6 


John Gilmore, 


10.01 


Samuel Maynard, 


3-15- 6 


Joseph Perkins, 


10.01 


Benjamin Dole, 


3-14- 4 


Roger Gilmore, 


9-95 


Joseph Perkins, 


3-14- 






1810. 




1820. 




Benj. Prescott, 


$40.86 


John Cutter, 


$40.11 


John Cutter, 


36.88 


John Conant, 


27-33 


Joseph Cutter, 


31-57 


David Gilmore, 


24.22 


James Stevens, 


30-49 


Laban Ains worth, 


23.64 


Eleazer Spofford, 


30-38 


John Wright, 


23-48 


Adonijah Howe, 


29.07 


Oliver Prescott, 


23.28 


Alexander Milliken, 


27.97 


Benj. Hayward, Jr., 


22.81 


John H. Loring, 


26.74 


Eleazer Spofford, 


22.68 


Joseph Thorndike, 


24.72 


Edward Spaulding, 


22.30 


Edward Spaulding, 


22.79 


Oliver Bailey, 


22.15 




1830. 




Benj. Prescott, 




John Cutter, 




John Conant, 




Eldad Prescott, 




John Cutter, 2d, 




Daniel Cutter, 




John A. Prescott, 




Laban Ainsworth, 




Benj. Hay ward. 




Oliver Prescott. 





1 66 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



1840. 




1850. 




Jonas M. Mellville, 


$77.02 


John Conant, 


$45.06 


John Conant, 


46.16 


Addison Monroe, 


37.84 


Eldad Prescott, 


45-33 


Benj. Cutter, 


31.98 


Benj. Cutter, 


44.51 


Eldad Prescott, 


30-75 


Benj. Hayward, 


38.55 


Jonas Pierce, 


22.84 


Benj. Prescott, 


37-34 


John A. Prescott, 


22.45 


Daniel Cutter, 


28.98 


Laban Ainsworth, 


21.13 


Luke Howe, 


28.43 


Oilman Mower, 


20.04 


Laban Ainsworth, 


27.74 


Asa Baker, 


19.74 


John A. Prescott, 


26.12 


Benj. Hayward, 


18.15 


i860. 




1870. 




Benj. Cutter, 


$69.74 


Alonzo Bascom, 


$553-18 


John A. Prescott, 


65.46 


Samuel Ryan, 


151.25 


Samuel Ryan, 


63.65 


Arad Adams, 


124.03 


John Conant, 


52.00 


Charles H. Powers, 


109.73 


Asa Baker, 


46.12 


Peter Upton, 


108.26 


Arad Adams, 


38.65 


Moses S. Perkins, 


102.96 


Peter Upton, 


35-78 


Henry B. Wheeler, 


93-50 


Rufus Sawyer, 


32.92 


Edwin C. Baker, 


93-30 


William Lacy, 


28.81 


Daniel P. Adams, 


91.03 


A. P. Prescott, 


25.42 


John Conant, 


79-32 




188 


;o. 




Benj. Pierce, 


$130-74 


John Fox, 


$71.90 


Benj. Cutter, 


120.34 


Hannah J. Ryan, 


71-15 


Peter Upton, 


89.44 


Ruby Adams, 


59.56 


James S. Lacy, 


87.09 


Daniel P. Adams, 


56.04 


Charles H. Powers, 


78.46 


Aaron Perkins, 


53-90 



CHAPTER XV. 

PAUPERISM— WARNINGS FROM TOWN— BOARD OF THE 
POOR SOLD AT PUBLIC VENDUE— TOWN FARM. 

THE first act of the town on record, relating to paupers, 
was at a meeting held April 26, 1774, the year after 
the organization of the town. In the warrant for that meet- 
ing there was an article " To see if the town will Vote to 
Rais a sum of Money to Support the Poor of s*^ town." 
" Voted not to Rais Money for the Poor." The next act of 
the town was to take the benefit of a law enabling towns to 
remove their liability for the support of paupers by warn- 
ing from town all persons moving in for a settlement. At 
a meeting of the town, April 20, 1778, the town voted that 
the selectmen shall warn all persons out of town who come 
in to inhabit, or come any way into town. 

FORM OF THE WARRANT. 

State of ) To David Allan, Constable for the town of 

New Hampshire > JaftVey, Greeting. 

Cheshire ss. j In the name of the Government and People 
of the United States, you are requested to notify and warn 
Lucy Geary to Depart out of this town forthwith or otherwise 
give the Selectmen sufficient bonds to keep the town from 
damage. 

Hereof fail not, and make return of this warrant with your 

doing thereon by the sixteenth of this May, inst. Given under 

our hands and seal this tenth day of May, 177^- 

Roger Gilmore ■! o , , 

T 1 04- 1 { oelectmen 

John Stanley ? of laffrev 

Abraham Bailey J '^ ^ 



1 68 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

In obedience to the above \A'arrant, I have notified and 
warned the within person to depart out of the town ofjaffrey 
forthwith, otherwise to give the Selectmen Sufficient bonds to 
keep the town from damage. 

David Allan ) Constable 
i for Jaffi'ey. 

The practice of warning persons from town was generally 
adopted by other towns. The object probably was to pre- 
vent the emigration of the poor from older townships. 

Lucy Geary appears to have been the first person warned 
from town, and as her name does not again appear, it is 
quite probable she left. In January of the next year, Han- 
nah Underwood was warned from town, and in June, John 
Gray and family. In January, 1781, Solomon Wood and 
family, Simon Perry and family, Benj. Stone, Abel Spauld- 
ing, John Pritchard, Wheeler Willard, Jennie Hunt, Eliza- 
beth Asa and son ; in March, John Gilson and family ; in 
September, Aaron Taylor and family, Amos Fortin, John 
Fitch, Francis H. Pitt. In 1784, May 9, John Pushee and 
family, from Westford, Mass ; Persis, Jesse, and Joseph 
Snow, from Woburn, Mass. ; John Dun and John Math- 
ews, from Peterborough ; John Wheat and Marshal Cutter. 
In 1786, May 27, Eleazer Green and wife, John French and 
family, Myron Dean and family, Peter Davis and family, 
Jonathan Holt and family, Sarah Philbrick, from Rindge, 
and Alpheas Crosby. In 1789, Dec. 21, Widow Hannah 
Robbins and daughter, from Stoddard ; Samuel Needham, 
from Billerica ; Asa Crosby, from Moultonborough ; Jonas 
Clark, Townsend ; Eunice Philbrick, Rindge; Jona. Mower, 
Billerica ; Betty Stiles, Bridgetown ; Samuel Parker, New 
Ipswich ; Asa Spofford, Rowley ; Lemuel Stickney and 
family, Londonderry ; Lucy Wilder, Winchendon ; Isaac 
Spofford, Townsend ; Eunice Thomas, Rindge ; James 
French and family, Rockingham ; Rhoda Russell and Jonas 
French, Jr., and family, Rockingham ; Joseph Cloyce, Con- 
cord ; Abigail Sanders, Gardner ; William Stacey and fam- 
ily, Townsend; wife of Benjamin Whittemore, Sterling; 



PAUPERISM. . 169 

John Russell, Rindge ; Anna Dunlap, Silas Houghton, Sterl- 
ing ; Nathan Taylor and family, Fitchburg ; Jonathan Blod- 
gett and family, from Rockingham. Many more were warned 
from town, whose names are not recorded, as we find re- 
ceipts on record of money received for warning persons 
from town of later date. The last on record was dated 
Sept. 9. 1799. 

Received of the Selectmen six dollars and ninety cents in full 
for warning thirty persons out of town the present year. 

Rufus Houghton. 

Notwithstanding the warrant, the town was from time to 
time called on to make provision for paupers. In 1783, 
Sept. 15, the town voted to give Hugh Gregg the use of a 
cow, to aid him in the support of his wife and child. In 
1785, Oct. 7, the town made provision for the support of the 
family of Thomas Goff. In 1786 the expense of board and 
burial of a widow Hathorn was paid by the town. In 1787 
the nursing and doctor's bill of a Mr. Combs, and provisions 
for the family. In 1791 Eleazer Spofford, Oliver Bacon, 
and John Joslin were chosen overseers of the poor, and 
Lieut. Underwood was paid for their board and care. In 
1794 the town voted to vendue the support of the poor, and 
four paupers were disposed of in that manner that year. 
The practice of venduing the support of the poor continued 
till 1828, when the more humane way, as it was considered 
at that time, of hiring their board at one place was adopted. 
Proposals were made by Capt. Samuel Patrick to board 
them at his house for ^500 per annum, for three years, 
which was accepted. In 1833 the town voted to purchase a 
farm on which to support the poor, and chose Oliver Pres- 
cott, John Conant, and Edward Spaulding a committee for 
that purpose. The farm of Capt. Patricks was purchased 
for the sum of $2,500, and possession given April i, 1835. 
Jacob Adams was hired to manage the same for a salary of 
;^200. In 1835 the house was burnt, and rebuilt in 1836. 

The paupers were supported on the farm till 1869. In 
12 



I/O HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

1868 a law was enacted which so diminished the number of 
paupers to be supported by the town that it was thought 
advisable to sell the farm, and it was sold at public auction, 
by vote of the town, March 29, 1869, together with the 
stock, tools, hay, and provisions, in one lump, to P. Ring, 
for ;^6,ooo. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

CEMETERIES— ACCIDENTAL DEATHS— LIST OF PERSONS 
WHOSE AGE AT DEATH EXCEEDED EIGHTY YEARS. 

IN the early settlement of townships the location of a 
place for the burial of the dead was among the first re- 
quirements. It was customary to have the burying-yard 
in rear of the church, and it was often called the church- 
yard. In Jaffrey, before any settlement was made, a piece 
of ground was selected for a public common, on which to 
build a church and locate a burying-ground. The exact 
boundaries were not fixed till 1784, when the town, at their 
annual meeting, March 5, 1784, voted to lay out the burying- 
yard by a committee. 

TRANSCRIPT OF THE SAME. 

We the subscribers, by virtue of an appointment from the 
town of JaftVey for laying out the Burying yard (sometimes called 
the house appointed for all living) have laid out the same in 
manner following, viz : Beginning at a stake and stones on the 
North line of the Common and about ten or twelve rods West 
of the North East corner of said common, from thence North, 
81 deg. West, 16 rods, from thence South i deg. East 17 rods, 
from thence North S3 deg. East 15 rods, from thence North 13 
rods to the bounds first mentioned, containing one acre and 71 
Square Rods ; also laid out an Alley through said yard, begin- 
ning at the middle of the yard on the South line at two stakes 
with stones about them from thence Running Due North 
across to the North line of the yard said alley is about twelve 
feet wide. 



Jaffrey, Nov. 2, 1784. 



Roger Gilmore ") 

Joseph Bates ( ^ 

'L .' , T^ > Committee. 

Daniel Ji-mery j 

Adonijah Howe j 



1/2 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

In 1785, April 15, the town voted to fence the burying- 
place with stone wall 4^ feet high, with a good gate, where 
staked out, said work to be sold to the lowest bidder at 
vendue. "Voted that Capt. Benj. Spaulding, Dea. Eleazer 
Spofford, and Lieut. Benj. Prescott, be a Com'^^ to lett out 
said work, View and Excepct of the same." In the burials, 
but little use was made of order, except in placing the head 
of the deceased to the west. In other respects they were 
very irregular. Previous to 1800 but few gravestones were 
erected. The stone bearing the most ancient date is situ- 
ated in the north-east part of the yard, and has the follow- 
ing inscription over the engraving of an hour-glass : 

My glass has run and so must yours. 

Under the glass is the following : 

Erected in Memory of 
Mrs. Jean Harper, wife 
of Mr. Andrew Harper, 
who departed this Life 
Nov. ye. 29, 1777, in the 65th 
Year of her age. 

Death like an overflowing flood 

Doth sweep us all away 
The young, the old, the middle age, 

To Death become a Prey. 

AINSWORTH. 

In Memory of 
Rev. Laban Ainsworth 

First minister 
Of the town of Jaftrey 
Bn. July 19, A. D. 1757, 
At Woodstock, Conn. 
Settled Dec. 11, A. D. 1782. 
He continued in that oflSce 
until his death, which 
occurred Mar. 17, A. D. 1858. 

I have fought a good fight 
I have finished my course, 
I have kept the faith. 



CEMETERIES. 1/3 

In Memory of 

Mrs. Mary, 

Wife of' 

Rev. Laban Ainsworth, 

Who died Feb. 5, 1845, 

aged 84 years. 
She lived the christian full 
of good works and alms deed 
and her last words were 
Remember the Poor. 

The oldest person buried, previous to 1800, per headstone, 
was Mary, relict of Mathew Wright, who died August 27, 
1795, aged 86. The oldest person buried in the yard is Rev. 
Laban Ainsworth. 

The form of the headstone and inscription varied at 
different periods. At first, a rude figure of the human face 
with wings was carved on the stone, and an hour-glass, as 
an emblem of the flight of time: then followed the urn 
under a Weeping Willow. At the present day, flowers and 
other emblems are common. The inscriptions commenced 
with "In memory of," "To the memory of," " Sacred to 
the memory of," and "Erected in memory of," all of which 
are now dispensed with. Originally, military titles were 
inscribed, from the highest to the lowest, as a mark of dis- 
tinction and honor ; and in those early times, military 
distinction was more honorable than civil. The warrior was 
the hero ; the coward stayed at home. The man who 
enlisted into the service of his country, in defence of her 
rights and for the protection of her liberty, was the indi- 
vidual whom the people delighted to honor. The settlement 
of our country was a period of warfare. Every man must, 
from necessity, be a soldier, especially during the French 
an Indian wars. The same was true of the Revolution, and 
it was not uncommon to find on the headstone the inscrip- 
tion that he was a soldier of the Revolution. 

In 1792, the town authorized Dr. Adonijah Howe to have 
a pest-house in some remote part of the town, to inoculate 



174 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

for the small-pox. It was considered more safe to have 
that disease by inoculation than by contagion, vaccination 
for kine pox not being in practical operation at that time. 
Quite a number died, and a place was selected for their 
burial. It is situated on lot 19, range 20, now owned by 
Benj. Pierce. The lot was fenced with stone wall, which 
for a time protected the premises; but time and neglect 
broke down the walls, and it is now (1873) used as a pasture, 
in common with the land adjoining. A tombstone was 
erected by Joseph Thorndike, in memory of his daughter 
Nancy who was buried there, the fragments of which alone 
remain. 

The names of the persons who died of the small-pox and 
were buried in that yard, were Oliver Gould, Nancy Thorn- 
dike, Rebecca Danforth, of Jaffrey ; a Mr. Thurber, of 
Keene ; a Mr. Cambridge, of Rindge ; and Hon. Abel 
Wilder, of Winchendon. 

WEST BURYING-YARD. 

In 1797, a gift of a piece of land for burials was offered 
to the town by Hon. Samuel Phillips, on condition that the 
town should fence the same. At a town-meeting, held 
May 31, 1797, the town voted to comply with the require- 
ment, and build a gate with stone posts and put a lock 
thereon, and to place the yard under the direction of the 
selectmen. Oldest headstone, Jona. Stanley, 1789 ; old- 
est person buried, William Comstock, aged 94 years, 7 
months. 

CUTTER CEMETERY. 

In 18 — , John Cutter built a family tomb, east of his 
house, on the road leading by his son Nathaniel's, and 
afterwards made an enclosure in the rear of the same for 
the purpose of burials. It is a very pleasant locality, and 
many have been buried therein. Oldest person buried, 
Mrs. Abigail Cutter, aged 97 years, 6 months, 1 1 days. 



CEMETERIES. 1/5 



EAST JAFFREY CEMETERY. 

The growth of the village of East Jaffrey, and the limited 
area of the burying-yard in the Centre, made it necessary 
to have one in that place. In March, 1829, the subject was 
brought before the town, and the selectmen were instructed 
to examine suitable locations and report at a future meeting. 
October 24th, of the same year, the town voted to purchase 
a certain piece of land of Oliver Bacon, not exceeding three 
acres, for a burying-place. The land was purchased for the 
sum of forty dollars and fifty cents. The first burial was a 
son of John Farwell, died April 4, 1832, aged 12 weeks, 
4 days. Oldest person, Mrs. Sarah Byam, aged 102 years, 
2 months, 7 days. 

CONANT CEMETERY, 

This cemetery was a gift of John Conant, Esq., to the town 
of Jaffrey, in i860. The burials that year were Andrew 
Emery, Thomas Chadwick, and a child of Greenville Shedd. 
Oldest person buried (1876) is Margaret Turner, aged 92 
years. 

Previous to 1800, but few headstones were erected, and 
consequently the localities of the graves of many of the early 
settlers are not known. No stone was erected till I777' ^ 
long period, probably, from the time of the first burial. 
Only thirty were erected previous to 1800. The first sexton 
chosen by the town to bury the dead was James French, in 
1778. In 1785, Asa Chandler was chosen; in 1789, Joseph 
Crosby ; in 1793, Josiah Carey; in 18 — , Eber Lincoln ; in 
18 — , Moody Lawrence; in 18 — , John A. Cutter; in 18 — , 

Baldwin. The first sexton of the West burying 

yard was Phineas Spaulding. 

A hearse was not used by the town till 1802. Hearse- 
house built, 1804. In 1809, a tomb was built by Joseph 
Cutter and Benj. Prescott, in the Centre burying-yard. 



1/6 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



Names of persons who died previous to 1800, per head- 
stones in Centre yard. 



1777. Jean Harper. 

1778. Son of John Gilmore. 

1779. Ann, wife of Roger Gilmore. 
1 78 1. Son of John Gihnore. 

1784. A dau. of Abel Parker. 

1785. A son of Abel Parker. 

1787. Sarah, wife of Alex. Ames. 

1788. Thomas Mower. 
1788. Isaac Spoflford. 
1790. James Cutter. 

1790. A son of Abel Parker. 
1790. Two sons of Jos. Stewart. 

1790. Dau. or Isaac Bailey. 

1791. A son of Abel Parker. 

1792. Samuel Stanley. 
1792. Moses Spofford. 



1793. Ezra T. Mower. 

1794. Sarah, w. of Jos. Thorndike. 

1795. John Dutton. 

1795. Mary, w. of Mathew Wright. 
1795. Son of John Gilmore. 

1795. Samuel Parker. 

1796. Eliza, dau. of Sam^ Jaquith. 

1797. Paul Powers. 

1797. Amos Parker. 

1798. Polly, dau. Nathan Cutter. 
1798. Ruth, dau. of Job Dodge. 
1798. Elizabeth, w. of Jas. Stevens. 

1798. Sally, dau. of Jas. Stevens. 

1799. Priscilla, w. of Abel Shedd. 
1799. William Turner. 



DEATHS BY ACCIDENTS. 

The number of accidental deaths, so far as we have been 
informed, is 34. The first is recorded in Morse's History 
of Sherburne, — Arthur Clark, burnt in a dwelling-house 
which was destroyed by fire in 1785. 



Date of death. 

Feb. 13, 1788. 



Age. 



Mar. 25, 1792. 
Jan. 7, 1794. 



Isaac A. Spoftbrd, son of Dea. Eleazer Spoflford, 
burnt in the house of the Rev. Laban Ainsworth, 
which was destroyed by fire at that time, 8 

Samuel Stanley, killed by a falling limb, 50 

John, aged 10; Cena, aged 6; Polly, aged 4; and 
Maria, aged 2, — children of John and Elizabeth 
Butters, were burnt in his dwelling-house, while 
the parents were absent on an evening visit. 
July ID, 1794. Sarah, wife of Joseph Thorndike, fell dead while 

milking in the barnyard, 45 

John Dutton, killed by a falling tree or limb, 22 

Oliver Bacon, son of Oliver and Rebecca Bacon, 

killed by lightning, 8 

James Gowing, fell dead on the road near his house. 69 
Oliver Spaulding, drowned in the Connecticut river, 



June 17, 1795. 
Jan. 2, 1801. 

June 6, 1805. 
July 29, 1807. 



while a member of Dartmouth college. 



22 



SUICIDES. 177 

Sept. 15, 1819. Oliver Carter, killed by falling from a road wharf- 

ing, 76 

Oct. 2, 1822. George, son of Jerome Underwood, Jr., killed by an 

overturning cart, 9 

July ID, 1825. Isaac Nutting, drowned while bathing in the Frost 

pond, 44 

Aug. 21, 1826. Lucretia, wife of Joseph Joslin, killed by being 
thrown from a carriage while on a visit at Charl- 
ton, Mass. 
July 19, 1827. George Gilmore, son of John Gilmore, killed by be- 
ing thrown from a carriage, 4 
Feb. 25, 1829. Jesse Butters died in a snowstorm, 45 

1829. A child or David H. Gilmore, drowned in a well. 
June 29, 1838. Hannah Chapman hung herself accidentally, by the 

falling of a school-house window in District No. 2, 12 
Jan. 2, 1839. Samuel Abbot, burnt in his starch factory, at Squan- 

tum village. 
Nov. 12, 1845. Richard Warren, killed in Bascomb's factory, 21 

Jan. 2, 1853. James Butler, drowned. 11 

Nov. 12, 1859. William Moore, killed by being thrown from a car- 
riage, 54 
Apr. 27, i860. John Henry, killed in the Cheshire factory, 10 
July 4,1864. A daughter of Charles Verder, drowned, 12 
Sept. 14, 1864. Josiah Sawyer, killed by a runaway horse, 64 
July II, 1864. George H. Marshall, killed by lightning, 19 
July 4, 1865. Ellen Heald, drowned, 12 
June 15, 1868. A child of Levi Brigham, killed by falling into a tub 

of hot soap, I 

Feb. 22, 1872. Abraham Whitney, killed by falling into the cellar, 68 
Dec. 13, 1873. Mi's. J. W. Fassett, killed by a runaway horse, 52 

Aug. 13, 1876. Frederick Hart, drowned, 17 

July 28, 1879. Thomas A. Stearns, killed by being thrown from a 

carriage, 68 

SUICIDES. 

May 7,1821. Mary, widow of Capt. William Pope, by hanging, 78 

May 8, 1864. Ralph Emery, by hanging, 67 

Feb. 27, 1862. Luther Durant, by hanging, 44 

July I, 1878. Frank W. Mower, by drowning, 21 

Aug. 19, 1880. James P. Clay, by hanging, 63 



178 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

MORTUARY RECORD. 

In relation to longevity, the town of Jaffrey compares 
favorably with other towns in its vicinity. More persons 
have lived to an age exceeding one hundred years than any 
other town in the state of the same number of inhabitants. 
The town has always been remarkably free from epidemics, 
or any prevalence of malignant disease. The situation of 
the town, the character of the soil, its altitude, and its fresh 
mountain streams, furnish a salubrity of climate favorable 
to the health of its inhabitants. It has already become a 
favorite resort of the inhabitants of Boston during the 
summer season. 

No record of deaths has been found, except on the head- 
stones and in family Bibles, till 1841. From that time, one 
has been kept by Mr. J. D. Gibbs, which we have carefully 
examined. It is a valuable record, and should be recorded 
in the town book of the Record of Marriages and Births. 
From his record it appears that the average number of 
deaths, yearly, for a period of thirty years, is twenty-six : 
the largest number of annual deaths was forty-one, in the 
year 1865, and the smallest number, 14, in 185 1. From 
the above records, we have found one hundred and forty- 
three persons who lived from eighty to ninety years; twenty- 
seven, from ninety to one hundred years ; and three over 
one hundred years, making a sum total, of persons living 
eighty years and upwards, of one hundred and seventy-three. 
The number of aged persons living (1873) Centennial year 
was, — from eighty to ninety, twenty-two ; from ninety to one 
hundred, two ; and over one hundred, one ; sum total, twenty- 
five, — which sum, added to the above one hundred and 
seventy-three, would amount to one hundred and ninety- 
eight persons whose lives exceeded eighty years, in the 
town of Jaffrey, to 1873, inclusive. The number of males is 
eighty-nine ; females, one hundred and nine, — equalling one 
hundred and ninety-eight, — making the excess of females, 
twenty. 



LONGEVITY. 179 



LONGEVITY, 8o TO 9O YEARS. 
Date of death. Place of birth. Age. 

Mar. 17, 1794. Mary (Martin), wife of Kendal Briant, Pepperell, 

Mass., 84 

May 27,1795. Mary, widow of Matthew Wright. Londonderry, 86 

May 7, 1795. Samuel Parker, 80 

Nov. 30, 1797. Kendal Briant, Pepperell, Mass., 88 

Dec. 23, 1803. David Bailey, England, 86 

1809. Oliver Proctor, 83 

Jan. 18,1811. John Davidson (first settler), Londonderry, 85 

Apr. 22, 181 1. Susannah, wife of Isaac Bailey, 80 

June 7. 18 12. Isaac Bailey, Lunenburgh, Mass., 82 

May 20, 1815. John French, Billerica, Mass., 84 

Feb. 15, 1816. Mary, widow of Thomas Mower, 86 

Aug. 6, 1817. Samuel Patrick, Stoughton, Mass., 84 

Oct. 27,1818. Margaret, wife of Moses Burpee, Sterling, Mass., 84 

Aug. 22, 1819. Dea. Daniel Emery, Townsend, Mass., 89 
June 8,1820. Mary (Stockwell),wid. of Oliver Gould, Petersham, 

Mass., 84 

Nov. 16, 1820. Capt. William Pope, 80 

May 7,1823. Esther, wife of Ebenezer Jaquith, Billerica, Mass., 87 

July 2,1823. Priscilla, wife of John French, Billerica, Mass., 81 

1823. Ebenezer Hathorn, 84 
Dec. 9, 1828. Lois (Moore), widow of Jona. Stanley, Andover, 

Mass., 81 
Feb. 18, 1831. Sarah Shipley, wife of Thomas Fisk, Pepperell, 

Mass., 82 
Jan. 16, 1832. Hepsibath (Hardy), wife of Moses Worcester, 

Tewksbury, Mass., 84 
JFeb. 15, 1832. Jane (Wright), widow of William Turner, Peter- 
borough, 82 
July 2, 1833. Zacheus Witt, Lunenburgh, Mass., 84 
Oct. 9, 1833. Moses Worcester, Tewksbury, Mass., 83 
Mar. 31, 1834. James Stevens, Andover, Mass., 85 
Jan. 20, 1835. Rachel (Hobart), wife of Joseph Cutter, Pepperell, 84 
May 6, 1835. Daniel Priest, 89 
Nov. 24, 1836. Samuel Buss, Leominster, Mass., 87 
Apr. 13, 1838. Asa Parker, 81 
Nov. 15, 1833. Lucy Heselton, 82 
Aug. 22, 1839. Mary, widow of Reuben Pierce, Leominster, Mass., 85 
Dec. 27, 1839. Betsey, wife of David Priest, 88 
Apr. 28, 1839. Benjamin Prescott, Groton, Mass., 85 



i8o 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Mar. 31, 1840. Laban Ripley, Barre, Mass., 83 

June 25, 1840. Joseph Cutter, Lexington, Mass., 88 

June 28, 1840. Rachel (Kimball), widow of Benj. Frost, 86 

July 16, 1840. William Emery, Townsend, Mass., 82 

Aug. 31, 1840. Mercy, wife of Joseph Robbins, 86 

Oct. 17,1841. Hannah, wife of Uriah Keyes, 87 

Nov. 13, 1841. Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Hodge, 84 

Jan. 11,1842. Mrs. Hallet, 80 

June 22, 1842. Joseph Robbins, 84 

June 24, 1842. Molly (Farnsworth), widow of Thomas Adams, 

New Ipswich, 88 

Jan. 23, 1843. Mrs. Jaquith, 83 

Mar. 3, 1843. Rebecca (Whitcomb), widow of Jacob Pierce, 

Lunenburgh, Mass., 89 

June 25, 1843. Rebecca (Jewett), widow of Oliver Bacon, Hollis, 87 

Dec. 14, 1843. Alice (Shedd), widow of Daniel Twiss, 86 

Dec. 21, 1843. Mehitable, wife of Stephen Adams, 81 

Mar. 5. 1844. Abel Winship, 87 

Apr. 9, 1844. Mrs. Gould, 82 

May 23, 1844. John Turner, Peterborough, 81 

June 18, 1844. Ebenezer Jaquith, Billerica, Mass., 85 

Oct. 13, 1844. Jacob Baldwin, Billerica, Mass., 84 

Nov. 8, 1844. Lucy (Gould), wife of Abel Parker. 80 

Feb. 3, 1845. Mary (Minot), wife of Rev. Laban Ainsworth, 

Concord, Mass., 84 

Feb. 4,1845. Sally (Wesson), widow of John Mathews, 84 

July 2, 1845. Mrs. Chadwick, 87 

Sept. 29, 1845. Rufus Sawyer, 86 

Oct. 25, 1845. Alpheas Crosby, Milford, 83 

Jan. I, 1847. Ebenezer Hathorn, 86 

Jan. 22,1847. Esther, wife of Benj. Nutting, Groton, 88 

Oct. 31, 1847. Joseph Crombie, 82 

Feb. 21, 1848. Thomas French, Billerica, 82 

Mar. 21,1848. Elijah Welman, 83 

Nov. 29, 1848. Mrs. Gary, 83 

Aug. 21, 1849. Rachel (Turner), widow of Moses Cutter, JafFrey, 80 

Feb. 12, 1850. Ithamer Wheelock, 89 

Aug. 19. 1850. David Gilmore, Jaffrey, 82 

Sept. 3, 1850. Elizabeth, widow of Roger Brigham, 83 

Aug. 29, 1 85 1. Daniel French, Jaffrey, 80 

Dec. 19, 1852. Elizabeth (French), widow of Joseph Blodgett, 82 

Apr. 30, 1852. Sally (Cutter), widow of William Marshall, New 

Ipswich, 86 



LONGEVITY. l8l 

May 5, 1852. Josiah Mower, Topsfield, Mass., 83 

June 7, 1852. Paul Hunt, 87 

Sept. II, 1852. Joseph Joslin, Leominster, Mass., 86 

Mar. 27, 1854. Moses Perkins, Jaffrey, 85 

May I, 1855. Hannah (Cummings), widow of Thomas French, 87 

Aug. 31, 1855. Mrs. Chapin, 89 

Dec. 8, 1855. Oliver Bailey, Andover, Mass., 88 

Jan. 5,1856. Edward Perkins, JaiTrey, 82 

Oct. 23, 1856. Sarah (Nichols), wife of Levi Johnson, 83 

Dec. 12, 1856. Levi Johnson, Leominster, 89 

Apr. 7, 1857. Sybil (Jackson), widow of Jona. Fox, Newton, 88 

Aug. 17, 1857. Levi Fisk, Jaffrey, 82 

Dec. 31, 1857. Ebenezer Poole, 83 

Jan. 12, 1858. Betsey (Litch), widow ot James Stevens, 86 

Apr. 8, 1858. Samuel Pierce, Leominster, 82 

Aug. II, 1859. Olive (Newell), wife of Jacob Hammond, 80 

Dec. 3, 1859. Abraham Priest, 81 

Jan. 4, i860. Polly (Pratt), widow of Moody Lawrence, 84 

Feb. 9, i860. Mercy (Adams), wife of James Stephens, Jr., 81 

Mar. 9, i860. Mrs. Lucy Jennings, 82 

May 30, i860. Ruth, widow of Edward Perkins, 83 

July 3, i860. Samuel Litch, Lunenburgh, Mass., 81 

Aug. 25, i860. Jacob Hammond, Waltham, Mass., 85 

Nov. 16, i860. Dea. Abel Spaulding, Townsend, Mass., 83 

Nov. 20, i860. Joseph Cutter, Jaffrey, 83 

July 22, 1861. Hannah (Mellin), widow of Levi Fisk, 86 

Aug. 27, 1861. Joshua Nutting, Jaftrey, 80 

Dec. 6, 1861. Nabby (Newton), widow of Edward Spaulding, 

Philipston, Mass., 81 

Jan. 9,1863. Lucy (Emery), widow of Samuel Buss, Dublin, 84 

July 10, 1863. Mrs. Risby Wright, 83 

Sept. 7,1863. Ruth (Perkins), widow of John Stone, Jaffrey, 82 

Oct. 4, 1863. Ruth, wife of William Comstock, 86 

Jan. 7, 1864. Mrs. Tabitha Livermore, 85 

Feb. 28, 1865. Mercy, wife of Moses Perkins, 85 

Aug. 5, 1865. Hannah, widow of Moses Burpee, Jr., 87 

Sept. 25, 1865. Abraham Garfield, 85 

Oct. 10, 1865. Ketura (Mayo), widow of Sewell Gould, 83 

Dec. 2, 1865. Elias Smiley, 82 

Dec. 5, 1865. Abraham Ross, Jaffrey, 85 

Dec. 14, 1865. Betsy, widow of Elias Smiley, 82 

Dec. 23, 1865. William Comstock, 85 

Dec. 27, 1865. James Leathers, Peterborough, 85 



l82 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Feb. 13, 1866. Mary Reed, 83 

Apr. 7, 1866. Hitty (Brooks), widow of Samuel Pierce, Jaffrey, 88 

June I, 1866. Jerome Underwood, Jaffrey, 82 

Oct. 26, 1866. Samuel Foster, 82 

Sept. 23, 1868. Daniel Cutter, Jaffrey, 84 

Jan. 28, 1869. Mrs. Anna Pierce, Jaffrey, 88 

Feb. 21, 1869. Mrs. N. W. Beman, 86 

May I, 1869. Thomas French, Jaffrey, 80 

July 13, 1869. Mrs. Jabez Stratton, 84 

Sept. 7, 1869. Sally (Searle), widow of Benj. Prescott, Temple, 88 

Sept. 7, 1869. Phebe K., widow of Zebediah Pierce, 84 

June 4, 1870. Abigail (Smith), widow of William Button, Fitz- 

william, 83 

Aug. 3, 1870. Mrs. Abba C. Harris, 82 

Aug. 16, 1870. Mrs. Darmaris Woodruff, 80 

Oct. 23, 1870. Abijah Pierce, Jaffrey, 83 

Oct. 31, 1870. Gabriel Beman, 87 

Nov. 8, 1870. Mrs. Betsy Smith, 86 

Jan. 4,1871. Miss Mary Bacon, Jaffrey, 82 

Jan. 20, 1871. Abel Marshall, Jaffrey, 80 

May 8, 187 1. John Houghton, 80 

June 1,1871. Sarah (Poor), widow of John Briant, Dublin, 82 

June I, 1 87 1. Mrs. Thankful Evans, 81 

Aug. 13, 1871. Sarah (Adams), widow of Dea. John Frost, 85 

Jan. 20,1872. Hannah, widow of David Chadwick, 81 

Feb. 13, 1872. Luther Hemmingway, 85 

Feb. 15, 1872. Dolly Robbins, 80 

Apr. 23, 1872. Eldad Prescott, Jaffrey, 86 

Sept. 23, 1872. Keziah (Powers), widow of Jacob Newell, 84 



AGE 90 TO 100 YEARS. 

Nov. 17, 1801. Amos Fortune (colored), Africa, 91 
Jan. 4, 1826. Lydia (Welman), widow of James Gowing, Lynn- 
field, Mass., 91 
Nov. II, 1826. Moses Burpee, Rowley, Mass., 93 
Aug. 5,1827. Susanna (Hastings), widow of John Cutter, Water- 
town, Mass., 96 
Aug. 26, 183 1. Joseph Hodge, Londonderry, 90 
Oct. 27, 1832. Sarah (Lamson), widow of James Gage, Amherst, 93 
Aug. 28, 1836. Mary (Flint), widow of Dea. Eleazer Spofford, 

Danvers, Mass., 92 



LONGEVITY. 1 83 

Dec. 31, 1838. Thomas Button, Westford, 9^ 

Oct. 25, 1840. Lydia, wife of Lieut. Samuel Buss, 92 

May 13, 1841. Joseph Horton, 91 

July 14, 1841. Abraham Russ, Bolton, Mass., 97 

July 27, 1844. Mrs. Patch, 9° 
Sept. 5,1846. Mary (Hastings), wife of Moses Stickney,Waltham, 

Mass., 9° 

June 3, 1847. Lois Burdov (colored), Lexington, Mass., 92 
Sept. 23, 1848. Edith (Jewett), widow of Hon. Abel Parker, Pep- 

perell, Mass., 9^ 

Jan. 18, 1853. Nathan Hunt, 93 

Oct. 23, 1853. Lucy (Robinson), widow of Joseph Kimball, 93 

Nov. 26, 1857. Polly (Spofford), widow of David Cutter, Jaffrey, 92 

Jan. 30, 1858. Hannah (Frost), widow of William Worcester, 98 
Aug. 27, 1861. Polly (Perkins), widow of Oliver Bailey, Methuen, 

Mass., 90 

Mar. 23, 1863. John Wilder, 90 

Mar. 4, 1866. Abigail (Demery), widow of John Cutter, Boston, 97 

May I, 1867. William Smith, Peterborough, 94 
Sept. 22, 1867. Rebecca (Cutter), widow of Josiah Mower, New 

Ipswich, 93 
Dec. 30, 1867. Margaret Turner, Peterborough, 92 
Feb. 17, 1868. Lucy (Wellington), widow of Dea. Daniel Gil- 
more, Watertown, Mass., 90 
Dec. 6,1871. Phebe Gage, widow of Joseph Cutter, JaiTrey, 92 

AGE 100 YEARS AND UPWARDS. 

Mar. 2, 1852. Moses Stickney, Boxford, Mass., 100 y., 3 mo., 9 days. 

Mar. 7, 1858. Rev. Laban Ainsworth, Wood- 
stock, Ct., iooy.,7 mo., 28 days. 

Nov. 27, 1866. Mrs. Sarah (Heywood), widow 

of JohnByum, 102 y., 2 mo., 7 days. 



1 84 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



PERSONS RESIDING IN JAFFREY OVER 80 YEARS OF AGE, 

IN 1873. 



Sarah Averell, 


80 


Sally B. Patrick, 


82 


Rebecca Bacon, 


83 


Jacob Priest, 


82 


Nathaniel Biggelow, 


84 


Dorcas Rice, 


103 


Perkins Biggelow, 


82 


Fanny Royce, 


82 


Crombie Chadwick, 


80 


Thomas Ryan, 


84 


John Conant, 


83 


John Sanderson, 


81 


Benjamin Cutter, 


80 


Isaac Stratton, 


84 


Mehitable Cutter, 


82 


Betsy Stratton, 


85 


John Grant, 


90 


Nancy Smith, 


94 


Sally Hemmingway, 


86 


Abby C. Tucker, 


81 


Joseph Hodge, 


86 


Mary Twiss, 


84 


John Hodge, 


84 


Abigail Wheeler, 


80 


Betsey Mann, 


81 







Mrs. Rice, widow of David Rice, was born in Oxford, Mass., Dec. 
10. 1769; died April 15, 1874. 



CHAPTER XVII. 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN, 1873, WITH THE LOCATION OF 

THE INHABITANTS. 



TAKEN by the selectmen of Jaffrey, by a vote of the 
town, March, 1873. Alphabetically arranged. 



Name. 


Age. 


Place of 
Binh. 




Name. 


Age. 


Place of 
Birth. 


Adams, Addison J. 


43' 


N. H. 


Adams, Susan E. 


12, 


Mass. 


Mary R. 


41, 


" 




Alice P. 


6, 


N. H. 


Edgar A. 


16, 


Mich. 




George A. 


3, 


(( 


Everett F. 


II, 


N. H. 


Will 


am F. Newhall, 


17, 


Mass. 


Elmer J. 


9- 


i<. 




Lot 5, range 


6. 




Charles H. Plummer, 


19^ 


t ( 


Aldrich, Hosea B. 


SO, 


N. H. 


Resides on lot 5, 


range 


7- 




Emily M. 


45. 


(( 


Adams, Arad 


61, 


N. H. 




Randall H. 


23- 


Vt. 


Ruby H. 


57, 


4 ( 




Freddie L. 


16, 


N. H. 


Maria R. 


28, 


ii 




Fanny M. 


14. 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


7- 






Emily E. 


8, 


i( 


Adams, Austin 0. 


35. 


N. H. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Sarah A. 


31. 


(t 


Allen, Warren F. 


35' 


N. H. 


Grace M. 





( . 




Ellen J. 


35, 


U 


Willie M. 


\h 


(I 




John F. 


12, 


(C 


Lot 15, range 


8. 






Warren C. 


7' 


Mass. 


Adams, Daniel P. 


46, 


N. H. 




Lot 17, range 


8. 




Emily L. 


40. 


( ( 


Annett, Thomas 


41. 


N. B. 


Olive Burpee, 


71. 


( t 




Mary H. 


32' 


N. H. 


Joseph Flood, 


60, 


( ( 




Maria J. 


13. 




Lot 2, range 


7- 






Albert I. 


II, 




Adams, Marshal C. 


46. 


N. H. 




Anna S. 


10, 




Susan B. 


45' 


Mass. 




Asahel S. 


8, 




Sarah L. 


14. 


( fc 




Arthur S. 


6, 




13 















1 86 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Maria S. Raymond, 


72, 


N. H. 


Baker, 


Alvena 


I, 


N. H 


Lizzie S. Prescott, 


22, 


ii 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Henry A. Bancroft, 


24. 


i i 


Baker, 


Ezra 


74, 


N. H 


Frank J. Boynton, 


24, 


U 




Caroline 


68, 


Mass 


Lot 21, range 


10. 






Milton 


42, 


N. H 


Armstrong, Milton W. 


41, 


N. H. 




Lot 7, range 


8. 




Martha 


47, 


( i 


Baldwin, Benj. L. 


61, 


N. H 


Charles M. 


II, 


( 4 




Rosaline 


58, 


( i 


Mary A. 


5, 


i i 




Lot 18, range 


5- 




Lot 17, range 


8, 




Baldwin, James A. 


62, 


Mass 


Austin, George W. 


34, 


Mass. 




Catherine W 


• 55, 


Va. 


Caroline A. 


41, 


N. H. 




Charles A. 


25, 


N. H 


Ella A. 


12, 


Mass. 




James A. 


17, 


44 


Mary K. 


9, 


(( 




Lot 12, range 


6. 




George F. 


7, 


i i 


Baldwin, Elbridge 


61, 


Mass 


Alice F. 


4, 


n 




Mary F. 


71, 


N. H 


Hattie M. 


2, 


n 




John E. 


30, 


4i 


Edward J. Bryant, 


24, 


( i 




Hattie E. 


30, 


a 


Lot 9, range 


9- 






Charles E. 


8, 


t 4 


Bacon, Rebecca 


83, 


N. H. 




Edwin P. 


4, 


i i 


Lot 17, range 


7. 






Almon A. 


2, 


44 


Bacon, Oliver 


61, 


N. H. 




Carl F. 


T^. 


44 


Stephen S. 


27, 


( < 




Lot 12, range 


6. 




Adelia A. 


19, 


(( 


Ballou, 


Seth D. 


50, 


N. H 


Willie C. 


17, 


U 




Rebecca B. 


48, 


4 4 


Lot 22, range 


4- 




Hattie F. Boyse, 


28, 


44 


Bacon, Charles 


58, 


N. H. 




Lot 9, range 


7- 




Frances M. 


36, 


( ( 


Balagaron, Charles 


48, 


Can. 


Burt 


22, 


«( 




Sophia 


42, 


44 


Hattie J. 


17, 


i* 




Charles 


21, 


44 


Fred E. 


14, 


a 




Sophia 


17, 


( 4 


Carrie M. Bruce, 


3, 


( ( 




George 


16, 


1 4 


Lot 20, range 


5- 






Lovell 


13, 


4 4 


Bailey, Clarence S. 


42, 


N. H. 




Lena 


12, 


44 


Sarah E. 


34, 


Mass. 




Chan 


10, 


44 


Carrie E. 


6, 


N. H. 




Fred 


2, 


4 i- 


Fannie E. 


I, 


»« 




Lot 17, range 7. 




Abner 


75, 


i4 


Barker, 


Mark T. 


41, 


Me. 


Lot 7, range 


5- 






Cynthia 


35, 


( ( 


Baker, Frank 


38, 


Can. 


Mary Estes, 


75, 


i 4 


Mary 


34, 


1 i 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Hannah 


10, 


K 


Bartlet 


Byron E. 


48, 


Mass. 


Julia 


7, 


(( 




Mary J. 


44, 


4 4 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



187 



Laura B. 


15. 


Wis. 


Biggelow, Perkins 


82, 


Mass 


George H. 


13' 


( ( 




Elizabeth C 


• 56, 


N. H 


iMary B. 


•7 

— 1 


N. H. 




Lot 17, range 


8. 




Sophia M. Waters, 


55' 


Vt. 


Blodgett, Timothy 


50' 


N. H, 


Lot 17. range 


7- 




Fanny 


Salsbury, 


68, 


(4 


Bartenback, Christina 


42, 


Ger. 




Lot 17, range 


8. 




William 


20. 


(fc 


Blood, 


1 Lafayette 


48, 


Mass, 


Henry 


11. 


N. H. 




Eliza T. 


46. 




Lot 18, range 








Janett 


18. 




Bascomb, Roswell 


67. 


N. H. 




Napoleon 


21, 




Lucie E. 


39. 


it 




lola 


15. 




William H. 


33- 


H 




Bion 


13. 




Nellie M. 


6, 


( ( 




Alice 


II, 




Lot 17. range 


7- 






Edgar 


10, 




Bascom, George W. 


3O' 


N. H. 




Lizzie 


7, 




Sophia W. 


30' 


Mass. 




Moses 


5. 




Bascomb, Marcellas M, 


. 28, 


N. H. 




Susan 


J, 




Jenny S. 


28, 


ii 




Lot 5, range 


7- 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Bolster, Aaron 


77, 


Vt. 


Bascomb, Lucy 


33^ 


N. H. 




Betsey 


67, 


(( 


Clara E. 


10. 


i i 




Lot I, range 


4- 




Lot 17. range 


7. 




Bolster, James L. 


49. 


N. H, 


Bass, Albert 


47. 


N. H. 




Phebe K. 


48, 


( 4 


Emily E. 


45' 


i i 




Nettie S. 


19. 


<« 


Lot 21, range 


9- 




Minnie C. Emery, 


4' 


(4 


Benjamin. George W. 


62. 


N. H. 




Lot 18, range 


7- 




Sarah F. 


21, 


44 


Bradley, Oscar H. 


47. 


Vt. 


George A. 


27. 


(< 




Julia A. 


42, 


N. H. 


Sarah J. 


20, 


ii 




D. E. 


II. 


44 


Wallace 


9 


a 




Mark F. 


5. 


(4 


Lot 21, range 


10. 






Lot 17, range 


7- 




Bemis, Alvin J. 


5I' 


N. H. 


Brigham, Levi E. 


48, 


Mass. 


Mary G. 


48, 


(( 




Ann J. 


46, 


(4 


Emily S. 


19. 


i( 




Edwin L. 


21, 


4 4 


Lot 17, range 


6. 






Daniel W. 


18, 


i 4 


Biggelow, Nathaniel 


84, 


Mass. 




Ellen J. 


16, 


it 


Lot 18, range 


8. 






Isadore 


14. 


4 4 


Biggelow, Joseph T. 


53' 


Mass. 




Dolly A. 


12, 


( 4 


Mary C. 


47. 


N. H. 




Lizzie J. 


10, 


N. H. 


Carrie E. 


17' 


( ( 




Lot 4, range 5. 




Georgia A. 


13' 


4 4 


Briant, 


Emeline C. 


56, 


N. H. 


Josie M. 


5' 


a 




Peter A. 


22, 


i< 


Sarah Frost, 


45. 


( ( 




Kendall 


14, 


i( 


Lot 13. 'range 


6. 






Martha 


16, 


i( 



i88 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Mary A. Porter, 


23' 


N. H. 


Burpee, Mattie 


3' 


N. H. 


Briant, Edwin G. 


25' 


a 




Lot 19, range 


7- 




Clara C. 


22, 


fc( 


Burton 


, James L. 


3Z^ 


Mass, 


Lester H. 


2, 


<( 




Ellen A. 


Z7, 


Me. 


Lot 12, range 7. 






Eva M. 


7' 


Mass, 


Brown, Robert 


72, 


N. H. 




Lot 17. range 


6. 




James T. 


32, 


t i 


Butler, 


, Eliza J. 


54' 


N. H. 


Celina 


25' 


( ( 




Hattie G. 


18, 


(( 


Edith J. 


3' 


«( 




Flora T. 


13' 


( ( 


George R. 


A. 


(( 




Alfred 


8, 


(C 


Lot 10, range 


5- 






Lot 17, range 


7- 




Brown, Caroline M. 


49' 


N. H. 


Caldwell, Catherine 


46, 


Scot. 


Lizzie 


18, 


Iowa. 




David P. 


21, 


N. Y. 


Nellie 


16, 


Iowa. 




Alexander M. 18, 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


8. 






William D. 


15' 


N. H. 


Brown, Oliver H. 


45' 


Mass. 




Alonzo M. 


13. 


t i 


Mary S. 


4I' 


N. H. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Frank H. 


16, 


it 


Capen, 


, Gardner VV. 


30, 


Mass, 


Mary A. 


14' 


(« 




Ellen M. 


20, 


( & 


Lena L. 


II' 


( ( 


Carey, 


Edmond 


47' 


IrePd , 


Annie L. 


5' 


(i 




Bridget 


42, 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


8. 






John 


15' 


N. H. 


Brodett, Ezra 


42, 


Can. 




Catherine 


13' 


< ( 


Lucy 


3I' 


( t 




Thomas 


12, 


t ( 


Charles 


II' 


N. H. 




Bridget 


9' 


t ( 


Ellen 


8, 


( t 




Edmond 


7' 


(« 


Fred 


1^5' 


(i 




Mary Ann 


5' 


( i 


Lot 17, range 


8. 






Margaret 


2, 


(( 


Buckwold, Jacob 


37^ 


Ger. 




Lot 17, range 9. 




Catherine 


38, 


i i 


Carter, 


William 


56, 


(t 


Christina 


15' 


N. H. 




Catherine 


56' 


i( 


John 


13' 


( t 




Lot 18, range 


8. 




Philip 


ii> 


(4 


Carter, 


Luke 


58, 


N. H. 


Emma 


6, 


i( 




Lucy 


54' 


Vt. 


Carrie 


3' 


t ( 




George A. 


23' 


N. H. 


Charles 


2, 


«( 




VinaS. 


20, 


(( 


Edward H. Piper, 


22, 


Mass. 




Emma 


14' 


( ( 


Lot 17, range 


7. 




Frank Had ley, 


'1 


Mass. 


Burpee, Stilman 


64, 


N. H. 




Lot 22, range 


4- 




Martha 


60, 


t ( 


Case, Rufus 


62, 


Vt. 


Ari T. 


24, 


(< 


Melvina 


60, 


Mass 


Ella R. Lenhert, 


29' 


(i 




Lot 12, range 


6. 




Burpee, Hugo 


5. 


(( 


Chadwick, Charles A. 


47' 


N. H. 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



189 



Chadwick, Sarah A. 45, 
Abigail Stratton, 72, Mass. 

Grota Nutting, 62, N. H. 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Chadwick, Crombie 80. N. H. 
Z. Maria 61, 



Conant, John 83, Mass. 

Sally 66, N. H. 

Lot 17, range 8. 
Condon, James 26, Irel'd. 

Joanna 68, " 

Lot 15, range 10. 



Lot 19, range 


8. 




Cragin, Orlando 




70, 


N. H 


Chamberlin, Henry 


49' 


Mass. 


Emma 




48, 


( (. 


Melvina 


40, 


N. H. 


Helen 




II, 


it. 


Samuel L, 


. 12, 


a 


Alvira Pierce, 




66, 


fci- 


Martha S. 


II, 


i t 


Lot 17, range 


7 


. 




Lot 12, range 


9- 




Crombie, Joseph 




68, 


N. H 


Chrisholm, Mary A. 


43. 


N. H. 


Mary S. 




49' 


i i 


George C. 


12, 


«( 


Anna F. 




12, 


i i 


Lot 12, range 


6. 




Lot 17, range 


7' 






Clark, Austin F. 


36, 


N. H. 


Crowe, John H. 




55, 


Irel'd 


Amelia 


30' 


Can. 


Mary 




55' 


i i 


John H. A. 


9' 


N. Y. 


Nettie F. 




19' 


N. H 


James D. A. 


r 

J' 


N. H. 


David F. Hickey, 




12, 


Mass, 


Nellie M. 


3. 


ii 


Lot 14, range 


10. 




Emma J. M. 


I, 


i i 


Crowe, Edward H. 




34' 


Irel'd, 


Ann Cook, 


57, 


Mass. 


Anna M. 




34, 


i 4 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




John F. 




ID, 


N. H, 


Clark, Jonathan 


64, 


Mass. 


Anna F. 




7, 


i ( 


Catherine 


28, 


(i 


Mary L. 




5' 


i4 


Adelbert E. 


7- 


N. H. 


John Haley, 




14' 


Mass. 


Lot 17, range 


8. 




Lot 15, range 


9 






Clark, Nathaniel 


34, 


Mass. 


Cummings, Cynthia E 


». 


68, 


Mass, 


Henrietta 


35. 


Me. 


Warren Brigham, 




66, 


a 


Lot 12, range 


6. 




Martha Adams, 




73, 


N. H. 


Coburn, David A. 


59' 


Mass. 


Lot 17, range 


7- 






Emeline W. 


50' 


Me. 


Cutter, David A. 




59. 


Mass. 


Emma F. 


20, 


Mass. 


Sarah E. 




47, 


N. H. 


Edward A. 


16, 


N. H. 


Martha A. 




26, 


Mass. 


Flora G. 


9. 


i 4 


Lot 17, range 


6. 






Lot 17, range 


7- 




Cutter, Benjamin 




80, 


N. H. 


Coburn, Frank H. 


25, 


Mass. 


Julius 




48, 


4 4 


Juliett R. 


22, 


N. H. 


Caroline H. 




43' 


Mass. 


Lenora R. 


2, 


N. H. 


Emma M. 




19' 


N. H. 


Lot 17, range 7. 




Alice E. 




15, 


44 


Comstock, Jona J. 


69, 


N. H. 


Ermina Campbell, 




6, 


4 4 


Rohona 


64, 


(( 


Lot 13, range 


6. 






Lot 5, range 7 


. 




Cutter, Ethan 




78, 


N. H. 



IQO 



HISTORY OF JAFFREV. 



Cutter, Jonas 


39. 


N. H. 


Ella Butler, 


14. 


N. H 


Valeria L. 


41. 


( 4 


Deborah Bailey, 


67. 


( 4 


Mortimer E. 


16, 


( i 


Lot 4, range 6. 






Lot 12, range 


6. 




Davis, Abraham B. 


57. 


Me. 


Cutter, Nathaniel 


73- 


N. H. 


Mary 


47. 


N. H 


Mary 


70, 


4 4 


Jennie E. 


13. 


Mass 


Laura J. 


33- 


a 


Charles VV. 


12, 


u 


Lucius A. 


37. 


a 


Ella C. 


21, 


<( 


Carrie E. 


26, 


4 4 


• Aliar 


5. 


• ( 


Lucie B. 


I, 


(4 


Lot 8, range 6. 






Lot 14, range 


6. 




Davis, Joseph 


51. 


N. H 


Cutter, John A. 


63. 


N. H. 


Martha 


48, 


t( 


Nancy W. 


62, 


4 4 


Frank F. 


II, 


(( 


Lot 12, range 


6. 




Charles B. 


23. 


< 4 


Cutter, Charles 


55. 


N. H. 


Clara 


23. 


( 4 


Maria E. 


54. 


(4 


Willie B. 


I, 


<< 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Lot 20, range 5 






Cutter, Nehemiah 


48. 


N. H. 


Davis, Kendall 


41. 


N. H 


Emily A. 


46, 


4 4 


Lucinda A. 


43. 


< ( 


Clara A. 


19. 


4 4 


Freddie K. 


5. 


(( 


Julia A. 


8, 


44 


Leonard Burton, 


74. 


Vt. 


Lot II, range 


4- 




Lot 22, range 9 






Cutter, Franklin H. 


45- 


N. H. 


Davidson, Almira 


49. 


N. H 


Anna S. 


41. 


4 4 


Myra M. 


28, 


i 4 


Florence E. 


19. 


4 4 


Lot 17, range 7 


. 




Henrietta S. 


17. 


4 4 


Donnelly, John 


40, 


Ire. 


Lot 12, range 


3- 




Bridget 


30, 


4 ( 


Cutter, Charles A. 


53. 


N. H. 


Joanna 


8, 


N. H. 


Philena L. 


52. 


Vt. 


Daniel 


4. 


<i 


Gustavus A. 


26, 


N. H. 


Mary 


65. 


Ire. 


Lucy A. 


21, 


( b 


Lot 18, range 7 


. 




Willie M. 


15. 


4 ( 


Donnilly, Daniel 


48, 


Ire. 


Lucy R. Kimball, 


74. 


(i 


Margaret 


40, 


4 t 


Lot 12, range 


10. 




James, 


16, 


N. H. 


Cutter, Lydia 


66. 


Mass. 


John 


15. 


U 


Edwin R. 


31. 


(( 


Michael 


13. 


( ( 


Charles E. 


25. 


<( 


Bridget 


12, 


4 4 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Daniel 


II. 


4 4 


Cutter, M eh i table 


82, 


Mass. 


Julia M. Farwell, 






Harriet E. 


55. 


N. H. 


Lot 15, range 7. 






Lot 13, range 


6. 




Donnilly, Michael 


35. 


Ire. 


Darling, Person 


65. 


N. H. 


Margaret 


32. 


(4 


Theodore W. 


73^ 


4 4 


John 


7. 


N. H. 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



191 



Donnilly, Mary 


6, 


N. H. 


Fassett, Joseph W. 


50. 


N. H. 




William 


5. 


i t 




Sarah A. 


51, 


( fc 




Annie 


2, 


'( 




Charles W. 


24, 


i( 




Lot 14, range 


9- 






Abbie A. 


22 


Mass. 


Dupray, 


Peter 

Selina 


31. 
19. 


Can. 

i 4 




Henry J. 
Lot 2, range ^ 


9. 


N. H. 




Delia 


I, 


N. H. 


Fitzgerald, Michael 


60. 


Ire, 


Durant, 


Maria E. 


43. 


i fc 




Mary K. 


38, 


i h 




Julius C. 


17, 


( t 




Mary A. 


7. 


Mass. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Edward C. Boyce, 


14. 


Me. 


Button, 


John S. 


53. 


N. H. 




Lot 12, range 


4- 






Mary B. 


48, 


Vt. 


Fisk, 


, Adams 


72, 


N. H. 




Lot 10, range 


8. 






Mary L. 


68, 


( & 


Emery, 


Amasa 


69, 


N. H. 




Lot 19, range 


2, 






Mary 


26, 


4 i 


Follansbee, Mary C. 


43' 


N. H 




Lot 16, range 


8. 






IdaM. 


15' 


Ohio, 


Emery, 


Mary S. 


64, 


N. H. 




George W. 


20, 


t 4 




George S. 


37i 


( ( 




Fred A. 


17. 


( ( 




Lot 17, range 


7- 






Lot 17, range 


7- 




Emery, 


Sarah M. 


28, 


N. H. 


Fosti 


er, Peter 


38, 


Can. 




Gertrude 


5' 


t ( 




Delied 


33' 


i ( 




Charles H. 


I, 


i( 




Peter 


II, 


(<> 


Lucy Sawtell, 


70, 


( t 




Mary 


ID, 


4 ( 




Lot 17, range 


7- 






Annie 


9. 


«i 


Erskine 


, John 


33- 


Scot. 




Fred 


2, 


N. H, 




Sarah 


33^ 


i i 




Parmelia 


A' 


( ( 




Sarah 


13. 


h( 




Lot 17, range 


7- 






Ellen 


II, 


i( 


Fox, 


John 


69, 


N. H 




Gracie 


9. 


it 




Isabel 


53' 


(£ 




Jennie 


7. 


t ( 




Mary B . 


24' 


( ( 




Agnes 


5. 


Mass. 




John H. 


16, 


( t 




John 


2, 


*( 




HattieW. 


13. 


( t. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 






George W. 


42, 


iC 


Fairbanks, George 


47 < 


N. H. 




Lot 12, range 


6. 






Marietta 


45, 


i t 


Fren 


ch, Luke 


65' 


N. H 




Charles H. 


21, 


t ( 




Lucy 


63' 


( ( 




Delos E. 


12, 


t( 




Emma S. 


3I' 


t ( 




Sarah J. 


7, 


1 1 


Charles H. Newton, 


24' 


Mass 




Lot 17, range 


8. 




French, Henry C. 


48, 


N. H 


Farnum 


, Lyman K. 


58, 


N. H. 




Caroline P. 


41, 


it. 




Ann F. 


52, 


tt 




Edwin H. 


II, 


(» 




Frank F. 


5, 


1 1 




Malcolm S. 


8, 


i( 




Lot 12, range 7. 






Lot 8, range : 


10. 





192 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Frost, Joseph P, 


S7, 


N. H. 


Goff, 


Kendall B. 


62, 


N. H 


Sarah A . 


49- 


t i 




Mary 


64, 


Me. 


Edith C. 


28, 


< t 




Thomas H. 


36, 


N. H 


J.Albert 


26, 


( t 




Charles E. 


6, 


(( 


Lot 13, range 


:6. 






Lot 10, range 7. 




Frost, John 


54. 


N. H. 


Grant, John 


90, 


N. H 


Amanda 


52, 


Vt. 




Martha 


79. 


(( 


William S. 


18, 


N. H. 




Lot 16, range 


8. 




Eva A. 


16, 


a 


Hahr 


I. Philip 


45. 


Ger. 


Lot 17, range 


4- 






Elizabeth 


47, 


( ( 


Gardner, Ira 


29, 


N. H. 




Lot 19, range 


3- 




Hattie A. 


28, 


it 


Handerson, Charles 


71, 


N. H, 


Wallis L 


5. 


(( 




Theodore 


42. 


Can. 


Caroline 0. 


3. 


( ( 




Hannah P. 


42, 


Mass. 


Lot 17, range 


8. 






Eva 


18, 


N. H, 


Garfield, John 


61, 


N. H. 




Fred H. 


15, 


i i 


Emily 


65. 


( ( 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Lucius A. 


24, 


( « 


Harradon, John S. 


58. 


Mass. 


Sarah A. Gould, 


54, 


(( 




Harriet N. 


46, 


(( 


Ella M. Clark, 


22, 


R. L 




Alice H. 


13- 


«( 


Lot 21, range 


10. 






Lot 17, range 


8. 




Gibbs, Jonathan D. 


76, 


Mass. 


Harrington, James 


46, 


N. H. 


Sarah H. 


63, 


N. H. 




Eliza 


56, 


Eng. 


Elizabeth R. 


49, 


«> 


Sally 


Hemmingway, 


86, 


N. H. 


Lot 13, range 


6. 




Hartwell, John S. 


39, 


Mass. 


Gilmore, Harvey 


78, 


N. H. 




Mary A. 


34. 


(( 


Mary 


75. 


( ( 




Mary I. 


13, 


N. H. 


George F. 


33. 


(( 




Carrie L. 


9. 


ii 


AnnaR. 


32, 


(« 




Lot 8, range 6 


, 




Bertha A. 


4. 


( ( 


Hastings, Ira 


72, 


N. H. 


Winnie 


2, 


( ( 




Rebecca 


64, 


a 


Lot 12, range 


7- 




Mary 


Twiss, 


84, 


li 


Goodenow, Wm. E, 


60, 


Me. 




Lot 17, range ; 


7- 




Abigail 


54. 


Mass. 


Harwood, Joseph H. 


30. 


Mass. 


Walter L. 




( ( 




Annie S. 


25. 


N. H. 


Wayland H 


• 17. 


N. H. 




Emma F. 


4, 


Mass. 


Winsor H. 


9, 


i ( 




William G. 


T%- 


< ( 


Rachel Capron, 


61, 






Lot 6, range 9. 






Lot 17, range 


7- 




Heath 


, Josiah S. 


38, 


Can. 


Goodrich, Darius N. 


39. 


N.J. 




Laura A. 




Mass. 


Abby H. 


29. 


N.Y. 




Willie W. 


16, 


Can. 


Hattie R. 


3. 


Mich. 




Rachel C. 


14, 


( ( 


Lot 17, range 


7- 






Lot 12, range 7 


'. 





CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



193 



Heath, Eleazer W. 


47, 


Can. 


Hodge 


, Jonas F. 


47, 


N. H. 


Mary M. 


45, 


N. H. 




Lydia F. 


43, 


( i 


Walter 


IS, 


(( 




Maria F. 


21, 


i( 


Dora M. 


13, 


(( 




Lillie 


12, 


ii 


Eddie 


9, 


(C 




Lot 12, range 


7- 




Ellen J. 


9, 


t ( 


Hodge 


, Harland F. 


23, 


N. H. 


Lucian W. 


6, 


(( 




Mary C. 


21, 


t ( 


Elton J. 


5, 


(( 




Gertie 


tV. 


ii 


Allen M. 


4, 


a 




Lot 17, range 


8. 




Lot II, range 


7- 




Hogan 


, Peter 


55, 


Ire. 


Hacker, John 


46, 


Ger. 




Ellen 


47, 


ik 


Alice 


50, 


Eng. 




Patrick 


25. 




William 


15, 


N. H. 




Mary A. 


19, 




Alice 


II, 


ti 




Hattie E. 


16, 




Lot 8, range 9. 






Annie 


14, 




Hern, Joanna 


41, 


N. H. 




Lot 14, range 


2. 




Joanna 


16, 


(( 


Howe, 


Asahel S. 


29, 


N. H 


James 


14, 


(( 




Sarah J. 


31, 


(( 


John 


9, 


n 




Rosco 


4, 


it 


Lot 17, range 9. 






Daniel R. 


I, 


( ( 


Hickey, George W. 


37, 


Pa. 




An infant dau. 




(( 


Ellen 


34, 






Lucy 


74, 


Mass 


George A. 


12, 






Fannie W. 


46, 


N. H 


Clara M. 


9, 






Lot 17, range 


7- 




Mattie G. 


8, 




Hunt, 


Howard C. 


38, 


Mass 


Sally C. 


4, 






Viola N. 


29, 


N. H 


Willie C. 


t\. 


N. H. 




Ernest E. 


8, 


ti 


Lot 17, range 


7- 






Freddie H. 


5, 


(( 


Hodge, Joseph 


86, 


N. H. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Samuel 


49, 


ti 


Hunt, 


Sarah A. 


42, 


Mass 


Charles S. 


14, 


«- 




Edgar 0. 


16, 


N. H 


Mary A. 


12, 


(( 




John P. 


9, 


Mass 


Eva C. 


8, 


( ( 




Lot 19, range 


10. 




Abbie F. 


6, 


i( 


Ingral 


lam, Wm, H. 


37, 


N. H 


Lot 19, range 


2. 






Minerva J. 


36, 


Mass. 


Hodge, John 


75, 


N. H. 




Charles W. 


ID, 


N. H 


PoJly 


70, 


( ( 




Selden A. 


8, 


( i 


Calista C. 


30, 


i i 




Sela S. 


3, 


( t 


Lot 10, range 


9- 






Lot 17, range 


6. 




Hodge, Simpson 


74, 


N. H. 


Jaquith, Lewis S. 


39, 


Can. 


Sarah A. 


49, 


(( 




Abbie R. 


39, 


N. H 


Albert W. 


37, 


a 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Lot 10, range 


9- 




Jaquith, Addie G. 


S7, 


N. H 


14 















194 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Jaquith, Almira S. 


60, 


Vt. 


King, Emeline 


52, 


Mass 


Luena F. 


21, 


n 


Emma S. 


21, 


( ( 


Lot 21, range 


10. 




Nettie M. 


21, 


a 


Jewell, Samuel D. 


42, 


N. H. 


Lot 6, range 5 


. 




Mary F. 


41, 


(( 


Knowlton, Dexter B. 


60, 


Mass, 


Willis B. 


13. 


(( 


Mary A. 


59. 


N. H 


Ernest H. 


9. 


ii 


Charles L. 


27. 


« i 


Lot 14, range 


4- 




William A. 


23. 


i ( 


Jewett, Anson W. 


39. 


N. H. 


Jane B. Newell, 


52, 


(( 


Emily S. 


38, 


fr i 


Elizabeth C. Newell, 


58, 


( i 


Lot II, range 


9- 




Lot 17, range 


8. 




Johnson, Charles A. 


28, 


N. H. 


Lacy, James S. 


43. 


N. H. 


Ann 


30, 


(( 


Dorcas C. 


37. 


t i 


Horace H. Gilmore, 


53. 


(i 


Mary F. Bailey, 


5. 


(< 


Lot 1 1 , range 


8. 




Lot 17, range 7 


. 




Joslin, Joseph 


75. 


N. H. 


Lacy, Betsey 


74, 


Mass. 


Sarah D. 


70, 


Mass. 


Priscilla C. Foster, 


43. 


Vt. 


Lot 17, range 


8. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Joslin, Wilder 


72, 


N. H. 


Lacy, David W. 


43. 


N. H. 


Henry M. 


32, 


ii 


Emma S. 


37, 


Vt. 


Lot 15, range 


7- 




Harriet C. 


7. 


(( 


Joslin, Emily 


67, 


N. H. 


Ned M. 


4. 


(( 


Vashti Parker, 


70, 


( ( 


Lot 16, range 7. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Lacy, J. M. M. 


41. 


Vt. 


Keyes, James E. 


40, 


Mass. 


Mary J. 


36, 


it 


Delia 


31. 


(( 


Mary J. 


16, 


i i 


Elliot 


10, 


it 


Susie G. A. D. 


6, 


t ( 


Walter A. 


8, 


ii 


Lot 15, range ( 


9- 




Lot 4, range 7 






T-add, John A. 


46, 


Vt. 


Kidder, Harvey 


41, 


Vt. 


Martha A. 


44. 


ii 


Myra J. 


39. 


N. H. 


IdaL 


14, 


(( 


Elwood E. 


18, 


( i 


Jennie E. 


6, 




Laura E. 


IS. 


ii 


Thomas Ryan, 


84, 


Mass. 


Jeremiah 


12, 


n 


Lot 17, range 


10. 




Orlena A. 


ID, 


a 


Laport, George 


25. 


Can. 


Lizzie 


8, 


a 


Ann 


25. 


* ( 


Harry 


5, 


(( 


Alfred Robinson, 


13. 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


7. 




Sophia Savage, 


T^^. 


N. H. 


Kidder, Henry 


40, 


Vt. 


Lot 17, range 7. 




Mary 


25. 


N. H. 


Lawrence, John S. 


56, 


N. H. 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Sarah E. 


5°. 


(( 


King, Joseph 


55. 


N. Y. 


Fred J. 


21, 


(( 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



195 



Lawrence, Rebecca 75, N. H. 

Fred W. Oaks, 12, 

Charles W. Faulkner, 49, Mass. 

Lot 15, range 3. 

Lawrence, Benj. F. 35, N. H. 

Sarah E. 22, " 

Walter F. 2^, 

Elias S. Ball, 25, Mass. 

Lot 13, range 6. 

Lawrence, James G. 23, Mass. 

Abbie A. 24, 
George H. 4, N. H. 
Ezra W. 2, " 



N. H. 



Law, Charles D. 


40, 


Emily A. 


40, 


George A. 


14, 


Sarah 


72, 


Lot 17, range 


7- 


Leathers, Mary W. 


46, 


Betsy J. Fitch, 


44, 


Albert Fitch, 


18, 


Alice Fitch, 


14, 


Lot 17, range 


7- 


Lemire, Octave 


40, 


Julia 


25, 


John 


20, 


Mary 


16, 


Henry 


\l 


Jane Sawin, 


16, 


Lot 17, range 7. 


Libby, Edward B. 


21, 


Charles C. 


24, 


Adaline S. Whitney, 


66, 


Lot 5, range 5 


• 


Lincoln, Betsey B. 


66, 


Sarah A. 


31, 


Sarah Jaquith, 


65, 


Lot 17, range 


7- 


Little, John 


53, 


Margaret K. 


38, 


Clara 


26, 


Alfred 


18, 



N. H. 



Can. 



Mass. 
Can. 

Mass. 



N. H. 

vt. 

Can. 



58, 
49, 
13, 
9, 
4, 
51, 



Little, Jane 16, 

Ellen 14, 

Charles 12, 

Alice 8, 

Henry 6, 

Ella 5, 

Josie 2, 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Lovejoy, Selah 

Adaline 
Ann A. 
Samuel C. 
Flora M. 
Catherine 
Lot 20, range 10. 
Lowe, Francis 57, 

Sarah A. 51, 

Willie 16, 

Lot 15, range 5. 
Mann, John W. 42, 

Betsey 81, 

Lot 3, range 5. 
Martin, Caleb K. 57, 

Clara M. 55, 

Byron E. 19, 

Lot 15, range 6. 
Marble, Samuel 79, 

Tula, or Tyla 47, 
Deborah Newell, 52, 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Marule, Benj. F. 49, 

Lucy M. 50, 

Winifred 18, 

Florence 11, 

Lot 17, range 8. 
Merryfield, James A. 62, 
Sophronia 63, 
Lot 18, range 3. 
Miller, Charles 42, 

Jennie 39, 

Lizzie 16, 

Villia 12, 

Charles 8, 



Can. 



N. H. 



N. H. 



Mass. 
N. H. 



N. H. 
Mass. 

N. H. 



Mass. 

N. H. 



N. H. 
Vt. 
N. H. 



Mass. 



Ger. 



196 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Miller, Bonney 


4. 


N. Y. 


Mower, Mary L. 


13, 


N. H. 


Emma 


2, 


N. H. 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Robert 


10 


( t 


Nutting, Alpheus 


75, 


Mass. 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Mary 


74, 


(( 


Moors, Abner 


71, 


N. H. 


Lot 17, range 


4- 




William H. 


26, 


( t 


Nutting, Charles 


55, 


N. H 


Herbert F. 


23, 


(( 


Nancy S. 


58, 


(( 


Mary S. 


19- 


( i 


Martha C. 


22, 


(( 


Albert 


II, 


ii 


Ella A. 


16, 


(( 


Lot 21, range 


10. 




Fred H. 


14, 


( ( 


Morse, Harland F. 


29, 


N. H. 


Lot 16, range 


8. 




Theoda A. 


22, 


Vt. 


Nutting, Isaac 


54, 


N. H 


Mary M. 


4, 


N. H. 


Susan 


51, 


t( 


Emma M. 


2, 


4 ( 


Marcellus A. 


22, 


(( 


Lot 2 1 , range 


10. 




Charles Gun, 


35, 




Morse, Henry F. 


34, 


N. H. 


William Henebury, 


24, 




Elizabeth R. 


29, 


a 


Thomas Downey, 


21, 




Etta E. 


9- 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


8. 




Frederick S. 


6, 


(i 


Nutting, Asa 


50, 


N. H 


Ervin C. 


3, 


it 


Ann M. 


37, 


Mass 


Lillian A. 





(( 


Maria A. 


19, 


6i 


Oliver H. 


t\' 


«( 


Lot 13, range 


6. 




Elizabeth F. 


17, 


(( 


Nutting, Lucy 


71, 


N. H 


Lot 20, range 


10. 




Polly Stevens, 


76, 


<( 


Mower, Josiah 


73, 


N. H. 


Lot 13, range 


6. 




Louisa 


67, 


ii 


Nutting, Luke H. 


46, 


N. H 


Enos 


35, 


n 


Mary Ann 


44, 


(( 


Lot 12, range 


10. 




Frank H. 


15, 


it 


Mower, Gilman 


71, 


N. H. 


Fred H. 


13, 


(( 


Gilman J. 


40, 


(« 


Mary E. 


9. 


(t 


Lucy Carter, 


35, 


11 


Willie E. 


8, 


(( 


Sally B. Patrick, 


82, 


Mass. 


Alice P. 


3, 


i( 


Lot 17, range 7. 




Lot 19, range 


5- 




Mower, Liberty 


70, 


N. H. 


Nutting, Alpheus 


75, 


Mass 


Mary A. 


55, 


(i 


Mary 


74, 


a 


Ellen C. 


25, 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


4. 




Samuel H. 


24, 


<t 


Page, Jonathan 


57, 


N. H 


Willie J. 


17, 


<< 


Lorinda 


52, 


(( 


Lot 15, range 


7- 




Lydia 


23, 


(t 


Mower, Nahum W. 


44, 


N. H. 


Harvey 


20, 


i6 


Lydia A. 


42, 


Mass. 


Harriet 


17, 


H 


Clara A. 


18, 


(( 


Adeline 


14, 


t ( 


Frank W. 


16, 


N. H. 


Lizzie 


12, 


i« 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



197 



Page, John 9, N. H. 

Clara M. 4, 

Lot 4, range 10. 

Parker, Lucy 74, N. H. 

Eliza A. 69, 

Abia C. 64, 

Lot 17, range 7. 



Parker, Alva 




50, 


N. H 


Amanda L. 




51. 


(( 


Merrill G. 




17, 


li 


Flora J. 




13. 


a 


Harriet 




9. 


(( 


Lot 12, range 


6. 




Parks, Clarence A. 




25, 


Mass 


Helen S. 




23, 


N. H 


Grace M. 




h 




Perkins, Aaron 




55, 


N. H 


Maria 




49. 


( ( 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Perkins, Moses S. 




76, 


N. H 


Cozby 




72, 


( ( 


Cozby Tenney, 




34, 


( ( 


Dora V. Tenney, 




12, 


it 


Lot 12, range 


6. 




Peasley, John A. 




27, 


N. H 


Alice M. 




19, 


( ( 


Devans 




17, 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


8. 





Perry, Thomas 
Cynthia 
Nancy 
Lot 12, 

Perry, John 

Almira 
Hattie 

Edward Dillon, 

AlexV Keller, 



range 6. 



Lot 21, range i. 



Phelps, Gurley A. 
Nancy B. 
Grace 
Charles S. 
Mary E. 



67, 
63. 

29, 

65, 
65, 
26, 

15, 
37, 

50. 

49, 
21, 

13, 
10, 



N. H. 
Vt. 

N. H. 

N. H. 



Scot. 

Vt. 
N. H. 



Phelps, William S. 5, N. H. 

Lot 12, range 6. 

Pierce, Samuel W. 64, N. H. 

Martha P. 55, 

J. Plummer 22, " 

Frank W. Sturtevant, 14, " 
Lot 16, range 6. 

Pierce, Frederick S. 50, N. H. 
Mary A. 52, " 

Angeline 9, " 

Lot 17, range 7. 

Pierce, Reuben 64, N. H. 

Cordelia J. 66, " 

Eloisa M. 34, 

Delia J. 23, " 

Lot 16, range 7. 

Pierce, Addison 56, N. H. 

Millie 60, 

Clark M. 20, 

Carrie E. 18, " 

Lot 20, range 6. 

Pierce, Benjamin 51, N. H. 

Lucinda 49, " 

George A. 24, " 

Ada L. 15, 

Lot 19, range 7. 

Pierce, Dexter 45, N. H. 

Mary E. 42, 

James M. 21, 

Loren D. 19, 

Willie B. 17, 

Jessie G. 13, 

Austin O. 11, 

Myron E. 8, 

Jane L. 4, 

Lot 2 1 , range 6. 

Pierce, Lewis L. 53, N. H. 

Christina M. 53, Mass. 
Xenophon 27, N. H. 

Lot 17. range 7. 

Pierce, Addison Jr. 27, Mass. 
Mary E. 25, N. H. 

Lot 17, range 7. 



198 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Pollard, Levi 


64, 


Mass. 


Prescott, Benj. F. 


36, 


Mass. 


Sarah 


66, 


N. H. 




Mary E. 


36, 


( i 


Lot 18, range 


6. 






Hermon S. 


14, 


N. H 


Poole, John W. 


60, 


N. H. 




Mary A. 


12, 


li 


Nancy H. 


62, 


it 




Fred A. 


9, 


a 


Louis K. Howe, 


22, 


H 




Henry M. 


7, 


a 


Lot 13, range 


6. 






Carrie 


4, 


i( 


Poole, Joel H. 


31. 


N. H. 




Helen 


t\. 


(( 


Lizzie 


29, 


Mass. 




Lot 14, range 


2. 




Arthur E. 


4, 


N. J. 


Priest 


, Jacob 


82, 


N. H. 


Lot 10, range 


4- 






Eunice 


72, 


ii 


Potter, George S. 


35' 


N. H. 




Lot 6, range 7 


, 




Mary L. 


32, 


(( 


Quin, 


John 


35, 


Irel'd 


George W. 


5. 


(( 




Ann D. 


26, 


(( 


Electa E. 


3, 


(( 




Patrick J, 


6, 


N. H 


Louisa M. 


f. 


«t 




Henry 


3, 


t« 


Lot 13, range 


6. 






John F. 


tV. 


ii 


Powers, Charles H. 


44, 


N. H. 


Mary 


Donnelly, 


28, 


Irerd 


Eliza 


40, 


N. Y. 




Lot 15, range 


4- 




Fred S. 


14. 


N. H. 


Rand 


, Emeline E. 


53, 


N. H 


Amanda Bailey, 


63, 


N. Y. 




Charles A. 


24, 


(( 


Mary Miller, 


20, 


Mass. 




Albert H. 


IS. 


ii 


Lot 17, range 


7- 






George H. 


12, 


a 


Prescott, Oren 


50, 


N. H. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Louisa 


47, 


1 1 


Raymond, Orlando 


43, 


N. H 


Eliot 0. 


18, 


it, 




Hattie E. 


32, 


(i 


Julius E. 


17. 


(( 




Ernest 0. 


6, 


ii 


Carrie M. 


14. 


(i 




Lot 22, range 


5- 




Willie E. 


4. 


( ( 


Raymond, Asahel S. 


40, 


N. H 


Lot 17, range 


6. 






Marietta A. 


27. 


(( 


Prescott, Addison 


36. 


N. H. 




Lot 22, range 5. 




Mary A. 


30, 


( ( 


Reardon, Michael 


45. 


IrePd 


John A. 


6, 


a 




Ellen 


44. 


( ( 


Bessie 


4, 


(« 




Jane 


15, 


N. H 


Alice 


I, 


4( 




Patrick 


14, 


a 


Lot 21, range 9. 






Michael 


12, 


a 


Prescott, Oren D. 


30, 


N. H. 




Mary Ellen 


9. 


i i 


Ella M. 


21, 


t ( 




Lot 8, range 5 


. 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Rice, 


Laban 


72, 


N. H 


Prescott, Charles F. 


31. 


N. H. 




Esther C. 


71, 


(( 


Mabel 


6, 


(( 




Jonas C. 


40, 


(i 


James E. Bemis, 


48, 


(( 




Nancy A. 


40, 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


6. 






Sophia 


19. 


(( 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



199 



Rice, Fred O. 15, N. H. 

Emily A. 13, " 

Herman C. 6, " 

Grace E. i, " 

Dorcas 103, Mass. 

Rice, George L. 32, N. H. 

Lucy H. 21, " 

George L. 4, " 
Lot 13, range 6. 

Rice, Ira 69, Mass. 

Phylena 61, 

Otis G. 39, 
Lot 3, range 7. 



Richardson, Geo. O. 36, 

Frances 35, 

Fred E. 9, 

Mabel V. 5, 

Phebe Lamb, 69, 

Rowena Bailey, 64, 

Lot 2, range 9. 

Ritchie, Robert 74, 

Mary 71, 

John 46, 

George C. 41, 

Adelbert 27, 

Sarah M. 30, 

Mary J. Pratt, 40, 

Willie H. Pratt, 12, 

Melinda H. Hutchinson, 74, 

Lot 18, range 7. 
Ripley, Eliza 78, 

Lot 12, range 6. 

Robbins, Leonard E. 42, 

Ellen M. 30, 

Ellsworth A. 11, 

Elvira Stiles, 63, 

Lot 21, range 10. 



Mass. 



N. H. 



N. H. 
N. H. 



Robbins, Wm. B. 30, N. H. 

Anna M. 

Jane W. 

Sarah E. 

Charles B. 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Robbins, Nancy A. 66, N. H. 

Lot 17, range 7. 



30, 
25, 
70, 
39. 
27. 



27. 

7- 
9 



Roberts, George 24, 

Sarah E. 20, 

Lot 17, range 7. 

Robertson, Samuel B. 55, 

Mary A. 

Lester S. 

Herbert A 

Willis W. Fairbanks, 5, 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Rolf, William H. 31, 

Elizabeth A. 25, 

Edward F. 5, 

Walter F. i. 

Lot 20, range 10. 
Ryan, Samuel 62, 

Hannah 61, 

Lot 17, range 8. 
Russel, Isaac S. 55, 

Olive G. 52, 

Sarah E. 10, 

Nancy Smith, 94, 

Arthur H. Felt, 17, 

Lot 17, range 3. 
Rust, Leopold 36, 

Rosalie 32, 

Sanderson, John 81, 

Lydia F. 54, 
Lot 17, range 7. 

Sawyer, Cummings 48, 

Elizabeth 34, 

Albert C. 13, 

Emily J. 10, 
Fred L. 7, 

Lot 22, range 8. 

Sawyer, Alfred 41, 

Lucy M. 43, 

Mary A. 17, 

Clifton A. II, 

Margaret, 78, 

Marshal D. Jaquith, 45, 

Lot 21, range 10. 

Sawyer, Leonard F. 33, 

Mary B. 26, 



Mass. 

N. H. 

Me. 



N. H. 

N. H. 
Mass. 

N. H. 

N. H. 

N. H. 

i i 
it 

i i 

N. Y. 
Can. 



Mass. 
N. H. 

N. H. 
Mass. 
N. H. 



N. H. 



N. H. 



200 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Sawyer, Etta M. 


6, 


N. H. 


Sheehy, Edward 




28, 


Ire. 


ElIaM. 


6, 


( t 




Nancy 




30, 


44 


Lot 1 8, range 


9- 






Frank 




II, 


N. H 


Scholland, Patrick 


45. 


Ire. 




John T. 




6, 


44 


Maggie 


42, 


44 




Jennie 




4, 


4 4 


Patrick 


16, 


a 




Edward J. 




2, 


4 i 


Catherine 


10, 


44 




Thomas 




19, 


44 


Thomas 


8, 


4& 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Lot 17, range 


7- 




Smith, 


Elijah 




61, 


N. H 


Simeonough, Godfrey 


33i 


Can. 




Rebecca 




63. 


4 4 


Mary 


25. 


1 4 




Almeda M. 




33. 


44 


Napoleon 


6, 


44 




Lot 19, range 


4- 




Joseph 


3. 


44 


Smith, 


J. M. H. 




46, 


N. H 


Alice Savage, 


13. 


4 4 




Elizabeth 




39- 


44 


Lot 17, range 


7- 






Mattie M. 




12, 


Ga. 


Sharon, John 


30' 


Can. 




Alonzo S. 




9. 


S. C. 


Mary 


24, 


«4 




Anna T. 




7- 


Ohio. 


Mary 


6, 


4 4 




James H. 




5. 


Me. 


Frederick 


4. 


44 




George C. 




2, 


Wis. 



Isaac 
Gideon Bailey, 

Shattuck, Vrying D. 
Sally M. 
Lot 1 1 , range 
Shattuck, Edmund P. 
Rachel R. 
Lucy M. 
Edmund C. 
Daniel C. 
Lot II, range 
Shedd, Nathan C. 
Sally M. 
Xenophon B. 
Mark D. 
Isaac Ryan, 

Lot 17, range 
Shedd, John B. 
Sarah J. 
Frank E. 

Sheehy, John 
Ellen 



I, " Lot 17, range 6. 

21, " Smith, Joseph 45, N. H. 

Eliza A. 43, 

64, Mass. Frank L. 21, " 

62, N. H. Lot 13, range 6. 

;, Smith, Eliza 45, Mass. 

62, Mass. Ampudia 24, " 

58, N. H. Wales 23, 

24. Mass. Carrie 15, " 

21, " Lot 17, range 7. 

18, " Spaulding, Richard 68, Mass. 

;. Alvira 54, N. H. 

49, N. H. Lot 13, range 6. 

41, " Spaulding, Frederick 36, N. H. 
24, " Mary Ann 30, " 

4, " Emma L. 8, " 

37, " Edith B. I, 

7. Mary A. 60, 

47, N. H. Ann F. 33, " 

46, " Ermina M. 38, " 

16, " Lot 7, range 7. 

Spaulding, Leonard E. 32, N. H. 
■j;^, Ire. Mary A. 32, Mass. 

70, " Spaulding, Ambrose 53, N. H. 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN, 



201 



Spaulding, Lizzie M. 51, 

Carrie L. 20, 

Minnie 9, 

Clarence Crosby, 22, 

Lot 3, range 8. 
Spaulding, Austin A. 29, 
Vryland S. 29, 
Lot II, range 5. 



64, 
61, 
13, 

61, 
59. 

25, 
22 

13- 
80, 

10, 



Vt. 
N. H. 



N. H. 
Mass. 

N. H. 



Vt. 

N. H. 



N. H. 
Me. 
N. H. 



Stanley, Alva 

Lucy B. 
Henry A. 
Lot I, range 5 
Stearns, Thomas A. 
Almeda S. 
Henry M. 
Mary C. 
Sarah A. 
Sarah Averill, 
Fred C. Emery, 

Lot 16, range 5. 
Slebbins, Josiah 49, 

Submit 46, 

Etta E. 14, 

Mary L. 12, 

Nettie S. 9, " 

Josiah C. 5, " 

Lot 18, range 6. 
Stearns. Clarissa 67. N. H 

Adaliza A. 36, " 
Lot 17, range 7. 
Stevens, William P. 66, N. H 
Mary E. 56, " 

Sally 67, " 

Charles 57, " 

Lot 12, range 9. 
Stevens, Albert 36, 

Jennie L. 30, 

Ida M. 6, 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Stoen, John 50, 

Julian 47, 

Joseph 19, 

Kurd 16, 

Jane 14, 



N. H. 
N. Y. 
N. H. 

Can. 



Stoen, Alice 5, Can. 

Lot 12, range 10. 
Stone, James F. 40, Mass. 

Rachel A. 35, 

Lizzie M. 18, 

Fred J. 13, " 

Lot 3, range 7. 
Stratton, Isaac 84, N. H. 

Betsey 85, 

Lot 13, range 10. 
Stratton, Jona. W. 59, N. H. 

Edna J. 40, " 

Lot 13, range 10. 
Stratton, Fred G. 30, N. H. 

Martha A. 29, 
Lot 21, range 10. 
Taggart, Esther 64, N. H. 

Charles W. 22, " 
Lot 17, range 7. 
Tarbox, Edward B. 28, N. H. 

Etta 22, Mass. 

Susan B. 58, N. H. 

Lot 16, range 9. 
Thayer, Joseph A. 53, N. H. 

Abbie 42, " 

George B. Hagget, 16, Mass. 

Lot 19, range 5. 
Thomas, Eliza L. 26, Vt. 

Lula B. 5, N. H. 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Towne, Liberty 45, N. H. 

Lizzie yj, " 

Albert 18, 

Jennie 16, Mass. 

Willie K. II, N. H. 

Sylvester 8, " 

Freelove 5, " 

Lot 16, range 7. 
Towne, Levi P. 47, Vt. 

Emily A. 45, N. H. 

Carrie S. 16, " 

Julia E. 6, " 

Lot 10, range 10. 
Towns, Sylvester A. 40, N. H. 



202 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Towns, Sarah J. 


yi^ 


N. H 


Lot 1 6, range 


7- 




Towns, Polly 


76, 


N. H 


George A. 


36, 


( ( 


Mary L. 


29, 


kk 


George M. 


4, 


i ( 


Nola L. 


h 


(i 


Lot 1 6, range 


7- 




Turner, Jona. D. 


67, 


N. H 


Cynthia E., 


59. 


(( 


Lot 17, range 


8. 




Turner, Henry A. 


32, 


N. H 


Lucy A. 


30. 


<i( 


Lucy L. 


6, 


(( 


Eunice B. 


4. 


ii 


Lot 17, range 


8. 




Underwood, Geo. A. 


49. 


N. H 


Mahala B 


• 39. 


a 


Geo. B. 


18, 


i; 


Deborah 


IS. 


<( 


Abby A. 


2, 


<( 


Lot 9, range 8 






Upton, Peter 


56, 


N. H. 


Sarah M. 


39. 


4( 


Mary A. 


16, 


(( 


Hiram D. 


13. 


a 


Alice W. 


9- 


( ( 


Lot 17, range 


7- 




Upton, Thomas 


54. 


N. H, 


Sophia 


42, 


i ( 


Adelia 


22, 


( ( 


Lot 17, range 


8. 




Upton, William 


52, 


N. H, 


Sally 


48, 


( ( 


James M. 


14, 


( t 


Lot 22, range 


5- 




Upton, Eliza 


46, 


Mass. 


Frank 


14, 


N. H. 


Verder, John F. 


73, 


Mass. 


Sarah J. 


66, 


N. H. 


Lot 17, range 


7. 




Verder, Albert S. 


41. 


N. H. 



Verder, Priscilla M. 41, 
Lefy A. 15, 

Lot 17, range 7. 

Verder, Charles W. 35, 
Sarah E. 42, 

Lot 17, range 7. 

Wales, John M. 53, 

Cynthia A. 47, 

Lot 17, range 8. 

Warren, Richard 76, 

Maria 72, 

Cornelius W. 41, 
Edna W. 41, 

Lot 14, range 8. 

Waters, Sophia M. 55, 

Lot 17, range 7. 

Webster, William T. 40, 

D. C. 37, 
C. Fred 12, 

Lot 17, range 7. 
Webster, Wilbur 34, 

Lizzie E. 22, 

Thomas Fitzgerald, 27, 

Lot 17, range 7. 

Wellman, Elijah 78, 

Samuel 65, 

Fanny Royce, 82, 

Mary Wallace, 56, 

Lot 22, range 5. 
Wheeler, Henry B. 39, 

Mrs. B. 
F. H. 

E. W. 
Abigail 
Wilson S. 
Hattie C. 

John T. Stone, 
T. H. Curtis, 
Elizabeth Houghton, 
Emily M. Towns, 
Vesta Metcalf, 

Lot 17, range 7. 



N. H. 



N. H. 



Vt. 
N. H. 

Vt. 

N. H. 



Vt. 
Mass. 

( ( 

Mass . 

(( 

N. H. 



N. H. 



42, 




14. 




8, 




80, 




59. 




17, 




39. 


Mass 




N. H 


45. 


Mass 


23. 


N. H, 


26, 


4 4 



CENSUS OF THE TOWN. 



203 



Wheeler, James A. 

Madeline P. 
Mary J. 
Rosira 
John F. 
Lot 16, range 
Whitney, Henry H. 
Caroline F. 
Lot 22, range 
Whitney, Thomas P. 
Harriet A. 
Whitney, John 

Alvira S. 
Elizabeth A. 
Lot 17, range 
Wilber, Le Prelett 
Hannah 
Lot 17, range 
Wilber, Lowell 

Amarantha 



67, Mass. 
62, 



24, N. Y. Willoughby, Nelson L. 40, N. H. 

22, N. H. Harriet 46, 

12, N. Y. Dora 25, " 

59, N. H. Eva ID, 

27, Conn. Lillian 4, " 

'. Frank Sweetland, Mass. 

Winch, Caleb, 46, N. Y. 

Mary D. 48, N. H. 

Myra L 14, 

Mass. Lot 17, range 8. 

N. H. Woodburn, Emma F. 27, N. H. 
Faith C. 2, 

Mass. Woodruff, John W. 57, N. J. 

Susan A. 52, " 

Mass. Anna M. 22, " 

Fred S. 15, " 

Abby C. Tucker, 81, " 

Mass. Lot 12, range 2. 



4- 
56, 
S3. 
SO, 
58, 
24, 

7- 
69, 
66, 

7- 
29, 

32, 



Lot 17, range 7. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

CONCLUSION— 1880. 

THE end of the period cov^ered by this history has now- 
arrived, — a period of 130 years. Two generations 
have passed and gone, and only a few are left of the third 
to tell the history of the first. The descendants of the early 
settlers are in the minority among the present inhabitants 
of the town. Very few are in possession of the original 
homesteads, and that number is fast diminishing. In the 
male line we find only the names of Clarence S. Bailey, 
Fred. J. Lawrence, John and Simpson Hodge, William and 
Charles Stevens, and Geo. A. Underwood. In the female 
line, Joel W. Poole, Jona. J. Comstock, and Jonas C. Rice. 

The early settlers now represented by their descendants 
are Oliver Bacon, David Bailey, Jacob Baldwin, Jona. Blod- 
gett, Moses Burpee, Kendall Briant, Joseph Cutter, John 
Cutter, Moses Cutter, James Cutter, David Chadwick, Jo- 
seph Chamberlin, Thomas Dutton, Daniel Emery, William 
Emery, Jona. Fox, Thomas French, Thomas Fisk, Benjamin 
Frost, Roger Gilmore, Thomas Goff, Joseph Hodge, Eben- 
ezer Jaquith, Jacob Jewell, Levi Johnson, Joseph Joslin, 
David Lacy, Benj. Lawrence, Thomas Mower, Benj. Nut- 
ting, Isaac Nutting, Jacob Newell, Joseph Perkins, Samuel 
Pierce, Ebenezer Poole, Benj. Prescott, David Sawtell, David 
Stratton, Jona. Stanley, James Stevens, Jereme Underwood, 
Elijah Wellman, and even these have probably more repre- 
sentatives in other places than in the town of Jaffrey. 
Wherever they are, I think, like the Romans of old, they 
will feel honored in being sons of Jaffrey. 



TOWN OFFICERS, ETC. 205 

The census recently taken shows the number of inhabi- 
tants to be 1,267. The largest number in Jaffrey was in 
1850, which was 1,497. Number of tax-payers in 1880, 
468 ; valuation, including polls, $730,798. 



MONEY ASSESSED. 




For State tax, 


;^ 1,868.00 




county tax, 


1.523-31 




school tax, 


1,634.50 




town charges. 


1,674-19 




interest on town debt, 


1,000.00 




highway and bridges, 


700.00 




breaking roads, 


300.00 




deficiencies for 1879, 


700.00 




• watering-troughs, 


100.00 




redeeming town bonds, 


1,000.00= 


=$10,500.10 


Drawn from state, 


^2,400.00 




Outstanding taxes, 


. 300.00 




Money in savings-bank, 


1,300.00= 


=^4,000.00 




^6,500.00 


Five per cent, added, 




325.00 




$6,825.00 


Tax on dogs, 




49.00 


SCHOOLS 


;. 




Money assessed, 




$1,634-50 


Literary fund and interest. 




272.98 



$1,907.48 

TOWN OFFICERS, ETC., 1880. 

Moderator — Charles H. Powers. 
Town-clerk — Joseph P. Frost. 

Selectmen — Clarence S. Bailey, Geo. A. Underwood, W. 
B. Robbins. 



206 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Town treasurer — Charles H. Powers. 

Superintending School Committee — Wm. W. Livingston. 

Deputy sheriff — Fred. S. Pierce. 

Justices — State : Frank H. Cutter, Fred. S. Pierce, F. B. 
Spalter ; — County : G. A. Phelps, J. W. Fassett, Alfred Saw- 
yer, H. B. Aldrich, L. N. VVilloughby, J. P. Frost. 

Postmasters — Centre, G. A. Phelps ; East Jaffrey, Peter 
Upton. 

Physicians — Centre, G. A. Phelps ; East Jaffrey, Oscar 
H. Bradley. 

Lawyer — East Jaffrey, John H. Fox, 

Ministers — Centre, Rev, Wm. W. Livingston ; East Jaf- 
frey, 2d Congregational, Rev. John C, Staples ; Baptist, 
Rev. Theodore C, Gleason ; Universalist, Rev. Fred. W, 
Bailey. 

Express agent — Aaron Perkins. 

Insurance agents — Pierce & White, F. S. Cutter. 

Hotels — Centre, Jonas Cutter, Jonas C. Rice ; East Jaf- 
frey, Granite State, Rodney Brown ; Mountain House, 
Batchelder & Newton. 

Merchants — Centre, J, T. Biggelow ; East Jaffrey, J. S, 
Lacy, C, H. Powers, Walter Goodnow & Co, ; meat, Kit- 
tredge & Robbins, Reuben Pierce, 

Millinery — Mrs. Prescott. 

Dress-makers — Centre, Miss E, R, Gibbs, Mrs. G. L. 
Rice ; East Jaffrey, Mrs. T. Hanscom, 

Hair-dresser — A. Caldwell. 

Banks — Monadnock National Bank, Benjamin Cutter, 
president, Peter Upton, cashier ; Monadnock Savings Bank, 
Oscar H. Bradley, president, Peter Upton, treasurer. 

Livery stables — Centre, Jonas Cutter ; East Jaffrey, 
Aaron Perkins. 

Manufacturers — Centre : leather, Julius Cutter ; chair 
stuff, Heath & Gilmore ; furniture, F, L, King ; shoes, 
Luke French ; — East Jaffrey : wooden ware, A. J, & J. E. 
Bemis ; blue drilling. White Bros. ; dry pulp, G. A. Shep- 



TOWN OFFICERS, ETC. 20/ 

ard & Co., Elijah Sturtevant, agent ; lumber, J. E. Bemis ; 
nest-boxes, Annett & Murdock ; shoes, G. Fairbanks ; shoe- 
knives, Wilbur Webster. 

Mechanics — Centre : blacksmiths, Joseph Smith & Son ; 
carpenters, J. P. Frost, Alvah Parker ; cooper, Elbridge 
Baldwin ; printers, Livingston Bros. ; wheelwright, John 
Dunbar ; — East Jaffrey : blacksmiths, D. A. Colburn, Ira 
Gardner ; carpenters, L. L. Pierce, Liberty Towne, G. A. 
Towne, Sylvester Towne, B. E. Bartlett, P. B. Robinson ; 
cooper, N. C. Shedd ; gunsmith, J. S. Button; brick-masons, 
I. C. Ryan, W. H. Ingraham ; watches and jewelry, J. S. 
Freeman, 



Genealogical Register. 



15 



GENEALOGY. 



Abbreviations: — a., aged; b., born; m., married; unm., unmarried; 
d., died; s., son; dau., daughter; ch., child— children ; r., residence; 
re., removed. 



AINSWORTH FAMILY. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



7 
8 



lO 

II 
(5) 

12 



Daniel Ainsworth and his wife Alice, natives of 
England, settled in Roxbury, Mass., where she d. in 
16S5, childless. He sent to England for his nephew, 
Edward, and made him his heir. 

Edward Ainsworth appears to have been a sea-faring 
man. He m. Joanna Hemmingway, Jan. 11, 16S7-S. 

Children by Joanna (Hemmingway) Ainsworth: 

I. Joshua, b. Jan. 32, 1688-9 ' lived only three 

days. 
II. Hannah, b. Jan. 21, 1689-90; m. John Green, 
of Brookheld, Mass. 
Edward, b. Atig. 18, 1693 ; m. Joanna Davis, 

of Roxbury, Mass. -\- 
JElizabeth, h. Nov. iS, 1695 ; m. John Johnson, 

of Brookfield, Mass. 
Daniel, b. Oct. 7, 1697. 



Ill 



IV 



V 



VI. Joanna, b. 



[699. 



VII. Joanna, b. Oct. 5, 1700; {}) is this a second 
Joanna, or by error per the date of the first. 
VIII. Judith, b. Jan. 25, 1702-3 ; m. James Marcy. 
IX. Smith, b. March. 25, 1712; a bachelor. 

Edward Ainsworth, Jr., m. Joanna Davis. 
I. Abigail, b. 



212 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



13 
16 



(16) 

17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 

(17) 



23 

24 

(24) 

25 
26 

27 



II. Daniel, b. 

III. Alice, b. 

IV. Edward, b. 

V. William, h. 

Nov. 14, 



[805.+ 



172S; m. Sybil Child. 
1729; m. Mary Marcy 



William Ainsworth, of Woodstock, Conn. Chil- 
dren by Mary (Marcy) Ainsworth : 

I. Ldban, b. July 19, 17^7; m- Mary Minot ; d. 

March 17, 185S. -f 
II. Marsylvia, b. Aug., 1759 ; m. Daniel Needham ; 
d. May 20, 1853. 

III. Louisa, b. ; m. Paul, of Newport, 

N. H. 

IV. Atidreto, b. March 17, 1766, unm. ; d. July, 1796. 

V. Oliver b. 

VI. Luke, b. ; d. young. 

Laban Ainsworth. The town records, which have 
been badly kept and badly transcribed, state his birth 
as of July 9, 17541 while authority says July 19, 1757- 
He studied under Nathaniel Tisdale, of Lebanon, Conn., 
and entered Dartmouth college as sophomore in 1775 i 
graduated, 177S ; studied theology with Rev. Stephen 
West, of Stockbridge. Preached for two years at Spen- 
certown, on the Hudson ; was foi' some months chaplain 
in Major McKinstry's corps. Ordained pastor of the 
church in JaftVey, Dec. 11, 1782; m. Dec. 4, 1787, 
Mary Minot, dau. of Jonas Minot, of Concord, Mass. 
She d. Feb. 3, 1845. Their children were, — 

I. Sarah, b. March 23, 1789; m. Isaac Parker; 

d. May 29, 1S57. 
II. Willia7n, h. Aug. 24, 1792; m. Mary Morse 
Stearns ; d. June 14, 1842. -|- [See Coll. 
Graduates.] 

William Ainsworth. Children by Mary Morse 
(Stearns) Ainsworth : 

I. Frederick Smith, b. April 11, 1820; m. Mary 
Harris. [See Coll. Graduates.] 

II. Mary Minot, b. Feb. 26, 1822 ; m. Theodore P. 

Green, U. S. Navy. 

III. 'William Parker, b. Dec. 22, 1825. Killed in 

Battle at Port Royal, Va., 1862. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



213 



28 I IV. Josiah^ b. Aug. 14, 1S33; d. Oct. 23, 1833. 
After these, the names in this branch ai"e all extinct. 



ADAMS FAMILY. 

Many of the descendants of this family have been residents of 
JaflVey ; — Thomas and Stephen, previous to 1774; Ephraim, 
previous to 1778 ; Samuel, 177S ; Jonas, 1785 ; and Silas, pre- 
vious to 1793. 



Thomas was a son of Dea. Ephraim and Lydia 
(Kinsman) Adams, of New Ipswich, a descendant of 
William Adams, who settled in Cambridge in 1635, 
and removed to Ipswich, Mass., previous to 1642. He 
m. Molly Farnsworth, and settled on lot 17, range 4; 
d. Oct. 1 1, 1820, a. 69. His widow d. June 24, 1843, a. 
88. They had no children. 

Mr. Adams was one of the prominent men in town, 
and held many offices of trust ; — was moderator, select- 
man, town treasurer, a militia officer, and a soldier in 
the Revolution. 



Ephraim Adams was probably a brother. He set- 
tled on lot 7, range 3, at the base of Grand Monadnock, 
afterwards the residence of Joseph Meeds, now un- 
inhabited. His name appears on the records for the 
last time, as highway surveyor, in 17S9. He was a 
soldier in the Revolution. 



Stephen Adams settled in the west part of the 
town. His name appears in 1774 on a remonstrance, 
signed by the inhabitants of JaflVey, against the annex- 
ation of a portion of the east part of the town to 
Feterboro' Slip, now Sharon. In 1775 he enlisted into 
Capt. Philip Thomas's company, of Rindge. This com- 
pany was in the battle of Bunker Hill, and lost three 
men, killed in that battle. 

In 1777 Stephen Adams enlisted for three years, or 
during the war, and was in service at Ticonderoga. It 
seems quite probable that he was the same man who 
enlisted for three months in Capt. Thomas's company 
in 1775. 



214 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



5 
6 

7 
8 

9 

lO 



II 



12 

H 

15 
16 



17 



18 
19 

20 

21 



Jonas Adams came from New Ipswich and settled 
on lot II, range 4, previous to 1785, and left town 

, and left a bii-th 



about I 79S. He married Phebe 
record of six children. 



I. Lucy, b. March 22, 1784, at New Ipswich. 
II. Jere, b. Aug. 15, 17S5. 

III. Jonas, b. Aug. 25, 1787; d. Feb. 26, 1790. 

IV. Phineas, b. Oct. 20, 17S9. 

V. Millet/, b. Sept. 2, 1791. 
VI. JVanci/, b. Jan. 25, 1794. 



-, and left on record the 



Silas Adams m. Lois — 
birth of five children. 

I. Thirza, b. July 7, 1792. 
II. /Silas, b. Feb. 6, 1796. 

III. Lois, b. Oct. 29, 1799. 

IV. Gregory, b. June 16, 1S04. 

V. Asa, b. Oct. 3, 1805. 

Mr. Adams settled on lot 16, range 2, about i793» 
and left town about 1S07. It was afterwards owned by 
John Pierce. 



Thomas Adams, 2^, son of Daniel and Sarah (Clark) 
Adams, and grandson of Dea. Ephraim Adams, of New 
Ipswich, was born at Fitzwilliam, May 9, 1785 ; 
became a resident of Jaflrey in 1S06. He settled on 
lot 17, range 4, and m, Sarah Sawtell, of Jaftrey. 
Capt. Adams was highly esteemed as a citizen, and held 
many offices of trust : was town-clerk, selectman, 
superintending school committee, and for many 3'ears 
a distinguished teacher in the public schools. When 
the rifle company was organized, he was chosen one 
of its officers, and afterwards its commander. They 
had a family of ten children, none of whom are now 
residents of the town. He d. Sept. 11, 1841, a. 56. 
His wife d. Oct. 25, 1828, a. 40. 

I. Cynthia, b. Oct. 20, 1808; m. Orford Capron, 
q. V. 

II. Thomas, b. Jan. 27, 1810; d. Dec. 7, 1834. 

III. Ephraim, b. Nov. 15, 181 1 ; m. Catherine Cal- 

laiian ; r. in Nashua. 

IV. David Sawtell, b. Dec. 11, 1813 ; d. at Canton, 

Oct. 15, 1834; unm. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 21 5 

22 V. tTames, b. Feb. S, iSi6; m. and re. to Eliza- 
bethtown, 111. 

23 VI. George, b. March 2, 181S; re. to Dorien, Ga. 

24 VII. Moses, b. Feb. i, 1820; m. Fanny Howe; and 
d. at Nashua, Feb. 8, 1850, leaving a son, 
John Qiiincy, b. Aug. 21, 1847 ; afterwards 
adopted by Orford Capron ; d. Oct. 23, 
1864, in the marine hospital at Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

25 VIII. Amos S., b. Jan. 30, 1S23 ; studied medicine 
at Woodstock, Vt., and settled in Lynn, 
Mass. 

26 IX. Charles A., b. Aug. 17, 1824; r. in Lynn; is a 
teacher of music. 

27 X. Sarah M., b. Sept. 18, 1826; r. in Nashville, 
N. H., 1852. 



28 



29 

30 
31 

32 
33 

34 
35 



Capt. Samuel Adams was born in Boxford, Mass., 
Aug. 22, 1750. He was a son of Isaac and Mary 
(Wood) Adams. Removed with his father to Rindge, 
about 1772, and to Jaffrey in i77S- The emigrant of 
this family was Robert, who resided in Ipswich, Mass., 
in 1635, afterwards in Salem and Newbur}', and d. in 
1682. In 1773, July I, Capt. Adams m. Lucy, dau. of 
Col. Eliphalet and Lucy (Peabody) Spoftbrd, of 
Boxford. He built the first meeting-house in Jaftrey ; 
was a Capt. of the militia and a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion. He d. of typhus fever, Feb, 21, 1813 ; his widow 
d. Feb. 23, of the same disease, and both were buried in 
the same grave. They had ten children. The two 
oldest were born in Rindge. 

I. Eli2yhalet, b. Feb. 10, 1775. Emigrated to 

Upper Canada, 
n. Isaac, b. Nov. 18, 1776. -j- 

III. Sally, b. Jan 28, 1779. Emigrated to Upper 

Canada, and d., 1854. 

IV. Samuel, b. Aug. 16, 1782.-!- 

V. Lucy, b. Jan. 23, 1785 ; iii. Artemas Lawrence, 

q. V. 
VI. Polly, b. Jan. 5, 1787; m. i^ Perley P. 
Burnam ; m., 2^, Joseph G. Swan, of 
Gilead, Me. 
VII. Israel, b. Jan. 27, 1790 ; m. Harriet Putnam ; r. 
in Danvers, Mass. ; d. Feb. 8, 1857. 



2l6 

36 

37 
38 



(30) 



39 
40 



41 
42 

43 

44 

45 
46 

47 
4S 
49 



(32) 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

VIII. Jacob., b. Sept. 25, 1792 ; re. to Sacket's Harbor ; 
from thence to Upper Canada; and d. Jan. 
21, 1S67. 

IX. Betsy, b. March 24, 1794; m. Eliphas Chap- 

man, of Bethel, Me. ; d. Oct. 15, 1847. 

X. Daniel, b. Aug. 19, 1796; re. to Watertown, 

N. Y., and was drowned. 



Isaac Adams m., i^*, Deborah Twitchell, of Dublin, 
N. H. ; re. to Gilead, Me. Mrs. Adams, with her in- 
fant, was drowned in the Androscoggin river. M., 2"^, 
Olive Wright, of Dublin. He d. Nov., 1848 ; his wid., 
Olive, d. April 22, 1856, a. 79. 

Children by first wife : 

I. Eliphalet, b. Feb. — , 1801 ; d. 1803. 
II. Infant, drowned 1S03. 

Children by second wife : 

III. lEliphalet, b. Feb. 23, 1804. 

IV. Darius, b. April i, 1805. 
V. Samuel, b. Dec. 19, 1806. 

VI. Deborah, b. March 23, 1808. 
VII. Lucy, b. Jan. 9, 1810. 
VIII. Aphia, b. Oct. 3, 18 11. 

IX. Isaac, b. July 23, 1813. 
X. Israel, b. May 26, 1815. 

XI. Olive, b. 1 818. 



Samuel Adams m., i'*, Sally, dau. of Francis 
Wright, of Jaflrey ; m., 2'^, Eliza Learnard, of Dublin ; 
r. Watertown, N. Y. He d. Dec. 18, 1854, a. 72 ; his 
wife, Sally, d. Aug. 19, 1837, ^* 47* 

Children by first wife : 




/ 



Albertype — Forbes Co., Boston. 




GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 21/ 

50 I. John Wright, b. Nov. 5, 1816; m., 1S46, Ber- 
intha Gowdy. 

51 II. Israel, b. Nov. 12, 1818; m. Harriet Boynton. 

52 III. Ariemas X., b. Jan., 1821 ; m., i^*, Delilah 
Hill ; z"*, Mary J. Adams. 

53 IV. Lucy, b. Sept. 3, 1822 ; m. Pierson H. Thurs- 
ton. 

54 V. Caroline Elizdbeth,h.'^\\\y ^\,\Z^6\ m. Henry 
Andrews. 

Child by second wife : 

55 VI. Sarah E., b. Aug. 31, 1S43 ; d. Sept. 7, 1845. 



56 Stephen Adams came from Ipswich, Mass., about 
1807 ; settled in school-district No. 5 ; m. Mehitable 
, and had children : 

£;7 I. Stephen, b. at Ipswich ; m., Aug., 1813, Re- 

becca Chadwick, of Rindge. 

58 II. Isaac, b. 1794; m. Adelia, dau. of Capt. Ed- 
ward and Ruth Perkins, of JafiVey ; d. May 
18, 1852. She d. July 28, 1864, a. 63.+ 

59 III. Jesse, b. 1796; d. Dec. 15, 1863.4- 



(58) 

60 
61 

62 

63 
64 

65 



(59) 

66 

67 
68 



Isaac Adams and wife, Adelia, had, — 

I. Edward Francis, b. May 25, 1825. 
II. Daniel Perkins, b. March 8, 1827 ; m. Emily 
L., dau. of Edmund and Olive Burpee. 

III. Lysander Alonzo, b. July 5, 1829. 

IV. Stephen A. 
V. Andrew J. 

VI. Adelia J£, b. 183S ; m. George G. Bailey, Oct. 
21, 1S59. 



Jesse Adams m. Ruth Perkins ; six children : 

I. Joseph A., b. 1830.4- 
II. Sarah M., b. 1S32. 
III. Alphonzo A., b. 1S55. 



2l8 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



69 
70 

71 



(66) 



(69) 



80 



(75) 



IV. Austin 0., b. 1S3S ; m. 
V. Roderick H., h. 1S40. 
VI. Elizabeth A., b. 1S46. 



2"* 



Joseph A. Adams m., i'', Martha ; 

Mrs. Roancy Plummer. 

(i) Edgar, b. 1857. (2) Everett F., b. 1S62. (3) 
EHmer J.,h. 1S63. 



Austin O. Adams m. Sarah A. 



-. Two children 



(i) 6^mceJ!/:, b. 1871. (2) Willie 31., h. 18^2. 



Daniel Adams, b. at Cambridge, Mass., March 14, 
176S, was a son of Dea. Joseph Adams, a descendant 
of Henry, who emigrrated from Devonshhe, Enghmd, 
in 1630. He m. Phebe Britton, b. Jan. 25, 1778 ; came 
to Jartrey about 1813, and puichased the farm of Dea. 
Eleazer Spoflbrd, which now comprises a large part of 
East JaftVey. He afterwards sold the same, and bought 
a farm of Amos Milliken, near the Monadnock Mineral 
Spring. In 1840. he re. to Springfield, Vt., and d. 
April 3, 1857. ^'s '^if^ ^^- ^'»y 20, 1847. 

Phebe. b. March 18, 1794. 
Cynthia, b. April 14, 1796. 
Daniel, b. May 22, 1798.-I- 

Hannah, b. May 20, 1801 ; d. . 

Hannah, b. Feb. 18, 1804; m. Jonathan 

Adams ; r. Chester, Vt. 
Franklin, b. April 7, 1805. 
Louisa, b. Dec. 14, 1806 ; m. Enos Holmes ; d. 

at Bertrand, Mich., Jan. 25, 1776. 
VIII. Harriet, b. Dec. 14, 1817 ; m. Amos E. Buss, 

r. Oneida, Ohio. He d. at Springfield, Vt., 

April 3, 1857. She d., May 20, 1847. 



n 


I. 


74 


II. 


15 


III. 


76 


IV. 


n 


V. 


78 


VI. 


79 


VII. 



Daniel Adams m., i'', Elmira, adopted dau. of Will- 
iam and Sally (Searle) Hodge ; m., 2'^, Betsey Holmes ; 
re. to Springfield, Vt., and d. there. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 219 

8i I. Sarah, b. ; m. Rev. Eleazer S. Foster, 

q. V. 

82 II. Caroline^ b. at Jaftrey ; m. Daniel Brown, of 

Springfield, Vt. 

83 III. Cynthia, b. at Jaftrey ; m. John M. Wales ; d. 
1S74, a. 48. 



84 



85 



86 



Nehemiah Adams came from Ipswich, Mass., about 
1820; settled in school-district No. 5 ; m. Lydia Benja- 
min ; had eight children. He d. Aug. 10, 1853, ^- 53- 
Mr. Adams was a member of the state convention for 
the revision of the constitution in 1850. 

(i) Augustus A., b. at Hartford, Vt. in 1829. 

(2) George A., h. Nov. 24, 1831 ; m. Josephine, 

dau. of Luther and Caroline Cutter, r. Troy. 

(3) Oscar J^.,h. 1833. 

(4) Isaac 31., h. 1835. 

(5) Helen i., b. 1838. 

(6) Oren S., b. 1840. 

(7) Charles W., b. 1843. 

(8) Abb)/ i^., b. 1S45. 



Arad Adams, son of Israel Adams, who came from 
Andover, Mass., to Rindge in 1772, came to East Jaf- 
frey, and engaged for a time in trade. He m. Ruby 
Hale, daughter of Emerson and Jemima (Foster) Hale, 
and has two children. Mr. Adams d. at East Jaftrey. 

(i) Maria, h., June 25, 1840. 

(2) Lizzie, b. May 8, 1843 ; d. Jan., 1857. 



Marshal C. Adams, son of Marshal Adams, a de- 
scendant of Oliver Adams, of Chelmsford, Mass., was 
b. at Rindge, May 23, 1827 ; m., April 19, 1853, Susan 
B. Patterson ; re. to Jaftrey, and settled on lot 5, range 
6, the old Gilmore place. Four children : 

(i) Sarah L.,h. 1859. 

(2) Susan E., b. 1861. 

(3) Alice P., b. 1867. 

(4) George A., b. 1870. 



220 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



BACON FAMILY. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



(7) 



9 

lO 

II 

12 

'3 



Thomas Bacon emigrated from 
mouth, Mass. He d. April ii, 1749, a 
d. April 17, 1759. 



England 



81 



to Ply- 
his widow 



His son, the Rev. Jacob Bacon, graduated at Har- 
vard college in 173I1 studied divinity, and settled in 
Keene, N. H., Aug. 5, 1738. He was the first minister 
settled in that town. In 1747 he was dismissed at his 
own request, without the usual formalities. A few days 
afterwards the town was abandoned by the inhabitants, 
through fear of the Indians, who soon burnt it. Mr. 
Bacon returned to Plymouth, and m., April 22, 1749^ 
Mary , by whom he had five children : 



I. Mary^ b. Aug. 18, 1750. 
II. Jacob, b. Aug. 25, 1751. 

III. Thomas, b. Feb. 15, 1753 ; d. Aug. 6, 1753. 

IV. David, b. Aug. 24, 1754. 
V. Oliver, b. Oct. 28, 1755. -|- 

VI. Hannah, dau. of Thomas, m. Nathaniel 
Wight; d. Oct., 1754, a. 58. He d. April 

3^ 1755- 



Oliver Bacon re. from Plymouth to Jaffrey, about 

. He first settled on lot 14, range 5, afterwards 

owned by Robert Harkness. He m. Mrs. Rebecca 

(Cummings), dau. of the Rev. Jewett, of Hollis ; 

d. March 25, 1835 5 ^""'^ V4\^. d. June 25, 1843, a. 87. 
He was a lieutenant in the Revolution. They had five 
children : 



I. Jacob, b. Dec. 11, 17S6. -\- 
II. Mary, b. May 2, 17S8; d. Jan. 2, 1871 ; unm. 

III. Rebecca, b. May 20, 1790; d. March 23, 1876; 

unm. 

IV. Oliver, b. Dec. 2, 1792; killed by lightning, 



July 2, 1 801. 
V. Jonathan Jewett, b. May 26, 1795. 



(9) 

H 
15 

16 
17 



(13) 

iS 
19 



(H) 



(16) 



28 
39 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 221 

Jacob Bacon m. Betsey Sawyer, of Boothbay, Me. 
They had 4 chikh-en : 

I. Olii'.er, b. March 15, iSii.-j- 

II. Martha, h. Jan. 3, 1S13; m. Stihuan Burpee, 
q. V. 

III. Charles, b. Oct. 16, 1S14. -f- 

IV. Hebecca, h. Oct. 9, 1S16 ; m., i", June 16, 1S46, 

Faxon Rice ; 2'^, Zervia M. Smith. 
Jacob Bacon d. March iS, 1S66 ; his wife d. July 26, 
1854, a. 73. 

JoNA. Jewett Bacon m. Sally, dau. of Samuel 
Patrick, Jr. : re. to Canada. Children : 

(i) Sarah, h. Dec. 11, 1S18. 

(3) Oliver Jeicett, b. Jan. 16, 1821 ; m. (3) Eliza 
A. (4) Samuel (5) Caroline. (6) Abi- 
gail. (7) Relief. 

Oliver Bacon m., June 11, 1840, Mary Ann, dau. 
of Jared Pratt. Had eight children. His wife d. Jan. 
18. 1867, a. 48 yrs., 11 mos., 16 dys. 

Henry, b. March 24, 1841. 

Frances A., b. Dec. 20, 1S43 ; d. June 33, 1S65, 

a. 32 yrs., 6 mos., 5 dys. 
Stephen S., h, Dec. 31, 1844. 
Sydney C, b. Oct. 10, 1846 ; d. March 13, 1848, 

a. i6 mos., 5 dys. 
C. Oliver, b. Sept. 13, 1848; d. Aug. 38, 1867, 

a. 18 yrs., 11 mos., 15 dys. 
Clara A., b. Oct. 15, 1850; d. Feb. 3, 1871, a. 

30 yrs., 3 mos., 18 dys. 
Adelia J., b. Aug. 33, 1852. 
Willie, b. Sept. 4, 1855. 

Charles Bacon m. Eliza J., dau. of James Leath- 
ers, of Peterboro' ; she d. Feb. 9, 1S71, a. 50; m., 2^, 
Mrs. Frances Bruce, dau. of Goodyear Bassett ; b. at 
Hancock, May 6, 1836; had by first husband, French 
Bruce, i child, Cora Bruce, b. May 9, 1869. 

Children by first wife : 

I. Frarik, b. May 13, 1846; d. Sept. i, 1848. 

II. Abby E., b. March 16, 1849; m. Oct. 6, 1872, 

John G. Morse, of Worcester, Mass. 



20 


I. 


31 


II. 


22 


III. 


23 


IV. 


24 


V. 


25 


VI. 


26 


VII. 


37 


VIII. 



222 



HISTORY OF JAFFKEY. 



30 

32 

33 



III. Btirt, b. Feb. 13, 1851. 

IV. Omar, b. Nov. 25, 1S5S ; d. Nov. 26, 1S61, 
V. Hattie Jane, b. Nov. 7, 1S55. 

VI. Fred. K, b. Sept. 2, 1S58. 



BAILEY FA^IILY. 

Jethro Bailey was the first man of the name who 
settled in town. His residence was south-west of Abra- 
ham Bailey's, near the road from Mailboro' to Rindge. 
At the annual meeting, 1774, he was chosen auditor of 
accounts ; in i775' ^ member of the committee of inspec- 
tion. In 1777 '^'^ name appears, for the last time, in 
the record of a transcript of a road running by his 
house. From whence he came or whither he went we 
have no knowledge. 

David Bailey, born in England, 1716, came to this 
countrv with his brother Nathan and settled in Andover, 
Mass. ; married and had a family of nine children, foin- 
sons and five daughters. His sons were Oliver, who 
died in service during the French War, Abraham, 
David, and Oliver. Abraham was the first one of the 
family who came to Jaftrey, settled on lot 7, range 5, 
on the east part of which he built a saw-mill, and sold 
the west half to his father, who, after the death of his 
wife at Andover in 1775? came to JaffVey with his 
youngest son, Oliver, and an unmarried daughter, and 
settled on the premises. He d. Dec. 33, 1S03, a. '^d. 

Abraham remained in town till 17S0, when he sold 
his premises to John AI. Coughran and removed to 
Keene, from thence to Vt. and Brookline, N. H., and 
died there. He was auditor of accounts and highway 

surveyor in 177^' ^"^^ '" ^779 ^'^^ ^"^ '^^ ^ committee 
to average service in the war of the Revolution. The 
birth of one cliild, Ephraim, b. Nov. 23, 1777, appears 
on the town record of births. 

David Bailey, Jr., settled in town, and was highway 
surveyor in 17S4-5-6. He re. to Windsor, Vt., from 
thence to St. Louis, and d. there. 

Oliver, on reaching his majority, m. Polly, dau. of 
Capt. Joseph Perkins. She was born at Methuen, 
Mass., in 1771 ; d. Aug 27, 1861, a. 90. He d. Dec. 8, 
1S55, a. 88. 

The dau. of David, Sen'r, Sarah, m. Beterly, 

and settled in Brookline, N. H. 



6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 



II 

12 
13 



(6) 



15 



16 

^7 

18 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 223 

Oliver Bailey m. Polly Perkins, and settled on the 
homestead. Mr. Bailey was a successful farmer. He 
built a large mansion house on his farm, now in the 
possession of his son Abner, and grandson Clarence 
S. Bailey. They had eight children : 

I. Echcard, b. Sept. 33, 1792.-I- 
II. Mary^ b. May 8, 1794; m. Samuel Emery, Jr., 
q. V. 

III. Oliver^ b. April 16, 1796.-}- 

IV. Abner, h. June 5, 1798. 

V. Almoji, h. Jan. 3i, 1801 ; m. Maria Stone, of 
Marlborough, and d. there Aug. 12, 1837; 

she m., 2*^, . 

VI. Marinda, h. Oct. 30, 1804; m. David H. Gil- 
more, q. V. 

VII. Louisa, h. 1809; d. July 12, 1827. 

VIII. Elizabeth, b. 1816 ; m. Abner Gage ; r. in Fitz- 

william ; has three children. 



Capt. Edward Bailey was a woollen manufacturer. 
His mill was located on the lot formerly owned by his 

uncle Abraham. His mill was burnt in , and he 

built another on the same stream lower down, and car- 
ried on the business of making carriages. He was a 
very worthy man, and was an early commander of the 
famous Rifle company. He m., i'', Nabby, dau. of Al- 
exander Milliken, Esq., Sept. 20, 1820; m., 2^, Mrs. 
Sarah (Hayden) Perkins, of Fitzwilliam. His first 
wife d. Oct. 6, 1826, a. 24; he d. Jan. 6, 1871, a. 78. 
His widow d. Nov. 29, 1S77. 

Children by first wife : 

I. Alfred, b. May 11, 1823; d. Feb. 11, 1S27. 
II. Randall, b. Feb. 11, 1824; d. Jan. 27, 1825. 

Children by second wife : 

III. Frederick W., b. Aug. 15, 1833 ; m, Mary, dau. 

of Moses and Cozby (Cooledge) Perkins. 
She d. Dec. 8, 1867, leaving an infant 
daughter, Mary F., b. Dec. 8, 1867. He d. 
at Keene, April 27, 1870. [See College 
Graduates.] 

IV, Edward H., b. ; m. Abbie A., dau. of 

Nathaniel and Mary Woodbury Cutter, 
July 23, 1S65 ; two children: 



224 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



19 
20 

(8) 



21 

22 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 
28 



(9) 



29 
30 

31 
32 

33 



1. Henry Hayden, b. July 15, 1S70. 

2. Annie Laura, b. Oct. i, 1871. 

Col, Oliver Bailey m. Deborah Perry, of Marl- 
borough. He was a prominent man and a good citi- 
zen ; held many important offices ; was selectman, cap- 
tain of the Rifle company, and colonel of the Twelfth 
Regiment. He d. Dec. 7, 1S63. They had eight 
children : 

I. Emily A., b. April i, 1822 ; m. Nehemiah Cut- 
ter, April 2, 1S50, q. V. 
II. Infant, b. Sept. 28, 1828 ; d. Oct. 7, 1828. 

III. Lydia 0., b. Nov. 8, 1830; d. June 26, 1837. 

IV. Caleb P., b, March 16, 1835 : d. June 8, 1839. 

V. Alojizo E., b. March 26, 1S35 5 "^- Alice Stone- 
hart, of Somerville, Mass., May 15, 1865. 

VI. Benjamin F., b. Nov. 8, 1841 ; d. Dec. 18, 

1861. 
VII. JosephW., b. Nov. 26, 1S44; d. June 6, 1845. 
VIII. Mary P., b. Nov. 26, 1844. 



Col. Abner Bailey, now a resident of the home- 
stead of his father, like his brother has been a good 
farmer, and has had the distinguished honor of com- 
manding the famous Rifle company, and of being a 
lieutenant-colonel of the Twelfth Regiment. He m., 
i**', Caroline, dau. of James and Nancy (Buss) Gilmore, 
by whom he had four children. She d. Sept. iS, 1835. 
M., 2*^, Lydia Whitney, who d. March 7, 1872, a. 73. 

Children by first wife : 

I. JSfancy^h. March 9, 1827; m., Sept. 15, 1S47, 

Alonzo Farrah ; one child, — Frederick. 
II. Clarence S., b. Oct. 26, 1830; m., July 21, 
i860, Sarah E. Whitcomb ; two children, — 
Carrie E., b. Aug. 8, 1866; Fannie E., b. 
Dec. II, 1871. 

III. Louisa, b. July 13, 1S33 ; m. Edwin Farrah; 

one child. 

IV. George C, b. Sept. 10, 1835; m., Oct. 21, 

1859, Adelia M. Adams ; one child. 

Children by second wife : 

V. Infant daughter, d. at birth. 



34 



35 



36 

37 

38 

39 
4o 

(39) 



42 

43 
44 

45 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 22$ 

VI. Almon Whitney, b. Aug. 6, 1843 ; d. in mili- 
tary service at New Orleans, June 22, 1863 ; 
Sixteenth Regiment, N. H. V. 

Isaac Bailey came from Lunenburgh, Mass., to 
JaftVey about 177S, and settled on lot 13, range 10. He 

m., i'', Mary , who d. Oct. 2, 1802, a. 72 ; m., 2**, 

Susanna , who d. April 22, 181 1, a. 80. He d. 

June 7? 1S12, a. 82. He was a soldier in the Revolution. 

I. Molly^ b. ; m. Jona. Holt, Dec. 12, 1782 ; 

re. to Maine ; five children. 

II. JBetsey, b. ; m. Abel Hodgman : re. to 

Rabi. 

III. Hannah, b. ; m. Calvin Russell; re. to 

Maine. 

IV. Isaac, b. , 1757.-I- 

V. John, b. ; m., Nov. 8, 1797, Rebecca 

Wheelock. 

Isaac Bailey, Jr., settled on the farm with his 
father ; m., i^', Betsey Wheelock, 1789, who d. June 30, 
1801, a. 32 ; m., 2*^, Hannah Stacey, who d. Sept. 3, 
1838, a. 74. He d. Sept. 20, 1826, a. 69. 

I. Betsey, m. Isaac Stratton. She d. April 9, 

1873, a- 85- 
II. Infant dau., d. March 9, 1790, a. 6 days. 

III. Jonathan, d. Oct. 4, 1808, a. 17. 

IV. Polly, d. Nov. 19, 1810, a. 15. 



Benjamin Bailey came from Dublin to JaftVey 
about 1806; was a resident of the Thorndike ftirm 
1807, 1808, and 1809. In 1801 he re. to school-district 
No. 10, and in 1816 re. to Bolton, Mass., and there d. 
He m. and had a numerous family. 

(i). Adam. (2) Dexter, re. to Bolton, Mass; a 
manufacturer of combs. (3) Austin, xt^. \.o 
Bolton, a comb manufacturer. (4) Sally, 
m. Gershom Twitchell : r. Oxford, Mass. 
(5) Andrew. (6) Abigail, m. Samuel 
Twitchell, Jr., of Dublin. Two children, — 
Caroline and Maria; m., 2^, Samuel Pat- 
rick. (7) Betsey, m. Joel Joslin, of Leom- 
inster, Mass. (8) Lucinda, m. Jonas 
Pierce. (9) JRoxana, m. Joseph Pierce, of 
Leominster, Mass. (10) Lucretia. 

16 



226 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



46 



47 
48 



I 

2 



4 

5 



7 
8 



Ephraim K. Bailey (Rev.), was installed pastor of 
the Baptist church, East Jat^rey, June, 1846; dismissed 
at his own request in 1861 ; and d. Jan. 4, 1868, a. 60. 
The society and church were greatly prospered under 
his pastoral charge, increasing both in means and num- 
bers. He m. Amanda L., dau. of Phineas and Elsie 
(Munroe) Spencer, of Spencertown, N. Y. Two chil- 
dren ; 

I. iSpencer X., b. Oct., 1829; m. Martha (Ryan) 
Prescott ; r. Fredonia, N. Y. One child, — 
Annie, b. July 20, 1857. 

II. Eliza Ann, b. March 10, 1833 ; m. Charlqe H. 
Powers. 



BAKER FAMILY. 

Richard Baker was b. in Concord, Mass., April 8, 
1729; m. and d. at Westminster, Mass., Dec, 1807. 

Bezaleel, his son, was b. Jan. 4, 1768, at Westmin- 
ster ; m. Abigail Wood ; re. to Marlborough ; d. Oct. 
I, 1849, a. 81 yrs., 9 mos. 

Ezra, his son, b. Feb. 27, 1799 ' ^^' Caroline, dau. of 
Levi Adams, of Townsend, Mass., b. Nov. 11, 1804; 
re. to Jaflrey in 1826; settled on lot 7? nmge 8; had 
two children. 

I. Milton, b. July 23, 1830. 

II. Mahala,h. Aug. 15, 1833; m. George A. Un- 
derwood. 

Asa Baker, a brother of Ezra, was b. in Marl- 
borough, Feb. 24, 1803 ; m. Hannah Moore, by whom 
he had three children. She d., and he m., 2'', Adaline 
Plummer. He settled first in Marlborough, and in 
1837 re. to JaftVey, and settled on lots 2 and 3, range 
9, known as the Perkins farm. He d. Oct. 12, 1869. 

-, 1834 ; r. Keene. 



I. /Sumner A., b. - 

II. Edwin C, b. , 1843 ; r. Fitzwilliam. 

III. Elliot Webster, b. , 1847 ' '• Antrim. 



ballou family. 

j Seth D. Ballou came from Richmond to Jafirey in 
1847, and settled on lot 9, range 7 ; m. Cynthia, who d. 
Jan. 7, 1852, a. 33 ; he m., 2**, Mrs. Rebecca B., widow 

|of Robert Boyce. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 22/ 

2 I. Harvey E.^ d. Sept. lo, 1866, a. 13. 

3 II. Clara 6*., b. 1850; m. Edwin G. Briant, 1868. 

BALDWIN FAMILY. 

Henry Baldwin is said to have emigrated from 
Devonshire, England, about 1640. He settled in Wo- 
burn, Mass. ; became a distinguished citizen and free- 
man of the colony in 1652. He m., Nov. i, 1649, 
Phebe Richardson, who d. Sept. 13, 1716, a. 84. He 
d. Feb. 14, 1697. They had eleven cliildren, — five 
sons and six daughters- 
Isaac Baldwin, 4th gen., settled in Jaflrey, on lot 19, 
range 4, afterwards the residence of John Butters, whose 
house was burnt in 1794, with four of his children — now 
uninhabited. His name is among the list of highway 
surveyors in i777 '*"<^' ^77^ ' ^'^^ °" ^ committee chosen 
to divide the town into school-districts in i779- When 
the church was incorporated in 1780, Isaac Baldwin and 
wife were members. 

TT'. T 

Jacob Baldwin, son of Jacob and Betsey (Lewis) 

Baldwin, came from Billerica, Mass., to Jaflrey, about 
1779. He settled on lot iS, range 5. He m. Sally, 
dau. of Lieut. William and Jane (Wright) Turner, who 
d. Aug. 25, 1S18, a. 52. He d. Oct. 13, 1844, a. 84. 

Mr. Baldwin was an upright, industrious man, high- 
ly respected by his fellow-citizens. Eleven children : 

3 I. Sally^ b. May 31, 17S4; m. Nathan Dutton, 
q. V. 

4 II. Elizabeth, b. Mar. 7, 17S6; m. Peletiah Brooks; 
r. Acton. 

5 III. William Turner, b. Feb. 18, 1790; d. Mar. 18, 
same year. 

6 IV. Polly, b. Sept. 22, 1791 ; m., Dec. 14, 1813, 
Nath. Watts, of Peterborough, who was ac- 
cidentally killed while blasting rocks in a 
well of Joab Eveleth's, of Dublin. 

7 V. William Turner, b. Dec. 8, 1793.-I- 

8 VI. Cynthia, b. Feb. 6, 1796; m. Gershom Fay ; 

2*^, Howe, of Hudson ; 3*^, Hugh 

Smith, of Hudson. 

VII. Joanna, b.July 24, 1798; d. 1869, at Ogdens- 
burgh, N. Y. ; unm. 
10 VIII. Jacob, b. June 14, 1800; m. Martha P. Bruce 

July 16, 1826. 



228 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



II 
12 

13 
(7) 

H 

15 
16 

17 
18 

^9 

(13) 

20 
21 

(14) 
22 

23 



24 



25 
26 

27 



IX. JaneWright, 1). June 11, 1802; m., Oct., 1S32, 

Jacob Robbins, q. v. 

X. Rachel, b. May 18, 1804; m. Simeon S. David- 

son, q. V. 
XI. Benjamin Levns, b. Nov. 25, 181 1 ; m. Rosa- 
line French, dau. of Daniel French. 

William Turner Baldwin m., Nov., 1825, Char- 
lotte Felch, of Francestown ; r. Hudson ; d. Jan 26, 
1869. Children : 

I. William Lewis, b. in Watertown, Mass. ; m. 

; r. Peterborough. 

II. Jolin Fay, b. in Watertown ; m. Eliza Lund ; 
r. Nashua. 

III. Charlotte Augusta, h. in Newton, Mass. ; m. 

N. H. Wood ; r. Nashua ; two children. 

IV. Austris Brown, b. in Jafirey ; m. E. O. Wood ; 

r. Nashua ; four children. 
V. Sarah Loring, b. in Jaffrey ; m. L. W. Conant ; 

r. Medford ; three children. 
VI. Jacob Franklin, b. in Hudson ; d. young. 



Benjamin L. Baldwin m. Rosaline F., dau. of 
Daniel and Rebecca (Fletcher) French. 

I. Echcard L.,h.'^-l^, r%,^ /%^^ 
II. Fred 31., b. , 1841. ' 

William Leavis Baldwin m. Elizabeth Johnson, of 
Greenfield ; b. , 1829 ; r. Peterborough ; one child. 

I. Florence A., b. in Boston ; m., Feb. 13, 1879, 
George W. Longley, of Peterborough. 

James Adams Baldwin, son of Abial, and grandson 
of David, b. in Pepperell, Mass., March 10, 181 1 ; m. 
Catherine Woodworth Mead, b. in Richmond, Va., 
Dec. 27, 1816 ; r. Hinsdale, Dublin, and JaftVey. 

I. Sarah Luena, b. March 22, 1839; m. Charles 
A. Willard ; r. Ashburnham, Mass. ; one 
child. 
II. Ellen Symira, d. May, 1816, in Hinsdale. 

III. Eliza Clark, b. Jan. 16, 1843, in Hinsdale. 

IV. Emily Fiske, b. Dublin, June 8, 1845 ; m. Geo. 

W. Wood, of New Orleans, La. ; one child. 



28 
29 

31 



32 

33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 229 

V. Charles Alpha^ b. in Dublin, Jan. 30, 1S48 ; 
m. Maria L. Ilodge, Feb. 23, 1S74; one 
child. 
VI. Lucy Harriet^ b. in Dublin, Dec. 6, 1865 ; m. 
George L. Rice, son of Laban and Esther 
(Cutter) Rice, of Jaftrey, q. v. 
VII. James Appleton^h. in Dublin, Sept. ii, 1S55 ; 
r. JaftVey. 



Elbridge Baldwin, brother of James A., b. in Pep- 
perell, JMass., Oct. 16, 1812; m. Mary, dau. of Levi 
and Hannah (Mullen) Fisk ; r. in Dublin, Clareniont, 
and Jaffrey ; a cooper by trade. 

His son, John Elbridge Fisk, b. July, 1843, m. Hat- 
tie, dau. of Col. Charles W. and Abigail Gowing 
Fierce, of Dublin. 

I. Charles E.^ b. April 28, 1S65. 

II. Mary J., b. March 9, 1S67 ; d. same month. 

III. Edwin P., b. Jan. 4, 1869. 

IV. Ahnon A., b. Oct. 15, 1870. 
V. CarlF., b. July 30, 1872. 

VI. Mark E., b. March 22, 1874. 
VII. Clarabel^ b. Nov. 19, 1875. 

THE BALDWIN APPLE. 

The discovery of the fiimous Bakhvin apple was 
made by Col. Laomi Baldwin, a distinguished citizen 
of Woburn, great grandson of Henry, the emigrant. 
While engaged in surveying land in Wilmington, he 
observed a tree, on tlie land of James Butters, much fre- 
quented by woodpeckers. Curiosity let! liim to exam- 
ine the tree, and he found thereon apples of excellent 
flavor. The next spring he took from it scions to engraft 
into stocks of his own. Others in his neighborhood 
did the same, till the apple was extensively cultivated. 
Some named the apple, from the locality of the tree, 
Butters's apple ; others, from the birds who caused the 
discovery, Woodpecker apples ; till one day, at an en- 
tertainment of friends at the house of Col. Baldwin, 
it was suggested that the name " Baldwin apple," in 
honor of the discoverer, was the most appropriate, and 
it has since been known by his name. The original 
tree was destroyed by the famous Seutember gale in 
iSiv 



230 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



3 
4 



BASCOM FAMILY. 

Aloxzo Bascom, son of Shubael Bascom, was born 
in Hinsdale, X. H.. Sept. 13. 1S12 ; m., Sept. 5, 1837, 
Clarissa Keith, and settled in Palmer, Mass. : re. to Jaffrey 
in the spring of 1S44. ^^'^ ^^'^^^ ^^- ^^b- -9' ^^5^- ^^-i 
2^, Ann J., dau. of Joseph and Sarah D. (Parker) 
Joslin. who d. Jan. 4, iS6r, a. 31. Mr. Bascom pnr- 
chased the old cotton factory, made additions, and 
atterwards bought the Cheshire factory, and for many 
years manufactured blue cotton drilling When the 
war broke out, he became a large dealer in cotton, 
\yhich enabled him. by the increase of his wealth, to 
build the large cotton mill now owned by the White 
brothers. As a man of enterprise, Mr. Bascom had no 
superior in town. When he settled there, business was 
at a stand-still. By his industry and enterprise he 
gave it new life, and it has since grown up into a large 
and flourishinsr yillasce. disrnfied by the name of East 
Jaftrey. In the midst of his progress, by a sudden 
stroke of paralysis, he d., Sept. 24, 1S72. Children by 
his first wife : 

I. Alonzo Fernando, b. at Palmer. July 20, 1S3S ; 
m., Dec. 5, 1S61, Lucy L. Searle ; d. March 
2. 1S65 : I dau.. Clara E., b. Oct. 16. 1S63. 
Clarissa Eudora, b. Sept. iS, 1S40 ; m. Samuel 
G. Smith. Kate A., b. Sept. 6, 1S64; 
Dexter M., b. May 9. 1S6S. 
JTarcellus JMigud, b. at JatlVey, June 24, 1S44; 
m.. Feb. 10. 1S66, Sarah J. Houston ; i ch., 



II 



III 



Alonzo Fernando, 
March 13, 1S70. 



b. July 30. 1S6S; d. 



BATCHELDER FAMILY. 

Samuel Batchelder. from Beyerly. Mass., came to JaflVey 
at the close of the Reyolution, and remoyed to New Ipswich in 
1785, engaged in the business of a baker, and was also employed 
in trade. After the turnpike was built, in iSoo, he erected and 
kept a public house, long and extensiyely known as Batch- 
elder's Inn. His children were Samuel, b. at Jatlrey. 17S4; 
Peter, b. at New Ipswich, 17S6; Betsey, b. 17S9, m. Moody 
Adams: William, b. 1791, d. 1811 ; Xancy. b. 1793, m. Rey. 
Phineas Pratt ; Mary, b. 1797-, m. Silas Wheeler; Serena, b. 
1800, m. Joel Parker; Fanny, b. 1S04, m. Rey. J. Brown. 
Mr. Batchelder d. 1S14, a. 69. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



231 



Samuel Batchelder, his son, wash, in Jaffrey, June 8, 1784, 
received liis education at the New Ipswich academy, and was 
early employed in the store of his father. In 1S04, at the age of 
twenty, he opened a store on his own account in Peterborough, 
remained there two years, and then returned to New Ipswich, 
and was there engaged in the same business. In 1812 his store 
and goods were destroyed by fire ; he, however, built another, 
and continued in trade till about 1S26, when he removed to 
East Chelmsford, now Lowell, Mass. While in New Ipswich, 
in 180S, he purchased an interest in the second cotton factory, 
and became the most active manager. In Lowell, under his 
directions, the foundations were laid and the structures erected 
that constituted the Hamilton Manufacturing Corporation. In 
1831, he, with others, purchased the site of a cotton mill at 
Saco, which had been destroyed by fire. He took charge of 
the mills which were tliere erected, and was instrumental in 
building up that city. Later he was connected with the mills 
at Lawrence, Mass., and Portsmouth, N. H. In 1855, he again 
took charge of the York mills, and continued treasurer and man- 
agfer of them and of the Everett mills at Lawrence, until alter his 
eightieth year. In 1846, having secured an ample competence, 
he removed to Cam.bridge with the intention there to spend 
the remainder of his useful life in quietude and retirement. 
But the manufacturing enterprise at Lawrence was projected ; 
he became one of the proprietors, and was soon after engaged 
in that enterprise. He held the office of director in many 
corporations, and was treasurer of the Portsmouth mills until 
1855, when he again took charge of the York mills, and he has 
since been treasurer and manager of them, as well as the 
Everett mills at Lawrence. 



BATES FAMILY. 

Joseph Bates (Lieutanant), re. from Westford, 
Mass., to New Ipswich in 1751, re. from thence to 
Jaffrey about 1778 ; was a member of the committee of 
inspection that year. He was also a member of the 
same committee in 1775, at New Ipswich. He was a 
lieutenant in the Revolution, and was at Saratoga when 
Burgoyne surrendered. He was a prominent business 
man, and held most of the important offices in the 
gift of the town. He settled on lot 17, range 3, since 
owned by Jacob Jewell, Dea. Isaac S. Russell, and Sol- 
omon Garfield, the present occupant. He re. to N. Y. 
state in 1801. He m., 2^ wife, Mary Davis, Dec. 12, 
1781. Name of first wife unknown. Children: 



232 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



3 

4 



6 

7 
8 

(6) 



lO 



I. Sarahs b. June, 1768; m. Alexander Ernes, of 
Dublin. She d. Dec. iS, 1787, and was 
buried in the old burying-yard in Jaffrey, 
leaving a dan., Sally, who m. Farnum Fisk, 
r., Potsdam, N. Y. She d. Sept. 12, 1838. 

II. Hannah, b. ; m. Lieut. Daniel Emery, 2*^ 

wife. 

III. Joseph, b. ; m. April 7, 1795. Lucy, dau. 

of Job Dodge; had ch., (i) John. m. Su- 
san Kidder, r. Potsdam, N. Y. 

IV. Samuel, m. June 21, 1810, Jenny, dau. of Capt. 

Moses Cutter, r. Bradford ; d. June. 1854. 
She d. Oct. 14, 183S. 

V. Peter, b. ; m. Elizabeth Milliken, of 

Sharon. -(- 

VI. JVa7icy, b. ; m., April 21, 1803, Alexander 

Milliken, of Sharon. 
VII. Isaac, b. . 



Peter Bates m., Nov. 24, 1793, Elizabeth, dau. of 
Samuel Milliken, Esq., of Sharon ; re. to Potsdam, N. 
Y., in 1808. Children: (i) Elizabeth, b. Dec. 22, 
1794. (2) Peter, b. June 5, 1796. (3) Oliver, b. 
Aug. 31, 1797. (4) Martha, b. Sept. 30, 1799. _ (5) 
Sarah Emes, b. April 17, iSoi. (6) James Milliken, 
b. March 2, 1803. (7) Harriet, b. July 17, 1805. 
(8) Phebe Powers, b. April 7, 1807. 

Benjamin Bates was sealer of weights and measures, 
1783 ; last tax, 1801. 

John Bates was a resident of JafFrey, 18 14 to 1826, 
inclusive ; had a large family, but left no record of 
births. 



BELKNAP FAMILY. 

JosiAH Belkxap came to Jaffrey previous to 1791 ; 
was a clotliier by trade ; settled on lot — , range — . 
He m., June 14, 1791, Sarah, dau. of Dea. William and 
Sarah (Robinson) Smiley; r. in Jaffrey till 1818, when 
he re. to Springfield, Vt., and d. there, April 27, 1845, 
a. 85. His wid. d. Feb. 20, 1846, a. 82. 

Rev. Appleton Belkxap was pastor of the Baptist 
church from 1835 to 1845, when he re. to Lyme, N. H. 
I child : 

Fenelon, who m., Oct. 6, 1847, Mary, dau. of Orford 
and Cynthia (Adams) Capron ; r. Lyme. 



2 

3 



5 
6 

7 
8 



(5) 



lO 



TI 



13 



(6) 



13 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 233 

BIGGELOW FAMILY. 
Nathaniel, of Framingham, m. and had children : 

I. e/oAw, b. ; m. ; r., Marlborough, N. H. 

II. Isaac, b. ; m. Nancy, sister of Capt. John 

Joslin, of Jaftrey. 

III. David, b. ; m. Candace Hale, of Leomin- 

ster, Mass ; settled in Framingham, Mass. 

IV. Nathaniel, b. May 26, 1789.-!- 

V. Perkinfi, b. Feb. 25, 1791.-I- 

VI. Susan, h. ; m. John Barker; d. in Boyl- 

ston, Mass. 

VII. Dextej',h. ; m. Lydia Brigham, of Marl- 
boro', INLiss. 

VIII. Josiah, b. Sept., 1798; m. Exion Patterson.-|- 

Nathaniel Biggelow m., Feb. 8, 1S14, Catherine, 
dau. of Phineas and Tabitha (Hartwell) Tyler, of 
Leominster, who for a number of years resided in Jaf- 
frey, in the service of Dea. Eleazer Spoftbrd. He d. in 
Leominster, Mass., in 1847, ^- ^^ ' ^""'^ ^'\^- in 1850, a. 
81. In 1814 Mr. Biggelow re. to Marlborough, N. H., 
in i8i8 to Leominster, and in 1822 to Jaflrey. He d. 
July 28, 1876, a. 87 yrs., 2 mos., 8 dys. His wife d. 
Dec. 18, 1867, a. 74. Children: 

I. Perkins, b. Nov. 11, 1814; settled first in 
Keene, afterwards in Marshfield, Ohio ; was 
mayor of that place when it was made a 
city. He is now engaged in the drug busi- 
ness. He m. and has two children. 
II. Catherine, b. March 29, 181 7 ; m. June 2, 1841, 
William, son of William and Mary (Sweet- 
zer) Carter, q. v. 

III. Josejyh Tyler, b. Sept. 15, 1S19, at Leominster; 

m. Mary C. Barker, of Hancock, N. Y.-(- 



Perkixs Biggelow m. Relief, dau. of Samuel and 
Sarah (Davidson) Patrick ; she d. May 14, 1845, a. 42 ; 
m., 2^, May 18, 1846, Elizabeth, dau. of Joseph and 
Mary (Wright) Crombie, of Rindge. He d. Jan. 16, 

1877, a. 85 yrs., 10 mos., 21 dys. 

I. Laura, d. Sept. 6, 1843, a. 16. 
II. Edwin Patrick. 



234 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



(9) 



15 
16 



(12) 



17 
18 

19 



JosiAH BiGGELOW m. Exioii Patterson, and settled in 
JartVey, on lot 14, range 8, the John French farm. He 

afterwards re. to Framingham, and in returned to 

JafiVey. In he re. to Foxboro, Mass., and d. Nov. 

22, 1S70, a. 72. His wid. is now (1878) living in that 
place. Children: 



I. Adelia, b. ■ 
11. Jerome, b. 



; m. Oliver P. Prescott, q. v. 
- : d. . 



Joseph T. Biggelow m. Mary C, dau. of Sherman 

Barker, of Hancock ; r. first, East JaftVey ; in he 

re. to Jaffrey, and is now (1878) engaged in trade in 
that place; a man highly respected. Children: 



I. Carrie E.^ b. Aug. 21, 1855 

public schools. 
II. Georgie A., b. Aug. 26, 1859 

the public schools. 
III. Jane 31., b. July 28, 1S67. 



A teacher in the 
A teacher in 



3 

4 



BILLINGS FAMILY. 

Paul H. Billings came from Lincoln and settled in 

East JaftVey about 1824 ; m. Rachel , who d. Nov. 

28, 1S70, a. 80. He d. June 30, 1871, a. 79. 

I. Christina, b. 1821 ; m., 1841, Lewis L. Pinxe, 

q. V. 
II. Elizabeth, h. 1825. 
III. George T., b. 1835. 



2 
3 



blodgett family. 

Jonathan Blodgett was a descendant of Thomas 
Blodgett, who emigrated from London, England, and 
settled in Cambridge in 1635; was a glover; m. 

Susanna , and had four children: (i) Daniel. (2) 

Samuel. (3) Susanna. (4) Thomas, who d. 3oung. 

Samuel settled in Woburn, and became a distin- 
guished citizen of that place. 

Jonathan m. Molly Fitch, of Bedford, Mass., came to 
JaftVey previous to 1777, and settled on lot 15, range 8. 

I. Jonathan, b. March 6, 1756.-I- 
II. Molly, b. Oct. 3, 1760; m. Roger Gilmore. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 235 

III. Thadcleiis^ b. Dec. 24, 1762 ; d. Nov., 1807, 
11 nm. 

5 IV. Charlotte^ b. April 14, 1769; m. David Lacy. 

6 V. Joseph, b. Oct. 14, 1770. 

(2) Jonathan Blodgett m. Susannah ; r. Rock- 
ingham, Vt., Jaftrey, and Bethel, Me. 

7 I. Josejyh, b. ; re. to Me.+ 

8 II. Lxike, b. ; settled in Marlborough, N. H. 

9 III. Sally, b. . 

10 IV. Nathan, b. Nov., 1792.-}- 

(7) Joseph Blodgett m. Betsey, dau. of John and 

Priscilla French ; d. May 28, 1842, a. 71. She d. 
Dec. 19, 1S52, a. 82. 

11 I, Lucinda, b. Aug. 26, 1798; m. Hial Stebbins, 
of Winchester. 

12 II. Joseph, b. Nov. 12, 1800; d. Sept. 11, 1805. 

13 III. Martin, d. Oct. 17, 1843, a. 38. 

14 IV. Elizabeth, d. July 21, 1824, a. 16. 

(10) Nathan Blodgett m. Roancy, dau. of Daniel and 
Rebecca (Fletcher) French, Oct. 9, 1815. She d. 
March 4, 1826, a. 29. He m., 2**, Electa, dau. of 
Eliphalet and Hepsibah (Norton) Johnson, of Jaftrey, 
Oct. 18, 1827. He d. Oct. 24, 1843, a. 51. 

4 

15 L Fletcher, b. April 5, 1816; m. ; r. Gardner, 

Mass. 

16 II. Sumner, b. Dec. 9, 181 7 ; m. ; r. Glover, Vt. 

17 III. Timothy, h. Dec. 28, 1S22 ; r. Jaftrey ; unm. 

18 IV. Lorenzo, b. July 6, 1825 ; r. Fitchburg, Mass. 

Children by second wife: 

V. Sarah, b. Oct. 24, 1828 ; d. May 24, 1863 ; 



19 
20 



u n m . 



VI, Marij Ann Harper, b. March 5, 1831 ; m. G. 
W. Todd, Jr., of Rindge; d. Dec. 28, 1864. 
One child, — Frank F., d. Sept. 30, 1864, a. 
3 mos, 4 days. Mr. Todd has distinguished 
himself as a teacher in some of the leading 
academies in this state. 



236 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



21 



22 



23 



VII. Henry J. ^ b. April 15, 1S33 ; m. Caroline Dag- 
gett. Children : 

(i) Fred Johnson, b. Jnne 5, 1856. (2) 
Alice Lonisa, b. Sept. 13, 1859. (3) 
Henry Lincoln, b. April 28, 1861. (4) 
Mabel, b. Jnne 17, 1863. 
M., 3'^, S. Villa'Hudson, of Templeton, Mass. 
VIII. Emily J£, b. Aug. 34, 1834; d. April 7, 1862, 
unm. 
IX. Edwin, b. Oct. 10, 1837; ^' Nov. 23, same 
year. 



BRADLEY FAMILY. 

Oscar H. Bradley, m. d., was b. in Vermont in 
1S26 ; came to Jaffrey about 1851 ; settled at East Jaf- 
frey, as a physician, that year. In 1853 he m. Julia 
A. Spaulding, dau. of Daniel and Lucinda (Perkins) 
Spaulding, of Fitzwilliam, and has two children: 

I, D. Edward, b. 1862 : now a member of Dart- 
mouth college. 
II. Mark E., h. 1868. See p. 104. 



BRIANT FAMILY. 

Kendall Briaxt came from Pepperell, Mass., to 
Jaflrey, and settled on lot 14, range 4, at an early date. 
The farm remained in possession of his descendants till 
the death of Col. George Briant, in 1865. It is now 
(1S73) the farm of Samuel D. Jewell. 

When the first church was incorporated. Air. Briant, 
wife, and son John, were members. He m. Mary Mar- 
tin, who d. March 17, 1794, a. 84 yrs., 2 mos., 19 dys. 
He d. Nov. 30, 1797, a. 88 yrs., 8 mos., 13 dys. His 
two sons, John and Thomas, settled in Jaffrey. 

John settled on the homestead with his father, and m. 
Lucy, dau. of Joseph and Elizabeth (Martin) Lawrence, 
of Groton and Pepperell, Mass. He d. March 14, 1800, 
a. 49 yrs., 8 mos. His widow d. Nov. 11, 1S17, a. 70. 
Had children : 

3 I. Anna, h. Feb. 2, 1777 ; m. David, son of James 
Houghton, March 3, 1798: re. to Albany, 
N. Y. ; r. in Jaffrey, lot 9, range 6. 

4 II. Lucy, b. Jan. 17, 1781 ; m. William S. Kim- 
ball, Aug. 29, 1797 ; re. to Chester, Vt. 



6 

7 



(6) 



lO 

II 

13 
(10) 



H 

15 
16 

17 

(11) 

18 

19 
20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

(12) 

25 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 237 

III. Dorcas, b. Sept. 11, 17S2 ; m. Moody Law- 

rence, Sept., 1S05, q. V. 

IV. Joh7i^ b. May 11, 1785.-I- 

V. Polly, b. March 9, 1787; m. Samuel B. W. 

Wessell, June, 1808. 
VI. Sally, b. Jan. 11, 1790; m. Robert Goff, q. v. 

John Briant m. Sally Poor, Feb. 24, 1807; r. on 
the homestead, and d. July 18, 1843. His witlow d. 
June I, 1871, a. 82. Had children: 

I. Sarah, m. Jonas Pierce ; r. Marlborough and 

state of Maine. 
II. Edmund, h. 1808; m. Eliza; last tax, 1850.4- 

III. Luke, d. Sept. 24, 1S61, a. 44; m. Mrs. Eme- 

line Alger. -f- 

IV. George, d. June 21, 1865, a. 51.^- 
V. John Jay, b. 1817; paid taxes, 1838. 

Edmund Briant m. Eliza ; r. on tlie home- 
stead ; had four children b. in JafiVey. Mr. Briant re. 
from town about 1850. 

I. Caroline A.,h. , 1832. 

II. Benjamin F.,\i. , 1835. 

III. John T., 1). , 1842. 

IV. Edioard G., b. 1849. 

Luke Briant m. Mrs. Emeline Alger. Seven chil- 
dren, — two d. young. 

I. Mary Ann, b. 1850; m. Porter. 

II. Peter, b. 1851. 

III. Mrmina. 

IV. Child, d. Oct. 17, 1753, a. 3 days. 
V. Child, d. Sept. 10, 1855. 

VI. 3Iartha, b. 1857 ; <-'• ^^^74. 
VII. Ke7idall, b. 1859. 



George Briant (Col.) m. Elvira E., dau. of John 
and Polly (Page) Hodge. 

I. George Edxcin, b. April i, 1848; m., 186S, 
Clara C, dau. of Seth D. IBallou. One 
child, — Leslie H.,b. 1871. 



238 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



26 



27 
28 



29 



30 



Thomas Briant, son of Kendall, was fence-viewer 
in 17S6. Daniel Chandler, his son, a blacksmith by 

trade, m. Elizabeth , who d. Nov. 24, 1786. Two 

children : 

I. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 21, 1784. 
II. Sarah, b. Nov. 19, 17S6. 

Thomas Briant paid taxes 1 793-' 94. 



Samuel Briant m. Eunice 



One child. 



Polly, b. at Rutland, Nov. 21, 1787. He paid taxes, 
i793-'4- 



eepinc^ 



Reuben Briant received two orders for 
school, March, 1790, in the north-east district; had 
his taxes abated in 1794. 



BRIG HAM FAMILY. 

Thomas, the ancestor of the Brigham family, was b. in 
England in 1603 ; emigrated to this country in 1635 ; settled in 
Watertown, and was admitted freeman in 1639; m. Mary 
Hurd, b. in England, and d. in 1653, leaving five children, — 
three sons and two daughters. 

Alpheus Brigham came to JaflVey previous to 
1775 ; was chosen deer-reeve that year ; settled on lot 4, 
range 10, the farm now owned by Jonathan Page. Pie 
was a prominent man in town aflairs, held the various 
town offices, and was a member of many important 
committees. He m. Lydia , and had six children. 

1. Asaph, b. June 2, 1765. 

3 II. TFri^Ai, b. June 23, 176S. 

4 III. Sylcanus, b. Feb. 10, 1771. 

5 IV. Abel, b. July 31, 1773. 

6 V. Joseph, b. May 2, 1777 ; m. Polly Dutton, May 
30, 1796. 

VI. Lydia, b. April 12, 1782; m. Jedediah Foster^ 
June 7, 1807. 

Roger Brigham, b. at Westborough, Feb. 28, 1762; 
came to JaftVey previous to 1793; paid tax that year; 
settled on lot 18, range 3 ; m. Elizabeth Rich, of Truro. 
He d. Nov. 18, 1837, ^- IS' She d. Sept. 3, 1850, 
a. 83. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



239 



10 

II 
12 

13 



15 



17 
18 



19 
20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 



II. 
III. 

IV. 
V. 



Sally ^ b. at Philipston, Sept. 9, 1790; m. Joel 

O. Patrick, q. v. 
Eli^ b. Oct. 19, 1792 ; m. Abigail Russell, of 

Dublin; r. Macdonough, N. Y. 
Lora^ b. June 27, 1795 ; m. ; r. Dunbarton. 
Dexter, b. April 30, 1798 ; d. July 6, 1800. 
Betsey, h, July 6, 1806; m. Charles Lincoln, 

Sept. 17, 1835. He d. Oct. 7, 1859, a. 60. 

Two children : 

I. Rohanna, d. Feb. 13, 1865, a. 28. 



2. Sarah A., b. 



1842. 



Asa Biugham came to JaflVey about 1815 ; his name 
was on the tax-list that year. He purchased the tavern 
stand previously owned by Jacob Danforth. The tav- 
ern was burnt Dec. 16, 1816, and rebuilt the following 
year. Mr. Brigham was an inn-keeper, merchant, and 
tailor. In consequence of his loss by fire he failed in 
business, and left town in 1818. He m. Elizabeth 
Swift. One child, b. in JaflVey : 

I. Benjamin Rice, b. April 21, 1815. 

Levi E. Brigham came to Jaftrey about 1863 ; set- 
tled on the farm previously owned by John Felt, and 
left town 1873 ; m. Ann J. . Children: 



I. Edwin X., b. - 

II. David W., b. - 

HI. Ellen J., b. — 

IV. Isadore, b. — 

V. Dolly A., b. — 
VI. Lizzie J., b. 1863. 
VII. Child, d. June 15. 1868, a. i yr. 



-, 1852. 
-, 1855. 

1857. 

1859. 
, 1 86 1. 



2 
3 

4 

5 



BROOKS FAMILY. 

Joseph Brooks came from to JaftVey about 

1776. He settled on lot 8, range 4, near the mountain ; 

m. Abigail , and had seven children. In 1816 

he re. to Dublin, and d. Dec, 1816. 

I. Jonas, b. Jan. 27, 1772. -|~ 

II. Abigail, b. ; m. Joseph Tilton, Nov. 23, 

1802. 

HI. Mehitable, b. , 1779 ; m. Samuel Fierce, Jr., 

March 25, 1806. 
IV, Esther, b. March 20, 1780; m. Simeon Holt, 
of Wilton, March 12, 1801. 



240 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



7 
8 

(2) 



lO 



II 



12 

H 

15 



V. Rhoda^ b. March 3, 17S2 ; m. William Yeardly, 
Dublin; d. April ^^ 1S37. Nine children. 

VI. BeUy^h. ; m. Abraham Spoftbrd ; re. to 

Jefferson county, N. Y. ; d. Oct. 28, 1S43. 
VII. t/bse^Vi/ baptized. No date given. 



Jonas Brooks settled near the homestead of his 
father ; m. Mary Tilton ; b. in East Sudbury. Jan. 23, 
1777. He re. to Dublin in 1S16; to Marlborough in 
1S40; d. Dec. 22, 1842. 

I. Mary W., b. Nov. 7, iSoo; m. Rolan Farnum, 
of Dublin, Nov. 13, 182S. Five children ; 
two sons, three daughters. 
II. John, b. Nov. 21, 1803 ; m. Adeline Twitchell, 
of Dublin, June 12, 1S27. Three children; 
one son, two daughters. 

III. Rebecca T., b. Dec. i, 1805; m., i*', Minot 

Haywood, of Dublin, Dec. 19, 1825 ; 2^, 
Wm. B. Powers. Re. to Royalton, Vt. 

IV. Ehenezer A., b. Dec. i, 1810; m. Henrietta 

Breed, of Petersham, Mass., 1833. 
V. Elizabeth J9., b. March 14, 18x4. 
VI. Jonas H.^ b. July 10, 1815 ; m. Julia Foster, of 

Fitzwilliam. 
VII. Joseph^ b. Oct. 14, 1822 ; m. Eliza A. B. Hurl- 
burt ; r. Nashua. 



BROWN FAMILY. 

Caleb Brow^n came to Jaftrey, and settled in school- 
district No. 5, in 1803; left town in 1809; r. Chester- 
field, N. H. 

I. Caleb. II. Jerusha. in. Hopstill. iv. Dolly., 
m. Simon Warren, r. Woodstock, Vt. v. 
George, vi. Amelia, vii. Sukey, b. March 
13, 1804. 



Nathaniel Brown, and wife, Lydia P., in town, 
1849. He was b. 1779; his wife, 1784. Left town 
about 1856. 



4 

5 



2 

3 
4 



5 
6 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 24I 

Robert Brown, in town, 1842-1856; d. Nov. 22, 
1873, a. 72. Mary Ann, his wife, d. July 9, 1866, a. 59. 

James T., b 1841 ; m. Celina , b. 1848. Children : 

I. Edith J., b. 1870. 
II. George B.^ b. 1872. 



BUCKLEY FAMILY. 

John Buckley was b. in Stuttgart, Germany, 1756; 
came to this country with the British army, and desert- 
ed ; settled in Jaffrey, on lot 9, range 6 ; was a cabinet- 
maker by trade ; m., 1789, Peggy, dau. of Hugh Dun- 
lap. He d. June 13, 1817, a. 61. After his death she 
re. with her son to Cape Vincent, N. Y., and d. there. 
Children : 

\. John., re. to New York state about 1816. 
II. Frederick. 

III. James^ m. Tryphena Felt, of Peterborough, Feb. 

17, 1820; re. to Cape Vincent, N. Y. .She 
d. Oct. 15, 1877, a. 87. 

IV. SaniKel, re. to Waterloo, N. Y., 1818. 
V. William, re. to Buftalo. N. Y. 1820. 



BURPEE FAMILY. 

Moses Burpee came from Rowley, Mass., and set- 
tled in Jaffrey, on lot 19, range 5, previous to 1793. 
He m. Margaret, surname unknown. He d. Nov. 11, 
1826, a. 93. She d. Oct. 27, i8i8, a. 84. Four chil- 
dren, — Ebenezer, Moses, Betsey, and Polly. 

Betsey m. Samuel Sargent Oct. 20, 1801. 

Polly m. John Dodge March i, 1808. 

Ebenezer Burpee m. Elizabeth, dau. of Isaac and 
Lucy Wesson. 

3 I. Betsey, b. Feb. 18, 1791. 

4 II. Lucy, b. Oct. 15, 1792. 

5 HI. Edmimd, b. Sept. 15, 1794.-}- 

6 IV. Stephen, b. Aug. 7, 1796; d. April i, 1855. 

7 V. Hepsibath, h. Ji\u. 27, 1799; re. to New York. 

state. 

8 I VI. Ebenezer, b. Jan. 21, i8oi.-|- 

17 



242 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



lO 
1 1 
12 



13 
H 

16 

(5) 

18 

19 

20 
21 

(8) 
22 

23 
24 

25 

26 

27 



VII. Isaac Wesso7i, b. Dec. 23, 1802 ; re. to New 

York. 
VIII. Margaret^ b. April 26, 1805. 
IX. Almira. h. May 6, 1809. 
X. Eunice H.^ b. Oct. 10, 181 2. 



Moses Burpee settled on the homestead ; m. Han- 
nah, (lau. of Eli and Lucy (W-^esson) Keyes ; d. Aug. 
17, 1847, a. 67. She d. Aug. 4, 1865, a. 87. One 
child : 

Stillman, m. Martha, dau. of Jacob and Betsey 
(Sawyer) Bacon. He d. May 9, 1876, a. 67. Three 
children : 

(i) Ami jE'., b. , 1841 ; m. James A. Cogswell, 

of Concord, Mass., July 4, 1861. 

(2) Ella H., b. , 1844; m. Wilhelm C. Lenhert, 

b. in Germany. 

(3) Ari T., b. , 1S49. 



Edmund Burpee m., i'', Polly, dau. of Thomas and 
Polly (Rolfe) Dutton, who d. June 6, 1824, a. 26; m., 
2^, Olive Towne. He d. Oct. 7, 1871. 

I. 3fary, dau. by first wife, m. Nathaniel Horton ; 

r. Vermont. 
II. Olive E., d. June 28, 1833, a. 3 yrs., 9 mos., 
19 days. 

III. Emily X., b. , 1833 ; m. Daniel P. Adams. 

IV. Edmimd Warren^ b. , 1835 ; d. Aug. 22, 

1872. 



Ebenezer Burpee m. Dorcas Bowman ; r. Dublin. 

I. Lucy Jane^ b. April 8, 1824; m. Andrew J. 

Snow. 
II. Julia Ann^ b. Jan. i, 1826. 
HI. Eunice Maria^ b. Nov. 1 1, 1827. 
IV. Abbot Botonian, b. June 12, 1831 ; m. Eliza A. 

Lawrence. 
V. Asaph Ebenezer, b. Feb. 2, 1836. 
VI. Martha Elmir a, b. Sept, 2, 1838. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



243 



BUSS FAMILY. 

Three individuals by the name of Buss were early settlers in 
Jaftrey, — Epliraim, Samuel, and John, brothers. After a short 
residence in Jatlrey, Ephraim re. to Waterloo, N. Y.,and 
John to Marlborough, N. H. Samuel became a permanent 
resident in town. They were tiie sons of Stephen and Pru- 
dence (Carter) Buss, and were b. in Leominster, Mass. 

The progenitor of tliis family was 



2 
3 

4 

5 
6 



(5) 



8 

9 
II 

12 

15 

17 

18 



William Buss, who emigrated from England pre- 
vious to 1639, settled in Concord, Mass., and was made 

freeman in 1639. He m., i'', Ann , who d. in 

1674; 2*^, widow Dorcas Jones, d. 1709. Hed.Jan. 31, 
1698, a. about S^. Four children: 

I. -Richard, b. May 6, 1640. 

II. A?iJi, h. Dec. 18, 1641 ; m., Oct. 20, 1659, Wm. 
Wheeler. 

III. Nathaniel, b. Jan. 15, 1646; m., 1668, Mary 

Haven; d. Dec. 17, 1717 One child: 
I. John, b. May 22, 1648; m. Hannah 
Hosmer.-]- 

IV. Joseph, b. March 4, 1649; m. Elizabeth Jones ; 

d. Dec. 16, 1680. Four children : 

(i) Dorcas; (2) Ann; (3) William; (4) 
Joseph. 

John Buss m., March 8, 1711, Hannah Hosmer, and 
d. April 30, 1734- Six children : 

(i) John. (2) Abigail. (3) Hannah. (4) Stephen, 
b. Aug. 8, 1718; m. Prudence Carter.-j- 
(5) Jonathan. (6) Ehenezer. 

Stephen Buss, m. Dec. 2, 1743, Prudence Carter; 
d. Aug. 9, 1790. Thirteen children: 

I. Ephraim, b. in Leominster, Mass. 

II. Prudence. 10. iii. John. 

IV. Samuel, b. Nov. 22, 1749 ; m. Lydia Lincoln. -|- 

V. Elizabeth. 13. vi. Elisha. 14. vii. Dorothy. 

VIII. Elizabeth. 16. ix. John. 

X. Dorothy, m. Asa Evans, of Peterborough. 

XI. Mary. 19. xii. Susajina. 20. xiii. Elisha. 



244 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



(11) 



21 

22 

24 

25 
26 



27 
28 

(21) 

29 

30 
31 

32 

33 
34 

35 



Samuel Buss m., 1772, Lydia Lincoln, b. in Leom- 
inster, Mass. ; settled in Jaffrey, on lot 10, range 5 ; 
was a prominent man ; held the offices of moderator, 
selectman, and town treasurer; was a lieutenant in 
the Revolution. He d. Nov. 24, 1S36, a. 87. She d. 
Oct. 25, 1840, a. 92. Eight children: 

1. Samuel^ b. Aug. 15, 1772, in Leominster,-|- 
II. William, b. Nov. 9, 1773; m. Naomi Smith 
and Elizabeth Bowman ; r. Vergennes, Vt. 

III. Loring^h. Oct. 17, 1775; m. Prudence Buss; 

d. Jan. 22, 182S; r. New Hartford, N. Y. 

IV. Mary, b. Aug. 5, 1780; d. Aug. 23, 1815, unm ; 

a school-teacher. 
V. Nancy, b. Oct. 2, 1782; m. James Gilmore. 
VI. Stephen, b. Dec. 16, 17S4; settled first in Pots- 
dam, N. Y. ; m. Minerva Bailey, of that 
place ; re. to Brandon, Vt, where his wife 
d. ; re. to Ohio and d. 
VII. Lydia, b, Aug. 19, 17S7 ; m. Feb. 8, 1825, An- 
son E. Glazier ; d at Vergennes, Vt, Aug. 
I, 1836. 
VIII. Franklin, b. Feb. 5, 1792; d. Jan. 22, 181 2, 
a. 20. 

Samuel Buss m. Lucy, dau. of Amos Emery, of 
Dublin, Nov. 6, 1801 ; he d. July 29, 1837, ^- ^4- ^he 
d. Jan. 9, 1863, a. 84. 

I. Artemas, b. Aug. 24, 1802 ; d. Sept 13, same 

year. 
II. Emily, b. Sept. 3, 1803 ; m. Dea. Liberty 
Mower, q. v. 

III. Clarissa, b. April 20, 1805 ; m. Jabez Stearns, 

of Fitz William. He d. at Peterborough, 
Oct. 6, 1854, a. 57. 

IV. Lucy Emery, b. March 31, 1807; d. Dec. 19, 

1870; unm. 
V. William, b. Dec. 20, 1809; m. Ruth Frye 
Wolcot, of Boston, Oct 28, 1837. ^^ ^• 
March 10, 1862. 
VI. Amos Emery, b. Nov. 27, 1812; m. Harriet, 
dau. of Daniel and Phebe (Briton) Adams, 
Aug. ^, 1841 ; re. to Oneida, Carroll county, 
Ohio, and d. April 25, 1872. 
VII. Maria, b. Jan. 14, 1815 ; m. Dwight Thompson, 
of Illinois, June 8, 1842 ; d. Sept. 18, 1870. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



245 



36 VIII. Mary Ann^ b. Aug. 21. 1817; m. Dea. Liberty 
Mower, q. v. 

37 IX. Samuel Lincoln^ b. Aug. 19, 1S21 ; m. Mar- 
garet Baker, of Boston, March 10, 1846. 
He d. Aug. 10, 1S6S. She d. March 28, 
1871. 



4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

1 1 



BUTTERS FAMILY. 

Simeon Butters settled in town previous to 1790- 
was selectman that year. He resided in town till about 
1803, when he re. to the state of Maine. While in 
town he held many offices of trust ; was moderator, 
selectman, and an officer in the militia. He settled on 
lot 17, range 9; m. Betsy (surname unknown), and 
had ten chiklren. We have no date of their births, but 
find the following names in the baptismal record: 
Charles, Alfred, Flavel, Betsey, Rachel, Simeon, Flavel, 
Daniel, and Pamelia. They also had a dau. Achsah, 
as we learn from other sources. Charles m. Polly 
Gragg, Feb. 17, 1800; r. Maine. Betsey m. Thomas 
Frost, q. V. 

John Butters settled on lot 20, range 4, where his 
house was burnt, with four children, Jan. 7, i794' 
The parents were absent on a visit at one of the 
neighbors. He did not rebuild, but left town that year. 

(i) John, b. Sept. 20, 1784. (2) Cena, b. Jan. 17, 
1788. (3) Polly, b. Aug. 20, 1790. (4) 
Maria Theresa, b. Sept. 30, 1792. 



Jesse Butters m. Phebe Carter, of Woburn, Mass., 
and came to JaflVey in 1814. He lost his life in a snow- 
storm, Feb. 25, 1829, a. 45 yrs., 4 mos. 

I. Jesse, b. 1809 ; r. Montpelier, Vt. 

II. Wilder, b 1810; r. Fitchburg, Mass. 

III. Silas, b. 1811 ; r. Flint, Mich. 

IV. Phebe, b. 1813 ; m., and r. Chelsea, Mass. 

V. Peuhen, b. 1814; d. 1843. 

VI. Ezra C, b. 1S15 ; r. Lyndon, Wis. 

VII. Isaac, b. 1817 ; r. Boston. 

VIII. Charles, b. 1818; r. Lyndon, Wis. 



246 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



12 



15 



IX. Bhoda, b. 1S20; m. Francis Boynton ; r. Hyde 

Park, Mass. 

X. Almira S., b. 1823 ; r. South Boston. 

XI. Mary, b. 1825 ; m. Edward Wilder, of Ashby, 
Mass. ; d.'i876. 

Warren Butters came from Wilmington, Mass., 
to Jaffrey in 1815. He m. a dau. of Amos Stickney, 
and returned to Wilmington in 1S23. 



16 



Amos Butters paid taxes in 1823-4. 



6 
7 



BYAM FAMILY. 

John Byam was b, in Chelmsford, Mass., June 8, 
1761 ; m., 17S4, Sarah, dau. of James Haywood, and 
sister of Benj. Haywood, early settlers of JaflVey; b. in 
Chelmsford, Sept. 20, 1764. He came to Jatlrey in 
1798, settled on lot 17, range 8, and d. Jan. 6, 1835, a. 
73 yrs., 6 mos., 28 dys. His widow d. Nov. 29, 1866, 
a. 102 yrs., 6 mos., 9 dys. At the time of her death she 
had 6 daughters, 38 grandchildren, 90 great-grand- 
children, and 5 great-great-grandchildren. He followed 
the business of farming, and the manufacture of cordage. 
Children : 

I. Hannah, b. May 10, 1785, in Chelmsford, m. 
Jan. 1807, Josiah Barnard ; r. Peru, Vt. ; 
had 6 ch. She d., 1835, ^- 5°- -^^ ^^- ^^ 
Oberlin, O., in 1839. 
II. Sally, b. Jan. 6, 1787; m., i^', Dec. 31, 1846, 
Fordyce Carter. He d. July 16, 1862. She 
m., 2*^, May 20, 1867, Luther Hemingway. 
He d. Feb. 13, 1872, a. 85. 
Deliverance, b. Dec. 4, 1789; m., i^\ Dec. 30, 
1810, Tilly Reed. He d., 1836. M., 2^ 

Curtis, and d. in Utah Territory, 

a. 82. 



III. 



[87] 



IV 



Anna, b. July 5, 1791 ; m. Feb. 26, 181 1, David 

Symonds, who d. in 1869, at Peru, Vt. 

They had 11 children. 
V. Mary, b. Aug. 25, 1799, in Jafirey ; m., 1824, 

Harvey Gilmore. 
VI. Sophia, b. Dec. 12, 1805; m. 1827, Eleazer, 

son of Isaac and Betsey (Hathorn) Nutting, 

of Jaftrey. 2 Children. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 

II 

(5) 



12 

H 

15 
16 

17 

18 

19 
20 

21 

22 

23 
24 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 247 

CAREY FAMILY. 

Samuel Carey was a resident of Jaffrey previous to 
1793; paid taxes tiiat year; m. Polly Smith, Feb. 18, 
1 791. He d. 1813, a. 45. His widow d. at Springfield, 
Mass., i860, a. 83. 

I. Sally, b. 1793. 

II. JSdioard Smith, b. 1795 ; re. to Francestown. 

III. Polly, h. 1797; d, at Peterborough. 

IV. Samuel, h. 1799; i". in Peterborough. -|- 
V. Eliza, b. iSoi ; r. in Boston. 

VI. Finetty, b. 1S03 ; m. Williams ; d. at Buf- 

falo. 

VII. JVabby, b. 1805 ; d. at Peterborough. 
VIII. Emily, b. 1807 ; m. Peak. 

IX. Lucetta, b. 1809; m. Murray, and d. at 

Peterborough. 
X. Luther, b. 1812; d. in New Jersey. 

Samuel Carey re. to Peterborough in 1814; m. 
Harriet Olcott, 1822. He has been an extensive farmer ; 
now (1873) r. Centre Village. 

I. Jane, b. Oct. 20, 1822 ; m. Munro Johnson, of 
Hancock; d. Sept. 30, 1852, a. 29. 

II. Willard 0., b. June 10, 1824; m., i'', Julia 
Ann Robbe ; m., 2^, Emma T. Perry. One 
ch. first wife ; five ch. second wife. 

III. Eliza Ann, b. Sept. 22, 1826 ; m. Geo. Everett ; 

r. New Jersey. 

IV. Warren, b. June 11, 1828 ; d. June i, 1831. 

V. 3Iary Ann, b. Sept. 6, 1830; m. Elliot. 

VI. Samuel TF". , b. June 20, 1S32; r. Iowa. 

VII. Harriet R., b. April 26, 1835. 

VIII. Almena, b. April 6, 1838. 

IX. JohJi, b. Dec. 8, 1839; m. Annette; r. 

Nebraska. 
X. Charles A., b. July 6, 1842 ; d. Sept., 1852. 

Elijah Carey, taxed 1794 to 1798 inclusive; r. 
Sharon. 

JosiAH Carey, taxed 17951 '96, '97- 

Lewis Carey, brother of Samuel, Sen'r ; taxed 1802 
to 1808 inclusive; r. Francestown. 



248 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 

II 

(4) 



12 

(8) 



16 

17 



CARTER FAMILY. 

Capt. Jonah Carter came from Leominster, where 
he was b. in 1773 ; m. Lucy Joslin, b. the same year 
and in the same town; settled in JaffVey about 1792. 
In iSoo he re. to Rindge, where he d. Feb. 25, 1837. 
His widow d. Sept. 18, 1S46. 

I. Lucy^h. March 20, 1794; m. Charles Smith; 

d. 1866 in New York state. 
II. Susan, b. March 12, 1796 ; m. Nathan Stratton, 

1816; d. New York, 1869. 

III. Fordice^h. March 4, 1799.-}- 

IV. Orinda, b. Dec. 15, iSoo; d. Sept. 3, 1841. 
V. Jonah, b. April 2, 1803 ; d. Feb. 15, 1S19. 

VI. Grata, h. Dec. 26, 1804; m. Samuel Marble, 

q. V. 
VII. Charles, b. Oct. 26, i8o6.-|- 

VIII. Stillman, b. Sept. 6, 1808 ; d. in Rindge, Mar. 
25, 1814. 
IX. Josiah,h. Dec. 2, 181 1; m. Jane Robbins, 

April 17, 1838; re. to Keene. 
X. Luke, b. Sept. 20, 1814; m. Lucy M. Roys, 
Nov. 3, 1S39.4- 

FoRDiCE Carter settled on lot 12, range 8 ; m. Jan. 
30, 1825, Lucy Palmer, of Boston. She d. Jan. 21, 
1846, a. 43. M., 2**, Sally Byam. He d. July 16, 1862. 
Children by first wife : 



I. Emeline, m. 
II. Lucy M., m. 



bymonds, of Peru, Vt. 
- Russell. 



Charles Carter m., Feb. 12. 1829, Eliza A. Rob- 
bins. She d. Jan., 1S49, a. 37. He d. Sept. 24, i860. 

I. Charles Lyman, m. Anna, dau. of Ebenezer 
Bass ; is a tailor by trade ; r. in Winchendon. 
II. Frances E., m. Martin Day, of Winchendon, 
Mass. 

III. Oscar Eugene, d. in the Union army. 

IV. Adaline Victoria, m. Gilbert vStearns, of Win- 

chendon. 

Luke Carter, a manufacturer of wooden-ware, set- 
tled on lot 22, range 4 ; m. Lucy M. Roys, Nov. 3, 1839. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



249 



l8 

19 
20 

21 

22 

23 
24 



25 

26 

27 

(26) 



28 
29 

30 



Aug 



I. Susan F.^ b. 1841 ; m. Osgood J. Hadley ; d. 

Sept. 17, 1861, a. 20. 

II. Charles Albert, b. 1841 ; d. in the Union army. 

III. Lavina. 

IV. George ^., b. 1850. 
V. Vina S.^h. 1853. 

VI. Emma, b. 1859. 

William Carter, son of Oliver Carter, b. 17S6, m., 
Mary, dau. of Philip Sweetzer, of Marlborough, 
23, 1812; m., 2'!, Elizabeth, dau. of Samuel and 
Mary (Waite) Edes, of Peterborough. She d. Aug. 11, 
1832, a. 23. His first wife d. Aug. 8, 1819, a. 27. He 
d. Nov. 17, 1831. He was a stage-driver from JaftVey 
to Keene. 

I. Frances Maria, b. May 12, 1814; d. at Charles- 
town, Mass., May, 1833. 
II. William, b. May i, 1816.--J- 
III. Mary Elizabeth, b. Aug. 16, 181 8. 

William Carter, Jr., m. Catherine Bigelow, of 
Marlborough ; r. in JaftVey till 1873, and then re. to 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

I. William Clarence, b. Aug. 7, 1843. 
II. Zephyr Bigelow, b. April 11, 1850; d. Oct. 3, 
i860. 

Abijah Carter, highway surveyor, 1786. 



2 
3 

4 

5 



CAPRON FAMILY. 

Orford Capron came to Jaffre}' in 1831 ; was a 
blacksmith by trade ; r. East Jaflrey ; m., i*', April 5, 
1833, Cynthia, dau. of Capt. Thomas and Sarah (Saw- 
tell) Adams; she d. March 10, 1840, a. 30; m., 1^, 
Rachel, dau. of John and Mary Davis Turner, Oct. 
1840. He d. Oct. 14, 1867, a. 57. She d. April 
1S79, a. 6'$>. 

Cynthia A., b. April 23, 1833. 

Sarah Adeline, b. July 26, 1S34; d. March 4, 

1835- 
Mary Adeline, b. Nov. 23, 1835. 

Susan Amelia, b. Jan. 26, 1837 ' ^- March 24, 
1837- 



10, 



I. 
II. 

III. 

IV. 



250 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



6 V. Ellen Josephine, b, March 23, 1835. 

7 VI. John Quincy Adams, b. Aug. 24, 1847 (an 
adopted son). His father, Moses Adams, 
d. Feb. 8, 1S50, leaving a wife and one 
child, — ^J. Q. Adams. 



CHADWICK FAMILY. 

David Chadvvick was b. in Andover, Mass. He 
was in JaftVey previous to 17S0 ; was chosen field-driver 
that year. He settled on lot 12, range 10, in the south 
part of the town. His brother Joshua settled in Rindge 
about the same time. He m. Hannah, dau. of Thomas 
and Molly (Kinney) Mower. He d. Dec. 30, 181 7, a. 
60. His widow d. July 11, 1830, a. 73. 

2 I. Hannah, b. ; m. John Wood. 

3 II. David, b. , 1781 ; m. Hannah Stacy. -|- 

4 III. Sally, b. , 1787; m. Samuel Stearns, of 

Temple, 2^ wife; d. at Peterborough, Aug. 
25, 1875. 

5 I. Charles Albert, b. May 5, 1819 ; m., i", 

Lucy Davis ; m., 2^, . 

6 2. Almira, b, Jan. 3, 1821 ; m. Lovell 

Dodge ; re. to Maine. 

7 3. Lucinda, b. Sept. 17, 1822 ; m. Horace 

Bruce, re. to Pelei-borough. 

8 4. Hannah Marion, b. Aug. 27, 1824; m. 

Luke O. Forbush, r. Peterborough. 

5. Betsy Chrystina, b. July 15, 1S27 ; m. 
Charles Baker and Daniel White; 
r. in Manchester. 

10 6. Abbie Adeline, d. . 

11 7. Abbie Adeline, b. Dec. 6, 1829; m. 

John Pickering ; r. in Lawrence. 

12 IV. 3Iary,h. 1788; m. Joshua Towne, of Rindge ; 
d. Jan. 10, 1865. 

13 I. Phebe, b. Jan. 21, iSii ; m. Solomon 

F. Towne. 

14 2. Mary L., b. Sept. 30, 1813 ; m. Levi 

Russell, of Rindge. 

15 3. Laura, b. Jan. 3, 1815 ; d. Oct. 30, 

1850. 

16 4. Sophrona, b. Nov. 10, 1818; m. Stephen 

P. Patch, of Ashby ; d. 1846. 



17 
i8 

19 
20 

31 

22 



23 



(3) 



24 



25 

26 

27 
28 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 2$! 

5. Sarah M., b. March 25, 1821 ; d. March 

7, 1853. 

6. Joshua C, b. July 29, 1823 ; m. Eveline 

J. Brooks. 

7. Josiah T., b. April 5, 1S26 ; m. Sibel 

Boardman. 
S. Caroline Rand, b. July 1=^, 1S30; d. 
July 18, 1S33. 

V. Abigail, h. , 1791 ; m. Daniel Chamberlin, 

q. V. 
VI. Thomas 3foioer, b. 1796; m. Sarah Chapin, 

dau. of Thomas Chapin. He d. Jan. 4, 

i860. His widow d. March 6, 1863, a. 64. 

I child : 

I. Eliza Ann, d. Sept. 9, 1821, a. 2 yrs., 
4 mos. 



David Chadwick, Jr., m., May 23, 1809, Hannah 
Stacy. He was a deacon of the Baptist church ; and, 
in 1820, captain of the Jaffrey Rifle Company. He d. 
Nov. 12, 1858, a. 76. His widow d. Jan. 20, 1872, a. 
81. 

I. William S., d. Sept. 8, 1839, a. 29 ; m. Hepse- 
bath, dau. of Moses and Jane (Harper) 
Fairbanks. 
II. Charles A., b. 1826; m. Sarah A., dau. of 
Samuel and Abigail (Fife) Stratton. 

III. Calvin G., b. , 1830. 

IV. Appleton B.^h. , 1838. 

V. William, M., h. , 1839- 



CHAMBERLIN FAMILY. 

Joseph, with his brother Nathan, came from Hop- 
kinton, Mass., and settled, first in Sharon, afterwards 
in Jaffrey, about 1807. They settled on lot 23, range 
5, and carried on the business of sawing lumber. Jo- 
seph d. March 21, 1832, a. 80. 

Nathan m. Hannah . He d. Oct. 25, 1821, a. 

6^. His widow d. Nov. 4, 1822, a. 68. 

3 David, b. 1784 ; m. July 7, 1813, Abigail Chadwick. -[- 

4 Hacheliah, paid tax, 1813 to 1816, iuclusive. 



252 

(3) 



5 
6 



(6) 

8 
9 

lO 

II 

12 



13 



H 



15 
16 



17 



18 
19 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

David Chamberlin m. Abigail, dau. of David and 
Hannah (Mower) Chadwick. He d. April 15, 1844, 
a. 60. His widow d. Jan. 30, 1870, a. 79. 
I. Augustus A. 
II. David C, b. 1817.-]- 
III. Joh7i M., b. 1829. 



David C. Chamberlin m., i'*, May9, 1848, Ermina, 
dau. of Benj. and Grata (Hunt) Cutter. 

I. Alary Augusta^ b. May 25, 1849 ; m. Albert S. 

Pierce, 1872 ; r. in Fitchburg. 
11. Ada Ermina, b. June 24, 185 1. 

M., 2'^, Helen Marr, dau. of Nath'l and Mary B. 
(Averill) Cutter. 

III. Lucien Beecher^ h. July 14, 1857 ; d. June 15, 

1859. 

IV. Edward Woodbury, b. May 21, 1861. 
V. Allen Howard, b. April 3, 1868. 

Mr. Chamberlin graduated at Amherst college ; was 
a teacher in Melville academy, and in the high school 
in Winchendon, Mass. ; r. in Jaffrey, 17S0. 



Asa Chamberlin came from Mass. to JafFrey in 
1850, paid tax 1850 to 1864, inclusive. He was born 
in Mass., 1792. His wife, Sophronia O., b. in Vt., 
1 801, settled on lot 10, range 6. 



Sumner Chamberlin, b. 1820, came from Holden, 

Mass., tojaftrey in 1846; m. Cynthia ; had two 

children : 

I. Charles S., h. 1847. 
II. Emogene, b. 18=50 ; r. lot 21, range i. 



Jacob, a brother of Sumner, came to Jaffrey in 1848, 
settled on lot 17, range 6; left town about 1862; m. 
Ann ; had two children : 

I. Cyrus X., b. 184S. 
II. Alary Z>., b. 1850. 



20 



21 

22 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 253 

Henry, brother of Sumner and Jacob, came to Jaf- 
frey in 1846, and settled on lot 12, range 9; m. Mel- 
vina, dau. of Samuel and Martha (Stevens) Litch, 
Aug. 18, 1859. 

I. Samuel Litch^ b. Aug. 8, 1861. 
II. Martha Stevens^ b. March 4, 1862. 



COFFEEN FAMILY. 

Henry was a son of Michael, who emigrated from Ireland to 
this country at the age of sixteen. He m. at the age of twenty, 
and settled in Topsfield ; re. from thence to Lunenburgh, and 
subsequently to Winchendon, Mass. He is represented as be- 
ing of wealthy and respectable parentage. 

Henry was b. in Lunenburgh, April 6, 1738. He settled 
first in Rindge ; was selectman there in 1770; re. to Jaftrey 
soon after, at which place he became a very prominent man. 
At the first annual meeting after the organization of the town 
he was chosen moderator ; first selectman and moderator at 
two subsequent meetings the same 3'ear. In 1775 he v/as cho- 
sen deputy to attend the Provincial Congress at Exeter ; and in 
June of the same year he was chosen captain of the military 
company that year organized, — the first one formed in Jafirey. 
He also gave his security that year for a town's stock of salt, 
and furnished a barrel of rum used at the raising of the meet- 
ing-house, for which he was paid by the town in 1780, about 
which time he removed to Acworth, N. H. He purchased a 
mill in that place, on Cold river, in the south part of the town, 
and was drowned, in 1785, bv a freshet which carried away his 
mill. 

He m., previous to 1765, Lucy, dau. of Moses Hale, of 
Rindge; m., 2*^, Mehitable Smith, of Acworth. Children by 
first wife : 

Henry ; Nathan, re. to New York state ; Moses ; David ; 
Lydia ; and Lucy. 

Children by second wife : 

Daniel, m. Folly Currier ; r. in Acworth for a time, and then 
re. to Johnson, Vt. ; had a family of ten children, — five now 
living. Mrs. Lucy M. Tyler, of Cambridge, Vt., is the eldest. 

COMBS FAMILY. 

John Combs and wife, Bathsheba, were members of the 
church when incorporated in 1780; he d. in 17S9. His widow 
d. 1797. One child : 

Sarah, m. Simon Whitcomb ; was a widow in 1S06. 



254 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



4 

5 

6 

7 



8 
9 

lO 



COMSTOCK FAMILY. 

William Comstock, b. in Lyme, N. H., settled in 
Sullivan; m., i'*, March lo, iSoi, Martha Jewett, dau. 
of Jonathan and Martlia (Belcher) Jewett. She d. at 

Sullivan, He m., 2^, Ruth ; d. at Jaffrey Oct. 4, 

1863, a. 86. He d. Dec. 33, 1S65, a. 94. 

Jonathan Jewett Comstock, son of William by first 
wife, came to Jaffrey about 1828; paid tax that year ; 
settled on the Jewett farm, lot 5, range 7, where he now 
resides. 

Mr. Comstock is an extensive farmer, and one of the 
prominent men in town ; was for a number of years a 
member of the board of selectmen. He was b, in Sul- 
livan, May 30, 1S03 ; m., Oct. 4, 1S30, Roancy, dan. of 
William and Nabby (Smith) Button. 

I. Mary Roancy^ b. Aug. 16, 1831 ; m. Johnson 
Plummer, of Goftstown, who d. Feb. 11, 
1857 ' '^^-i '^'^1 Addison J. Adams, who now 
resides with his father-in-law on the same 
farm. 

1. Edgar A., b. in Mich, 1857. 

2. Everett F., b. 1S63. 

3. Elmer J., b. 1864. 

II. Freeman tT., b. Feb. 11, 1834; m. Abbie, dau. 
of Benjamin Heywood ; r. St. Louis, Mo. ; 
a prominent citizen of that place. 

III. William, Button^ b. May 19, 1839 > '^- Susan F. 

Gregory ; r. Sacramento, Cal. 

IV. David I., b. May 16, 1841 ; d. Oct. 19, 1841. 
V. Charles S., h. April 28, 1S43 ; d. Sept. 10, 

1849. 



CONANT FAMILY. 

John Conant, son of John and Hulda Hobart Conant, was 
b. in Stow, Mass., Jan. 20, 1790. His grandfather, Samuel, 

m. Holman, and was also a resident of Stow. His 

mother was the dau. of Nehemiah and Rachel (Shattuck) Ho- 
bart, of Pepperell, Mass., a lineal descendant of Rev. Peter 
Hobart, the first minister of Hingham. His father was a de- 
scendant of the French Huguenots ; was twice married, and 
the parent of fifteen children. He was a large fiirmer, and a 
man of wealth ; at the age of 18 he gave his son John a mort- 
gage of $1,500 on a farm in Acton. He soon came into the 




z^y^^^n u^^ ocq^^ 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 255 

possession of the farm. It was covered with wood and timber, 
and with the aid of iiis labor in cutting and drawing the wood 
to the Boston market he doubled his capital. He then sold his 
farm, re. to JatiVey, and purchased the Thorndike farm, lots ii 
and 12, range 3, then under a high state of cultivation. This was 
in 1S16, a year of very short crops. The price of hay was ex- 
tremely high, and the sale of the product of the farm that year 
was equal to a large portion of its valuation. With this income 
he was enabled to erect the large, elegant frame house now on 
the premises. At the time of his settlement in Acton, he m. 
Parmela Houghton, who d. in childbed in about eleven months 
after marriage. In 1S16, April i, he m. Mary Prescott Hos- 
mer, of Concord, Mass., an accomplished and educated lady, a 
few years older than himself. They had no children. Situ- 
ated in affluent circumstances thus early in life, he had abun- 
dant means of procuring books, — publications of everything 
relating to scientific research and agriculture. Always on a 
farm from his youth up, early accustomed to its labors and 
management, induced him to apply science to practice, and 
thus perfect himself in its operations. In the management of 
his farm he did not expend his income in foolish and unprofit- 
able outlay, but in a way that greatly increased it. 

He was early associated with the Cheshire Agricultural Soci- 
ety, and for some time its president. He ofibred his farm to 
the society for the purpose of founding an agricultural school, 
which was accepted, but for some reason the school was never 
put in operation. In 1850 he sold his farm to Nehemiah Cut- 
ter, and soon after removed to East JaftVey, built a fine resi- 
dence, where he spent the remainder of his useful life, and died 
April 6, 1S77, aged 87. His wife d. Aug. 9, 1S5S, a. 74. M., 
3*^, Nov. 12, 1859, Mrs. Sally (Livermore) Kittredge, of Nel- 
son, b. at Alstead, 1807. She d. Jan. 5, 1S78. 

Mr. Conant has been much in public service. In the town 
where he lived he was for many years moderator of its town- 
meetings ; several years selectman ; represented the town in the 
state legislature in 1834, '35' ^""^^ '3^' trustee of the Asylum 
for the Insane at Concord ; first president of the board ; super- 
intendent of the erection of the building ; president of the 
Cheshire County Agricultural Society ; and president of the 
Monadnock Bank, established at Jafl:rey in 1850. 



PUBLIC GIFTS. 



First, in the town where he lived, $7,000 for the support of 
a public high-school; $3,000 for the aid of indigent families; 
$1,000 to the Baptist church, of which he was a member; 



256 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



$1,000 to the Congregational church ; and $1,000 to keep the 
town-house, formerly the meeting-house, in permanent repair. 
To the State Lunatic Asylum, $6,000; to the Academy of 
New London, $13,000 ; to the State Agricultural College at 
Hanover, $70,000; to each town in the county of Cheshire 
a scholarship of $i,ooo=$23,ooo ; whole amount exceeding 
$100,000. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



COREY FAMILY. 

David Corey, son of Stephen Corey, was born in 
Flintstown, Me., Feb. 28, 1790. He came witli his 
father to Dublin in i797' ^"^ settled on lot 12, range 
2, in Jaftrey, in 1818 ; m., 1S17, Betsey, dau. of Abel 
VVinship, of Hancock, Me. Corey was a good, practi- 
cal farmer, one of the best in his district. The farm he 
purchased was swampy and unproductive, and consid- 
ered of little value. By his labor and skill, the swamps 
were drained antl made productive, and his other lands 
so improved that large products were the result; and 
he became a man of wealth and influence. He sold 
his farm, re. to the centre of the town, and in 1863 
went to the residence of his sons, Yates City, 111., where 
he d., May, 1871, a. 81. 

1. Jesse, b. Oct. 21, 1S18; d. Oct. 3, 1827. 
II. fToh7i 6\, b. March 20, 1820; r. Kentucky. 

III. Stephen^ b. Nov. 22, 1822 ; d. June 26, 1851. 

IV. David, b. Dec. 17, 1824; r. Yates City, 111. 

V. Charles G., b. Aug. 28, 1826 ; studied medicine, 
and received the degree of M. D. at Dart- 
mouth college. Settled in Greenville, N. H., 
and d. Oct. 19, 1878. He was a successful 
physician, and highly esteemed as a citizen. 
He m. Susan Maria Marshall, of Fitchburg, 
who now survives him. 

VI. James Monroe, h. Aug. 22, 1828 ; r. Maryland. 



CRAGIN FAMILY. 

John Cragin, the emigrant, was b., 1634, in the 
south part of Scotland. In early life he was pressed 
into the army, and was taken prisoner at the battle of 
Dunbar, 1650. The prisoners taken in that battle were 
brought to this country, himself with the rest, the fol- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



257 



3 
4 



5 
6 



7 
8 

9 
10 



12 



lowing year. He settled in Woburn ; m. Sarah Dawes, 
b. in England; and d. Jan. 27, 1708. They had eight 
cliildren, some of whose descendants settled in Temple, 
N. H. 

Orlando, son of Moses and Lucy (Felt) Cragin, was 
b. in Temple, Aug. 24, 1802 ; m., 1^', Malinda G. Christie, 
of New Boston, Dec. 20, 1825. She d. Feb. 15, 1869; 
m., 2'', Emily (Ware) Cragin, widow of Stephen 
Cragin. He r. Mason Village (now Greenville), Rindge, 
New Ipswich, and came to JaftVey in 184S ; his name 
is on the tax-list of that year. He settled on lot 18, 
range 9. 9 children : 

I. Orlando Bradford, b. at Mason, June 24, 1827 ; 
m. Amanda T. Jaquith, Sept. 9, 1S52; r. 
Gardner, Mass. 
II. JLucy 3Iali?ida, h. Nov. 2, 182S; m. Augustus 
W. Joslin ; r. Fitchburg, Mass. 

III. J3e7y. F., b. Oct. 27, 1S30 ; m. Harriet M. Spen- 

cer, Dec. 6, 1865 ; b. in Kingsbury, N. Y., 
July 27, 1838. 

IV. Olive Ann, b. March 4, 1833 ; d. March 8, 1833. 
V. Ahhy Rosilla, b. at New Ipswich, March 23, 

1834. 
VI. George TF., b. at Mason, Sept. 23, 1836. 
VII. e/oA/i Christie, b. at Rindge, Feb. 13, 1S39. 
VIII. Henry II., h. at New Ipswich, Dec. 24, 1840; 
d. Dec. 27, 1863. 
IX. Robert Clark, b. at New Ipswich, June 6, 1844. 



Stephen Cragin, son of Capt. Francis and Sarah 
(Cummings) Cragin, of Temple, b. Aug. 25, 1821 ; m. 
Emily M. Ware, of Hancock ; settled in East JaftVey, 
1853 5 ^- ^"g* 3O' 1866, a. 45. One child : 



I. Emma Jane, b. May 9, 1853. 



CROSBY FAMILY. 

The Crosby family is one of the many distinguished English 
families who settled in New England. In their ranks are 
a large number of literary men, graduates of colleges, and many 
who have distinguished themselves in the learned professions. 
The origin of the New England portion of the family has been 
traced to Simon de Crosby, of Lancashire, England, 1220. 

18 



258 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



7 
8 



lO 

1 1 

12 

H 

16 



biMON, the emigrant, at the age of 26, with his wife 
Ann and son Thomas, came to this country and settled 
in Cambridge in 1635. He d. in 1639, and his widow 
m. Rev. William Thompson, of Rraintree, Mass. They 
had three sons, — Thomas, Simon, and Joseph. 

Thomas, b. 1635 ; graduated at Harvard college in 
1653, studied divinity, settled in Eastham, and d. in 
1702. He was the parent of twelve children. 

Simon, b. 1637 ' settled in Billerica ; became freeman 
in 166S ; representative in i6g2-'j-8 ; m., 1659, Rachel 
Brackett, and had a family of nine children. 

Joseph, b. 1639 ; m. Sarah Brackett, and had a num- 
ber of children. He represented the town of Braintree 
in 1689. 

Josiah, son of Simon Crosby, b. in Billerica in 1677 ; 
m. Mary Manning, and had eleven children. 

Josiah. his eldest son, b. 1730; m. Sarah Fitch, of 
Bedford ; settled in Milford, and had ten children. 
Two of his sons, Joseph and Alpheus, settled in JaflVey. 

Joseph was b. Oct. 15, 1753, and 

Alpheus, b. Nov. 16, 1762, at Milford, N. H.-|- 

Joseph m. Esther Lane, and settled in JaflVey about 
1778. While he remained in town he held the offices 
of assessor of taxes, surveyor of roads, and fence-viewer, 
the last office in 1789. He was also a soldier in the 
Revolution, was in the battle of Bunker's Hill, and for 
many years received a pension. He removed from 
Jaflrey to Harvard, Mass., about 1790, and afterwards 
to Amherst, N. H., and d. Oct., 1842. His wife, 
Esther, d. Nov. 2, T794. M., 2"^, Sarah Richardson, 
who d. Feb. 22, 1850. Eight children: 

I. Grace Head, h. at Jaflrey, Aug. 7, 1779; m. 
Nathaniel French, of Sandwich, and d., 
July 12, 1855. 6 children : 
11. J^ohn Lane, b. . 

III. Joseph, b. July 29, 1798; d. Sept., 1798. 

IV. Otis, b. in Amherst, April 22, 1800; m. Salona 

Whipple, of Barre, Vt., and d. Jan., 1870. 

V. Lorenzo Lowe, b. ; d. Aug., 1805. 

VI. Sarah Ann, b. Oct. 15, 1812; m. Langdon 

Smith, r. Amherst. 

VII. Lucy 3Iaria, h. June, 1814; m. Benj. T. Co- 

nant, of Milford ; d. June 12, 1865. 
VIII. Joseph Fitch, b. Sept. 16, 1819; m. Helen M. 
Averill, of Mont Vernon. 



(8) 



17 

i8 

19 
20 

21 



22 

23 

24 



25 
26 



(22) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 259 

Alpheus Crosby came to Jaffrey in 1786, and was 
warned from town that year. He m. Elizabeth, dau. 
of Roger, Esq., and Ann (Hunter) Gihnore, Nov. 18, 
17SS. He settled on lot 15, range 4, was a prosperous 
farmer, and also, for a time, followed the business of 
teaming to Boston and other places. He held many 
town offices, and was captain of the Jaffrey and Rindge 
cavalry company. He was a man of industrious habits, 
a good citizen, and a member of the Baptist church. 
His wife d. Oct. 26, 1839, a. 70. He d. Oct. 4, 1845, 
a. 83. He m., 2^, Mary Foster, of Amherst, who sur- 
vived him, and after his decease returned to her native 
town. 

Children by first wife : 

I. Betsy^ b. Aug. 30, 1789; m. John Cutter, Jr., 

q. V. 10 children, 
n. Esther^ b. April 5, 1791 ; m. Samuel Burpee, ol 
New London, Oct. 5, 1820; r. Lima, N. Y. 
She d. Sept. 10, 1855. Had 4 children. 

III. Mary^ b. Sept. 14, 1793 ; m. Loren Woodbury, 

q. V. 3 children. 

IV. Nancy Ann, b. July 6, 1794 ; m. Abner Boyden, 

Esq., of Marlborough, a man of wealth and 
distinction. She d. in Troy, in 1845. 2 ch., 
Charles and Maria, who re. to Rockford, III. 
V. /Sarah, b. Nov. 6, 1796; m., i^', Moses Bush, 
April 3, 1S32, r. Troy ; m., 2'', Abel Baker, 
a brother of Ezra Baker, of Jaffrey. 
VI. Alpheus, b. April 13, 1798. -|- 
VII. Asa, b. June 3, i8cx5. -|- 

VIII. Franklin, b. April 2, 1S02 ; 3 children, Alpheus 
and Darius. Darius d. in military service 
in the late civil war. 

IX. Porter, b. Feb. 19, 1804; m. Sophia Fernald, 

re. to California, and d. in 1874. He was 
engaged in the roofing business. 

X. Josiah, b. May 28, 181 1 ; d. at Somerville, 

Mass., Oct. 7, 1861. He was a merchant 
in Boston ; m. Lucy Lee, who, after the 
death of her husband, re. to Chicago. 



Alpheus Crosby m. Mary, dau. of Jonathan and 
Sibyl (Jackson) Fox ; settled in Troy, and was engaged 
in the business of blacksmithing ; re. to Rockford, 111., 
where he d. Dec. 16, 1873. His wife d. Oct. 19, 1868. 



26o 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



27 
28 

29 



30 



31 



32 



33 



34 



(23) 



35 

36 
37 

38 



IV 



I. Infant^ b. in Jaffrey ; d. . 

11. Mary Louisa, b. in Jaffrey ; d. young. 
III. Joseph Fox, b. in Troy, Dec. 25, 1827; m. 
Priscilla Babcock, of Rockford, 1850, and 
d. there. 

George Fox, b. Dec. 28, 1829 ; m. May Wood, 
of New Milford, 111. ; was killed by a 
kick of a horse, Nov. 16, 1S74. Children: 
(i)Charles Arthur. (2)LauraMay. (3)Hattie. 
V. Mary E., b. Feb. 11,. 1832 ; m. John G. Pendle- 
ton, broker, Oct. 20, 1856; r. in Rockford. 
Children : (i) Helen Maria. (2) Fannie 
Hunter. (3) Kate Crosby. 

Emma C, b. Jan. 7, 1842 ; m. Charles Cotton, 
jeweller, Aug. 14, 1862. He d. Sept., 
1872. Children: (i) Roger Gilmore. (2) 
Mary Elizabeth. (3) William Boyden. (4) 
Helen Louisa. 

Frederick L.,\). June 28, 1846; m. Elizabeth 
Larime, Feb. 20, 1868. 3 children : (i) 
Mary Elizabeth. (2) Clara Maria. (3) Ann 
Hunter. 

Ahhie Crocker, b. May 28, 1848 ; m. Norman 
Robinson, of Rockford, hardware dealer. 
I ch., Robbie, d. 1872. 



VI 



VII. 



VIII 



Asa Crosby m. Mary Wood, dau. of Dr. Adonijah 
and Persis (Wood) Howe, of Jaffrey, April 28, 1829. 
He was an English goods merchant in Boston; re. to 
Rockford, and d. 1864. 

I. Harriet E., b. in Rockford, May 3, 1S40; m. 
Noyes E. Babcock, 1865. Children: (i) 
Herbert M. (2) Cora Alice. 
Mary E., b. Sept. 6, 1844. 
Caroline Ii.,h. Oct. 22, 1847. 



II. 
III. 



JosiAH Davis Crosby, b. in Ashburnham, Mass., 
March i, 1807, was a son of Fitch and Rebecca (Davis) 
Crosby, a brother of Joseph and Alpheus Crosby. He 
graduated from Union college ; studied divinity at the 
Andover Theological Seminary ; was settled pastor of 
the Congregational church in Jaffrey, a colleague with 
Rev. Laban Ainsworth, in 1837 ; dismissed in 1844, 
and now resides on the homested in Ashburnham. He 
m. Elvira Willard, of Athol, April 16, 1S39, a relative 
of President Willard, of Harvard University. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



261 



CUMMINGS FAMILY. 

John Cummings, son of Asahel and Polly (Ames) 
Cummings, was b. in Hancock, June iS, 181 1 ; settled 
in Jaftrey in 1S47 ; ^^* ^° Peterborough in 1S56 ; was a 
carpenter and joiner by trade. He m. Mary, dau. of 
Josiah and Nancy (Gilchrist) Wait, Oct. 28, 1833. Four 
children : 

I. David A?igelo, b. Aug. 9, 1834; m. Elizabeth 
Chesebro ; 3 children : (i) Frank. (3) 
Henry. (3) Roy. R. Wisconsin. 
II. John Addison, b. Jan. 16, 1838; m., i^', Katie, 
dau. of James and Sarah A. (Wilson) Scott. 
She was drowned in the Potomac river, 
occasioned by a collision of the steamers 
West Point and George Peabody, Aug. 13, 



III. 



IV. 



1863 ; m. 
15, 1866. 



2*^, Adeline J. Cummings, Nov, 



Mr. Cummings was a lieutenant 
in the 6th Regt. N. H. V., Co. E., promoted 
to captain, and afterwards to Maj. of the i^' 
N. H. Cavalry, and was in service during 
the war. 7 children, 6 living : (i) Guy 
Pierson. (3) Leslie Wait. (3) Susie Ella. 
(4) Madell. (5) Clifford. (6) Nina. (7) 
John. R. Somerville, Mass. 

£Jllen Jane, h. Sept. 6, 1S41 ; m., May 26, 1S63, 
Wm. G. Livingstone. 3 children : (i) 
Fred. G. (2) Frank W. (3) Alice; a 
merchant, Peterboro'. 

George Wait, h. May 11, 1844; m. Fanny P. 
Dane, March, 1866. i ch., George Dane. 
R. Francestown. 



CUTTER FAMILY. 

Richard Cutter, the progenitor of the Cutter family, son 
of Samuel and Elizabeth Cutter, came from Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne, England, with his mother, and settled in Cambridge 
about 1640. His father d. previous to their emigration. He 
was probably under twenty years of age at the time of his arri- 
val, and unmarried. June 3, 1641, he was admitted a free- 
man. The requirements for admission were to be " orthodox 
member of the church, twenty years old, and worth £300." 
In 1643 he became a member of the Artillery Company, now- 
known as the '^ Ancient and Honorable Artillery," of Boston. 



262 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

He was also a member of Cambridge church, in full commun- 
ion. He was a cooper by trade, and became a large land- 
owner. About 1644 he m. his wife Elizabeth, whose surname 
is unknown. Her tombstone is one of the oldest now standing 
in the ancient burying-ground at old Cambridge. 

Here lyes y* body of 

Elizabeth Cutter wife to 

Richard Cutter aged 

about 42 Years died 

March 5, 1 66 1-2. 

Feb. 14, 1662-3, li^ "''• Fiances (Perriman)Amsden, widow 
of Isaac Amsden, or Emsden, of Cambridge. She survived his 
decease. He d. June 16, 1693, and was buried near the grave 
of his first wife, Elizabeth. 

Here lyes y" body of 

Richard Cutter, 

Aged about 72 

Years dyed y*^ i6 of 

June 1693. 

liichard Cutter was the parent of fourteen children, — seven by 
each wife. By his wife Elizabeth he had five sons and two 
daughters ; by wife Frances one son and six daughters. Of 
his two eldest sons, Samuel and Thomas, but little is known ; 
the others, — William, Ephraim, Gershom, and Nathaniel, — are 
the progenitors of the Cutter family of New England. 

William, b. 1649, m. Rebecca, dau. of John Rolf; had ten 
children, — five sons and five daughters. His oldest son, Rich- 
ard, settled in Woodbridge, N. J. ; John, William, and Samuel, 
in Cambritlge. Ammi Rahamah graduated from Harvard col- 
lege in 1725, studied divinity, and was settled in North Yar- 
mouth, Me. William Cutter, Sen'r, d. 1723, a. 74; buried 
in Cambridge. 

Ephraim, b. 165 1 ; m. Bethia Wood; r. Charlestown and 
Watertovvn ; had eight children, — four sons and four daughters. 
(i) Ephraim, settled in Brookfield, Mass. ; (2) Jonathan and 
(3) George, in Watertown ; and (4) John, in Woburn and 
Lexington. 

Gershom, b. 1653 ; m. Lydia Hall ; r. Cambridge ; had four 
children, — one son and three daughters Gershom, his son, 
settled in Cambridge. Gershom, Sen'r, d. 173S, a. 85. 

Nathaniel, son of Richard Cutter by his wife Frances, was 
b. in 1663, m. Mary Fillebrown, of Charlestown, and had seven 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 263 

children, — five sons and two daughters ; r. Charlestown. His 
oldest son, Nathaniel, r. Charlestown ; Jacob, place of resi- 
dence unknown ; Ebenezer, r. Medford : Ricliard, d. young. 

Of the Cutter family in JaftVey, Joseph, Benjamin, Moses, 
David, and Natlian were descendants of Ephraim ; James, of 
Gershom ; and John, of Nathaniel. 

Fifth generation. Joseph Cutter, son of John, and grandson 
of John and Rachel Powers Cutter, tlie son of Ephraim, was b. 
May 13, 1752, at Lexington, Mass.; re. with liis father first to 
Waltham ; second, to Shrewsbury ; and from thence to New 
Ipswich, where his father d. in i^Ji-, in the forty-sixth year of 
his age. His father was the parent of eleven children. He 
left a widow, Susanna (Hastings), who m., 2'^, Simeon Gould, 
of New Ipswich, and d. at Jaffrey, Aug. 5, 1827, aged 96. 
She was a dau. of Joseph and Lydia (Brown) Hastings, of 
Waltham, son of Thomas, who settled in Watertown in 1634, 
and was admitted freeman in 1635. 

The name Hastings is of Danish origin. A portion of the 
county of Sussex was taken possession of by a Danish chief of 
that name, and the castle and seaport were held by his family 
when William the Conquerer landed in England ; and they 
held it from the crown for many generations. Several of the 
Hastingses were raised to a peerage. Sir Henry and George 
Hastings, grandsons of the Earl of Huntington, had sons who 
became Puritans and came to this country. 

Joseph Cutter and his brother John were appointed executors 
of their father's will ; and after the estate was settled, Joseph re. 
to JaftVey, and settled on lot 17, range 3, afterwards the f:irm 
of Josepli Bates, now (1873) of Dea. Isaac S. Russell. After 
a short residence, he purchased a lot of land near the moun- 
tain, built thereon a log cabin, levelled the forest trees, and 
made from time to time additional purchases of land till he be- 
came tlie largest landed proprietor in the towm. On this tract 
he settled his sons, giving each one a fiirm, — his eldest son, Jo- 
seph, the homestead, who built the spacious mansion now the 
residence of Joel H. Poole, his great-grandson, — and purchased 
the tavern stand in the centre of the town of his brother Ben- 
jamin, and spent there the remainder of his days, living to the 
great age of 88 years. He was a farmer by vocation ; was born 
and resided on a farm till 1804, when he retired at the age of 
52, having acquired an ample competence by his own industry 
from very small means in the beginning. From his early edu- 
cation and continued occupation in the business of farming, he 
acquired a thorough practical knowledge of its requirements : 
consequently success attended his labors, and he became 
wealthy in its operations. In town affairs, the honor of holding 



264 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



public office was secondar\- to his farming interest, and he de- 
clined serving. He. however, served a few times as selectman, 
and held occasionally other minor town offices ; was a military- 
captain ; was appointed justice of the peace. He was a soldier 
in the Revolution, for which he was honored with a pension. 

In his domestic relations success marked his progress. He 
m. Rachel, dau. of Nehemiah and Rachel (Shattuck) Hobart, 
of Pepperell. a lineal descendant of the Rev. Peter Hobart of 
Hingham. Mass. She had all the requisite qualifications of a 
kind mother and a faithful wife. She was b. April 12. 1750: 
m. Dec. 5. 1776; d. Jan. 20. 1S35. They were the parents of 
ten children. In 1S22 there was a tamilv feathering at his resi- 
dence in the centre of the town. His children and grand- 
children, sons and daughters-in-law, were all present, and in 
addition, his aged mother. No death had occurred among 
them except a wife of Dr. N. Cutter, of Pepperell ; he, how- 
ever, had recently m. a second wife, who was present on the 
occasion. Of the invited guests present were the Rev. Laban 
Ainsworth and the Hon. Abel Parker, with their wives. 

Ntimber of children present, ten. — six sons and four daugh- 
ters. JXumber of grandchildren, fortv. — twenty- of each sex. 
Sons-in-law. three ; daughters-in-law. six. Whole number, 
including parents and grandparents. sixt\-two. 

The meeting was opened with pra3er by the Rev. Mr. Ains- 
worth, sinsfins: bv the assemblv. follo^ved bv remarks from the 
distinguished ones present. A collation was prepared, of 
which all partook. When that was over the first and second 
generations retired, giving the third a fine opportunity for 
amusement. 

Children : 



2 
3 

4 
5 



7 
8 



I. Joseph, b. Aug. 23. 1777. + 

II. Hachel, h. Jan. 9. 1779: m. John Underwood, 
q. V. ' 

III. John. b. Oct. 24. i7So.-f- 

IV. Susa?i, b. June 3, 17S2 ; m. Edmund Parker, 

q. V. 
V, Daniel, h. Feb. 2. 17S4.-I- 

VI. Sabra, h. Oct. 11. 17S5 ; d. unm., Feb. 4, 1S43. 
VII. J^ehemiah, h. ]SIarch 30, 17S7 '• "i- Lucy Ste- 
vens, of Middlebury. Mary Parker, of Pep- 
perell, and Eliza Jones, of Boston. No ch. 
[See Coll. Graduates.] 
VIII. Oklist. b. May 14, 1790; m. Feb. 20, 1S21. 
Oliver Barrett, of ^lason : d. March 30, 1S3S. 
Children, — George, Susan, Rachel, Joseph. 



lO 

II 

(2) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 26$ 

IX. Abel, b. April iS, 1793.+ ) ^ . 
X. Joel, b. April 18, 1793.-I- ] ^^'"^• 

Joseph Cutter, Jr., settled on the homestead, and 
erected the spacious mansion house now standing on 
that place. He m., June 18, 1804, Phebe, dau. of Capt. 
James and Sarali (Lamson) Gage, b. Dec. 15, 1779- 
He d. Nov. 20, i860, a. 83. His widow d. Dec. 6, 
1871, a. 92. Early accustomed to a farmer's life, edu- 
cated in the business by a successful teaclier, his father, 
he too was successful in the business, and left a lasting 
memorial of his spirit of enterprise in the stately struct- 
ure on the premises already alluded to. He was a man 
of untiring industry, strict integrity, unassuming man- 
ners, quiet and strictly sober habits. His opportunities 
for even a common-school education were extremely 
limited. Schools were few in number, and at that 
time short in duration. Feeling the importance of an 
education, he furnished his children with the advan- 
tages of a good common-school, and spared no pains in 
giving them an opportunity to attend it. He had at 
heart their good, and they will ever hold him in aflec- 
tionate remembrance. 

Children : 

12 I. JVehemiahJIoba7't,h. March 12, 1S05 ; m., Feb. 
15, 1S38, Rebecca, dau. of Submit and 
Phebe (Rugg) Bailey, of East Hampton, 
Mass., b. April 15, 1S05 ; — r., first, in New 
York state ; second, in Joliet, 111., where he 
has been a distinguished citizen, a man of 
note and influence. 

13 II. Phebe, b. Oct. 24, 1806; m., Dec. 29, 1836, 
Joel Keyes, of Tyngsborough, Mass. ; r. 
Dunstable, Mass. He d. . 

14 I. Darwin P., b. Dec. 5, 1837; "^- Liz- 
zie Chene}', of Hollis. 

15 2. J. Willard, b. Sept. 30, 1839; "^- ^"'^ 

M. Cooper, of Minneapolis, Minn. ; is 
a Universalist minister, and is now 
(1S70) pastor of that church in Roches- 
ter, Minn. One child, Bertha A., b. 
April 18, 1868. 

16 III. Sarah, b. Nov. 27, iSoS ; m., Jan. 29, 1823, 
Darwin C. Perry, m. d., b. in Orwell, Vt., 
1807 ; r. JaftVey ; in 1836 re. to Woodstock, 
Vt., and d. Nov. 28, 1837. One child : 



266 
17 



i8 



^9 



20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 



26 

27 
28 

29 



30 



31 
32 

33 

34 
35 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

I. Sarah Electa, b. Feb. 24, 1837; "^•' 
Oct., 1S53, Hon. Selucius Garfield, of 
California. He has held many impor- 
tant government offices, and r. in vari- 
ous places, and had several children. 

Mrs. Perry m., 2'*, Dec. 25, 1838, Moses 
Fairbanks, who d. in Fitchburg, July 24, 
1874; she d.June 15, 1874. 

IV. Josei^h Hastings, b. May 28, 181 2; m. ; had 
six children; r. Milton; now (1873) in Cal- 
ifornia. 
V. James Lamson, b. June 4, 1814; m. Amelia R. 
Hutchinson, of Hebron, Ct., March 13, 
1851 ; r. Utica, N. Y. Five children : 

1. Lucinda Amelia, b. Fulton, N. Y., 
Nov. 18, 1852. 

2. Jaines Hutchinson, b. Sept., 1854. 

3. Franklin Jewett, b. Utica, Sept. 22, 
1858. 

4. Mary Lauretta, b. Feb. 3, i860. 

5. Harriet Phebe, b. Dec. 4, 1861. 

VI. Samuel Thomas, b. July 26, 1818 ; m., Dec. i, 
1849, Harriet M., dau. of Dea. Amos Wood, 
who d. Nov. II, 1850; m., 2'', Mrs. Alidia 
Maria (Willard) Talmadge, May 4, 1856. 
Three children by second wife : 

1. Harriet Majesta, b. May 14, 1857. 

2. Freddie, b.'Aug. 7, 1858. 

3. Alida Arvilla, b. Oct. 7, 1S59. 

Eliza, b. Dec. 20, 1820; m., Aug. 18, 1846, 
Rev. Harry Brickett, son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Putnam) Brickett, b. at Newbury, Vt, 
Feb. I, 1S15. Five children : 

1. Joseph Cutter, b. Francestown, June 
26, 1S17 ; d. Newburyport, Mass., Nov. 
25, 185 1. 

2. Ellen Josephine, b. Sept. 2, 1850. 

3. Harry Leroy, b. Newburyport, Sept. 
14, 1853 ; grad. Oberlin college. 



VII. 



5 



Julia Eliza, b. 
July 28, 1859. 
Isabel, b. July 



Hillsborough, N. H., 
21. 1862. 



VIII. Lucinda^ b, Feb. 17, 1824; d. April 18, 1849. 



(4) 



36 



37 
38 



39 
4o 

42 

43 
44 



45 
46 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 267 

John Cutter m. Mary, dau. of Daniel and Betsy 
Bachelder, of Wilton. He d. Jan. 15, 1S57. ^^""^ *^'' 
June 3, 1859, a. 76. He received the same education 
as his brothers, and was, like them, industrious in his 
habits, firm in purpose, decided in his opinions, and 
honest in his dealings. He was a successful farmer, 
and large wool-grower. He took deep interest in the 
education of his ciiildren, and many of them became 
distinguished scholars. Two of his sons studied medi- 
cine, and distinguished themselves in the practise of the 
profession. 

Children : 

Calvin, b. May i, 1S07 ; ^'^••> ^^') Caroline Hall, 
of Milfoi-d ; she d, Aug. 24, 1S42; m., 2", 
Eunice W. Powers, Dec. 10, 1843, of War- 
ren, Mass. He d. June 19, 1873 ; had 2 ch. 
by each wife ; — Eliza, d. young. Carrie, b. 
in Milford, July 29, 1S42 ; d. atNewburn, N. 
C, March 24, 1862. She was a lady highly 
educated, accomplished, refined, and patri- 
otic, and d. in the service of her country, a 
nurse in the army. John Clarence, b. July 
10, 185 1 ; graduated at the Mass. Agricul- 
tural college, at Amherst; now (1873) a 
student of medicine ; re. to Japan, and is a 
professor in a medical institution. Walter 
Powers, b. at Warren, April 28, 1S57 ; d. 
1871. [See Medical Graduates.] 

Luther Gutter, twin brother of Calvin, b. May 
I, 1807. + 

Rebecca, b. Aug. 5, 1S08; m. Ira Hastings, 
April 22, 1834, b. March 5, 1801, in Marl- 
boro'. Two children : 

1. Martha A. Melissa, b. July 16, 1837; 

d. Sept. 28, 1865. 

2. Mary A. Malvina, b. Sept. 9, 1S40; 

m. Josiah M. Darling, of Dublin, 
June, 1863. 

IV. John Abbot, b. Jan. 7, 1810. -|- 

V. Caleb, b. Oct. 29, 1812; m., March 26, 1835, 

Susan A., dau. of Neal}' and Anna (Belding) 
Norris; re. to Shirley, Mass., and d. Oct. 
17? 1873. Two children: 



268 
47 
48 

49 
5o 

51 



52 



53 



54 

55 



56 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

1. Ann Bachelder, b. Aug. 19, 1S38 ; m., 

Jan. 2, 1S59, John ■'^' Roberts; r. 
Boston. 

2. Charles Lyman, b. Oct. 24, 1S42 ; m., 

Nov. 26, 1S64, Sarah Collins ; is a 
flour dealer ; r. Boston. 

VI. Mary^ b. July 3, 1814; m., Oct. 14, 1S36, 
Samuel McCoy, of Peterboro'. Three chil- 
dren : 

1. Mary Elizabeth, b. Dec. 17, 1S37; m. 

Asa B. Clark, Jan. i, 1S61 ; r. 
Wilton. 

2. Charlotte, b. Nov. 19, 1839; "^•' -^^^S* 

II, 1864, Rev. Frank G. Clark, a 
graduate of Amherst college, 1S62 ; 
Andover Theological Seminary, in 
1S69; and now (1876) pastor of the 
Evangelical church in Rindge ; in 
1877, re. to Gloucester, Mass. 

3. Caroline, b. Aug. 6, 1842 ; m., May 2, 

1 86 1, John O. Nay, of Peterboro'. 
One ch. 

VII. Benoni, b. Feb. 14, 1816 ; studied medicine, and 
graduated from the Medical college at Wood- 
stock, Vt., 1838; settled in practise at 
Webster, Ale., in which he was very suc- 
cessful till his death, Sept. 4, 1851. He m. 
Olive S. Drinkwater, who d. ; m., 2*^, her 
sister, Jane B. Drinkwater, who survived his 
decease. Three children by i**' wife : 

1. Winfield Benoni, b. Feb. 14, 1843 ; in 

seivice during the late war, 23 
Regt. M. V. 

2. John Edward, b. May 16, 1844; in 

service in the same Regt. with his 
brother ; reenlisted in the 29"^ Regt., 
and was in service till the close of 
the war. Since that time he has 
been principal of Harrington acad- 
emy, Palermo, Me. 

3. Charles Drinkwater, b. Sept. 7i iS45- 

In 1869 he re. to Little Rock, Ark. ; 
was superintendent of the Arkansas 
Deaf Mute Institute ; m., and d. 
1874. 



57 

5S 
59 



(6) 



6o 



6i 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 269 

viii. Charles, h. Sept. 11, 1S17; m., April i, 1S41, 
Maria E., dau. of Eben'r and Mary (Tliomp- 
son) Hathorn, r. East JaftVey. Tiiey have 
no cliildren. 
IX. Sybil JBachelder, b. Oct. 14, 1819 ; m., i", March 
7, 1S39, J°^^ ^- Cutter ; m., 2*^, John Ward 
Poole, Nov. 13, 1S40, q. v. 
X. George,h. M?iy 23, 1821 ; d. Aug. 25, 1S27; 
the first death among the descendants of 
Joseph Cutter. 



Daniel Cutter settled on lot 9, range 3, near the 
homestead of his father. To this from time to time he 
made large and valuable additions, till he became the 
proprietor of a large landed estate. He was a practical 
farmer, having learned the requisites of good farming by 
experience on the homestead in early life. He was a 
large wool-grower and dealer in stock. In 1S35, having 
disposed of his home farm, he purchased the home- 
stead of the late Dr. Adonijah Howe, near the centre of 
the town, where he spent the remainder of his days. 
In his early life he took a deep interest in the common 
district schools, and contributed much to their support. 
When the Melville academy was incorporated, he 
aided in the enterprise, and became one of its pro- 
prietors, and assisted in the erection of the house. He 
took a deep interest in the education of his children, 
graduated three of his sons at Dartmouth college, and 
gave his other children liberal academical advantages. 
He m., Nov. iS, 1S06, Sally, dau. of Col. Timothy and 
Rebecca (Bateman) Jones, of Bedford, Mass. She was 
a person well educated, and, for a time, a teacher in 
the public schools. She was b. at Bedford, Aug. 9, 
17S6 ; d. July 7, 1864. He d. Sept. 23, 186S. 

I. Daniel Bateman, b. May 10, iSoS ; m., Dec. S, 
1835, Clementine P., dau. of Hon. Asa and 
Fanny (Jewett) Parker. She d. Aug. 28, 
1870; m., 2'^, Dec. 5, 1S72, Mrs. Tryphen 
T. Richardson, b. at Hillsborough, Feb. 9, 
1 819. [See College Graduates.] 

I. Lucia Antoinette, b. at Ashby, Mass., 
Sept. 7, 1836; d. at Peterborough, 
July 25, 1S54. 



2/0 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

62 2. Isabella Parker, b. at Peterborough, 

July 6, 1S47 ; m., Dec. 30, 1868, 
Albert W. Noone ; d. March 16, 
1871. 

63 II. Sally Maria, b. April 16, 1810; m. Yryling 
D. Shattuck, q. v. 

64 III. Susan Eliza, b. Nov. 4, 181 3; m. Charles J. 
Fox, q. V. 

65 IV. Rachel Rebecca, b April 8, 1815 ; m. Edmund 
P. Shattuck, q. v. 

6(i V. Abigail Jones, b. Aug. 4, 1817; m., June 15, 

1847, Benj. F. Fletcher; r. at Rockton, 111. 
One child : 

67 I. Abbie Cutter, b. July 25, 1853 ; d. Dec. 

II, 1877- She was a young lady of 
much promise, and d. as she was aljout 
being m., Dec. 11, 1S77. 

68 VI. Lucy Sylvania, b. Nov. 17, 1819; m. Elisha B. 
Barrett, of Mason. One child : 

Frank Herbert, b. March 30, 1851 ; m. 
and r. Boston; d. May 29, 1879. 

69 VII. LJdicard Stearns, h. Mar. 27, 1822; m., i'', May 
27, 1850, Janette, dau. of Samuel and Ja- 
nette (Steele) Swan, of Peterborough. She 
d. Sept. 14, 1873. He m., 2*^, Dec. 21, 1874, 
Sarah A. Lord, of Maine. [See College 
Graduates.] 

70 I. Edward Jones, b. July 5, 1855; grad- 
uated at Harvard, 1877 ; studied medi- 
cine ; re. Boston. 

71 2. Henry Arthur, b. Oct. 27, 1857; ^ttor- 

ney-at-law, Nashua. 

72 3. Annie Louisa, b. June 13, 1863; d. 

Aug. 31, 1877. She lived beloved and 
d. lamented. 

73 4. Leonard Taylor, b. Nov. 3, 1871. 

74 VIII. Leonard Richardson, b. July i, 1825 ; m. Mary 
Taylor, of Boston, April 15, 1852. He is 
an extensive real estate broker ; has accum- 
ulated by his own ability a large estate; 
has been for several years a member of the 
Board of Aldermen ; was mayor of the city 
of Boston in 1874- 








-c^^^^-^r ^-^^(^^ 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



271 



75 I- Agnes Elizabeth, b. 1S53 ; graduated 

at Vassal- college, N. Y., 1S74. 

76 2. Emma Adelaide, b. Nov. 10, 1S57. 

77 IX. Isaac Jones, b. May 31, 1S30; m., Sept. 9, 
185S, Margarette, dan. of James and Rispah 
(Farmer) Wood, of Concord, Mass. [See 
College Graduates.] 

78 I. Rose Margarette, b. May 20, i860. 

79 2. Frank Edward, b. Aug. 20, 1S61. 



(10) 



80 
81 



82 
83 

84 

85 
86 



87 
88 
89 



Abel Cutter, like his brothers, was a successful 
farmer. He settled, first, on the farm of Kendall Goft'; 
second, on the farm of David Cutter, near the Mineral 
Spring ; third, on the farm of John Qiiinn. He m. 
Mary. dau. of Reuben and Polly (Pratt) Spaulding. 
She d.July 25, 1854, a. 58. 

After the death of his wife he re. to Boston, and spent 
the remainder of his life with iiis son, Abel P. Cutter, 
and his widow. He d. at Cambridge Jan. 9, 1S78. 
Children : 

I. Edith Parker, b. Feb. 17, 1S16 ; m. John W. 
Poole, q. V. 
Abel Parker, b. June 14, 1818; m.. May 19, 
1847. Louisa, dau. of Reuben and Joanna 
(Cox) Frost, of Boston; d. Nov., 1872. 
He was a provision dealer, and was success- 
ful in the business ; removed to Cambridge, 
and there d. Children : 



II. 



Fannie Louisa, b. Sept. 8, 1S48. 

William Parker, b. Sept. 20, 1S50; 
drowned July 28, 1S63. 

Frederick Spaulding, b. Feb. 6, 1853 ; 
grad. Harvard coll., 1S74. 

Annie Frost, b. Oct. 5, 1855. 

Harry Edward, b. Cambridge, May 22, 
1861. 



III. Mariette,h. Jan. 26, 1S20; m., Nov. 14, 1839, 

Thomas Upton, q. v. 

IV. Ruba Eveline, b. Dec. 20, 1S21 ; m. Lyman 

R. Farnum, q. v. 
V. Sarah Eliza, b. Feb. 21, 1S24; m. Joseph P. 
Frost, q. v. 



2/2 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



90 
91 

92 

93 
94 

(11) 



95 

96 

97 
98 



99 
100 

lOI 



102 
103 



VI. Reuben Spaulding^ b. Oct. 24, 1S2S ; m. ; re. to 

California ; d. 1S73. 
VII. Fidelia Stearns^ b. July 9, 1S30 ; m. William 

D. Mackay; r. Oilman, 111. She d. July 

31, 1S71. 
VIII. Emily Frances, b. Sept. 20, 1S33 ; m. Amasa 

F. S. Hodge, q. v. 

IX. Charles Edmund, b. Aug. 11, 1835; ^' in San 

Francisco, Cal., Dec. 31, 1S63. 

X. Lucius Edicin, b. Aug. 12, 1837; d. Jan. 13, 

1843. 



Joel Cutter, twin brother of Abel, a farmer by vo- 
cation, was, like his brother, successful in the business. 
He m., Feb. 27, 1S16, Mary Sylvania, dau. of Col. 
Timothy Jones, of Bedford, b. June 17, 1793; d. Oct. 
3, 1853. He d. Sept. 6, 1871. Ten children: 

I. Joel Hobart^h. Nov. 23, 1S16; m,, March 7, 

1839, Sibyl B. Cutter, and d. Sept. 17, 1839. 

II. Timothy Jones, b. Aug. i, 1818 ; d. Nov. 28, 

1843, before the completion of his medical 

studies. 

III. 3fary Sylvania, b. Sept. 27, 1820; m., Sept. 

16, 1S41, Dea. Isaac Sylvester Russell ; d. in 
Mason, April 16, 1842. 

IV. Frederick Augustus, b. Dec. 28, 1822 ; m., i^', 

Dec. 28, 1S48, Clara Tomlin, ofMullica Hill, 
N. J., and m., 2^, Rebecca Chattin, of Roch- 
ester, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1857. ^^^ ^^'^^ ^^^^^^ 
d. Dec. 28, 1851. He d. Jan. 3, 1869. He 
practised medicine about nineteen years, 
and established a wide reputation. Two 
children by second wife : 

1. Albert Henry, b. Feb. 7, 1859. 

2. Lillia Eda, b. June 4, 1864. 

V. Nehemiah, b. March 24, 1825 ; m., April 2, 
1850, Emily Adeline, dau. of Col. Oliver 
and Deborah (Perry) Bailey ; r. on the 
homestead ; a farmer by vocation. 

1. Clara Augusta, b. June 14, 1852; m. 
Fred. J. Lawrence, q. v. 

2. Julia May, b. May 2, 1864. 



I04 



io6 
107 

108 

109 

no 
III 

112 



(41) 



116 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 2/3 

VI. Franklin Horatio^ b. May 26, 1S27 ; m., Sept. 
12, 1S52, Rhoana S., dau. of Capt, James 
and Parna (White) Bennett, of Rindge. 
He settled on the Conant farm, and carried 
it on successfully for a number of years, and 
has now retired to East JaftVey to enjoy the 
fruit of his labors. He has held the office 
of selectman, county commissioner ; repre- 
sented the town in the state legislature, and 
is now justice of the peace and quorum 
throughout the state. Two children : 

1. Florence Pearl, b. June 30, 1S53 ; m. 

Rev. Leonard J. Deane, pastor of 
the Baptist church, East Jaffrey. 

2. Henrietta Sylvania, b. Sept. 3, 1855 ' 

d. May 28, 1875. 

VII. Richard Albert^ b. May 15, 1830; d. at Mullica 
Hill, N. J., March 29, 1857. He was pro- 
fessor of penmanship, and had few equals 
with the pen. 

VIII. Henry Lyman, b. Nov. 11, 1832; d. at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Feb. 3, 1855, while attending 
medical lectures. 
IX. Elizabeth Rebecca, b. Oct. 9, 1834; m., Feb. 7, 
1864, Rev. Charles Guild, of Meriden, N. H. 

1. Laura E.. b. May 16, 1865. 

2. Mabel, b. Aug. 10, 1869. 

X. Ebenezer Bancroft, b. Oct. 30. 1837 ! "''•j March 
20, i860, Ann J., dau. of Capt. James and 
Parna (White)^Bennett, of Rindge, N. H., 
where he follows the occupation of a carriage- 
maker. 



Luther Cutter settled in his native town ; was a 
shoe manufacturer ; was also an auctioneer, deputy 
sheriff, and justice of the peace. He m., Sept. 15, 
1830, Caroline, dau. of Capt. Moses and Rachel 
(Turner) Cutter. She d. Dec. 26, 1861, a. 52. He d. 
Sept. 28, 1876. 

I. Caroline Pamelia, b, July 17, 1831 ; m. Henry 

C. French, q. v. 
II. George Washington, b. May 18, 1833 ; d. Dec. 
29, 1849. 

19 



274 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



117 

118 

119 
120 

(45) 



121 



122 

123 
124 



125 



III. Josephine Maria, b. Oct. 10, 1S36; m., Oct. 5, 

1S52, George A. Adams ; r. Troy ; ch. 

IV. Sarah Frances, b. Nov. 5, 1840; m. George N. 

Wheeler, of Royalston, Mass., May 24, 
1857. O"^ ^'^-i Mary E. She d. June 10, 
^ 1S74, a. 34. 
V. William Everett, b. Oct. 29, 1846; d. Nov. 15, 

1846. 
VI. Willard Zeverett, b. Oct. 29, 1846; d Nov. 25, 
1846. (Twins). 

John Abbot Cutter, Capt., an extensive farmer, 
and for many years the owner of the Ainsworth farm. 
He has now retired from the business, having accumu- 
hited by liis own industry a good estate. He has taken 
a deep interest in town aft'airs, and is now (1877) a 
member of the board of selectmen, and has been captain 
of the Rifle company. He m., Jan. 27, 1832, Nancy 
H., dau. of Emery and Sarah (Hill) Wheelock ; b. Jan. 
20, 181 1. 

I. Martha Bachelder, b. Jan. 30, 1833 ; m. Winsor 
F. Morse, March 28, 1S52. She d. May 29, 
1874. Four children : (i) Ella M., b. June 
25,1852. (2) John A., b. Dec. 5, 1861. 
(3) Clara R . b. Sept. 20, 1863 ; d. May 24, 
1867. (4) Winsor E., b. Ap'ril 4, 1865. 
II. George Abbot, b. June 17, 1835 ; d. June 29, 

1835- 

III. John Emery, b. June 17, 1835 ; d. same day. 

IV. Mary Elizabeth, b. July 27, 1S36 ; m. Alphonso 

A. Adams, of Marlborough, June 20, 1857. 
Two ch. : Freddie Eugene, b. Jan. i, 1858. 
Lillie Jane, b. Sept. 24, 1859. She d. 

Benjamin Cutter, a descendant of Ephraim, and 
brother of Joseph, was b. in Shrewsbury, Mass., June 
8, 1756 ; m. Catherine Farnsworth, who d. at Williams- 
town, Vt., Nov. 12, 1833, a. 73. He d. in Lashute, C. 
E., Feb. 7, 1820. He followed several callings, of a 
mercantile, agricultural, and mechanical character, and 
dwelt in various localities in New Hampshire, Vermont, 
and Canada. He was a man of enterprise, and, among 
his other pursuits, he was keeper of a tavern. He 
came from New Ipswich to JaftVey previous to 1781 ; 
was the owner of lot 17? range i, and afterwards of the 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 2/5 

farm of Benj. Frost and his son John, now unnihabited. 
In 17S3 or '3, he re. to Alstead where five of his chil- 
dren were born. In 1794 or '5, he returned to Jaffrey, 
and kept tavern near the meeting-house, afterwards 
the residence of Joseph Cutter, his brother. In 1798' 
or '9, he re. again to Alstead, and soon after to Wood- 
stock, and from thence to Lashute, C. E., where he d. 
Children : 

126 I. Hoses, h. at JaftVey, June 22, 1781 ; m. Hannah, 
dau. of Col. Christopher Webber, of Wal- 
pole ; d. in St. Louis, Aug. 23, 1858. He 
was a merchant in Royalton, Vt. ; after- 
wards in Cleveland, in company with his 
brother. Having accumulated a large estate, 
he re. to St. Louis, and spent the rest of his 
days with his children, located in business 
in that place. Four ch., sons. 

127 II. Catherine, b. in Alstead, Oct. 4, 1783 ; m. John 
S. Hutchins ; r. Lashute, C. E. Many ch. 

128 III. Betsy, b. May 12, 1785; m. William Powers; 
r. Lashute, C. E. 

129 IV. Benjamin, b. June 25, 1787; m. Roxey Corn- 
stock; settled, i"', in Williamstown, Vt., 2*^, 
Bloomfield, O. ; d. Feb. 23, 1867 ; a farmer. 

130 V. Try2dihosa,h. A.\i\'\\ 2, 1789; m. Augustus L. 
Stone; d. 1864, at Winona, Wis. 

131 VI. Nawa, b. March 27, 1794; m. Miss Davis; 
d. at Royalton, N. Y. Two children. 

132 VII. Orlando, b. at JaftVey, June 5, 1797 ; m. Phyana 
M. Phelps, of Painesville, O. She d. in 
Cleveland, O., Dec. 19, 1830; m., 2'^, Nov. 
8, 1832, Sarah A. Willard, of Cleveland, O. 
He was a merchant in Cleveland, in com- 
pany with Mack & Conant, and in 1825 
engaged in the auction and commission 
business, and in 1868 relinquished it to his 
son Edwin. Twelve ch., 2 by i^' wife, 10 
by 2*^ wife. -|- 

133 VIII. Sarah, b. in Alstead, March 17, 1800; m. John 
D. Howe. 

134 IX. Adeline Davis, b. at Woodstock, Vt., Dec. 3, 
1802 ; m. Mary Shepler Hemperly, b. at 
Beaver, Pa., Sept. 12, 1816. He d. in 
Cleveland, Sept. 11, 1852. He was a mer- 
chant, 1% in Wooster, O. ; re. from thence 
to Cleveland. Ten ch., 4 sons, 6 dau. 



276 

(126) 

135 
136 

137 

138 



(132) 

139 

140 

141 
142 

H3 
144 



H5 
146 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Moses Cutter, by wife, Hannah, had children : 

1. Charles^ b. 1805, in Royalton, Vt. ; m. ; 2 ch. ; 

r. St. Louis. 
II. George Webber, b. 1809; m. Juh'a Rogers; d. 

1837- 

III. Norman, b. iSii ; m. Frances A. Harrington, 

of Hopkinton, Mass. ; a merchant ; r. St. 
Louis. 

IV. Amos, b. 1815 ; m., 1S40, Catherine M. Har- 

rington, of Hopkinton, Mass. Has been a 
merchant in Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Bos- 
ton ; now r. in Arlington. Has one son, 
George Webber, b. in Cincinnati, March 10, 
1843 ; graduated from Washington Univer- 
sity, St. Louis, 1864; a tutor in that institu- 
tion ; graduated Cambridge Divinity School, 
186S ; ordained pastor of the First Congre- 
gational parish in Arlington, Mass., Jan. 26, 
1870. Two ch. 

Orlando Cutter, by i*' wife, Phyan M., had ch. : 



I. 



II. 



III. 



Eclioin Horatio, b. April 28, 1821, in Cleveland ; 

d. March 24, 1823. 
Orlando Phelps, b. July 25, 1824 ; served in the 

war of 1 86 1. 
Edwin, b. Oct. 21, 1827; m. Helen M. Earl. 

He is an auctioneer. 

IV. Michard Hillard, b. Aug. 16, 1S33 ; m. Delphine 

F. Wilson. He was in service in the Rebel- 
lion. R. Cleveland. 

V. WiUiam Lemen.h. Feb. i, 1835; m. Caroline 

A. Pease ; is cashier of the Merchants Na- 
tional Bank, Cleveland. 
VI. Nelson Patrick, b. Jan. 22, 1S37 ; one of the 
first volunteers in the rebel war; d. Dec. 6, 
1861. 

VII. George, b. Oct. 20, 1839; ^- ^^^- ^3: 1839. 

VIII. John Farnsioorth, b. Sept. 10, 1841 ; m., May 
22, 1867, Josephine Kelsey. He entered the 
Union service as a private, May, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to a lieutenant, and became adjutant 
of the 53*^ Regt. O. V. ; was in the battle of 
Shiloh, Atlanta, Ga., was taken prisoner, 
and after six weeks' imprisonment was ex- 
changed ; marched with Gen. Sherman to 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



277 



147 
148 
149 



156 

158 

160 
161 

163 



Savannah, where he was discharged. R. 
Cleveland ; a banker. 

IX. Helen Phyan^ b. Aug, 23, 1843 ; m. Henry J. 

Hoyt. 

X. Horace Long ^ b. Aug. 9, 1846; teller in the 

Ohio National Bank. 

XI. Norman Webber^ b. Aug. 29, 1848 ; r. Cleveland. 

XII. Sarah Catherine^ b. Feb. 12, 1S51. 



Moses Cutter a descendant of Ephraim and brother 
of Joseph, was b. in Shrewsbury, Mass.. March 26, 
1760 ; m. Rachel, dau. of Lieut. William Turner. He 
d. at Bradford. April 10, 1816. His wid. d. at Jaffrey, 
Alay 21, 1849, ^' ^'-*- ■^^^'- Cutter came to Jaffrey pre- 
vious to 17S7, settled on lot 7, range 4, now (1S73) 
uninhabited. He was a soldier in service during the 
Revolutio.i, and served for a time as one of Washing- 
ton's Life Guards. He afterwards held the office of 
captain in the 12"' Regt. N. H. Militia. Well versed 
in the manual of arms, he took high rank as a military 
officer. He re. to Bradford about 1808. 

I. Jane^h. Aug. 4, 1787; m. Samuel Bates, of 
Jaffrey, June 21, 1810. He was b. April, 
'^1786; d.'june, 1854. She d. Oct. 14, 1838. 

1. Sophia, b. at Bradford, Aug. 10, 1810; 

d. jLdy 13, 1 85 1. 

2. Moses Cutter, b. March 3, 1816; m. 

Martha Elliot. Three ch. 

3. Samuel, b. Sept. 6, 1821 ; m. Two 

ch. 

II. /iS't^sa/i, b. May 19, 1789; d. at Bradford, July 
7, 1818 ; unm. 

III. Rachel^ b. Oct. 31, 1792; m., Jan. i, 1815, 

Abel Nutting, of Groton, Mass., b. Feb. 13, 
1788; d. at Marlborough, N. H., June 10, 
1863. She d. Oct. 14, 1848. Five ch. 

IV. 3Iary, b. March 22, 1794; m. Richard Hoyt, of 

Bradford ; d. at Albany, N. Y., 1832. 
V. Moses, b. Nov, 11, 1795. -\- 
VI. William Turner, b. March 5, 1798. -)- 
VII. Sarah, b. Nov. 13, 1801 ; m. Artemas Law, of 

Jaffrey. He d. Nov. 12, 1836, a. 34. 

I. George Gilmore, b. June 18, 1830; m. 
Rachel JNIcGonn, Oct. 



I, 1861. 



278 

163 

164 



i65 
166 

167 



(159) 



168 
169 
170 

(160) 
171 

174 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

2. Charles Darwin, b. June 5, 1S33 ; m. 
Emily George, March 9, 1853. 

VIII. Pamelia,h. Aug. 8, 1S03 ; m., i'', Charles G. 
Gilmore, q. v. ; m., 2^, Dea. John Sanderson, 
Sept., 1852. She d. Oct. 10, 1867. 
IX. Willard, b. July 14, 1806. -|- 
X. Caroline., b. Oct. 26, 1809; m. Luther Cutter, 

q. V. 
XI. Johti, b. July II, 1812 ; d. at Jaftrey, March 12, 
1842. 



Moses Cutter m., Dec. 28, 1826, Abigail, dau. of 
William and Jane (Wright) Davidson, of Peterborough, 
b. Jan. 27, 1802. He settled in Jaftrey, and while 
there was a distinguished commander of the Jaftrey and 

Rindge cavalry company. In he re. to Princeton, 

Mass., and was there killed by a bull, Feb. 21, 1854. 

I. Calvin., b. in Jaftrey ; m. at Lowell, Mass. ; d. 

at sea, 1854. 
II. William Davidson., b, in Jafti-ey ; d. at sea, 

1854. 
III. Abigail Hunt, b. Jaftrey ; m. Luther G. Bemis, 
of Marlborough. 



William Turner Cutter m., March 7, 1832, Lydia, 
dau. ofMicah and Lucy (Vose) Jennings, of Waltham, 
Mass., b. June 18, 1806. He was a farmer, and d. at 
East JaftVey, June 4, 1866. 

I. Mary Vbse, h. Feb. 12, 1833; m. John W. 
Perry, of Rindge, Feb. 15, i860; r. Den- 
mark, Iowa. One child, — Sarah L., b. 
Dec. 12, i860. 

II. William J^yman, b. March 15, 1838 ; r. Den- 
mark, Iowa. He served three years and six 
months in Co. C, First Iowa Cavalry, dur- 
ing the rebel war. 

III. JEdwin Rice, b. Oct. 2, 184 1 ; was a non-com- 

missioned officer and a member of Co. G., 
14th Regt. N. H. Vols., in the late war. 

IV. Edward Everett., b. Oct. 2, 1841 ; m., Sept. 27, 

1866, Lydia A., dau. of Silas and Louisa 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



279 



^15 



i^^S) 



176 
177 

178 



179 
I So 
181 

182 

183 



184 
185 
186 

187 



[88 



189 



(Lincoln) Whitcomh, of Marlborough, N. H., 
where he resides. He was a member of Co. 
G, 14th Reg't, N. H. Vols. 
V. Charles Elliot, b. Sept. 23, 1847. 



WiLLARD Cutter m. Eliza, dau. of William and 
Rebecca (Moore) Shirley, of Waltham, b. Sudbury, 
Mass., Oct. 27, 1806. He settled, first, in Waltham, 
Mass. ; re. to Meadville, Penn., 1837; d. Feb. 8, i860. 
He was a carpenter and joiner. Ch. : 

I. Catherine, b. at Waltham, Mass., July 21, 
1831 ; d. Sept. 36, 1832. 
William Shirley, b. July 7, 1833 ; m. Elizabeth 
Sheafnocker, of Meadville, Oct. 18, 1868. 
One ch., — Hattie Bell, b. July, 1869. 
Eliza Ann. b. Aug. 16, 1835 ; m. Wm. H. Lar- 
kin, Feb. 21, 1S55. 



II. 



III. 



I. Elizabeth Ann, b. Aug. 15, 1856. 

3. Eva Jane, b. Ivlarch 11, 1S58. 

3. George Henry, b. June i, 1862. 

4. Albert Lincoln, b. April 14, 1869. 



IV 



Willard Ainsxcorth, b. Sept. 18, 1837; m., Jan. 
16, 1868, Mary M., dau. of Ethan and Eliza- 
beth (Warner) Greene. He is a carpenter 
by trade. 
V. Mary Jane, h. at Meadville, Nov. i, 1839; d. 

Aug. 9, 1844. 
VI. Harriet Adeline, b. July 5, 1842 ; d. Aug. 16, 

1844. 
VII. George Henry, h. Feb. 15, 1845. 



David Cutter was b. at Shrewsbury, Oct. 28, 1762 ; 
came with his father, John, to New Ipswich, and from 
thence to Jaftrey, and settled on the Wilder farm, near 
the Monadnock Mineral Spring. He m., Sept. 30, 
1789, Polly, dau. of Dea. Eleazer and Mary Flint Spof- 
ford, and d. June 12, 1826. His widow d. Nov. 26, 
1857, a. 92. Ch. : 

L Isaac Ayer, b. July 34, 1793. He was an ex- 
cellent drummer ; served in the War of 181 2 ; 
afterwards enlisted in the U. S. Army. 
II. David, b. June 9, 1795.+ 



280 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



190 
191 
193 



194 

196 
197 

1 98 



199 
200 
201 

202 



(189) 



203 



204 
205 



III. Polly, b. Aug. 20, 1797; d. Aug. 14, 1800. 

IV. John, b. April 29, i8oo.-|- 

V. Luke, b. April 6, 1802; d. Sept. 12, 1802. 
VI. Mary, b. March 3, 1S03 '■> "''• Levi Biggelow, of 
Fitzwilliam, May 20, 1824: r. Oakland Val- 
ley, Iowa. 

1. Levi Spoftbrd. b. May 31, 1835; m. 
Ann E. Purington, April 25, 1849; r. 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 

2. Horace, b. Oct. 8, 1837; d. Sept 32, 
1828. 

3. Horace, b. July 15, 1830; d. June 18, 
1848. 

4. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 4, 1831 ; m. Eli A. 
Smith, June 35, 1S58. Two children: 
(i) Minnie Rose, b. July 26, 1S59; (3) 
Leslie Elroy, b. June 26, 1S66. 

5. Mary, b. Oct. 31, 1836; m. Willard 
Hartwell, March 19, 1855. Four chil- 
dren. 

VII. ZiiJce Hastings, b. April 28, 1805. -|- 
VIII. Nathan, b. Dec. 33, 1S07 ; d. same day. 

IX. Adonijah,h. Aug. 39, 180S; m., Nov. 37, 1840, 
Maria Wilson, of Fitzwilliam. 

X, Susan, b. Dec. 33, 1810; d. Dec. 33, iSio. 



David Cutter, Jr., m., i^', Jan. 5, 1S34, Eliza, dau. 
of William and Mary (Brown) Tolman, of W' inchen- 
don. She d. Oct. 14," 1825, a. 3i. M., z'^, Dolly, dau. 
of Rev. Levi and Sarah (Packard) Pillsbury, of Win- 
chendon. 

He entered the U. S. Army, and served during the 
Mexican war. The time of his death is unknown. 
Children : 

I. Morrill Tolman, b. Oct. 10, 1825 ; m., June 5. 
1847, Mrs. Persis A. (W^yman) Munroe, of 
Northborough, Mass. ; r. in Akron, O. Is 
engaged in the boot and shoe business. He 
was in the Union army during the war. 

II. Eliza Tolman, b. April 33, 1830; m. 

Woods. 

III. Mary Sophia, went West and m. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



281 



(19O 



206 



207 



208 



209 



(199) 



210 
211 
212 
213 
214 



215 



John Cutter m. Eliza, dan. of Rev. Levi and Sarah 
(Packard) Pillsbiiry, March 17, 182:^. He was a farm- 
er ; settled in Winchendon ; was a distinguished man 
in town and church affairs ; held offices of trust ; was 
selectman, overseer of the poor, deacon of the church, 
and captain of the militia. He d. . Ch. : 

I. Levi Pillshury^ b. Dec. 29, 1825 ; m. Abbie G., 
dau. of David and Susan (Gray) Biggelow, 
in 1854; re. West, and was killed by the 
cars at Harvard Junction, 111., June 6, 1S62. 
Two children : (i) Fred Oscar, b. Nov. 29, 
1849; (2) John, b. Dec. 29, 1859. 
II. John C€tlvi?i, b. Aug. 21, 1827; m. Aurilla 
Pierce, of Londonderry, Vt., Dec. 12, 1849. 
Ch. : (i) Nelson S., b. Sept. 13, 1850; d. 
Aug. 25, 1854 ; (2) John Morrill, b. Nov. 4, 
1852 ; (3) Sarah A., b. Dec. 2, i860. 

III. Eliza Ripley, twin, b. Aug. 21, 1827 ; m. John 

Chapman, April 8, 1847 ; d. at Keene, July 
2, 1S65. Three ch. : (i) Ann Eliza, b. Jan. 
29, 1849 ; m. Christopher Hathorn ; (2) Ella 
Maria, b. Nov. 4, 1851 ; (3) Frank Bailey, 
b. Feb. 22, 1865. 

IV. Sarah Pillsbiiry, b. Oct. 16, 1829 ; m. Dr. Wm. 

Lincoln, of Wabasha, Minn., Aug. 28, 
1855; d. Oct. 19, 1859. One ch.: Willie 
H., b. June 2, 1857. 



Luke Hastings Cutter m., March 20, 1832, Abi- 
gail, dau. of T. K. Ames, of Mason ; re. to Peter- 
borough, and from thence to New Ipswich, where he 
d. in a snow-storm, March 8, 1845. His widow d. 
Feb. II, 1S54. Five ch. : 

I. Eliza. 

II. Williatn Hastings, m. and r. in St. Louis, Mo. 

III. Henry P., a jeweller. 

IV. Lucy, deceased. 

V. Mary, m. Putman, and d. at Brattleboro', 

Vt. 



Nathan Cutter came from New Ipswich — where 
his father, Nathan, a grandson of Ephraim, d. March 
6, 177s? Ji- 42 — and settled on lot 20, range 6, now 
owned by Addison Pierce. The time of his settlement 



282 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



2l6 
217 

21S 

319 
220 
221 

222 



(217) 



223 

224 
225 



226 



227 
228 
229 



230 
231 



233 



in Jaffrey is not precisely known, but some time previ- 
ous to 1785. He m. Polly, dau. of Capt. William Pope. 
About 1S12 he re. to Shoreham, Vt., and d. about 
1818. 

I. Polly^ d. in Jaftrey, Dec. 29, 1798, a. 17. 
II. William Pope, b. in Jaftrey, June 13, 1785.-}- 
[See College Graduates.] 

Mhoana^ b. in Jaftrey ; m. Nicanor Needham, of 
Shoreham, Vt., physician ; died. 

Orinda, m. Darius Cooper, farmer. 

Abdilla. 

Hosira, m. Leander Cass ; had a son and daugh- 
ter. 

JVathan. 



Ill 

IV 

V 

VI 



VII 



William Pope Cutter (Dr.) m. Prudence Evans, 
March 24, 1808; d. at Shoreham, Vt., July 8, 1815. 
Ch.: 

I. Dorothy, b. Sept. 20, 1809; m. Daniel Abbot; 

d. Nov. 19, 1842 ; had one daughter. 
II. William Pope, b. Nov. 23, 181 1 ; d. 1822. 
III. Phoana N., b. Hartford, N. Y., Dec. 21, 1814 ; 
m. Walter Robbins, of Leicester, Vt., Dec. 
31,1838. Ch.: 

1. Milo N., b. Dec. 9, 1840; m. Annie 
P. Whittier, Sept. 17, 1S66; r. Boston; 
one son, b. May 19, 1869. 

2. Hannah M., b. April 15, 1843. 

3. Emma R., b. Sept. 4, 1845 ; m. Edwin 
H. Hubbard, Feb. 24, 1864. 

4. Thirza L., b. 7» 1S49. 

5. Mary J., b. Sept. 19, 1852. 

6. Julia A., b. May 22, 1855. 

James Cutter, a descendant of Gershom, son of 
Richard, the emigrant, was the son of Gershom, Jr., 
and Anna, dau. of John and Sarah Fillebrown, of 
Cambridge, b. March 37-28, 1743; m. Catherine, dau. 
of Samuel and Mary (Hammond) Benjamin, of Wal- 
tham, Mass., b. March 6, 1745. They re., first, to 
Rindge, and Oct. 18, 1778, were dismissed from the 
church in Waltham to the church in that place. In 
he re, to Jaftrey, and settled in the village called 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



283 



234 

235 
236 

237 

238 
239 



(238) 



240 
241 
242 

213 
244 



245 
(240) 

246 



247 

248 

249 
250 



Squantum ; was a miller in that place, and d. there 
April 13, 1790, the first one by the name of Cutter who 
d. in JaBVey. His widow d. Feb. 12, 1818. Ch. : 

I. Polly, b. May 3, 1773 ; d. Feb. 28, 1773. 
II. James., b. March 23, 1774; d. unm. at Boston, 
1801. 

III. Mary, b. April 14, 1776; d. April 24, 177S. 

IV. Catherine, b. Sept. 16, 1778 ; m. Ford ; d. 

1839, Charlestown, Mass. 
V. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 24, 1781 ; " Betsey Cutter " 

d. unm. in Jaffrey, Oct. 11, 1852. 
VI. Stephen, b. Nov. 3, 1782.-I- 
VII. Samuel, b. Sept. 7, 1785 ; m. Susan Brown, of 
Groton ; r. West Cambridge, VVoburn, Lan- 
caster, and Watertown ; was a miller, and 
d. in Woburn, Nov. 3, 1843. His widow d. 
May 6,1861. Nine ch. 



Stephen Cutter m. Mehitable, dau. of Joseph and 
Lucy (Robinson) Kimball, of Jaffrey. He d. Aug. 15, 
1852, at Cuba, N. Y. His widow d. at Jaffrey, July 
26, 1879, a. 88. 

I. Stephen Kxmhall, b. March 12, 1815.-I- 

II. Harriet Eliza, b. Feb. 3, 181 7. 

III. Charles Americas, b. June 28, 1819.-}- 

IV. Catherine Augusta, b. Jan. 21, 1821 ; d. July 19, 

1842 ; unm. 
V. George Franklin, b. Dec. 27, 1822 ; m. Mrs. 
Mary S. Scott, b. in Charleston, S. C, 
March 23, 1819. 
VI. Gustavus A., b. April 16, 1825. -|- 

Stephen Kimball Cutter m. Eliza Daggett, July 
15, 1838, b. at Westmoreland, Oct. 2, 1817 ; is a car- 
penter ; r. Cuba, N. Y. Ch. : 

I. Frances Eveline, b. April 18, 1839 ' '""• Veranus 
B. Colman, Sept. 14, 1859; re. in Belmont, 
N. Y. Three ch. 
II. Judson Charles, b. Cuba, N. Y., July 30, 1842. 

III. Addison Adolphus, b. April 20, 1845 ; d. June 

26, 1845. 

IV. Addison Adolphus, b. Oct. 5, 1846. 

V. Ella FJliza, b. March 30, 1849. 



284 

(242) 
251 

252 
253 

(245) 

254 

255 
256 

257 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Charles Americus Cutter m. Philena Loveland, 
of Londonderry, Vt., June 2, 1S46 ; r. Jaftrey. He d. 
Dec. 8, 1S73. 

I. Gustavus Adolphiis^ b. Feb. 23, 1847, at Clare- 

mont. 
II. Lucy An?i, h. July 13, 1851, at Marlow. 
III. Willie Mark, b. Sept. 21, 1857, ^^ Jaftrey. 



Gustavus Adolphus Cutter m. Mary Vinton Lar- 
abee, ofMeh'ose, Mass., Jan. i, 1851. She was b. Aug. 
231 1833- •^- Newton, 111. He was impressed into the 
rebel army. Ch. : 

I. Jiary Jane, b. at Melrose, Oct. 31, 1852 ; d. 

May 29, 1854. 
II. William Chan7iing, b. Oct. 28, 1854. 
III. Daniel Webster, b. at Nashville, Tenn , May 15, 

1S57. 



John Cutter was a descendant of Nathaniel, son of 
Richard, the emigrant, by his 2^ wife, Frances (Perri- 
man) Amsden, the widow of Isaac Amsden, or Emsden, 
of Cambridge. Nathaniel m. Mary, dau. of Thomas 
and Anne Fillebrown, of Charlestown, b. May 5, 1662. 
They had seven children. John, their fifth child, m. 
Hepzebah Brooks, dau. of Jabez and Hepzebah (Cutter) 
Brooks, of M^oburn. They had two children — John 
and Nathaniel. Nathaniel m. Sarah, dau. of Benjamin 
and Esther (Richardson) Wyman. They had ten chil- 
dren — four sons and six daughters. John, the third son 
and fourth child, was b. at Woburn, March 16, 1765 ; 
m. Abigail, dau. of John and Rebecca (Corneille) 
Demary, of Rindge, N. H., b. Aug. 21, 1768, and d. 
March 4, 1866, a. 97. Mr. Cutter d. Sept. 14, 1835, a. 
70. John Cutter came to JaftVey in 1789, soon after his 
marriage, and commenced business as a tanner in the 
establishment afterwards occupied by his son, Ben- 
jamin Cutter, but since demolished. He was a person 
of singular energy of character, and by industry, frugal- 
ity, and strict honesty, acquired not only a comfortable 
subsistence, but a competency. He was among the 
first who openly avowed faith in God's impartial grace 
and salvation, and for many years was considered the 
pillar of the Universalist society in Jaff'rey. His house 




^ 



/ 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



285 



25S 



260 
261 
262 

263 
264 

265 
266 



267 



26S 
269 
270 

271 



was always the home for the ministers who came into 
town, where they ever fomid a welcome, both by him 
and his excellent companion. Mrs. Cutter was one of 
the excellent of the earth ; her whole life, long and useful, 
was characterized by strict integrity, virtuous principle, 
and a Christian walk. She retained her physical and 
mental faculties in a remarkable degree up to the close 
of her earthly pilgrimage ; patient, trustful, and hopeful, 
she met her death with calmness. She was the mother 
of twelve children, fifty grandchildren, and a large 
number of great-grandchildren ; six of her children, and 
twenty-six of her grandchildren were living at the time 
of her death. Mr. Cutter was the first person injaftrey 
who kept accounts in Federal money 
Children : 

I. John^ b. at Rindge, Oct. 31, 17S8. -|- 
II. Jonas^\). at Jaftrey, March 6, 1791 ; d. in Sa- 
vannah, Ga., Oct. 7, 1S20. He graduated 
at Dartmouth college, iSii. [See Coll. Gr.] 

III. Benjamin^ b. Jan. 8, i793-(- 

IV. Ethan, b. April 11, 1795.-I- 

V. Erviina, b. Feb. 14, 1797 ; m. Levi Underwood, 
Sept. 7, 1819; d. in Goshen, Oct. 17, 1821. 

VI. Cyrus, b. May 17,. 1798.-J- 

VII. Nathaniel, b. March 2. i8oo.-f- 
VIII. Esther, b. Nov. 3, 1801 ; m. Laban Rice, q. v. 

IX. Hepsy, b. Dec. 24, 1803 ; m., June 30, 1S25, 
John Holmes; and d. in Springfield, Vt., 
Sept. 5, 1854. He commenced business in 
company with his brother, Enos Holmes, at 
Springfield, manufacturing cotton fabrics; 
and is largely concerned in the Black River 
Manufocturing Company. Children : 



I.John Cutter, b. April 23, 1827; 



m. 



i'', Marcia A. Kimball, June 4, 
1850; and, 2^, Rebecca Spoftbrd, 
March 8, 1859. Is in a government 
office in Washington, D. C. Three 
Children: (i) Otto K. (2) Frank. 
(3) Harvey B. 

Emeline Duncan, b. March 7, 1830; d. 
Sept., 1 85 1. 

Abigail Demary, b. Aug. 21, 1836; d. 
April 20, 1854. 



286 

272 

273 
274 



276 



277 



(358) 



27S 

279 
28o 

281 

282 

283 

284 
285 
286 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

jc. Emeline., b. Sept. 16, 1806; m. Hiram Duncan, 
merchant, July 21, 1S29; b. at Hancock, 
March 4, 1805 ; d. at Jatirey, Dec. 24, 1840. 
His widow d. Feb. 28, 1876. One ch. 

I. Sarah Miller, b. July 8, 1833; m. 
Peter Upton, q. v. 

XI. Paulina, b. Aug. 2, 180S ; m. Hiram Spoftbrd, 
cotton manufacturer, Feb. 18, 1835, b. in 
Weathersfield, Vt., Nov. 3, 1801 ; d. Spring- 
field, Vt., July 16, 1846. 

1. Abbie Louisa, b. Oct. 25, 1839. 

2. Hiram Duncan, b. July 29, 1841 ; m. 

Georgiana Fowler, of Bellows 
Falls, Vt., June 4, 1867, b. Monroe 
township, Pa., Nov. 25, 1848. 

xii. Abigail, b. March 20, 1810; d. Feb. 7, 1849; 
unm. 



John Cutter m., Feb. 7, 181 1, Betsy, dau. of Capt. 
Alpheus and Elizabeth (Gilmore) Crosby. He was a 
leather manufacturer, and re. from JaflVey to Goshen, 
Feb. 25, 1829. He d. Feb. 5, 1S29. His widow d. in 
Campton, N. H. Children : 

I. John Telestus, b. Aug. i, 181 1 ; m. Elizabeth 
Hosley; d. July 3, 1879. 
Laura, b. Dec. 10, 1S12 ; m. Lucius M. Howe, 

q. V. 
Clarissa, b. Aug. 19, 1814; m. Hon. William 
Clark, March 22, 1836. Mr. Clark was a 
member of the New Hampshire senate in 
i849-'5o. He d. in Boston. Children : 

1. Clarissa Cutter, b., JaflVey, Oct. 8, 
1838; m. Theodore Parsons, of 
Gloucester, Mass., April 13, 1869; 
r. Boston. 

2. Emeline Duncan, b. in Campton, April 
4, 1841 ; d. Jan. 31, 1843. 

3. William Francis, b. Dec. 19, 1842; d. 
Dec. 20, 1862. 

4. Charles Elmer, b. Dec. 12, 1844. 

5. Emily Adams, b. Jan. 11, 184S. 



n 



HI. 



6. Ermina Demary, b. Sept. 3, 1852. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 28/ 

287 IV. Emily, b. Feb. 24, 1816; m. Samuel Cunning- 
ham, of Peterborough, June 12, 1S39; r. 
Rockford, 111. Children : 

288 I. Laura E., b. April 6, 1847; d. in 

infancy. 

289 2. James Ethan, b. Nov. 27, 184S ; d. 

Aug. 19, 1S67. 

290 3. John A., b. Aug. 27, 185 1 ; m., and d. 

1879. 

291 V. Ermina^h. ^an. 28, 1818 ; m. John Baldwin 
Tucker, May 5, 1S41, at Burlington, Alich., 
b. in Griswold, Conn., 181 1 ; r. Mich. ; en- 
gaged in an extensive flour anci saw mill 
business in Union Citv, Mich. Three ch. 

292 1. Minnie Theresa, b. March 13, 1S42. 

293 2. Frances Amelia, b. May 5, 1846. 

294 3. Charles Cutter, b. Sept. 9, 1848. 

295 VI. Elizabeth Crosby, b. March 3, 1820; m. Lucius 
M. Howe, q. v. 

296 VII. Charles, b. Feb. 22, 1822 ; m., March 27, 1850, 
Sarah Lucretia, dau. of Joseph and Sarah D. 
(Parker) Joslin, of JaftVey. He grad. Dart- 
mouth college in 1842. [See College Grad- 
uates.] 

297 VIII. Abigail, h. May 17, 1824; m. Charles Sabin, 
Nov. 24, 1846. He is an apothecary; r. 
Fitzwilliam. One child : May. 

298 IX. 3Iary Woodbury, b. Aug. 13, 1826 ; m. John 
Clement, May i, 1844, at Campton. 

2QQ ■ I. Lucius Howe, b. March 14, 1845; d. 

at Goldsboro', N. C, July 5, 1865 ; a 
soldier in the Union army. 

300 X. Benjar)\in Franklin, b. Dec. 14, 1828; m.,Oct. 
28, 1851, Emily Jane, dau. of Elijah and 
Eliza Pattee Mitchell, of Campton ; in 1863 
re. to Maiden, Mass., where he keeps a liv- 
ery-stable. Ch. : 

301 I. Jennie, b. Campton, Oct. 10, 1854. 



288 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



303 
304 



(260) 



305 



306 



307 



-, d. March 2, 1856; a. 14 days. 



3. Fannie, b. Oct. 4, 1857. 

4. Frank, b. Sept. 18, 1S59. 



Benjamin Cutter m., Sept. 9, 1819, Grata, dau. of 
Nathan and Abigail (Hale) Hunt, of Rindge. [See 
Hunt family.] She d. Nov. 5, 1871, a. 78. 

Benjamin Cutter has pursued the manufacture of 
leather in Jatlrey ; first, in the original establishment 
erected by his father, and afterwards in the building 
now occupied by his son Julius for the same purpose. 
He has been a prominent leading man in town atl'airs ; 
for many years town-clerk, justice of the peace, and is 
now (1880) president of Monadnock National Bank, 
East JaftVey. For several years he has been engaged in 
antiquarian research, and has a more extensive knowl- 
edge of the history of his native town than any other 
man living. Success has marked his cai'eer in every 
undertaking, and he is now highly respected and great- 
ly honored by his fellow-citizens. Ch. : 

1. Sarah Augusta^ b. Aug. 10, 1820; m. William 
Johnson Campbell, M. D., at Jaffrey, May 
28, 1844; d. in Francestown, Dec. i, 1846. 
Dr. Campbell studied physic with Dr. J. C. 
Grow, of Boston, and received his degree 
of M. D. from Harvard University in 1843. 
He has been successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession in Francestown, 
Nashua, and Londonderry, N. H., where he 
now r. Ch. : 

1. Sarah Frances, b. March 28, 1845 ; m. 
Henry Albert Shedd, of Sharon, Sept. 
24, 1S70. 

2. Ermina Cutter, b. Aug. 12, 1846. 

Mrs. Campbell left manuscripts, poetically written, 
that have never been published. She possessed a 
" philosophic mind, and though she wrote poetry it was 
with a philosophic expression." She had no educa- 
tional advantages beyond what the vicinity afforded. 
The following poems are selected by her friends as 
specimens of her composition : 



•■^ "^«v 




Alhcrtyiic — Furlics Cn. Unston. 




(Laa^^^^ , 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 289 



MY MOUNTAIN HOME. 

Oh ! how I love my mountain home- 
Each rock, each tree, each flower! 
The bleak wind, with its wildest tone. 

Can soothe my saddest hour. 
I 've gazed upon Monadnock's form, 

High-towering toward the sky, 
Bathed in the rosy light of morn. 

In sunset's purple dye. 
I \-e looked and looked, and wondered how 

One soul could view it there. 
And yet refuse to humbly bow 

To the great God in prayer. 
When yet a tiny, tottering child 

I first the green earth scanned. 
Toward it I sprang with wonder wild, 

And stretched my infant hand, 
Not knowing but its feeble grasp 

Could span the mountain wide. 
And bring it, with one childish clasp, 

A plaything to my side. 
in after days I learned to climb 

Its steep and rugged rock. 
And wonder how it had sustained 

Time's devastating shock. 
The dear old Mount! — I love it well — 

The genius of my home ! 
How dear nor tongue nor pen may tell, 

Wherever I may roam. 
''Tis the first sight that greets my eyes, 

Returning from afar ; 
And as it looms up toward the skies. 

It is my guiding star. 
It leads me to the sweet bright land 

Where my dear loved ones dwell, 
A laughing, joyous, happy band, 

Bound by a magic spell. 
Yes, 'tis a magic spell, that binds 

The heart to kindred heart ; 
And where are severed kindred minds 

The scalding tear-drops start ; — 
The fount of life seems gushing up, 

And flowing fast away : 
We deeply drink the bitter cup, 

Nor wish on earth to stay. 
My childhood's home ! my mountain home ! 

Precious thou art to me ! 
And o'er the wide earth if I roam, 

My soul will yearn for thee. 



February 18, 1844. 
20 



290 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



HAPPINESS. 

Long as the wheels of time have rolled 

Their annual circuit round, 
So long has Happiness been sought, 

But sought and rarely found. 

Once on a time, when gentle sleep 

Had closed my weary eyes. 
With spirit's wing unbound I soared 

To find the far-off prize. 

First to a kingly court I went. 

Where all were glad and gay; 
And where, amid the festive mirth, 

They pass their lives away. 

Amid the splendor, I had thought 

That Happiness dwelt there ; 
But soon indeed I learned the truth, 

'Twas all as false as fair. 

I saw a miser count his gold, 

And thought Pd find it there; 
But on his furrowed brow I traced 

The marks of wasting care. 

Fame next allured, with syren tongue, 
And held the wished-for prize ; 

Thousands and thousands hurried on 
With wonder-gazing eyes. 

But when they reached it, 'twas not there ; 

Still farther on it flew, 
'Mid gathering darkness and 'mid clouds 

Receding from their view. 

A beauty now had met my eye, — 

A being sylph-like fair : 
I thought my search was at an end ; 

But, ah ! it was not there. 

The rose is beauteous to behold, 

Beneath the dews of morn, — 
Its perfume floating on the air ; 

But it conceals a thorn. 



Once more I looked, ere hope had fled ;- 

My search was not in vain ! 
I found it in its only form : 

Religion was its name. 



December ii, 1841. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



291 



308 II. Ermina, b. Nov. 17, 1821 ; m. David Chamber- 
lin, q. V. 

309 III. Adaliza, b. Jan. 21, 1823 ; m. Gurley A. 
Phelps, M. D., April 11, 1851. She d. June 
3, 1852, leaving one child, — Grace Mina, b. 
April 12, 1852. 

Dr. Phelps is a native of Vermont, and 
graduated from the Castleton Medical Col- 
lege in 1848. He began practice in Han- 
cock, Vt. ; re. to Jaftrey in 1849, where he 
has since been successfully engaged in the 
business of his profession. Like her sister, 
Mrs. Campbell, Mrs. Phelps left poetical 
manuscripts, from which a published vol- 
ume was selected, forming a neat duodecimo 
of some 300 pages, embellished with her por- 
trait, and dedicated by the husband of the 
author to her parents, " in view of the great 
influence she ascribed to them in her educa- 
tion, and the formation of her general char- 
acter." The collection was published and 
oftered to the public at the earnest request 
of friends after her decease. The introduc- 
tory sketch, from the pen of her husband, 
describes her as one whose nature " was im- 
pulsive, and being moved with a restless 
fii-e, she burst forth in the poet's song, — a 
simple expression of what she lived, she 
felt." She wrote not ''to be admired, but to 
be loved." She was joyful and happy in the 
midst of friends, when no danger was near, 
but felt " with keenest anguish a frown, or 
unkind look or word." She lived in smiles 
or in tears, and her love of whatever was 
noble and pure and worthy was only 
equalled by her resentment and abhorrence 
of whatever was impure, low, mean, or de- 
grading." Her most considerable poem, — 
" The Life of Christ," — is a work of much 
merit. Two of her fugitive pieces are here 
presented. The first is descriptive of her- 
self and sisters ; the other, — her last effort, — 
was written a few weeks previous to her 
early and lamented death. 



292 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



THE THREE SISTERS. 

Three little girls ! — I see them still, 

As when, in happy years ago. 
They bounded o'er the green, green hill. 

Or by the silvery streamlet's flow. 
The eldest has a thoughtful mien, 

A deep, full, spiritual eye, 
That ofttimes earnestly is seen 

Turned upward to its native sky. 
The next one is a gentle girl, 

Mild as the summer evening air. 
With many a soft and golden curl 

Clustering around her forehead fair. 
The youngest is a careless child. 

Mocking the birds upon the tree : 
Birds that are not more gay and wild, 

Or bear more tender hearts, than she. 

Three little maidens ! — there they stand, 

Revealed unto my spirit's gaze ; 
Heart clasped to heart, hand linked in hand. 

As in those joyous bygone days. 
The eldest — we should know her well. 

The thoughtful child, the pensive maiden: 
The classic brow, the bright eye, tell 

The wealth with which the soul is laden. 
The gentle girl who won the love 

Of all, with her sweet, winning grace. 
Is still the dearly cherished dove, 

With guileless heart and angel face. 
The youngest and the gayest one, 

Her merry laugh so silveiy clear. 
From rising to the setting sun. 

Rings out like music on the ear. 

Three happy school-girls ! — side by side 

I see them toiling upward now, 
Up where perennial waters glide. 

To lave their weary, burning brow. 
The eldest upward, upward still. 

Lured onward by some mystic finger. 
Tireless ascends the classic hill ; 

Below, below, she may not linger. 
While by her side that gentle creature 

Glides like a living thing of light ; 
With calm joy mirrored on each feature, 

She sips the bubbling waters bright. 
The youngest one is still all gladness 5 

Joy dances still in her blue eye. 
Oh ! it will need stern scenes of sadness 

To cause that bounding heart a sigh. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 293 

Where are they now ? Alas ! they 're parted — 

Those happy, loving sisters three. 
The youngest has grown sadder-hearted, 

Alone beneath the household tree. 
She misses them, and oh, how sadly! 

Her loved companions from her side : 
Vows that thrilled her soul so gladly, 

Like music on her ear have died. 
That middle star, so mildly gleaming, 

Has gone to light another hearth ; 
With eyes of love all gently beaming 

On one who knoweth well her worth. 
That pure, white brow is touched by sorrow, 

Which left a holy impress there ; 
And from the skies has seemed to borrow 

Looks which we dream the angels wear. 

The eldest — she, alas ! is lying, 

A tenant of the peaceful tomb ; 
She heedeth not the wind's low sighing, 

Or flowers that round her bud and bloom. 
She heedeth not the young bird singing 

His wild and thrilling roundelay, — 
The tide of music round her ringing 

From every green and dewy spray. 
She heedeth not the heart's wild anguish 

Of those she left in sorrow here ; 
•She knoweth not how oft they languish, 

And shed the bitter, burning tear. 

At morn, and when the day is done ; 
She knoweth not how much they miss her 
Or how she longs to sleep beside her, 

The youngest and the saddest one. 



MY CHILD. 



Sweet little blossom of my heart, 

Born with the April birds and flowers ! 

Tears of delicious rapture start 

To think that thou indeed art ours. 

Our own most precious gift from heaven, 
A living, breathing soul divine, 

A precious gem the Saviour's given, 
To fashion in his crown to shine. 

I look into thy soul-lit eye 
Just opened to my earnest gaze ; 

Soft as the blue of yonder sky, 
And mild as summer evening rays. 



294 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



I gaze upon thy velvet cheek, 

Upon thy pure and spotless brow ; 

And joy no human tongue can speak 
I feel to be a mother now. 

A mother ! Oh ! what holy ties 

Now bind this trembling, happy heart : 

Aid me, O Saviour, from the skies, 
And faith and hope and love impart. 

O for a faith to lay my child. 

My precious treasure, at thy feet ; 

Pure as the snowdrop, undefiled, 
I feel she is an offering meet. 

O for a hope thou wilt receive, 
And bless the gift to thee I bring ; 

My treasure on thy breast I leave. 

Round her thine arms, O Saviour, fling. 

O for a love, a deathless love, 

To keep me ever by thy side; 
Hourly to look to thee above. 

For grace a mother's heart to guide. 

Husband and wife and child, we come ; 

To thy kind, sheltering arms we flee : 
Our hearts, our altar, and our home — 

We dedicate our all to thee. 



310 
3" 



(261) 



312 



313 
314 



IV. Julius, b. Nov. 28, 1S24.-I- 
V. Heiijamin French^ b. March 17, i827.-(- 



Ethan Cutter m. Feb. 5, 1824, Nancy, dan. of 
Timothy and Elizabeth (Stiles) Blodgett, of Fitzwill- 
iam. He r. in Jaffrey, where he has been keeper of a 
public house nearly forty years. Has been town treas- 
urer of JaftVey several years; was postmaster fifteen 
years, and has sustained other local offices with credit. 

I. Elizabeth Stiles, b. Dec. 24, 1S27; m. George 
Frederick Lawrence, Nov. 29, 1S57, son of 
Ithamar and Rebecca (Mower) Lawrence. 
He is a fruit and provision dealer ; r. Bos- 
ton. Ch. : 

1. George Ethan, b. May 29, i860. 

2. Nancy Blodgett, b. March 13, 1864. 



315 j II. Jonas, b. Dec. 9, 1833.-!- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



295 



(263) 



316 



318 

319 

320 
321 

322 

323 

324 
325 

(264) 



326 



327 
328 

329 
330 



Cyrus Cutter m., Aug. 30, 1820, Eliza Jackson 
Chapman, of Jaflrey ; d. Orford, Jan. 12, 1S42, a. 40; 
m., 2^, Mary Lucretia Abbot, of Thetford, Vt., March 
12, 1S43. He was an agriculturist and a leather manu- 
facturer ; was a major of militia ; served as selectman, 
and sustained other civil offices with honor and accept- 
ance. He d. at Orford, July 7, 1853. Children: 

I. Jonas, b. Aug. 17, 1821 ; d. May 27, 1843. 
II. Cyrus Demary, h. June 3, 1828; m. Mary S. 
Williams, of Orford, Dec, 1853 ; d. May, 
1857. Children: 

I. Charles, b. Cambridgeport, Sept. 13, 

1855- 

III. Eliza Paulina, b. Feb. 28, 1831 ; d. June 29, 

1831. 

IV. Mary Eliza, b. July 23, 1832 ; d. Sept. 2, 1844. 
V. Frances Ellen, b. June 5, 1834 ; d. at Thetford, 

Vt., Aug. 2, 1856. 
VI. Abigail Martha, b. March 27, 1836 ; d. Dec. 2, 

1853- 
VII. Rosamond Ermina, b. May 22, 1839 ; d. March 

22, 1842. 

VIII. Nettie Paulina, b. Jan. 22, 1846 ; m. Edson S. 

Bartlett, of Norwich, Vt., Feb. 25, 1869. 

IX. Johii James, b. Jan. 31, 1850. 



Nathaniel Cutter m. Mary Bradford Averill, dau. 
of John and Anna (Woodbury) Averill, of Mont Ver- 
non, Oct. 12, 1827. He is a farmer, and lives respected 
in Jaflrey. 

I. Emeline,h. Sept. 7, 1828; m. John Holmes, 
Sept. 15, 1855, and d. in Springfield, Vt., 
Feb., 1857. One ch : 

I. Nathaniel Cutter, b. Jan. 26, 1857. 

II. Ophelia A7in, b. May 22, 1830; d. Oct. 30, 
1854. 

III. Mary Frances, b. Nov. 26, 1831 ; m. Samuel 

Dexter Jewell, April 15, 1857. 

IV. Helen Mar, b. Jan. 8, 1834 5 '^- David C. 

Chamberlin, q. v. 
V. Lucius Averill, b. Dec. 30, 1835. 



296 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



332 

333 



(278) 



334 
335 
336 
337 

338 
339 
340 

341 
(310) 



342 



343 



(31O 



344 



VI. Lucia Bradford, b. Dec. 30, 1835 ; d. Aug. 22, 

1856. 
VII. Laura Isabel, b. June 13, 1838. 
VIII. Abbie Augusta, b. Feb. 27, 1S41 ; m. Edward 
H. Bailey, July 23, 1S65 ; r. Jaffrey. 

John Telestus Cutter m. Mary Elizabeth, dau. of 
Joshua and Betsy (Giles) Hosley, of Pepperell, Mass. 
He has been an active business man in Pepperell 
and Boston, Mass., and in Campton and Plymouth, N. 
H., where he has kept a public house and livery stable. 

I. 3fary Elizabeth, b. Pepperell, April 20, 1836; 

d. Campton, Oct. 19, 1854. 
II. Laura Lucretia, b. Aug. 31, 1838; d. Sept. 4, 
1839. 

III. Emily Frances, b. Jan. 16, 1840; d. March 11, 

1S41. 

IV. Martha Annette, b. Aug. 24, 1842 ; m. Thomas 

B. Little, Sept. 7, 1S64 ; r. Concord. One 
ch. — deceased. 
V. John Telestus, b. April 6, 1846. 
VI. Charles Henry, b. July 9, 1848. 
VII. Ethan Allen, b. March 2, 1851 ; d. Plymouth, 

April 30, 1865. 
VIII. Ruth Alice, b. March 27, 1853 ; d. Oct. 31, 1854. 

Julius Cutter m. Caroline H, Felt, dau. of John 
and Huldah Hobart (Conant) Felt, and grand-daughter 
of John Conant, Esq., of Stowe, Mass. Mr. Cutter is 
a leather manufacturer in Jaffrey. Children : 

I. Emma Maria, b. Jaffrey, June 27, 1853 ; visited 
Europe, 1879; now (1880) a teacher in the 
Southern states. 

II. Alice Ermina, b. July i, 1857. 

Benj. French Cutter m. Mary E. G. Capen, , 
April 27, 1852, dau. of Josiah and Mariette (Gridley) 
Capen, of Boston. He is of the firm of Cutter, Hyde 
Sl Co., Boston, importers, and dealers in fancy goods 
and toys ; r. on Jamaica Plain, which he has represented 
in the Massachusetts legislature. 

I. Annie Otis, h. Jamaica Plain, May 23, 1855. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



297 



345 II. Maria Capen, b. Feb. 20, 1857. 

346 III. Harry Ilolden^ b. Aug. 21, 1S60. 



(315) Jonas Cutter m. Lydia V. Eveleth, dau. of Joseph 
and Seba (Barnes) Eveleth, of Dublin. Is proprietor 
of the "Cutter House" in Jaft'rey Centre, which offers 
peculiar attractions to strangers desiring a rural resort 
near Grand Monadnock. Children : 

347 I. Isabella Valeria^ b. July 13, 1S54; d. Aug. 31, 
1S69. 

348 II. Mortimer Eveleth^ b. June 5, 1S56. 



DAKIN FAMILY. 

Samuel, son of Dea. Amos and Sarah Thankful 
(Minot) Dakin, was b. in Mason, Nov., 1770. He was 
a descendant of Thomas Dakin, who was a resident of 
Concord previous to 1650. He graduated at Dartmouth 
college in i797 • studied the profession of law ; opened 
an office in Jaftrey in iSoi. He resided in the house 
now owned and occupied by Dr. John Fox, which he 
built soon after his settlement in town. He was an 
active business man, and, on finding the business of an 
attorney-at-law too limited in the town of Jaftrey, he, 
with others, attempted the manufacture of crockery 
ware, from clay found in Monkton, Vt. The enterprise 
failed, and Mr. Dakin left town. While in town he 
held the office of town-clerk from 1806 till he left in 
1S15, and was a member of the board of selectmen 
during the same time. In iSoi, when he first came to 
town, he was appointed post-master. He re. to Utica, 
N. Y., afterwards to Hartford, and d. there, Jan. 29, 
1844. He m. Polly, dau. of the Rev. Stephen Farrar, 
of New Ipswich. Slie d. Aug. 24, 1854, '^* 7^- 

I. Samuel^ b. July 16, 1802 ; d. Jan. 26, 1853. 
II. Mary^ b. Jan. 4, 1804; m. Cyrus Ingalls, b. in 
Rindge ; r. Peterborough and Leominster, 
where she d. 

4 III. Charles^ b. Aug. 27, 1806; d. Feb. 7, 180S. 

5 IV. Sophia, b. July 11, 1808; m. and re. West. 

6 V. Martha, b. Oct. 13, 1810; d. Feb. 20, 1863. 

7 VI. WilUai7i, b. June 9, 1S12 ; d. Sept. 27, 1813. 



298 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



8 



DAXFORTH FAMILY. 

Jacob Daxforth was an early settler. In the tran- 
script of a road in 17S0, is the name of Samuel Danforth, 
probably a brother. It seems quite probable that both 
settled in Jaftrey at about the same time. Jacob was the 
first proprietor of the Cutter House, and probably built 
the first building thereon. He also carried on the busi- 
ness of blacksmithing in the rear of the same, where Arte- 
tnas Lawrence was afterwards engasfed in the same 
business. His last tax was in iSii. He re. to 
Amherst, and settled in that part of the town known as 
Danforth's Corner. He m.. i^*, Mehitable Lufkin, a 
sister of Jonathan ; she d. Feb. 24. 1S04, a. 37 : m., 2^, 
Mrs. Rebecca Fassett ; d. Oct. 2. iSio, a 32. Ch. : 



2 


I. 


3 


II. 


4 


III. 


i 


IV. 
V. 


7 


VI. 



Oliver, b. 

WiUiam. b. - 
E^imbalL b. - 
Polly, b. Dec. 16, 1794: 
Etyuly. b. Nov. 11. 1795 
David, b. Aug., 1796: 
pole. 
xii. Orpah. b. Oct. 16. iSoo. 



d. unm. 

■ ; d. unm. 

■ ; r. Groton. Mass. 

d. July 2S, 1795. 

; r. Groton. 

a blacksmith ; r. Wal- 



DAVIDSON FAMILY. 

John Davidson and his brother Thomas were born 
in Ireland, came to this countiy when quite young, and 
settled with the Scotch-Irish colony in Londonderry. 
About 175S, John settled in JaflVey and Thomas in 
Peterborough. John settled on lot 21. range 3. known 
as the Patrick farm, afterwards owned by the town, and 
now (1873) by Henr}- K. French, of Peterborough. 
When the town was organized, in 1773, John Davidson 
was chosen constable, and warned the next town meet- 
ing held that year, and the annual meeting of the 
next year, held March 31, 1774. He afterwards held 
the offices of fence-viewer, surveyor, tythingman. &c., 
and was a soldier in the Revolution. He is believed to 
have been the first settler of the town of Jaftrey. He m. 
a wife from LondonderrA^ : and a headstone in the Centre 
burying-yard bears the following inscription : 

Mr. 

JOHN DAVIDSON* 

Died 

Jan. 18. iSii, 

Aged 85. 



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3 



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13 

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16 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 299 

His children, so far as we can learn, were : 

I. BeUey^ b. ; m. James Turner, 1789. 

II. John^ b. ; m., Oct. 16. 1793, Widow Rob- 

bins ; last tax, 1794. 

III. James, b. ; m. Betsy Bride. Oct. 2, i793 '■> 

last tax, iSoo. John, Jr., and James were 
enrolled soldiers in 17S4. 



Thosas Davidson, Dea., settled near iiis brother's in 
Peterborough. He was also the owner of land in Jaffrey 
adjoining the farm of his brother ; built a saw-mill on lot 
5, range 22, and afterwards built a saw- and grist-mill on 
lot 12, range 7, now owned b\- Heath & Gilmore. He 
m. Anna Wright in 1757, a dau. of Mathew Wright. 
He d. April 11. 1S13, a. 86. She d. Jan. 4, 1823, a. SS. 
He was a man of enterprise, and accumulated a large 
fortune. Had ten children : 

I. Thomas, b. Dec. 20, 175S ; m. Betsy Pierce, wid. 
of Asa Pierce, of Dublin. She had two ch, 
by her first husband, — Asa and Jonas, -j- 
II. Charles, h. Sept. 10, 1760: m. Abigail Evans; 
d. Dec. 31, 1S31. 

III. ^lary, b. May 2, 1762 ; m. Maj. Jotham Hoar. 

IV. Sarah. h.Yeb. 15, 1766: m. Samuel Patrick, 

of JaftVe\\ 
V. William, b, Feb. 6, 176S; m,, i^, Abigail 
Hunt, and 2^, Jane Wright. -j- 

VI. Betsy, b. ; m. Dr. Frisby ; r. Phelps- 

town, X, Y. 

VII. John, b. ; d. at Lewiston, X. Y. 

VIII. JRohert,\). ; m, Doll}- Phelps; r. Canada. 

Xine children. 

IX, Anna. b. ; m. Capt Alpheus Dodge ; r. 

Derby, Vt. Eight children. 

X. Hannah, b. ; m. Dr. Ezra Clark ; re. West. 

Two children : 



Thomas Daatdson, Jr., settled in Jaffrey on lot 22, 
range 4; m, widow Betsy Pierce, of Dublin. He d. 
April I, 1S32, a. 73. His wid. d. Jan. 25, 1S41, a 77. 
Children : 

I. Betsy, b. ; m. Jona. Woods ; re. to Whites- 
town, X. Y, 



300 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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26 

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29 
30 



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32 

33 
34 

35 
36 

(28) 



II. John^ b. 



; m. Silvia Nay ; re. to and d. at 



Grass Lake, Mich. 

III. Robert^ b. ; m. . 

IV. Charles^ b. ; m. Emeline Lawrence ; r. 

Wisconsin. 

V. Thomas Wright, h. ; d. Jan. 4, 181 1, a. 

10 yrs., 8 mos., 4 dys. 
IX. Simeon Stilma7i, b. . -|- 



WiLLiAM Davidson settled on the homestead ; m., 
I'', Abigail Hunt; 2^^, Jane Wright, dau. of Francis, 
Nov. 15, 1798. He d. Jan. 29, 1838, a. 70. His wid. 
d. April I, i860, a. 82. 

I. Mathew W., b. Feb. 27, 1799; d. Sept. 25, 

1835 ; unm. 
II. Abigail, b. Jan. 27, 1802 ; m.. i^*, Moses Cutter, 
of JaflVey ; 2^, Capt. Isaac Jewell ; re. to 
Mich. 

III. Thomas, h. Aug. 26, 1806; r. on the home- 

stead ; unm. 

IV. Francis, b. Sept. 6, 1808 ; d. Oct. 31, 1833 ; unm. 
V. William, b. Sept. 9, 1810 ; r. Mich. ; unm. 

VI. John, b. Dec. 3, 1812 ; m. ; r. Holyoke, 

Mass. 

VII. Charles, b. Feb. 19, 1816; m. . -\- 

VIII. Calvin, b. Nov. 16, 1818 ; d. May 7, 1850 ; unm. 

IX. Jane, b. Jan. 25, 1821 ; m. Nichols; d. 

about 1848. 



Simeon Stilman Davidson settled on the homestead, 
and m. Rachel, dau. of Jacob and Sally (Turner) Bald- 
win in 1843 *^'' '4- -^^ ''^' *^o Wisconsin ; d. in 111., 1876. 



I. Elizabeth, b. 



m. 



; r. Sutton, Mass. 



II. Sarah Ann; unm.; r. 111.; killed, 1878, being 
thrown from a wagon. 

III. Rachel, d. in Sutton, Mass. ; unm. 

IV. Austress, m. Biggelow, attorney-at-law ; r. 

Galena, III. ; d. 1877. 
V. Adelaide, m. and r. Galena, 111. 
VI. Stilman W., d. June 17, 1839, a. 3 mos., 11 dys. 



-, who d. July 



Charles Davidson m. Louisa — 
10, 1849, a. 37. He was a resident of Jaffrey, on the 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 



301 



37 

38 

39 



Wright place, from 1849 to 1853, when he re. from 
town. Children: 

I. Helen Jf., d. Aug., 1846, a. i yr., 11 mos. 
II. Charles^ b. 1S47. 
III. Hubert H., d. April 24, 1853, a. 3 yrs., 9 mos. 



DAVIS FAMILY. 

The ancestor of the Davis family was Dolar Davis, who 
came from England, 1634; settled, first, in Cambridge; second, 
in Concord. 



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4 

5 
6 



8 

9 
10 

II 
12 



Daniel Davis was one of the first settlers. His 
name is in the report of Enoch Hale previous to 1770. 

In an earlier report by Grout and Giimore is family 
Davis, probably Daniel Davis. He came from Bed- 
ford, Mass., settled on lot 22, range 10, in the south- 
east part of the town. In 1774 he was chosen by the 
town grand juror and highway surveyor. In 1775 he 
was chosen commissioner and a member of the com- 
mittee of inspection. 

He m. Susannah Lane, of Bedford, Mass. ; re., first, 
to JaftVey, and in 1775, to Rindge. Children : 

I. Susannah, b. in Bedford, Nov. 6, 1767. 
II. Sarah, b. in Jaftrey, Feb. i, 1770. 

III. Paul, b. 1771 ; d. young. 

IV. Hannah, b. April 5, 1773. 

V. Daniel, b. in Rindge, June 15, 1775. 



Richard Davis came from Lincoln, Mass., to 
Rindge. In 1777 he re. to Jaflrey, and settled on lot i, 
range 2, west of the mountain. He m., Nov. 19, 1771, 
Lois Whitney, of Weston, b. 1733 ; last tax 1S03. 

I. Silas, b. Aug. i, 1772, in Weston; on tax-list, 

1795-1801. 
II. Solomon, b. April 24, 1774; paid tax 179S and 
1799. 

III. Lois, b. March, 1775 ; m., June 4, 1800, Josiah 

Cobb. 

IV. Richard, m. Sally Garfield ; last tax, 1816. 

V. James, b. 1782 ; m. Eunice ; d. July 2, 

1842, a. 6o.-\- 



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16 

17 
18 

19 
20 



21 

22 

23 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



24 



25 

26 
27 
28 



29 



VI. Jonah^ b. 



; a shoe manufacturer ; r. Marl- 



borough ; had a son Edwin, who was a 
Universalist mhiister. 



James Davis m. Eunice 



I. Elisha, b. March 4, 1S13. 

II. Lois Whitney, h. Oct. 29, 1815 ; m., 1844, Wm. 
Learnard. 

III. James Sumner, b. July 12, 1818; left town in 

1S46. 

IV. Mary, b. June 17, 1820. 

V. Williain X., b. March 15, 1823. 

VI. Augustus, b. Dec. 4, 1S26; d. Nov. 16, 1875; 

was a physician in Scranton, Pa. 



John Davis was in Jaffrey previous to 1779 ; settled 
on lot 19, range 4; m. and had children, and d. previ- 
ous to 17S3. 

I. John, b. ; on tax-list, 1793 and 1794. 



II. William, b. 
III. Andrew, b. 



; settled on the homestead of 



his fatlier, and about 181 2 re. to Peru, Vt. 



Peter Davis, a clock-maker, came from Rindge to 
JaflVey in 1786; m. Hannah, dau. of John and Mary 
(Mackintire) Eaton, of Jaftrey, Aug. 28, 17S3. She d. 
May 20, 1S18, a. <,^. Three children: 

I. Hannah, b. 17S4; d. Nov. 29, 1863, a. 79. She 

was a manufacturer of band-boxes. 
II. Jo7ias, b. . 

III. Peter, b. . 

IV. Mary, b. ; m. and r. in New Ipswich. 



Joseph Davis, b. in Dublin, Nov. 23, 1822; m., 
Sept. 23, 1847, Martha, dau. of Isaac and Sarah Howe 
Hadley, b. July 27, 1826; settled, first, in Peter- 
borough, and in 1870 re. so Jaftrey, and settled on lot 
20, range 6, known as the Captain Pope and Robert 
Ritchie farm. Two children : 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 3O3 

30 I. Charles JB., b. July 8, 1850 ; m., June 11, 1871 
Clara Ames, of Peterborough. One child, — 
Willie B., b. May 7, 1S72. 

31 n- Frank J., h. Aug. 14, 1861. 

32 Mathew Davis, on tax-list, 1793-1S06. 



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3 

4 
5 



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8 



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10 
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12 

13 
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15 
16 

17 



33 T. Gordon Davis, on tax-list, 1793. 

34 Eliakim Davis, on tax-list, i798-'99. 

35 Solomon Davis, on tax-list, i798-'99. 



DEAN FAMILY. 

Jonathan Dean settled on lot 17, range 6; m. 
Nancy, widow of William Hogg, and had four chil- 
dren. 



I. Sarah, b. July 24, 1779. 
II. William, b. June 14, 17S3 ; d. Aug. 27, 1S50. 

III. Susannah, m. John Lewis, of Temple. 

IV. Nancy, m. Reuben Robb, of Peterborough. 

Hiram Dean came from Groton, Mass., to Rindge 
in 1779; I'e. to Townsend, Mass., 17S1 ; to Jatlrey in 
1782. He was a manufacturer of steelyards; r. on lot 
15, range 7, now the residence of Emily Joslin. He m. 
Eleanor , and had several children. 

I. Siram, b. previous to 1779. 

II. Eleanor, h. ; m., May 21, 1801, Thomas 

Wilson. 

III. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 17, 1780, at Rindge. 

IV. Molly, b. at Townsend, 1781. 

V. Moses. 

VI. Dudley. 
VII. Amasa. 

VIII. Samson. 

jx. Polly. 

X. Sally. 

Rev. Leonard J. Dean, pastor of the Baptist 
church, East Jatirey, m., June 20, 1876, Florence 
Pearl, dau. of Franklin H. Cutter, Esq., of East Jaffrey. 



304 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 



2 

3 

4 

5 



DINSMORE FAMILY. 

Zebediah Densmore was enrolled in the military 
company, of JaftVey, 17S4. 

Capt. Thomas Dinsmore, b. Nov. 20, 1789, came 
from Montpelier, Vt., and settled in JaftVey about 1814, 
paying tax that year. His residence was on the turn- 
pike, on lot 10, range 6, now owned by James T. Brown. 

He was a carpenter and joiner by trade ; m. Polly, 
dau. of John and Alinda (Bardwell) Moore, of Whate- 
ly, Mass., a brother of Dea. Nathaniel Moore, of Peter- 
borough. He d. Aug. 5, 1839, a. 50. His widow d. at 
Peterborough, Feb. 15, 1875, a. 81. 

I. John, b. Oct. 6, 1810; m., Oct. 11. 1S30, Roena 
M. Johnson, of Hancock ; r. in Peter- 
borough. Eight children. 

Austin, b. March 28, 1812 ; m. Louisa W. 
Blanchard, of New Ipswich ; he d. there 
March 19, 1838. Four children. 

Jane, b. Jan. 7, 1814; m., Dec. 27, 1835, Lewis 
Johnson, of Hancock ; r. Hancock and 
Peterborough. Three children. 

Mary, b. April 10, 1816; m. Thomas Dodge; 
r. Augusta, Mich. One child. 

Lucy, b. Nov. 24, 1818; m., 1836, John H. 
Webber, of Mason ; d. at Peterborough, in 

1843. One child. 
Martha, h. April 12, 1820; m., 1840, Charles 

W. Hardy; d. at Peterborough, Dec. 2i, 

1844. One child. 
VII. Nancy, b. Feb. 17, 1822 ; m., 1841, Lorenzo S. 

Washburn, of Peterborough ; r. Alabama, 
New Orleans, and Louisville, Kentucky. 
Seven childi-en. 



II, 



III. 



IV. 



VI. 



DODGE FAMILY. 

Job Dodge settled in JaftVey, on lot 18, range 4, 
about 1796; was taxed that year. He m. Ruth, sur- 
name unknown, who d. 1S06, a. 70. He d. Dec, 1814, 
a. 83. 

I. Ruth, d. July 24, 1798, a. 37. 

II. John. 

III. Lucy, m. Joseph Bates, Jr., April 7, i795- 

IV. Hannah. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



305 



(3) 



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7 
8 

9 
10 

II 

12 



John Dodge m., i^', Pollly, dau. of Moses Burpee, 
March i, 1808 ; m., 2**, Nancy, dau. of John Paine, of 
Dublin, Jan. 7, 1813 ; re. to Goshen, 1824. 

I. Betsey^ b. Sept. 25, 1810. 
II. Mary Ann, h. Nov. 9, 18 13. 

III. JVancy, h. March 15, 181 5, 

IV. Lucy, b. April 21, 1817. 

V. Louisa, b. Jan. 16, 1819. 
VI. Harriet, b. Nov. 30, 1820. 

VII. John, b. vSept. 10, 1822. 



DOLE FAMILY. 

In 1775^ April 23, Benjamin Dole and John Dole, both from 
Jaffrey, enlisted for three months' service in the company under 
the command of Philip Thomas, of Rindge, and were in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. 

In 1777, John Dole enlisted for three years, or during 
the war. We have no further record of him. 

Benj. Dole settled on lot 5, range 5, and was a resi- 
dent of the town till 1795, after which his name 
disappears from the tax-list. In 1776-7 he held the 
office of fence-viewer ; was for many years highway 
surveyor; field-driver in 17S5, and constable in 1788. 
No family record has been found. On the tax-list are 
the names of Benj. Dole, Jr., 1794-5, and Thomas Dole, 
1796-7. 

MARRIAGE RECORD LABAN AINSW^ORTH. 



5 

6 



Dolly Dole, m., June i, 1790, Nathaniel Challis ; r. 
Grafton, Vt., and Goshen, N. H. 

Betsey Dole, m., June 26, 1791, Cornelius Baker. 

Lotta Dole, m., Sept. 14, 1792, Houghton. 

Benj. Dole, m., April 30, 1796, Ann Houghton. 

The Doles were distinguished wolf-hunters, and 
were the recipients of bounties from the towns of Jaf- 
frey and Marlborough, for wolves killed by them. 



DUNLAP FAMILY. 

Hugh Dunlap settled in Jaffiey previous to 1770. 
He purchased the right of Daniel Adams, which con- 
21 



3o6 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



tained lots Nos. 8 and ii in range No. 9, and No. 4 in 
range No. 10. He was a man of great physical 
strength ; was often in town office ; and was a soldier in 
the Revolution. Whom he married has not been ascer- 
tained. He d. in May, 1818. Children: 

I. AS'a%, b. Aug. 30, 1759; m., April 20, 1780, 
James Ritchie, of Peterborough ; d. Aug. 4, 
1832, a. 73. Seven children. 

II. Polly ^ b. Dec. 22, 1765 ; m., Aug. 14, 178S, 
Oliver Felt, of Peterborough ; d. Sept. 7, 
1830, a. 64. Seven children. 

4 III. Peggy ^ b. ; m., 1789, John Buckley, q. v. 

5 IV. Hannah, b. ; m., 1789, Aaron Taylor ; re. 

to N. Y. state. 

6 V. John, re. to Templeton, Mass. 

7 VI. Sandy, re. to Athol, Mass. 



Robert Dunlap was highway surveyor, '1774 ; field- 
driver, 1777* 



BUTTON FAIVIILY. 



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4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



Thomas Button, b, at Westford, Mass., Jan. 8, 
1748, came to Jaftrey previous to 17841 ^iiJ settled on 
lot 10, range 8. He was a very honest, upright man, 
a good neighbor and worthy citizen. He m., i^', Sarah 
Bigelow, b. Feb. 12, 1746, d. Bee. 23, 1811 ; m., 2^, 
Betsey Smith, Jan. 3, 1815 ; d. Nov. 10, 1851, a. 77. 
He d. Bee, 31, 1838. His second wife was a sister of 
the wife of his son, William. 

I. Sarah, b. March i, 1769; m., Sept. 30, 1793, 

John Hill. 
II. Thomas, b. March 10, 1771 ; m. Polly Rolf.-f- 
iii. John, b. Nov. 5, 1772 ; killed by a falling tree, 
June 17, 1795. 

IV. Joseph, b. Bee. 20, 1775 ; d. Sept. 15, 1777. 

V. Joseph, b. Sept. 25, 1777 ; d. at Brandon, Vt. 
VI. Polly, b. Aug. 18, 1779; m., i^'. May 30, 1796, 

Joseph Brigham ; m., 2^, Bavid Wilkins. 
She d. at Greenfield, Feb. 2, 1830. 
VII. Nathan, b. Aug. 19, 1781 ; m.. May 20, 1S04, 
Sarah, dau. of Jacob and Sarah (Turner) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 30/ 

Baldwin ; r. Bradford ; re. to Brandon, Vt. ; 
was a tanner; d. April iS, 1S38. 
9 vin. William, b. Jan. 23, 17S4; m., July 14, iSoS, 

Nabby Smith.H- 

10 IX. Rebecca^ b. Marcb 15, 1787 ; m. ; d. at Brandon, 
Vt. 

11 X. SamiieU b. March 14, 1789; a soldier in the 
War of 1S12 ; re., 1815, to Pittsfield, Vt. 



(3) Thomas Button m., Nov. 15, 1796, Polly Rolf. 
She d. at Peterborough, Jan. 19, 1849. ^^ ^- ^^^- ^3- 
1856, a. 85. 

I. Polly^ b. 179S; m. Edmond Burpee ; d. June 

18, 1S24. 
II. Sally, b. April 22, 1801 ; m. Loren Beckwith, 
of Lempster. She d. March 24, 1880. 

III. Thomas, b. 1803 ; d. 1805. 

IV. Eleanor, b. Aug. 2, 1806 ; m. Horace Evans, 
of Peterborough ; d. Feb. i, 1877. 

V. Elvira, b. Aug. 22, 1808; m. Leonard Stiles; 
r. Peterborough. He d. at Peterborough. 



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20 

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William Button m. Nabby Smith, of Fitzwilliam ; 
r. on the homestead. He d. July 13, 1844, a. 60. His 
widow m., 2*^, Robert Goft'; d. June 10, 1S70, a. 88. 

I. Jioa?icy, b. Feb, 2, 1809 ; m. Jona J. Comstocis. 

q. V. 
II. Abigail, b. May 3, 181 1; m. Amasa Emery, 
q. V. 

III. Mary, b. April 4, 1813 ; m. Samuel W. Pierce, 

q. V. 

IV. William, b. Aug. 9, 1815 ; d. April 15, 1816. 

[See College Graduates.] 
V. A7i infant daughter, b. Jan. 29, 1818 : d. 
VI. John Smith, b. Jan. 16, 1820; a farmer and 
gunsmith; r. on the homestead, 1873; m., 
I*', Jerusha A., dau. of Bavid and Olive 
(Emery) Howe, of Rindge, b. April 8, 1821, 
d. Jan 25, 1845 ; m., 2^, Jan. 8, 1846, Mary 
B. Bavis, of Newfane, Vt., b. Feb. 22, 1825. 



308 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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4 

5 
6 



(3) 



EATON FAMILY. 

John Eaton, son of Israel and Diademia Eaton, b. 
at Woburn, Mass., March 12, 1727 ; m., Aug. i, 1749, 
Mary Mackentier, and d. about i799- 

I. Diademia, b. May 18, 1750; m. Thomas Goft'; 

d. 18 16. 
II. David, b. Nov. 30, 1752.4- 

III. 3Iary. b. April 14, 1755. 

IV. Ruth, b. Sept., 175S. 

V. Sarah, d. Aug. 27, 1765. 

He re. from Bedford, Mass., to Jaflrey in 1774? ^^'^" 
tied on lot 21, range 10; was the owner of a saw- and 
grist-mill in that locality ; re. to Pennsylvania. 

David Eaton m. Feb. 21, 1S05, Hannah Stratton. 

(i) John, (2) Walter. (3) Sally. (4) Betsey. (5) 
Lucy. (6) James. (7) Reuben. 

Joseph Eaton m. July 28, 17SS, Ruhamah Snow. 



ELLIS FAMILY. 

Seth B. Ellis (Dea.), son of Millot Ellis, was b. at 
Keene, Feb. 4, 1792 ; m. Lucy, dau. of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Wilder) Joslin, July 2, 1818 ; r. in Water- 
ford, Vt., and Charlestown, Mass. ; settled in Jaflrey 
about 1825, on the farm of Samuel Joslin. In 183S he 
re. to the centre of the town, and worked at his trade of 
carpenter and joiner till 1840, when he re. to Oberlin, 
Ohio, and d. Oct. 25, 1865. His widow d. May 9, 
1S74, a. 76 yrs., 3 mos. 

Dea. Ellis was one of the pioneers of Oberlin ; went 
there in a short time after the first tree was felled in 
that place, and took an active part in the founding of 
Oberlin college, and the promotion of its interests. 
With the aid of an amiable wife, he was enabled, with 
limited means, to give his children a liberal education. 
Two sons and two daughters completed the college 
course, one of whom has been for many years a teacher 
in the college. They were both highly esteemed, and 
greatly beloved for their devotion to the Christian wel- 
fare of others. Others' good was their delight. They 
" lived beloved and died lamented." Eleven children : 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



309 



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4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



10 
II 

12 



Emeline Elizabeth^ b. Jan. 12, 1821 ; d. July 

24, 1S50. She graduated at Oberlin in 1S74, 

and was principal of the young ladies' school 

in Oberlin. 
Maria Rebecca^ b. April 3, 1822; m., Aug., 

1S43, G. W. Ellis. 
III. Lucy Amelia^ b. Aug. 25, 1S24; m., May 13, 

185 1, Dr. W. S. Dumock ; d. Sept. 25, 1853. 
Lucius Rajisted, b. Feb., 1S27; d. May, 184S. 
Mary Frances^ b. Feb. 28, 1S29; m. Rev. C. 

H. Remington. She was a graduate of 

Oberlin. 
John Millot^ b. May 27, 183 1 ; m., Aug. 28, 

1862, Minerva E. Tenney. Three children. 
[See College Graduates.] 

Samuel Horatio^ b. April 25, 1833 ; d. Jan. 26, 
1855. He graduated at Oberlin, 1853 ; d. 
while a student of medicine. 
VIII. Josephine M., b. July 18, 1835 ; d. Sept. 17, 

1835- 
IX. Josephine M., b. Sept. 6, 1836. 

X. Ellen /Sophia, b. July i, 1S39 ; "''•' Nov. 26, 

1863, Albert M. Bushnells. 

XI. Charles Brainard, b. Julv 3, 1S43 ; d. Aug.. 
1846. 



II. 



IV. 
V. 



VI. 



VII. 



EMERY FAMILY. 



The name Emery is of Norman origin. It was introduced 
into England in 1066 by Gilbert D'Amory, of Tours, in Nor- 
mandy, a follower of William the Conqueror, and with him 
at the battle of Hastings. In 1635, John and son John, and 
Anthony, his brother, b. in Ramsey, in Nantes, embarked in 
the ship "James," Capt. Cooper, and landed in Boston, June 3, 
of that year, John settled in Newbury, Mass., and d. Nov. 3, 
1683, a. 85. Anthony settled in Dover, N. H., afterwards in 
Kittery, Me. They were carpenters by trade. The first set- 
tler of that name in JaflVey was Thomas Emery, who was the 
owner of lot 7, range 5 and 4, range 5 and 9. On one of 
these lots, the noted Milliken brick tavern, afterwards the 
farm of John Felt, was located, now (1873) in possession ot 
Levi E Brigham. He settled in town previous to 1770; the 
last record of him was in 1790, when the town voted to abate 
his taxes. 



310 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



(3) 



8 
9 



Daniel Emery (Dea.) was a descendant of Anthony, 
the emigrant. He was b. in Chehnsford, Mass., May 
5, 173O1 a son of Zachariah and Sarah Emery. His 
mother d. Oct. 8, 1732, and his father m., 2**, Rebecca 
Reddington, who d. ; m. 3**, Thankful Foster, who d. 
Aug. 31, 1785, a. 74. His father d. Aug., 1776. He 
m. Jane, surname unknown, about 1774; settled, i^', 
in Townsend, Mass., where the births of his children 
are recorded ; and in 1776 he re. to Jaffrey, and settled 
on lot 18, range 3. He was a leading man in town 
and church affairs ; held in Townsend the offices of con- 
stable, tythingman, and selectman, and was a member 
of the committee of correspondence and inspection. 
In Jaffrey he and his wife were members of the church, 
when incorporated in 1780. He was chosen deacon of 
the same ; was one of the committee to procure preach- 
ing in 1779* I" town affairs he was one of the com- 
mittee of inspection in 1778, '79, and '80; moderator in 
1677, '79, '80 ; selectman in 1777 and '81; and was a 
soldier of the Revolution. His wife Jane d. June 7> 
1803, a. 71. He m., 2^, Esther, relict of Ebenezer Ja- 
quith, and d. Aug. 22, 1819, a. 89. Six children. 

I. Ja?ie, h. Feb. i, 1755. 
II. Daniel^h. Dec. 6, 1756. 

III. J^etsey, h. April 9, 1759; m. Alexander Milli- 

ken, q. v. 

IV. JVoah, b. Sept. 6, 1761. 

V. Jonathan^ b. July 25, 1763; m. Hannah Ja- 
quith ; d. Nov. 19, 1S24. She d. March 19, 
1S40, a. 72. 
VI. Asa^ b. Sept. 9, 1769. 

Daniel Emery (Capt.) came to Jaffrey, with his fa- 
ther, in 177^- -^^ '^ supposed to have been in Captain 
James Horsley's company, of Townsend, at the time of 
the battle of Lexington, and was in service from April 
19th to the 27th, in i775- He is supposed to have been 
the Daniel Emory commissioned April 24, 1776, as 
second lieutenant in Capt. Thomas Warren's company, 
of the Sixth Middlesex Regiment. On June 18, 1780, 
he m. Elizabeth Farnsworth, of New Ipswich, sister of 
the wife of Lieut. Thomas Adams, by whom he had 
two children. 

I. Daniel, b. Feb. 13, 1782. 

II. An infant daughter, b. about Oct. i, 1783; d. 
young. 



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H 

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17 

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20 
21 

22 
23 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 3II 

Mrs. Emery d. Oct. 23, 17S3. He m., 2^, Ji^nie 6, 
1786, Hannah Bates, of Jatlrey, and re. to \A''alpole, 
and by her had eleven children. 

III. Stephen, b. Dec. 23, 1786; m. and d. in Wis- 

consin. 

IV. Betsey, h. ApvW 15, 1788; m. Zachariah, son of 

Samuel and Mary Emery, b. March 4, 17S5 ; 
r. Rockingham, Vt., and Belfast, N. Y., 
where he d. May 28, 1853. She d. Jan. 13, 
i860. They had four sons and two daugh- 
ters. 

V. ITannah, h. Oct. 10, 1789; m. White; d. 

at Rockingham, Vt. 
VI. Sarah, b. April 14, 1791 ; re. N. Y. and d. 

VII. Nancy, b. Jan. 27, 1793 ; m., Jan. 20, 1815, 

Barber ; ten children. 

VIII. Joseph, h. May 24, 1794; m. ; r. Aurora, N. 

Y., and d. there, 
IX. Al)7ier, b. April 27, 1796; re. West, and d, 
X. Jonathan, b. July 31, 1797; m. and d. West, 

about 1850. 
XI. Aaron,\i. Feb. 24, 1799; m., April 20, 1824, 

Susan Martin ; r., first, Walpole ; second 

(1832), Stockholm, N. Y. Ten children. 

XII. Ira, b. April 16, 1801 ; m., i^*, Julia Fisher ; m., 

2^, Mrs. Rebecca Stearns, who d. Jan. 19, 
1864. He d. July 29, 1859. One daughter, 
adopted. 

XIII. Achsa, b. July 30, 1802; r. Michigan. 

XIV. Franklin, b. Feb, 7, 1807 ; d. Nov, 26, 1826, 

at Walpole, N..H. 
XV, Cynthia, b. April i, 1809 ; r. Belfast, N. Y. 
XVI. Irene, b. June 16, 18 10. 

Capt. Daniel Emery d. at Walpole, March 5, 1826. 
His widow d. about 1S52, in N. Y. state. 



Noah Emery m. Elizabeth, surname unknown. He 
left town about 1804; not taxed 1805. Five children: 

Jean, b. May 23, 1784, 
James, b. Aug. 23, 1785. 
Betsey, b. Aug. 3, 1787* 
Eunice, b. Nov. 2, 1788. 
Asa, b. Dec. 23, 1789. 



24 


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III 


27 


IV 


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V 



312 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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Daniel Emery (Lieut.), at the request of his mother 
on her dying bed, was adopted by her sister, the wife of 
Lieut. Thomas Adams, by whom he was brought up, 
and inherited one half of the Adams estate. He m., 
April 3, 1804, Polly Felt, of Temple, b. Nov. 7, 1782. 
He d. Aug. 24, 1828. His widow d. June 22, 1S62. 
Children : 

I. Adams, h. Dec. 4, 1S04; m., March, 1833, at 
Fall River, Mass., Mrs. Dolly (Wiggin) 
Smith. He d. at Boston, July 13, 1841. 
II. Andrews (Dea.), b. May 12, 1806; m., i^', 
April 28, 1830, Lucy Powers, of Dublin. 
She d. Aug. 22, 1832 ; m.,- 2*^, July 2, 1833, 
Mary Smith, of Peterborough. He d. April 
8, i860. Four children : (i) Jeremiah ; (2) 
George S. ; (3) Lucy M. ; (4) Charles D., 
d. Washington, D. C, 1863. 

III. Daniel I^arnsworth, h. Feb. 21, 1808; m., Dec. 

I, 1 83 1, Catherine B. Brown, of Fall River, 
Mass. ; r. Michigan. 

IV. Mary Caroline, b. Jan. i, 1810 (on the first day 

of the year, the first day of the month, the 
second day of the week, and the first hour 
of the day); m.. May 17, 1827, James R. 
French; d. June 28, 1S29. Two children; 
died. 
V. Elizabeth, b. Dec 6, 181 2; m. Daniel L. Rob- 
bins ; r. Fitchbuig. 
VI. George, b. May 5, 1S16; d. Dec. 15, 1816. 

VII. Harriet, h.T>ec. 28. 1817; m., April i, 1S47, 

Rev. Geo. F. Clark, of Dublin ; now r. in 
Mendon, Mass. 

VIII. Sophronia, b. Jan. 11, 1821 ; m., June 7, 1842, 

Geo. Bullard, of Dublin; r. Gardner, Mass. 
IX. Stephen Felt, b. June 25, 1823 ; m., Oct. 5, 
1847, Sarah M. Pierce, of JafiVey, dau. of 
Josiah and Paulina (Erskins) Pierce; r. in 
Mexico, N. Y. 



Samuel and Mary Emery left a record of the birth 
of four children : 



I. Sarah, b. April 24, 1779. 
II. Samuel, b. June 3, 1782. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



313 



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49 

50 

51 

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53 

54 

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III. Zachariah, b. March 4, 17S5 ; m. Betsey, dau. 

of Capt. Daniel and Hannah (Bates) Emery ; 
r. Belfost, N. Y. 

IV. Josiah, b. Aug. 30, 1787. 



Samuel and William Emery (twins), sons of 
Zachariah and Esther (Stevens) Emery, b. in Town- 
send, Mass., Oct. 23, 1758. Their father was an older 
brother of Dea. Daniel Emery. -|- 

Samuel Emery settled on lot 8, range 9 ; m. Olive, 
dau. of Ebenezer and Esther Jaquith, Jan. 31, 1789. 
He d. Jan. 12, 1836. She d. Oct. 8, 1S32, a. 64. 

I. Esther^ b. Nov. 21, 1792. 

II. Samuel^ b. Sept. 7, 1794.-I- 

III. Olive, b. May 29, 1799; m., Feb. 20, 1821, 

David Howe, of Rindge. 

William Emery settled on lot 9, range 9 ; m., i^*, 
Mary, dau. of Samuel and Sybil (Page) Stanley; m., 

2*^, Lucy . First wife d. June 2, 1827, a. 60. 

Second wife d. July 29, 1858, a. 66. He d. July 16, 
1740, a. 82. 

I. Silly, d. young. 

II. Zachariah, b. Feb. i, 1790 ; m. Rebecca Mower ; 
d. March 26, 1836. Two ch.-j- 

III. Polly, b. March 27, 1792; d. March 4, 1865; 

unm. 

IV. Sybil, b. March 25, 1794; m., April 27, 1820, 

Josiah Bemis, of Dublin. 
V. Half, b. Sept. 26, 1796; m.-|- 
VI. William, b. March 29, 1799; "^- Lucy Downs, 

Dec. 10, 1826; d. July 13, 1844. 
VII. Edward, b. May 3, 1801 ; m., May 1, 1836, 

Fanny, dau. of Isaac Nutting. 
VIII. Aniasa, b. April 2, 1804 -[- 
IX. Nancy A., b. April 29, 1807 ; m. April 28, 

1S31, Hervy H. Robbins, of Nelson. He 

d. Nov. 17, 1849, a. 42. 
X. John 8., b. March i, iSro. 
XI. Laura A., b. May 31, 1815 ; d. July 23, 1855 ; 

unm. 

Samuel Emery m. Mary, dau. of Oliver and Folly 
(Perkins) Bailey, July 11, 1821. He d. July 27, i860. 
Eight children : 



314 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



58 

61 
62 

63 
64 

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66 

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69 
70 

71 
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72 

73 

74 

75 
76 

77 
78 



; m. Carrie A. Spoftbrd, of 



I. Frederick A., h. Feb. 13, 1823 ; d. Nov. 6, 1850. 

II. 3farj/ Z., b. Sept. 15, 1S24. 

III. Almon /S., b, March 21, 1S30. 

IV. Christopher F., b, April 10, 1832. 

V. Ermina J/!, b. March 25, 1835. 

VI. Oliver B., b. March 4, 1S39 ; d. Feb, 17, 1840. 
VII. Elizabeth^ b. , 1S41 ; d. Feb. 13, 1845, a. 4. 

Zachariah Emery m. Rebecca, dau. of Col. Josiah 
and Rebecca (Cutter) Mower. He d. March 26, 1836, 
a. 60. Children : 

I. Mary Rebecca^ b., 1821 ; m. Sylvester B. Lavv^- 

rence, q. v. 

II. Sarah Eliza^ b., 1823 ; m. John S. Law^rence, 

q. V. 

Ralph Emery m., i'', Susan Williams, of Danvers, 
Mass. ; m., 2^, Carrie Robbins, of Jaftrey. He d. May 
8, 1864, a. 67. 

I. Henry ^ b. 

II. Charles, b. — 

Peterborough. 

III. Orren, b. ; r. and d. in Winchendon. 

IV. Amos^h. ; m., i", Sarah Eddy; m., 2^, 

Mary Ballou. 
V. Loring M., d. Feb. 19, 1845, a. 7. 

Amasa Emery m., Dec. 25, 1828, Abigail, dau. of 
William and Nabby Smith Button. She d. Aug. 21, 
1871, a. 60. Children:' 

I. Alonzo Amasa, b. Dec. iS, 1829 ; m., i", Ellen 
Kennedy ; she d. in Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 6, 
1S64; m., 2^ June 5, 1872, Jenny Wickoff; 
r. Somerville, N. Y. 

II. George Button, b. Dec. 4, 1S31 ; m., Oct. 26, 

1863, Theresa Vanardsdale, of Somerville, 
N. Y. ; r. Springfield, Mo. 

III. Paulina A , b. Nov. 2, 1836 ; d. May 2, 1845. 

IV. Eliza Ann, b. July 4, 1840 ; d. Aug. 26, 1858. 
V. Ellen Adelaide, b. Sept. 5, 1844; d. Nov. i, 

1845. 

VI. 3Iary Frances, h.} an. 26, 1847; ^' March 27, 

1879. 

VII. William Frederick, b. Jan. 26, 1847; m., Jan. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 315 

I, 1870, Frances J. Cressey. He d. at Peter- 
borough, April 12, 1873. One ch. 

79 Daniel Emory was the second son of John Emory, 
who came from Topsfield to Rindge in i77i,a descend- 
ant of the John Emery who settled in Newbury, before 
mentioned, in the history of Dea. Daniel Emery. The 
change in spelling the name is said to have been made 
by the Rindge family. Daniel was b. July 5, 1772 ; m. 
Betsey Curtice, b. in Boxford, Mass., July 14, 1772 ; d. in 
Jaflrey, April, 1848. His business was the manufac- 
turing of nest-boxes. In 1806 he re. to Jaffrey, where 
he engaged in trade, at first in the Thorndike stoi'e ; 
afterwards built one on the land of Mr. Ainsworth, 
which he occupied as a store, and for the manufacturing 
of nest-boxes and dry measures. He afterwards retired 
to a farm, and in 1825 went to Pennsylvania, and there 
continued the same business, and was for a time post- 
master. He d. in Mehoopany, Wyoming Co., Pa., in 
1855. Children: 

80 I. Pamelia, b. Nov. i, 1794; d. unm., Ware, 
Mass. 

81 II. JPrentice Barr^h. July 17, 1797; was a physi- 
cian ; d. in N. J. 

82 III. Alvah, h. June 11, 1799; '-^ hatter by trade ; d. 
Sept. 24, 1 85 1, in Leominster, Mass. 

83 IV. Ambrose, b. Nov. 12, 1802 ; m. Mary Gadding; 
r. Rindge. Two ch. 

84 V. Cynthia, b. ; m. Levi Joslin, of Rindge ; 

d. Two ch. 

85 VI. Daniel, b. Jan. 16, 1809 ; m. Susanna Pierce, of 
Lunenburg ; was a trader in Fitchburg, 
Mass. ; d. March 31, 185S. Nine ch. 

86 vii. Sophia, b. ; m. Jona. Ayers, of North 

Brookfield, Mass. 



FASSETT FAMILY. 

Joseph Fassett, b. in Fitzwilliam, came to Jaftrey, 
Jan. 7, 1836, settled on lot 2, range 4; m. Tabitha 
Wright, who d. Sept. 6, 1S71. He d. Sept. 17, 1858, 
a. 63. 

I. Tabitha, b. Aug. 26, 1820 ; m. Edward Stewart, 
of Boston. 



3i6 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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4 

5 
6 



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12 
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II. Joseph TT., b. June 7, i822.-(- 

III. Lois -S., b. Nov. 21, 1823 ; in. Abel Thompson, 

q. V. 

IV. John B.^ b. Oct. 12, 1825. 

V. Joel E., b. May 8, 1S27 ; d. May 11, 1862; a 

member of Co. E., 2*^ Regt. N. H. V. 
VI. Edward, b. Sept. 16, 1829; d. May 20, 1850. 
VII. Luther TF., b. Nov. 12, 1S31 ; m. Sarah E. 
Fassett. One ch. He was a soldier in Co. 
E., 2^ Regt. N. H. V. ; was killed by a 
Rebel scout, at Evansport, Va., April 2, 
1862 ; the first man killed from Cheshire 
county. 
VIII. Danvers C, b. May 2, 1834; was a member of 
the i'' Regt. of Heavy Artillery, N. H. V. ; 
m. Hannah Hamnion. Two sons. 
IX. Clarissa C, b. June 9, 1836 ; m. Samuel Wilber, 
Dec. 26, 1856. One son. 



Joseph W. Fassett m. Sarah A. Putney She d. 
Dec. 13, 1873, by being thrown from a carriage by a 

frightened horse, a. 52. He m., 2*^, . Mr. 

Fassett is one of the business men of the town ; has 
been several years selectman, and is now (1S76) rep- 
resentative in the state legislature. 

I. Charles TF., b. Dec. 3, 184S. 
II. Abhie A., b. Jan. 14, 185 1. 

III. Frank P., b. March 2, 1853 ; d. Oct. 22, 1853. 

IV. Henry, b. Dec. 19, 1863. 



FELT FAMILY. 

Aaron Felt, with his brother, emigrated from Wales, and 
settled in the vicinity of Salem, Mass. Aaron had six sons and 
one daughter. His sons Aaron and Peter settled in Temple ; 
Jonathan, Samuel, and Joseph, in Nelson ; and Joshua, in 
Keene. Polly m. John Breed, and settled in Nelson. 

John Felt, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Spoffbrd) 
Felt, was b. in Nelson, Sept. 22, 1798. He m. Huldah 
Hobart, dau. of John and Maria (Houghton) Conant, 
of Stowe ; re. to Jaflrey in 1825 ; settled on lot 4, range 
1^, formerly owned by Alexander Milliken, Esq. Mrs. 
Felt d. May 27, 1861, a. 57. 

Mr. Felt has been a prominent business man in town, 
in whose integrity and ability the people had entire con- 



2 

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6 

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9 

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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 317 

fidence. He held for a number of years the offices of 
moderator and selectman, was five years representative 
in the state legislature, and for many years justice of 
the peace. In 1S50 he was assistant marshal for taking 
the census, which duty he performed in a manner 
satisfactory to the public, and highly creditable to him- 
self. In Oct., 1S60, he fell from a tree while gathering 
apples, and dislocated his spine and three of his ribs, 
broke two, and the humeral bone of his left shoulder. 
For five weeks he was in a helpless condition, requiring 
the aid of six men to move him. He grackially recov- 
ered, enfeebled and crippled for life. 

I. An infant daughter^ b. June 13, 1S26; d. the 
next day. 

II. John Co7iant, b. May 10, 1827 ; m., Dec. 18, 
1S55, Sarah Almeda, tlau. of Levi Howe, 
Esq., of Rindge. He d. at Orange, Mass., 
Jan. 28, 1874. He was a dentist by profes- 
sion. 

III. Sally Maria, b. Sept. 17, 1828; m., Dec. 29, 
1862, Alfred Page, of Lunenburg, Mass. ; r. 
Shirley. One son : 

I. John Eli, b. May 8, 1864; d. Aug. 5, 
1864. 

IV. Caroline Huldah^ b. April 25, 1830; m. Julius 
Cutter, q. v. 

V. Joseph Alonzo^h.^ Oct. 11, 1831 ; m., Feb. 8, 
1855, Mary Howe, of Harrisville, N. H. ; 
settled in Gardner, Mass. ; re. to Grand 
Rapids, Mich., and d. Aug. 3, i860. He 
was a pail manufacturer. Two children : 

1. Arthur Hurlburt, b. Jan. 10, 1855. 

2. John, b. June 16, 1859; '^' 

VI. Albert Orlo, b. July 8, 1833 ; m., Nov. 8, 1S57, 
• Ladoria S., daughter of Joseph and Seba 

(Barns) Evleth, of Dublin. He was a chair 
manufacturer ; r. Gardner and Oshawa, Can- 
ada West. 

1. Everett Orto, b. April 26, 1859. 

2. Howard Albert, b. Aug. 2, 1S60. 

3. Edith, b. July 19, 1857 '- ''• 



3i8 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



14 



15 



vii. MartJia Ward, b. Oct. iS, 1836; m., Sept. 28, 
1S58, Clayton Evleth, son of Joseph ; r. in 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; a dealer in household 
furniture. Pie has now retired from busi- 
ness. 

VIII. William Henry Harrison^ b. April 5, 1841 ; d. 
Oct. 28, i860. 



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8 

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12 

13 
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FIFE FAMILY. 

John Fife, the third son of Dea. Silas Fife, came 
from Marlborough to JaftVey, about 1799. His father 
was tlie second son of James Fife, who was b. in Fife- 
shire, Scotland, about the year 1700, and was a son of 
James Fife, a descendant of one of the most ancient 
families of Fifeshire. At an early age the younger 
James Fife emigrated to America, and, after visiting 
several other settlements, finally purchased a farm and 
settled in Bolton, Mass., where he m. Patience Butler, 
and reared a fomily of twelve children. His brother, 
William, also settled in the same place. 

I. James, b. Nov. 18, 1742; d. Dec. 16, 1742. 

II. Silas, h. Oct. 4, i743.-f- 

III. 3Iolly, b. Feb. 24, 1745 ; m. Robert Hudson. 

IV. Robert, b. March 11, 1747 ; m. Hepsibath Bush, 

July II, 1776 ; d. 1785. 
V. Relief ,h. '^?^\\. 27, 1750; m. Jona. Whitcomb, 

June I, 1773. 
VI. Susanna, b. March 21, 1751 ; m. Capt. Samuel 
Woods. 

VII. Patience^ b. Nov. i, 1757; m. Wm. Fife, Jr., 

Dec. 26, 1786. 

VIII. James J., b. Aug. 24, 1760; d. Nov., 1790. 

IX. Deliverance^ b. July 22, 1763; m. Isaac May- 

nard. 
X. Samuel, b. Aug. 16, 1764; d. young. 
XI. Sarah, b. March 9, 1766; d. March, 1782. 
XII. Martha, h. Oct. 2, 1767; m. James Britain ; d. 
Dec. 29, 1848. 

Silas Fifk, his second son, removed to Monadnock 
No. 5, in the spring of 1765, and purchased a lot of land 
not far distant from Monadnock mountain, and includ- 
ing most of what was owned by Dea. Abel Baker in 
1S55, and became the first settler in the easterly part of 
the township, and the second within the territory now 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



319 



H 



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25 
26 

27-28 



comprised in the town of Troy. Here he continued to 
labor year after year, gradually converting his wild 
lands into fertile fields, until he was the owner of a very 
fine estate, during which time there was born to him 
ten children, all of whom, with one exception, grew to 
maturity on the old homestead. He was a prominent 
and influential man in educational, church, and town 
affairs, and held various positions of responsibility and 
trust. He was b. at Bolton ; m. Abigail Houghton, 
Aug. 15, 1772 ; d. May 23, 1836. 

I. Samuel, b. June 27, 1773 ; m., I'S Anna Emer- 
son, Sept. 6, 1S06; m., 2^, Sarah Thayer, 
April I, 1S19; d. Oct. 15, 1851. 
II. Betsey, b. May 3, 1775 ; m. Wm. Tenney. 

III. Silas, b. April 31, 1777; m. Abigail Johnson ; 

d. April 12, 1S34. 

IV. John, b. Feb. 6, 1779.-I- 

V. James, b. Nov. 14, 1780; m. ; d. 1S40. 
VI. Abigail, b. Dec. 2, 1782 ; d. in childhood. 
VII. Benjamin, b. March 24, 1786; m. Betsey New- 
ton ; d. Nov. 24, 1842. 
VIII. Am,os,h. Oct. 14, 1790; m. Nancy Ward ; d. 
Dec. 18, 1S30. 
IX. Timothy, b. April 24, 1792 ; m. Mary Jones, 

Jan. 24, 1821 ; d. Dec. 12, 1871. 
X. Nathan, b. Feb. 22, 1795; m. Margaret Bird; 
d. Oct., 1834. 



John Fife settled in Jaffrey, on lot 4, range 5, now 
(1873) owned by John W. Mann. He kept a a public 
house there, which he called the " Mountain House," 
and for many years it was quite a popidar resort for 
visitors to Monadnock mountain. He was also a farm- 
er. He m. Sarah Seward, and d. May 7, 1S43, a. 64. 
His widow re. to Peterborough, and d. Aug. 24, 185S, 
a. 82. Of his wife, one who enjoyed her acquaintance 
for many years speaks as follows : " She was a noble 
woman, and one of the best housekeepers in this coun- 
ty." 

I. Abigail, b. July 29, iSoo; m. Samuel Stratton 

Oct. 12, 1823, q. V. 
II. William,, b. Nov. 23, 1803.-I- 

III. Joh?i, h. Jan. 31, 1807. -|- 

IV. Elmira, and v. Elvira (twins) ; b. Aug. 1 1 , 

iSii ; r. Peterborough. 



320 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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33 



William Fife m., i'', Rutli Gott, April 27, 1833 5 
m., 2*^, Sarah Sellers, Dec. 22, 1847. ^oon after arriv- 
ing at man's estate he removed from Jaftrey to Isle-au- 
Haute, Me., and engaged in mercantile business with 
his uncle, Nathan Fife. Several years later he estab- 
lished, and for many years carried on, a large mercan- 
tile business at Swan's Isle, in the same state. While 
residing here he was appointed trial justice, and ably 
performed the duties of that office for fifteen years. 
During his continuance in that office he did almost the 
entire legal business within his jurisdiction. He was a 
prominent citizen, and held many positions of responsi- 
bility In 1S54, he removed to Ellsworth, Me., where 
he d.,June 2, 1S57. Children: 

I. Sarah Jane^ b. March 11, 1834. 
II. Almira Frances, b. March 2, 1836 ; m. Maurice 
R. Rich, Oct. II, 1853; r. Tremont, Me. 
He was b. in Mt. Desert, Me., Dec. 22, 
1833. During the great Southern Rebellion, 
he was connected with the Signal Service 
of the United States army. They still re- 
side in Tremont, where he is engaged in 
ship-building. Children: (i) Julia Ann, 
b. March 25, 1855. (2) Fred Judson, b. 
March II, 1858. (3) Mary Cora, b. Sept. 
27, i860. 

III. John William, b. Feb. 27, 1839.-]- 

IV. Nathan Judson, b. March 29, 1841 ; d. Jan. 9, 

1863, at Belle Blaine, Va., in the service of 
his countrv. He was a brave soldier. 



John Fife m. Caroline Stone, Nov. 4, 1830. He 
learned the blacksmithing business, removed to Peter- 
borough, and carried on the same with success, till 
1854, when he removed to Charlotte, Chautauqua Co., 
N. Y., where he engaged in farming. In 1868, he re. 
to New Hampshire, and settled in Swanzey ; but in 
1 87 1 returned to Charlotte, where he now remains. 
One ch. 



Alfred A., b. in Peterborough ; m. Elizabeth, dau. 
of James and Sarah Hayward, Feb., 1856. In 1854, 
he re. to Sinclairville, N. Y., and engaged in farming. 
One ch. : Anna, b. Sept. 28, 1865. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



321 



(30) John William Fyfe, was b. at Swan's Isle, Me., 
Feb. 37, 1S39. In 1S53 he re. to Ellsworth, in the same 
state, where he learned the art of printing. He re- 
mained there for several years, and, after visiting many 
of the important New England cities, finally settled in 
Hartford, Conn., where, in 1S69, in company with 
anotlier gentleman, he established a book and job print- 
ing-office, but soon disposed of his interest in the 
establishment to his partner, and retired from the firm. 
He then studied medicine, and was graduated a doctor 
of medicine in 1S7S, when he received a diploma from 
tiie Eclectic Medical College of Pennsylvania. From 
early youth he has been a frequent contributor to the 
columns of the press, on the subjects of temperance, 
laws of health, and other topics of the day. In 1868 
he commenced the genealogical researches contained in 
his work entitled "'James Fyfe and His Descendants." 
In 1874 he was elected a member of the Hartford court 
of common council, and served the regular term of one 
year. His residence is still in Hartfortl. He m. Mary 
Elizabeth, dau. of Dr. Wm. H. and Mary T. Card, 
April 6, 1863. She was b. in Utica, N. Y., Feb. 14, 
1843. Her parents were natives of Newport, R. I., 
and were descendants of two of the oldest f;imilies of 
that city. At the age of three years they returned with 
her to Newport. Here she was educated, and most of 
her unmarried life happily spent. Children : 

34 L Florence Almira, h. Aug. 34, 1867. 

35 H. Johii William,, b. Nov. 37, 1873 ; d. July 14, 
1874. 



FISK FAMILY. 



Thomas Fisk came from Peppered, Mass., to Jaftrey 
in 17S1 ; settled on lot 19, range i. He was a descendant 
of Samuel Fisk, who emigrated from England, and set- 
tled in Haverhill, Mass. His brother settled in Weston, 
Mass. Samuel, son of the emigrant, settled in Groton, 
Mass., about 1700. His son Thomas re. to Pepperell, m. 
Mary Parker, and d. April 3, 1S54. ^'^ widow d. May 
30, 179^1 ^' 69. They had five children, one of whom, 
Thomas, m. Sarah, dau. of John Shipley (Scotch 
Irish), b. Dec. 35, 1748; d. at Jaftrey, Feb. 18, 1831. 
He d March 15, iSiS, a. 73. Six children : 



22 



322 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



(2) 

S 
9 

lO 



II 

12 

H 
15 

16 

(3) 

17 

18 



(4) 



19 
20 

21 

22 
23 



I. Samuel^ b. Nov. 28, 1768.-I- 

II. Asa, b. July i, 1771. -|- 

iii. Levi, b. Feb. 16, 1775.+ 

IV. Sarah, b. March 22, 1779 ; d. April 21, 1844. 

V. Polly, b. Nov. 3, 17S3 ; d. June 14, 1804. 

VI. «/oe^, b. Jan. 14, 17S7 ; m. Sally Pierce; d. Jan. 
19, 1823. 



Samuel Fisk re. to Dublin ; m. Mary, dau. of Sam- 
uel Twitchell, Esq., of Dublin. 

I. Asa, b. May 8, 1794 ; d. Aug. 24, 1796. 
II. 3Iary, h. Oct. 19, 1795; m. William Cogsvvrell, 
of Peterborough. 

III. SanmeL b. April i, 1797; m. Betsey Gleason, 

who d. at Peterborough, Dec. 31, 1871, a. 
72. He d. July 14, 1872, a. 75. 

IV. Asa, b. Feb. 16, 1799; m. Priscilla Ranstead. 
V. Alice Wilson, b. Sept. 16, 1800; m. Elias 

Hardy. 
VI. Betsey, b. Sept. 21, 1802; m. Ephraim Foster. 
VII. Louisa, b. Oct. 17, 1804. 

VIII. Julia, b. July 22, 1808 ; m. Edward Foster; d. 
Jan. 25, 1842 
IX. Amos T., b. Jan. 22, 181 1 ; d. May 29, 1814. 



Asa settled in Dublin ; m. Cynthia Mann. 

I. Thomas, b. Dec. 29, 1802 ; m. Sophia Apple- 
ton. 
II. Cynthia M., b. Sept. 2, 1804; m. Calvin 
Learnard. One ch. 



Levi Fisk m., Nov. 10, 1799, Hannah Mellen, dau. 
of Daniel and Susan (Farwell) Mellen, of Fitzwilliam. 
He d. Aug. 17, 1857, ^- ^2. She d. July 22, 1861, a. 
86. Mr. Fisk was a prominent man in town affairs, 
and a member of the state senate in i835-'6. 

I. Adams, b. May 3, iSoo.-f- 

II. Mary, b. Feb. 11, 1802 ; m. Elbridge Baldwin, 
q. V. 

III. Polly, b. April 21, 1804: m. Eli Smith, of 

Dublin. 

IV. Parker, b. ; d. May, 1806, a. 26 dys. 
V. Air, b. Sept. 23, 1808 ; d. Oct. i, 1825. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



323 



34 



26 



(19) 



27 

28 
29 



VI. Emily, b. May 12, 181 2 ; m. James Harvey, of 

Marlborough, and d. there. 

VII. Johh Shipley, b. July 18, 1814 ; m. Ann C. 

Clark, of Nelson. 
VIII. Luke, b. Oct. 25, 1S17; d. Dec. 11, 1819. 

Adams Fisk resides on the homestead of his father ; 
m. Mary, dau. of John H. and Mary (Penny) Loring, 
of Rindge. Mr. Fisk has taken a deep interest in the 
History of JaftVey, and furnished much valuable infor- 
mation. Three children : 

I, Mary Emeline, b. May 20, 1837 ' "^' Benj. F. 
Prescott, from Westford, Mass. ; r. Jaffrey. 
II. John Adams, b. Sept. 4, 1839. 
III. Henry Harrison, b. April 3, 1842 ; d. April 20, 
1S43. 



FITCH FAMILY. 



3 
4 



Paul Fitch w^as the son of John Fitch, who came 
from Bradford, Mass., to Ashby, w^here he was captured 
bv the Indians in 174S, and taken to Montreal, Can. 
His family consisted of himself, wife, and five children, 
the youngest five months old. They were ransomed by 
their friends in Bradford. His wife d. on her return, 
Dec. 24, 1748, at Providence. He m.a 2'' wife, resided 
for a time in Rindge, then returned to Ashby, and d. 
April 5, 1795. It is supposed that Fitchburg received 
its name from him, he being on the committee of incor- 
poration. Paul Fitch settled first in Rindge ; m. Mary 
Jaquith, of Billerica, Mass., April, 1767. She was b. 
June 27, 1747, and was the mother of his nine children. 
His wife d. Feb. 18, 1800; he m., 2*^, Jan. 7, 1802, 
Joanna (Rice) Walker, widow of Samuel Walker. He 
re. to Rindge in 1774. and to Jaftrey in 1778. He after- 
wards, in 1S05, re. to Marlborough, and d. May 2, 181 8. 

I. Hannah, b. June 23, 1768; m. John Moore, of 

Sharon, son of David Moore. 
II. «/bAn, b. Oct. 11, 1770; m. ; d. in Cleveland, 

O., 1841. 
III. Paul, b. June 21, 1773 ; m., Nov. 25, 1802, Sa- 
rah, dau. of Samuel and Joanna Rice Walk- 
er, of Rindge. She d. Nov. 14, 1814; m., 



324 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



6 

7 

8 



lO 

II 

12 

^3 

H 

i6 



2"^, Dec. 21, 1815, Sarah Davis. He r. in 
Marlborough and Claremont, and d. Dec. 
18, 1S43. 
IV. Mary^ b. Marcli 15, 1776; in., April 15, 1799, 
William Moore, of Sharon, son of David 
Moore. He d. Oct. 6, 1823; she d. Oct. 
23, 1825. Had eleven children ; five died 



young. 



1800; m. Sarah 



m. 



Abigail 



1. Nathan, b. Feb. 10, 
Russell ; r. vSharon. 

2. Abner, b. July 21, 1802; 
Cook ; r. Jatirey. 

3. William, b. Feb. 14, 1805 ; m. Rox- 
ana Blodgett ; 2^^, Priscilla Blodgett ; he 
d. in Jaftrey, 1S59. 

6. Mary Fitch, b. April 20, 1S07 ; ni. 
Samuel Stearns, of Rindge, March 4, 
1830. a prominent man in town atl'airs, 
and representative in the state legisla- 
ture. They had seven children, among 
whom is Ezra S. Stearns, the distin- 
guished historian of his native town, 
Rindge. She d. April 28, 1S49. ^'^^ 
m. 2^, Sept. 26, 1850, Almira, dau. of 
John and Betsey (Bennett) Hall, of 
Ashburnham. He d. April 6, 1871, a. 
69 years. 

8. Isaiah,b. May 3, 181 1 ; m. Mary Wheel- 
er ; r. Minn. 

10. Jeremiah, b. May 10, 1S15 ; m. Mar- 
garet Jewett; r. Lancaster, Mass. 

V. Alice, b. April 11, 1779; d. 1859, unm. 
VI. Abigail^ b. Feb. 26, 1782 ; m. Joseph Piper, of 

JaflVey. 
VII. Jacobs b. Feb. 20, 1785 ; d. unm. 
VIII. /Susati, b. Oct. 2, 1789; m., i^', David Blood; 
m., 2'', Joseph Tolman. 
IX. Luther Jaquith, b. Sept. 8, 1792 ; ni. Jane 
Hoyt ; r. Hopkinton, N. H. 



FORTUNE FAMILY. 

Amos Fortune, b. free in Africa ; a slave in America ; pur- 
chased his liberty; settled in Jaffrey, on lot 18, range 6; now 
(1873) in possession of Levi Pollard. He was an early settler, 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



325 



came to town about iJ'jS', was a tanner by trade. He was a 
highly-respected citizen, member of the church, and made it a 
present of a silver communion service. He also left a school 
fund for the district in which he lived. He m. Violate, whose 
liberty he previously purchased. He had no children. The 
following inscription may be seen on their headstones in the 
old parish burying-ground : 

Sacred to the memory of 

Amos Fortune, 

Who was born free in Africa, 

a Slave in America. 

He purchased his liberty 

Professed Christianity 

Lived reputably 

died hopefully 

Nov. 17, iSoi, a. 91. 

Sacred to the memory 

of Violate 

by Sale, the slave of 

Amos Fortune, 
b}' Marriage, his wife 

by her fidelity, 
his friend and solace. 
She died his widow, 
Sept. 13, 1803, a. 72. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



FOSTER FAMILY. 

Samuel Foster came to JafFrey about 1810; pur- 
cliased the clothing-mill of Joseph Lincoln, situated in 
what is now East Jaffrey ; m., Oct. 9, 1817, Sopliia, 
dau. of Dea. Eleazer and Mary (Flint) Spofford. She 
d. Oct. 26, 1866, a. 82. He d. Aug. 15, 1863, a. 78. 

I. Miza B., b. May 3, 1818; m., i^ Dr. Thomp- 
son ; m., 2^^, Mr. Lancaster, of Minden, La. 
II. Urania S., b. Dec. 13, 1819; d. March 26, 

1839. 
III. Eleazer Spofford^ b. Sept. 24, 1821 ; m., April 
21, 1845, Sarah Adams. [See page 99.] 

IV. Hannah A., b. Aug. 28, 1823 ; m.. May 8, 

1845, George H. Merrill. 

V. Mary Flmt^ b. May i, 182S ; m., Jan. 11, 1849, 

Fortunatus Gleason, of Westmoreland. 



326 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



8 



lO 



II 



VI. Jerome^ b. Feb. 24, 1S31 ; d. Jan. 11, 1850, in 
California. 



Samuel Foster m. Lucy Boynton, Jan. 31, 1769; 
was a tanner by trade ; r. lot 13, range 6, now the resi- 
dence of Benj. Cutter, Esq. 



Obadiah Foster came to Jaffrey in 1806, and settled 
on lot 19, range 5, now the farm of Luke H. Nutting. 
His name was on the tax-list from 1806 to 1809. 



Jedediah Foster m., June 7, 1807, Lydia, dau. of 
Alpheus Brigham, settled on the farm of his wife's 
father, and remained there till 1836, when he left town. 
His wife d. May 21, 1859, a. 77. 

His son, Alpheus J?., d. Jan. 13, 1819, a. 10 years. 



4 

5 
6 



7 
8 



FOX FAMILY. 

Jonathan Fox, son of Timothy Fox, was b. at 
New Ipswich in 1769. Timothy, his father, son 
of John Fox, came from Littleton, Mass., and settled 
in New Ipswich in 1765. Jonathan came to Jaftrey 
about 1796, and settled on lot 3, range 7. In iSio he 
re. to lot 5, range 7, where he spent the remainder of 
his days, and d. March 20, 1S31. Mr. Fox was a prom- 
inent leading man in town affairs, was distinguished for 
his sound judgment and great financial ability, and 
held the office of selectman from 1803 to 1816 inclusive, 
a longer period than it was held by any other man in the 
town of Jaffrey. He m. Sibil Jackson, b. in Newton, 
Mass., and d. at Jaffrey, April 7, 1S57, a. 88. 

I. Joseph,h. lygy ; grad. Dart, college, 1818; d. 

at Savannah, Georgia, Sept. 16, 1820. 
II. J/ary, b. March 13, 1799; m., April 3,1822, 
Alpheus Crosby, q. v. 

III. Isaac tT., b. Aug. 28, i8oi.-}- 

IV. John, b. Aug. 2, 1803.-I- 

V. Harriet, b. Jan. 6, 1806; was twice m. ; r. in 

Concord. 

VI. Abigail, m. Crocker, and d. in Fitchburg. 

VII. Charles James, h. Jan. 12, 1813.4- 



(4) 



9 


I 


lO 


II 


II 


III 


12 


IV 


13 


V 


H 


VI 



15 

(5) 



16 

18 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 327 

Isaac Jackson Fox (Col.) m., i^', Sophia H. Wilder, 
of Leominster, Mass. She d. Oct., 1S37; '"'^v 2*^' ^''^'' 
sister, Pamelia Wilder. He d. at Nashua, May 6, 
1 85 3. 

Henry Jackson^ b. Aug., 1828. 

Ann Sophia^ b. 1830; d. young. 

George Wilder^ b. Jan. 24, 1831. 

Sarah Josephine^ b. Dec, 1833 ; m. George D. 

Jaquith. 
Charles Joseph^ d. young. 
Eloisa Howe, b. Jan., 1837 ; m. Edward Gay, 

of Maiden. 
VII. Sophia, b. Dec. 25, 1844. 



John Fox, m. d., son of Jona. and Sibil (Jackson) Fox, 
was b. in Jatirey, and was for a time a member of Dart- 
mouth college. He, however, left and engaged in trade 
in JafFrey in copartnership with his brother. Col. Isaac 
J. Fox. After a time they dissolved their copart- 
nership, and his brother removed to Nashua, and he 
studied the profession of medicine with Luke Howe, 
M. D., and received the degree of m. d. at Dart- 
mouth in 1835. For a time he was connected with a 
hospital in Massachusetts, and on returning to Jaffrey 
commenced the business of farming as a more desira- 
ble occupation. The death of his father brought into 
his possession a large amount of property, which was 
probably the principal reason why he left the profession 
of medicine. He has been a prominent man in town 
affairs, was for many years town-clerk and selectman, 
and represented the town in the state legislature for 
seveial years. He has also been one of the directors of 
the Monadnock State and National banks, and was 
president of the State Bank. He m., 1°', Eloisa, dau. 
of Dr. Adonijah, Jr., and Mary (Woodbury) Howe. 
She d. Feb. 2, 1837, ^- ^9 ; m., 2**, Isabel W. Howe, 
dau. of Dr. Luke and Mary (Woodbury) Howe. Three 
children : 

I. Mary Isabel, b. Jan. i, 1S49. 
II. John Howe, b. June 14, 1856 ; graduated Dart- 
mouth college ; studied law ; r. East Jaf- 
frey. 
III. Kate Woodbury ,h . ^\x\y 15, 1859. 



328 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



8) 



19 



20 
21 

22 

24 
25 



Charles James Fox m., April 29, 1838, Susan 
Eliza, dau. of Daniel and Sally (Jones) Cutter. He re. 
to Rockton, 111. ; was a large dealer in land. He died 
Jan. 30, 1873. 

I. Charles Edward, b. Nov. 7, 1840. In 1S60 he 

went to Boston, and was a clerk in a West 
India goods store. At the breaking out of 
the late civil war he enlisted in Co. D., ist 
Rhode Island Cavalry, Aug. 14, 1862, and 
was transferred to Troop C, new organiza- 
tion, as first sergeant, Dec. 21, 1864; mus- 
tered out at expiration of service June 6, 
1865 ; served as a private in Co. D, First 
Battalion Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, 
from May 9, 1872, to May 15, 1873; ser- 
geant-major of the battalion May 15, 1873, 
to March 31, 1875 ; first sergeant of Co. D, 
from March 31, 1875, to Jan. 12, 1876, when 
he was elected second lieutenant. He also 
joined the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company. He was a member of ]Mt. Leb- 
anon Lodge and St. Andrew Royal Arch 
Chapter F. & A. M. and of the Boston 
Commandery K. T. He was also an hon- 
ored member of the Commonwealtii Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. At the close of the war he en- 
gaged in the grocery business at the corner 
of West Newton and Tremont streets, and 
marked success attended his labors. He 
met with an accidental death by being 
thrown from his horse Jan. 29, 1878, leav- 
ing a widow to mourn his loss. 

II. Harriet Adelaide^ b. Feb. 10, 1844. 

HI. Jones Cutter, b. Julv 12, 1846; d. July 16, 

1846. 
IV. Abbie Crocker, b. July 14, 1848 ; d. Sept. 30, 

1852. 
V. Mary Elizabeth, b. Aug. iS, 1850. 

VI. John, b. Feb. 18, 1854. 

VII. Frank Cutter, b. June 4, 1857. 



FRENCH FAMILY. 

The early settlers by that name were James, John, Thomas, 
and David, — James in 1778, John in 1786, and Thomas in 
1788. David was a brother of Thomas. He left town about 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



329 



1794; re., first, to Andover, Vt. ; second, to Grafton, Vt., and 
d. there. Seven cliildren : 

James French settled on lot 13, range 5 ; was cho- 
sen sexton and highway surveyor in 177S; on commit- 
tee to hire soldiers in 17S1. He was a basket-maker. 

He re. to Rindge about 1793. He m. Sarah , 

and had five children, — -James, Betsey, Polly, Burly, 
and Oliver. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

II 

12 



13 

16 

17 
18 

19 
20 



James French, Jr., m., i^', April 13, 1781, Han- 
nah, dau. of Jabez and Hannah Russell, of Rindge. 
Shed. 1805. He m., 2*^, July 12, 1809, Olive Sawyer. 
He I'e. to Rindge in 1793 ; was a basket-maker. Ten 
children, — 9 by first wife, i by second wife : 

I. Isaac, b. in Jaff'rey, June 22, 17S1. 
II. Hannah, b. Feb. 6, 1783 ; d. March 6, 1783. 
HI. Hannah, b. Jan. 24, 1784. 
IV. Sarah,h. Feb. 17, 1786. 
V. James, b. Feb. i, 1789. 
VI. Samuel Brooks^ b. May 2, 1791. 
VII. Betsey, b. May 18, 1793. 
VIII. Edtoard Jewett, b. in Rindge, June 29, 1795. 

IX. Mahala, b. ISIay 25, 1804. 

X. Frances Sawyer, b. July 12, 1809. 

John French came from Billerica, Mass., to JaftVey, 

about 1786; m. Priscilla . She d. July 2, 1823, 

a. 81. He d. May 25, 1815, a. 84. 



I. John, b. - 
Gage.+ 
II. Sarah, b. 



; m., March, 1789, Abigail 
; m., i^*, Robert Harkness, 2**, 



William Stevens. 
HI. Benjamin, unm. 

IV. Priscilla, b. 1766; m. Abel Shedd, q. v. 
V. Daniel, b. 1771 ; m. Rebecca Fletcher, who d. 

Jan. 22, 1850, a. 71. He d. Aug. 30, 1851, 

a. 80. 

1. Roancy, b. Aug. 7, 1796; m. Martin 

Blodgett, q. v. 

2. Daniel, b. 1S03 ; m. Mary C, who d. 

July 5, 1850, a. 47. He d. Feb. 
24, 1858, a. SS' 



330 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



21 

22 

23 
24 

(H) 



25 
26 

27 
28 



29 

30 
31 

32 

33 
34 
35 



3. Rebecca, d. 1806, a. i yr., 8 mos., 14 
dys. 

VI. Elizabeth^ b. 1772 ; m. Joseph Blodgett, q. v. 
VII. Pa«^2/, m. Joshua Nutting. - ^ ,.;:^'' 

VIII. Josiah^ m. Abigail, dau. of Samuel Stanley. 



John French m. Abigail, dau. of James and Sarah 
(Lamson) Gage; re. to New Hartford, N. Y., and d. 
Feb. 25, 1S39. She d. April 20, 1S60. Three ch. : 

I. Sally^ b. Nov. 19, 17S9; m. Leonard Kellogg. 

Five ch. 
II. tfohn, b. Sept. 12, 1794; m. Almira, dau. of 

Robert and Phebe (Ingalls) Gilmore. Nine 

ch. 
III. Abigail, m. James Brockway. Two ch. 

Thomas French, b. Dec. 17, 1765, at Billerica, 
Mass. ; came to Jaffrey about 17SS, and settled on lot 13, 
range 4. He m. Hannah Cummings, dau. of Eleazer 
Cummings, of Londonderry, b. July 15, 1767; d. May 
2, 1855, a. 87. He d. Feb. 21, 1S48, a. 83. He carried 
on the business of farming, and the manufacture of 
shoes. He was a great musician, and an expert on the 
fiddle, and spent most of his time in playing on the 
same. He married, and, as his family increased, 
found himself in rather straitened circumstances. 
Awakened by a sense of his danger, he concluded to 
drop the fiddle and follow the plough. Food immedi- 
ately became abundant, making his family happy ; — but 
Mr. French said the people did not like the ploughman 
half as well as they did the fiddler. 

I. Thomas, b. Jan. 26, 17S9.-I- 
II. Cummings, b. April 27, i793.-f- 

III. Margaret, b. Dec. 18, 1795 ; m. Josiah Sawyer, 

q. V. 

IV, Lucy, b. May 18, 1797 ; d. Oct. 18, 1868 ; unm. 
V. Leonard, b. July 10, 1799; d. Feb. 3, 1771, at 

Milford, N. H. 

VI. Hannah, b. Feb. 17, 1802; d. Aug. 11, 1818, 
unm. 

VII. James Rollins, b. July i, 1804; m. Caroline, 
dau. of Lieut. Daniel and Folly (Felt) 
Emery. She d. June 28, 1829, a. 19. Two 
children ; d. He re. to N. Y. state. 



36 
37 



(29) 

38 

39 
4o 

(30) 



41 

42 



43 

44 

45 
46 

(36) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 33 1 

VIII. Luke, b. July 25, iSoy.-f- 
IX. Naticy, b. July 29, 1811 ; m. Dea. Richard 
Spaulding, q. v. 



47 
48 

49 



Thomas French m., March 20, 1816, Sophia, dau. 
of Jacob and Alary (Smith) Jewell. She d. June 9, 
1840, a. 51. He d. May i, 1869, a. 79. 

I. Jacob Jewell, b. Aug. 24, 1817 ; re. to Buffalo, 
and d. there. 

II. Mary Sophia, b. July 3, 1823 ; m., Aug. 30, 

1 85 1, Joseph Crombie, of Jaffrey, q. v. 

III. Thomas Dexter, b. May 11, 1827. 

CuMMiNGS French m. Sally, dau. of Capt. Abel and 
Priscilla (French) Shedd. She d. Nov. 2, 1862, a. 74. 
He d. Aug. 16, 1 866, a. 74. 

I. Richard IlarJcness, re. to Fitchburg. 

II. Henry Cummings, b. 1827 ; m., Oct. 8, 1S50, 
Caroline Pamelia, dau. of Luther and Caro- 
line Cutter. She d. June 23, 1876, a. 46. 

1. George Eaton, b. Jan. 26, 1856; d, 

June 20, 1856. 

2. Edwin Henry, b. July 25, 1861 ; a deaf 

mute. 

3. Malcolm Shedd, b. Dec. 3, 1864. 

III. Sarah, b. 1829; was principal of Melville 
academy ; re. to Minneapolis, Minn., from 
thence to San Jose, Cal. ; m. 

Luke French m., i", Jan. 28, 1832, Nancy, dau. of 
Simeon Blanchard. She d. June 20, 183S. M., 2^ 
Lucy, dau. of Dea. Abel and Lucy (Pierce) Spaulding, 
July 14, 1839. 

I. Susan Eliza, h. Jan. 28, 1833; m. March 14, 
1855, Charles S. Briant, of Dublin. 

II. Richard, b. Mav 19, 1834; "''•' i"' ^^^- 25> 

1859, Emilv F. Ryder', of Wethersfield, Vt. 
She d. 1866. He m., 2^ Rosie H. Taylor, 
Jan. I, 1S69. 

III. Sarah 3Iarinda,h. Feb. 28, 1836; d. Jan. 12, 

1842. 



332 
5o 

51 

52 
53 

54 

55 
56 

57 
58 

59 
60 



61 
62 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

IV. Preston L.,h. April 26, 1S38; m., Dec. 28, 
1869, Mary C, dau. of George W. Benja- 
min, of Jaffrey. 
V. Syloanus, h. May 11, 1840; d. Aug. 9, 1862, 
unm. 

VI. Sarah Ertnina^ b. Feb. 20, 1842; m., March 

28, 1S75, Otis G. Rice ; r. on lot 3, range 7. 

VII. Evander^h April 7, 1843; m., Jan. i, 1868, 

Sophia Catherine Lane, of Charlestown, N. 
H., b. April 27, 1842. 
VIII. Hannah Cummings, b. Sept. 14, 1844; d. 
March, 1S45. 
IX. An infant^ b. and d. Aug. 12, 1845. 
X. Abel Albert^ b. Feb. 10, 1S46 ; m., Jan. 31, 

1872, Ella F., dau. of John S. Lawrence. 

XI. Orford^ b. Jan. 15, 1S48 : m. Cynthia A. How- 

ard, of Acworth, June 7, 1874. 

XII. Merrill, b. Oct. 5, 1850; m., Oct. 5, 1S71, 

Delia Maria, b. at Fitchburg, Mass., May 
23, 1851. 
XIII. Emmons, b. April 23, 1853; m., Sept. 15, 

1873, Frances M. Knowlton, b. Sept. ^6, 
1847 ' '• Tewksbury, Mass. 

Whitcomb French (Col.), son of Whitcomb and 
Sally (Patrick) French, and grandson of John, of Wo- 
burn, Mass., was b. in Dublin, July 9, 1794. He was 
a large stage proprietor; r. in Jaftrey, Keene, and 
Fitzwilliam. He disposed of his stage property and 
re. to Peterborough, 1S33, where he built a large and 
commodious hotel, which became under his manage- 
ment one of the best in this section. Li 1849, he re- 
tired to a farm, which he carried on successfully till 
age made it advisable for iiim to retire from labor, and 
he has since r. in the village. In Nov., 1867, their 
golden wedding was celebrated, at which were gathered 
five children and seven grandchildren. His descend- 
ants were eight children, thirteen grandchildren, and 
four great-grandchildren, — in all, twenty-eight. His 
eight children were all living. He m., Nov. 27, 18 17, 
Mary, dau. of Joel Kendall, of Dublin, b. May 25, 
1797. 

I. Eliza G., b, in Nelson, Sept. 2, 1818 ; m., Sept. 

28, 1840, Jesse C. Little ; r. Salt Lake City, 

Utah. Eleven ch. 

II. Granville, b. in Dublin, July 2, 1820; m., 

April 26, 1843, Relief Walker ; b, Dum- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



333 



63 
64 

65 



66 



67 
68 



(64) 



69 
70 

71 
72 



(66) 



73 

74 

75 
76 



III. 

IV. 
V. 



VI. 



VII. 
VIII. 



merstown, Vt., Sept. 15, 1817. One child, 

Fred W., b. July 19, 1847 ; r. Epworth, la. 
Mary xS'., b. Jaft'iey, Dec. 4, 1823 ; unm. 
Henry Kendall^ b. in Jaffrey, Jan. 21, 1826.-}- 
Marshall W., b. injaflrey, Sept. 4, 1827; m., 

Jan. 10, 1855, \J\xTA& T. Wales, b. Sept 26, 

1830 ; r. Palmer, Mass. 
Charles Davidson, b. Keene, March 29, 1830; 

m., Jan. 23, 1851, Nancy L. Holbrook ; four 

children. -[- 
Sarah T., b. Feb. 22, 1832, in Keene. 
Williatn, b. June 4, 1841, in Peterborough ; m. 

Jan. 29, 1S6S, Helen A. Shearer, of Palmer, 

Mass., b. Nov. 2, 1841 ; two ch. 



Henry K. French succeeded his father in the pos- 
session of his hotel ; has remodelled and made large 
and valuable additions, every way improving the same, 
thereby making it a first-class public house. INIr. 
French has not only shown his spirit of enterprise in 
building a public house, but in the railroad enterprise, 
being one of the prime movers in that operation. He 
is now (1878) president of the Monadnock and Hills- 
borough railroads. 

He m., i"', July 9, 1850, Harriet N. Gray, of Wilton, 
b. Aug. 21, 1829; d. Oct. 13, 1852, a. 23; m., 2'', 
Nov. 20, 185:;, S.Amanda Adams, b. Mason, July 10, 
1834- 

I. Frank G., b. June 10, 1852. 

II. Charlie If., b. Dec. 22, 1856. 

HI. Hattie A., b. Aug. 27, 185S. 

IV. George A.,\i. Sept. 22, i860. 



Charles D. French m., Jan. 23, 1851, Nancy L. 
Holbrook ; b. in Swanzey, Aug. i, 1827. He re. to 
Chickashaw and Deerfield, la. ; returned to Peter- 
borough in 1858. He was in the Union army. Four 
children : 



I. 
II. 

III. 

IV. 



Charles W., b. Nov. 20, 1854; d. Feb. 26, 1856. 
H. Edward, h. March, 1857 ! '^ medical student 

in 1877. 
3Iinnie, b. June 17, 1861. 
Katie H., b. Nov. 11, 1871. 



334 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



3 
4 

5 
6 



7 
8 



(3) 



9 

lO 

II 

12 
13 

H 

15 
16 

17 



FROST FAMILY. 

Benjamin Frost, probably son of Thomas, b. in 
Dunstable, Mass., May i, 1748; settled (17S3) in Jaf- 
frey, on lot 17, range i, which he purchased of Benja- 
min Cutter, brother of Joseph Cutter, Esq. He m., at 
Fitchburg, Rachel Kimball, b. Sept. 5, 1754. He died 
April 12, 1819, a. 71. She d. June 28, 1840, a. 86. 
Mr. Frost was a good farmer and a worthy citizen. 
They had seven ch. : 

I. Dorcas, b. Sept. 3, 1774 ; m. Ebenezer Brooks ; 
re. to Pittsford, Vt. ; was proprietor of a 
public hotel. She d. Aug. 25, 1843, a. 69. 
He d. Jan. 21, 1845, a. 70. 

II. Thomas, b. Aug. 30, 1776.--I- 

III. Benjamin, b. Dec. i, i'jyS.-\- 

IV. John, b. Sept. 23, 1780.-)- 

V. Polly, b. at JatiVey, Sept. 16, 1782 ; m. Simeon 

Gowing, q. v. 
VI. Ejyhr aim Kimball, h. Dec. 17, 1790.-}- 
VII. Oliver', b. May iS, 1795 ; m., i'', Sept. 21, 
1826, Elvira, dau. of Jonas Clark, of Dub- 
lin ; re. to McDonough, N. Y. ; m., 2^, 
Lucinda Lines, of Charlestown, N. H. ; 
Feb., 1S34. ^^ <J- AiJg'i 1S47. She d. 
1872. Four ch. 

Thomas Frost (Capt.) m. Betsey, dau. of Simeon 
and Betsey Butters, of Jaffrey, Feb. 13, 1S06. He set- 
tled on lot 19, range i. In March, 1814, he re. to 
Charlestown, N. H. He worked at farming and mak- 

While in Jaffrey he was chosen 

militia. He d. April 28, 1849, ^- 

1863, a. 76. They had thirteen 



ing wooden pumps, 
captain of the state 
73. She d. Oct. 8, 
children : 



I. Horace, b. in Dublin, May 2, i8o6.-|- 
II. Permilla, b. in Jaffrey ; m. Carroll. 

III. Rufus, b. in Jaffrey, Oct. 9, 1809.4- 

IV. Thomas, b. July 15, 181 1 ; m. 

V. Alvin, b. Oct. 23, 1812.+ 
VI. Orinda, b. 181 3. 

VII. George W., b. in Charlestown, N. H. ; m. 

VIII. Adeline, m. Gregg. 

IX. Caroline, b. at Charlestown, N. H. ; three 
times m., I'S Randall ; 2"*, Tim- 
othy Blodgett, of Dublin. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 335 

18 X. Susan, b. at Charlestown. 

19 XI. Henry, b. 1S26 ; d. March 3, 1829. 

20 XII. Cyrus, h. 1829; d. 1831. 

21 XIII. Roanna, b. ; m. Smith; r. 

Charlestown. 



(a\ Benjamin Frost m. Annis, dau. of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Whitney) Pierce, of JaftVey, Dec. 18, 1806. 
He settled in Dublin, on part of lot 5, range i, previ- 
ously owned by John Russell. He was a natural me- 
chanic, and could do the work of a carpenter, mill- 
wright, brick-mason, make bedsteads, spinning-wheels, 
and hand-rakes, besides carrying on his farm. He built 
a grist-mill, and the house in which he lived and died. 
He d. March 9, 1835, a. 47. She d. Oct. 28, 1834, 
a. 51 years. 

22 I- Cyrus, b. May 12, 1807.-I- 

2-7 II. Annis, b. Dec. 30, 1808 : m., i'', Dec. 10, 1834, 

Edward M. Lawrence, of Pepperell, Mass. ; 

m., 2'', Silas Sawyer, Esq., of Peterborough, 

N. H. Five children : 

24 I. Eliza Ann, b. in Groton, Mass., Oct. 

4, 1836 ; m. Abbot B. Burpee, of Dub- 
lin. Nine children. 

2c 2. Nancy L., b. April 6, 1841 ; m. John 

Shedd ; r. Upper Bedford, Can. Three 
children. 

26 3- Samuel Henry, b. Jaffrey, May 13, 

1844 ; m., April 38, 1869, Sarah H. 
Morse, of Leominster, Mass. Onechild. 

27 4. Lydia M., b. Dublin, May 5, 1847 '■> ^' 

July 9,. 1850. 

28 5. Lyclia M., b. JafTrey, March 12, 1851 ; 

d. April 6, 1 85 1. 

29 III. Eliza, b. Oct. 17, 1811; d. April 14, 1835, 
unm. 

30 IV. Beiyaniin, b. June 25, 1813 ; m. Lydia M. 
White, of Pittsfield, N. H. ; a machinist; r. 
Nashua; d. Oct. 35, 1861. His widow m., 
2^, Elbridge G. Wilson ; r. Nashua. 

31 I. Elvira D., b. Aug. 17, 1839; m. May 

4, 1862, Charles A.Andrews; resides 
Nashua. 



336 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



32 



33 


V. 


34 


VI. 


35 


VII. 


36 


VIII. 



(5) 



37 
38 

39 
40 

41 



42 

43 
44 



45 

46 

47 
48 

49 



2. Elmira F., b. Sept. 18, 1847; ^- ^^^- 
3, 1S4S. 

tToseph Pie7'ce, b. Jan. 19, 1815.-)- 

Albert, b. March 20, 1S17.-I- 

/Silas P., b. Feb. 9, i820.-|- 

Ca/ei Whitney^ b. Feb. 9, 1S22 ; m. Nov. 29, 

1S49, Mrs. Rhoda D. Burgin, formerly of 

Lancaster, N. H. ; r. Boston. 



John Frost m. March 11, 1805, Sally, dau. of Dan- 
iel and Sarah (Clark) Adams, son of Dea. Epliraim 
Adams, of New Ipswich. He settled on tlie home- 
stead ; was deacon of the chnrch, and a worthy man. 

He d. July 4, 1S47, '*• ^7- S^^^ ^- ^"&- 135 1871? ^• 
85 years. 

I. Daniel A., b. Dec. 5, 1805.-I- 
II. David Livingston, h. Feb. 14, 1807. -|- 

III. Croydon, b. Ma}^ 19, 1808; d. April 20, 1813. 

IV. Liberty (Dea.), b. Nov. 2, 1809 ; m. Feb. 15, 

1835, Sarah E. Heald, of Carlisle. One 
child, Lemuel Porter, b. May 28. 1836, and 
d. July 9, 1836. Hed. May 25, 1838. His 
widow m. Abner Chandler. He was an 
overseer in one of the cotton mills at Low- 
ell, Mass. ; was deacon of the Baptist 
church at Lowell, a leader of the choir, 
and superintendent of the Sabbath-school. 
V. Palmyra, b. Aug. 10, 181 1 ; d. Feb. 17, 1837. 
VI. Ephraini Kimhall, b. Aug. 10, 1813.-J- 
VII. Lydia Adams, b. March 31, 1816; m., July 16, 
1833, Asa Borden, of Dublin, second wife. 
She d. Dec. 21, 1836. One child: 

I. Lydia Jane, b. June 5, 1834 ; m. Chas. 
C. Slocum, of Portsmouth, R. L Four 
children : 



1. Clara, b. Feb. 16, 1851 ; m. George 
M. Taylor, of Providence, R. I. One 
child, Lydia Frances, b. 1873. 

2. Mary B., b. Dec. 9, 1855 ; m. Geo. 
W. Sherman, of Portsmouth, R. L 

3. Rowena A., b. Jan. 26, 1861 ; m. 
Wm. J. Chroncher, of Portsmouth, 
R. I. 

4. Mattie, b. Jan. 16, 1S69. 



so 
51 



(7) 



52 
53 



54 

55 
56 

57 
58 
59 

60 
61 

62 



GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 337 

In 1S37 ^^^ Borden le. to Portsmouth, R. 
I., from whence he came ; m., 3'', widow of 
Eleazer Perkins, of Jatlrey. She d. at Ports- 
mouth, 1S73. 
VIII. Johfi, b. Dec. 5, 1S18. 
IX. Sarah Elvira, b. May 7, 1S28 ; unm. ; r. in Jaf- 
frey. 



Ephraim K. Frost (Dr.) ; educated at Dartmouth 
college ; studied medicine with Dr. David Carter, of 
Dublin, a fellow-student with Dr. Amos Twitchell. He 
commenced the practice of his profession in Marl- 
borough, and afterwards re. to Swanzey. While in 
Marlborough he was commissioned by the governor a 
captain in the state militia. In 1S34 he re. to McDon- 
ough, Chenango county, N. Y. In 1S54 he removed 
to Delaware county, Iowa, and in 1S67 to Lincoln, 
Neb., where he d. Nov. 23, 1S70, a. So. He appears to 
have been a man of talent, and was successful in the 
practice of his profession. He m., Nov. 11, 1S13, Persis 
Baker, of Marlborough, b. June 19, 1790. »Seven 
children : 

I. Charles, b. Sept. 3, 1S14; d. Sept. 23, 1814. 
II. Fero7iia,h Dec. 26, 1S16; m., 1835, George 
N. Sliervvood, of McDonough. Two chil- 
dren : (i) George L., m. and lives in Wood- 
stock, 111. ; (2) Eugene, m. and r. Burling- 
ton, Iowa. 

III. Lyman, b. Feb. 10, 1820; m. Sept. 10, 1846, 

Laura A. Gray. He is a farmer ; r. Lin- 
coln, Neb. Six children. 

1. Cornelia P., m. Henry D. Blakes- 
lie ; r. Nebraska. 

2. Alice M., graduated at the Nebraska 
State University, June, 1876. 

3. Charles Sumner ; r. Colorado. 

4. Flora. 5. A. Lincoln. 6. Fremont. 

IV. Lafayette S., b. June 4, 1824; m. Betsey Phe- 

nix, 1845. Two daughters. 
V. Caroline, b. Jan. 12, 1S29; d. July 3, 1S30. 
VI. Emeline, b. Jan. 12, 1829; m., 1844, John J- S. 
Lee. Two children. 
VII. Franklin, b. April 14, 1831 ; d. July 27, 1858; 
m. ; one child, Frank O. 

23 



338 
(9) 

63 
64 

66 
67 

(It) 



68 



69 



70 



71 



(13) 



72 

73 
74 



(22) 



75 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Horace Frost m., Jan. 19, 1S32, Melinda Lock. 
She d. March 33, 1S71, a. 67, 

I. Henry, b. March S, 1837, unm. ; r. North 

Charlestown. 
II. l!Jdiom, b. May 4, 1S39. 

III. 3Iaria L., b. Nov. 26, 1S40. 

IV. Leiois, b. Sept. 4, 1S42. 

V. James, b. July 25, 1848. 

RuFUS Frost m., April 6, 1S40, Maria L. Trow- 
bridge, of Pittsford, Vt, She d. Aug. 25, 1857. He 
was deputy sheriff at Pittsford ; now (1876) depot mas- 
ter at Rutland. Children : 

I. George H., b. Feb. 4, 1841 ; m. Minnie Rigdon, 
March 18, 1S70. One son. He is pass con- 
ductor on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas 
Railroad ; r. Hannibal, Mo. 
II. Albert P., b. Sept. 16, 1846 ; m. Julia A. Hart, 
Jan. 24, 1867. One ch. : George R., b. 
Aug., 1867 ; r. Philadelphia, Pa. 

III. Emma L., b. Dec. 22, 1S48; m., i^', Jan. 10, 

1871, Levi H. Goodrich, a book-binder ; r. 
Chicago, 111. Two ch. : Charles A. and 
Alfred William. M., 2^ June 6, 1864, 
Ruth Stewart, Clarendon, Vt. 

IV. Chester S., b. Jan. 10, 1868. 



Alvin Frost m. 



and settled in Charlestown. 



Has followed the business of school teaching and farm- 
ing. He has been one of the selectmen, and is a justice 
of the peace. 



I. Nelson Alvin, b. — 
Hanover, N. H. 
II. Helen Jane. 
III. Martha Ann, d. 



; a jeweller ; m., and r. in 



Cyrus Frost m., i", Nov., 1S29, Cynthia Nay, of 
Sharon. She d. Jan. 20, 1837. M., 2^ Betsey McCoy, 
of Sharon, Nov. 9, 1837. She d. Sept. 3, 1858. He 
settled on the homestead, and in 1852 re. to Peter- 
borough, where he now resides. 

I. Lydia Ann, b. July 30, 1831 ; unm. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 339 

76 II. Charles Albert^ b. Sept. 9, 1S38 ; m., June i6, 
186S, Sarah A. Garfield, of Claremont, dau. 
of Wm. and Annis (Walker) Garfield, b. 
May 23, 1S41. 

77 III- Sarah Eliza, b. Dec. 15, 1839; m., May 27, 

1875, Mifflin Bailey (3"^ wife); r. Tremont, 
111. 

78 IV. Cynthia A., b. Aug. 6, 1843; m., May 22, 

1876, Henry F. Mears ; r. Nashua. 



(33) Joseph Pierce Frost settled in Dublin ; built a 
house, saw- and grist-mill ; re. to Jaffrey in the spring 
of 1849. He is a carpenter and joiner by trade, and 
resides in Jaftrey Centre. He is a public spirited man, 
much employed in town affairs ; has been selectman, 
and is now (1S78) town-clerk and justice of the peace. 
He has furnished much valuable information relating to 
the history of Jaflrey. He m. Sarah Eliza, dau. of Abel 
and Mary (Spaulding) Cutter, Jan. 4, 1844. ^^e d. 
Sept. 34, 1859, a. 35. M., 3*^, April 2, 1861, Sarah, 
dau. of Joseph and Folly (Jewett) Osgood, of Milford, 
formerly of Nelson, N. H., b. Jan. 25, 1831, at Nelson. 



79 
80 



81 

82 

(34) 

83 

84 
85 



I. Edith E., d. July 11, 1873, a. 28 yrs. 
II. Joseph A., b. June 12, 1846; m., 1873, Clara 
Wilder, of Nashua, b. May 23, 184S, who d. 
July 5, 1874. He was a carpenter by trade. 
In the fall of 1874 he re. to Beaver Springs, 
near San Diego, Cal. 

III. Ari infant son, b. at Jaff"rey, July 16, 1857 ; d. 

July 16, 1857. 

IV. Charles Spaulding, b. at Jaftrey, July 18, 1859, 

d. Sept. 24, 1859. 



Albert Frost, a carpenter and joiner, settled in 
Peterborough ; m. Mary Boutelle, of Antrim, Feb. 21, 
1843 ; b. Jan. 19, 18 18. The son of Mr. Frost was a 
soldier in the Union army. 

I. George Albert, b. March 23, 1844 ; m. Oriseville 
S. Fisher, of Winchendon, Mass., b. Jan, 21, 
1848. One ch. : 

1. Albert Orris, b. Dec. 10, 1869. 

II. Mary Ellen, b. April 30, 1847. 



340 

86 

87 

(35) 
88 



89 
9o 

(37) 



91 

92 

93 

94 

95 
96 

97 

98 

99 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

III. Eugene Leslie, b. Aug. 30, 1S49; d. Aug. 21, 

1852. 

IV. Emma Jane, b. July 17, 1851 ; d. Aug. 10, 1852. 



Silas P. Frost m., Feb. 9, 1S49, Betsey E. Mason ; 
r. Dublin. 

I. Walter Clarence^ b. March 11, 1S51 ; graduated 
at Dartmouth college in 1S76 ; is a teacher 
of the high school in Woodstock, Vt., and a 
student at law. 
II. Alfred Clinton^ b. March 31, 1S52. 
III. Charles Mason, b. Sept. 24, 1858. 



Daniel Adams Frost re. to McDonough, N. Y. ; 
m., May 24, 1828, Marion Ecclestan, of that place. He 
was a farmer ; a man of great physical strength — a giant 
with the axe and scythe, as the forests and grass-fields of 
McDonough will abundantly testify. He was also 
captain of a rifle company in that place, and no doubt 
a good one. In 1S36 he re. to Worcester, Vt., bought 
a farm, remained there about thirty years, and then 
returned to McDonough, where he now resides. 

I. Liberty Adams, b. May 4, 1829; m,, July 26, 
1854, Mary Hancock ; r. Oxford, N. Y. 
Two ch. (twins), — Hattie and Willie, b. 
Sept. 29, 1S65. 
II. Marian Sophia, b. Feb. 22, 1831 ; d. Dec. 30, 
1847. 

III. Mary Elvira, b. March 31, 1S33 ; m. Cyrus 

Stoddard, Feb. 25, 1851 ; d. July 13, 1851, 
at Calais, Vt. 

IV. JVancy Ferona, b. April 29, 1835 ; m. 

Hill. Four children : 

1. Charles E., b. in Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 

20, 1S53. 

2. Ida P., b. in Worcester, Vt., Nov. 27, 

1855. 

3. Byron F., b. in East Montpelier, March 

24, 1858. 

4. Harrison A., b. in Cabot, Vt., Aug. 

25, 186 1 ; r. Oxford, N. Y. 

V. LAina Ann, b. May 9, 1837 ; d. Oct. 23, 1871. 



lOO 



lOI 

1 02 



(38) 

103 

104 

105 



106 
107 



(43) 



108 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 34I 

VI. Sarah, b. March 27, 1841 ; m. B. F. Johnson; 
d. Aug. 22, 1867. Two ch. : (i) Thirza, 
m. John Lee, 1876. (2) Solon. 
VII. Angelina, b. 1S46; d. Sept. 11, 1847. 
VIII. Winjield Scott, b. April 12, 1S49 '■< "^-i Dec. 24, 
1S71, Emeline C. Dolan ; r. German, N. Y. 
One ch.,— Martha W., b. May 2, 1875. 



David L. Frost settled in Worcester, Vt.,1834; m., 
i'', Louisa Kemp, of that place, Sept. 17, 1839. She 
d. April 16, 1851. M., 2^, Nov. 11, 1851, Eliza Ann 
Kemp. He d. Aug. 5, 1875. 

I. Lucretia Annette, b. Sept. 24, i8/|i ; d. Sept. 2, 

1859. 
II. Milan Warren, b. June 30, 1843 ; d. in the 
army, at Fairfax Court House, Va., March 
4, 1863; Co. C, Vt. Vol. 

III. Lucinda Rosina, b. March 23, 1845 ; m., April 

28, 1S67, Wm. Weston, of Chambersburgh, 
Pa. Three children : (i) Alice May, b. 
Jan. 22, 1868. (2) Edward, b. Aug. 31 
1869; d. April, 1870. (3) Arthur Forest, 
b. April 30, 1S71 ; re. to Chambersburgh, Pa. 

IV. Betsey Philena,h. March 3, 1847; m-iFeb. 18, 

1866, Wm. H.Maxham. One child, — Etta 
R., b. May 10, 1870; r. Middlesex, Vt. 
V. Alvin L., b. June 12, 1849; m., July 11, 1875, 
Ida J. Kellogg : r. homestead. One child, — 
Fannie Ida, b. Jan. 13, 1877. 



Ephraim Kimball Frost was a shoemaker by trade, 
resided in several places, and is now (1S76) a resident 
of Pine Run, Genesee county, Mich. ; a druggist and 
grocer. He m., i*^, Elvira Blackmer, of Dana, Mass., 
b. Sept. 28, 1816 ; d. at Petersham, Mass., March 13, 
1847. M., 2'^, Harriet Blackmer, aunt of first wife, June 
7, 1847, b. Sept. 30, 1810. 

I. Bufina Ambra, b. at Peterborough, March 13, 
1837; "^' Frederick Hodkins, of Troy, N. 
Y., Nov. 3, 1855 ; a shoemaker by trade ; d. 
in the army, at Washington, D. C, by a 
wound received in service ; buried on Ar- 
lington Heights. Three children : 



342 
109 

no 
III 

112 



"3 



114 



"5 



(50) 



116 
117 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

1. Mary L., b. Aug. 20, 1856; m. Chas. 
S. Giiswold ; r. Thetford, Mich. Two 
children. 

2. Frederick K., b. Nov. 22, 1858, at 
Lynn, Mass. 

3. Hattie E., b. Jan. 20, 1S62, at Orange, 
Mass. 

She m., 2"^, Eliphalet Hartson, Jan. 19, 1873 ; r. Pine 
Run. 
11. Hannah Elvira, b. at Newmarket, Feb. 8, 
1S39 ; m., I'*, Jan. 2, 1857, Joseph H. Boy- 
don, who d. in the arm}-, at Vicksburg, Aug. 
15, 1S63 ; m., 2^ John A.Jackson, of Pine 
Run. By first husband, two children: (i) 
Rosa E., b. Oct. 7, 1857; (2) Joseph H., 
b. April 6, 1859. -^y second husband, (3) 
John Anson, b. June 26, 1869; (4) Rose 
Emily, m. Emory Rogers, of Pine Run, 
Sept. 36, 1876. 
HI. Tryphena Eniogene, b. April 29, 1844, at Pe- 
tersham, Mass. ; m., Oct., 1864, Thomas 
W. Briggs, a farmer and a merchant ; r. 
Watertown, Tuscola county, Mich. One 
child,— Hattie N. Belle, b. Dec. 5, 1866. 

IV. John Kimhall, b. at Petersham, Mass., Sept. 

26, 1845 ; m., Oct. 7, 1866, Helen F. Tinker, 
b. June 8, 1846, at Monroe, Ohio, a mer- 
chant at Pine Run. One child, — Walter, b. 
May 30, 1867. 

V. Edioin Blackmer, b. Sept. 7, 1852 ; d. Sept. 13, 

1854. 



John Frost (Dea.) settled on the homestead. After- 
wards re. to lot 17, range 4, where he now (1876) re- 
sides. Mr. Frost is a worthy man, and a highly 
respected citizen. When the rebel war broke out he 
was one of the men who was ready to obey the call of 
his country, enlisted, and served in the 14th Regiment 
N. H. Vols, to the end of the war. In 1846, Jan. 22, 
he m. Amanda Simonds, b. at Peru, Vt., Aug. 23, 1820. 
Children : 

I. Mary Adaline, b. Jan. 13, 1847; m.,Jan. 2, 
1S69, John Rock wood ; r. Natick, Mass. 

II. John Simonds, h. July 17, 1849; d. Oct. 17, 
1850. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



343 



ii8 


III. Sarah Ann, b. Sept. 13, iScji ; d. Oct. 17, 




1857. 


119 


IV. William Locke, b. Nov. 27, 1S55. 


120 


V. Eva Amanda, b. Jan. 20, 1857 ! i^- Dwight 




Learnard, of Dublin. 



GAGE FAMILY. 

Thomas Gage, a descendant of John Gage, who settled near 
Boston in 1633, was b. at Bradford, Mass., March 10, 1700; m. 
Phebe Fry, of Andover, Mass. 



James Gage, his son, was b. Aug. 21, 1736; m., 
Sept. 29, 1 761, Sarah, dau. of Samuel and Abigail 
(Briant) Lamson, of Amherst, one of the first settlers 
of that place. He came from Amherst to Jaftrey about 
1779, and settled on lot 12, range 4, now the farm of 
Michael Fitzgerald. He d. April 30, 1815, a. 79. His 
widow d. Oct. 27, 1832, a. 93. He was a man highly 
respected, held many important offices of trust, was 
captain of the N. H. militia, and, with his wife, was a 
member of the church when incorporated in 1780. 
They had ten children : 



3 

3 

4 

5 



7 
8 

9 
10 

II 



(5) 



I. Thomas, b. July 2, 1762 ; d. at Jaffiey, Dec. 16, 

1781, unm. 
II. Abigail, b. Aug. 20, 1764; m. John French, 

q. V. 

III. John, b. May 6, 1766; d. May 24, 1766. 

IV. e/ames, b. Aug. 5, 1767; d. at McHenry, 111., 

Jan. 24, 1856.4- 
V. Sarah, h. A\>n\ 27, 1769; m. Samuel Jewett ; 

d. Feb. 12, 1861. 
VI. Phebe, b. May i, 1771 ; d. Dec. 14, 1777. 
VII. Samuel, b. Nov. 17, 1773 ; d. April 3, i860. -|- 
VIII. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 4, 1776; jl. June 6, 1778. 
IX. Phebe, b. Dec. 15, 1779; m. Joseph Cutter, 

q. V. 
X. Jonathan, b. Jan. 22, 1782 ; d. March 13, 186S. 



James Gage m., Sept. 10, 1773, Polly Drury, of 
Temple, N. H. ; settled in Litchfield, Herkimer coun- 
ty, N. Y., where his children were born. His wife d. 
Nov., 1840, a. 64. He d. Jan. 24, 1856. 



344 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



12 

13 

14 

15 
16 

iS 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 



I. James, b. Nov. 26, 1794; d. June 20, 1796. 
II. Mary, b. May 15, 1798 ; m., Jan. i, 1821, John 
Fay ; d. July 22, 1830 ; four children. 

III. James Lamson^ b. Aug. S, 1800; m., and d. at 

Lake, Lake county, 111., May iS, 1863. 

IV. John, b. Aug. 12, 1802 ; m., Oct. 4, 1830, Por- 

tia Kellogg. Eight children. 
V. Jared, b. Jan. 25, 1805 ; twice m. 
VI. Leonard, h. June 23, 1807; m. ; wife not liv- 



ing. 



VII. Sally, b. Jan. 2, 1810; m. Edward Perkins, 

Sept. 22, 1834; d. at Chicago, 111., Feb. 8, 
1846. Four children. 

VIII. 3faria, b. June 28, 181 1 ; m., Aug. 22, 1S36, 

Anson Cowles ; d. at Rockingham, Iowa, 
Aug. 7, 1839. 
IX. Eliza, b. Oct. 4, 1812 ; d. Oct. 26, 1812. 
X. George, b. Aug. 30, 1813 ; m. 
XI. Elijah, b. Nov. 28, 1816; m., and d. March 8, 

1846. 
XII. Esther, b. Oct. 9, 1818 ; m., Sept. 22, 1840, A. 
R. Bartlett ; d. Aurora, 111., March 18, 1867. 
One child. 



(8) Samuel Gage ni. Lucinda Edgerton, Oct. 30, 1799. 

He d. April 3, i860. She d. Sept. 24, 1S32, 
a. 53. Eleven children : 

24 I. Phebe,h. Aug. 18, 1800; m. Messenger; 

one child. 

25 II. Emily, h. Oct. 22, 1802; m. Messenger; 

d. Nov. 7, 1865. 

26 III. Mansola Watson, h. Oct. 2, 1804; d. June 12, 
1856 ; three wives. 

27 IV. Thomas, b. Feb. 3, 1808 ; d. Feb. 7, 1808. 

28 V. Samantha, b. Sept. 3, 1809; d. Nov. 30, 1810. 

29 VI. Mary Ann, b. July 4, 181 1 ; d. Feb. 18, 1812. 

30 vii. Cornelia, h. Jan. 11, 1815 ; m. 

31 VIII. Ann, b. May i, 1817 ; m. Judd. 

32 IX. Sintha, b. June 28, 1819. 

33 X. John L., b. Feb. 28, 1822 ; m. 

34 XI. Samuel Addison, h. Sept. 10, 1824. 

(11) Jonathan Gage settled on the homestead ; m. Han- 
nah, dau. of William and Hannah (Frost) Worcester. 
He removed to Fitzwilliam, and d. March 13, 1868, 
a. ^6. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



345 



35 

36 

37 
38 

39 
40 

43 

43 
44 



I. James, b. 1S07 ; m. ; re. to Charlestown, Mass., 

and d. there. 
II. Jonathan, d. June 14, 1S13, a. 4. 

III. Williain, m. ; re. to Fitzwilliam, and d. there. 

IV. JVctncy, m. Ephraim W^orcester ; r. Pittsfield, 

Mass. 
V. Abner, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Oliver and Polly 

(Perkins) Bailey ; r. Fitzwilliam. 
VI. Joseph. 
VII. Mary. 

VIII. Jonathan Alonzo, m. dau . of Harvey Gilmore, 2d. 
IX. Sarah, m. 
X. Eliza. 



GIBBS FAMILY. 

JoNATHAX D. GiBBS v^^as a son of Joseph Gibbs, a 
descendant in the fifth generation of Mathew Gibbs, 
who emigrated from Venton, or Fenton, in Darlington 
parish, England ; was a planter in Charlestown, Mass., 
where he sold his possessions in i754- Jona. D. settled 
in Jaftrey on a part of the old Thorndike farm, in 
school-district No. 11. After a residence thereon of 
eleven years, he sold the same and removed to the cen- 
tre village, built a fine brick residence, and a shop where 
he carried on the business of manufacturing boots and 
shoes, till the infirmities of age warned him to retire. 
Mr. Gibbs has always taken a deep interest in the affairs 
of the town ; published, in 1S50, a map of the same; 
and since 1S40 has kept a list of the deaths in town, to 
the present time. He m. Elizabeth, dau. of Edward 
and Rhoda Locke. She d. May 12, 1S34, a. 33, leav- 
ing one child : 

I. Rhoda Elizabeth, b. May 17, 1823. 
Married, 3*^, Dec. 29, 1S35, Sarah H. Wilson, of Mason. 



GILMORE FAMILY. 

John Gilmore, with his brothers Roger and Robert, came 
from Londonderry and settled in Jaffrey at an early date. He 
settled on lot 12, range 7, afterwards tiie residence of his son 
James, and now (1S73) in tlie possession of Harvey Gilmore, 
son of Roger. He and his brother Roger were the most prom- 
inent men among the early settlers. Roger Gilmore and John 
Grout made the first report of the settlement to the proprietors. 



346 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



John Gilmore was one of the leading men ; held all 
the important town offices, and was the second repre- 
sentative chosen after the adoption of the constitution 
in 17S4. He m. Alice Hunter. He d. April 8, 1813, 
a. 76. His widow d. March 14, 1819, a. 78. 

2 I. David, b. Oct. 20, 176S.-I- 

3 II. Robert^ b. May 26, 1770. 

4 III. «/b/m, b. Oct. 22, 1772 ; d. Oct. 12, 1778. 

5 IV. 3Iary, b. Sept. 11, 1774; m. Asahel Evleth ; 
r. Goflstown. 

6 V. James, b. Nov. 11, 1776.-!- 

7 VI. Mary A7in, b. Sept. 29, 1778 ; m. George Hen- 
ry ; r. Goffstown. 

VII. John, b. Sept. 24, 1780; d. Feb. 24, 17S1. 



10 

II 
12 

13 

H 

15 
16 



Roger Gilmore, Esq., settled on lot 13, range 6. 
At his house most of the town-meetings were held, pre- 
vious to the erection of the meeting-house in i775* 
When the town was organized he was chosen tything- 
man, a very important office in those days, and auditor 
of accounts. He was for many years almost continually 
in the service of the town, and held, more or less, every 
important office. He was chosen delegate to the con- 
stitutional convention in 1791, and was the first justice 
of the peace appointed by the state after the adoption 
of the constitution in 17S4. When the first military 
company was organized, in i775i '^^ ^'^^ chosen first 
lieutenant, and afterwards captain. He was in service 
during the Revolutionary war. He m., i*', Ann 
Hunter; m., 2*^, Molly, dau. of Jonathan and Molly 
(Fitch) Blodgett. His first wife d. Nov. 22, 1779, 331. 
His second wife d. July 15, 1819, a. 59. He d. Nov., 
1807, a. 69. By first vyife, 7 children ; by second wife, 
8 children : 

I. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 31, 1769 ; m. Alpheus Crosby, 

q. V. 
II. Robert, b. March 4, 1771.4- 

III. David, b. Nov. 20, 1772.4- 

IV. Jean, b. Jan. 3, 1775* 

V. Jonathan, b. Oct. 25, 1776; d. Sept. 4, 1777. 
VI. Ann, b. July 16, 177S ; d. Aug. 14, 1778. 
VII. Jonathan, b. Aug. 18, 1779; m. Betsey, dau. of 
Alexander Milliken, Aug. 28, 1803 ; re. to 
Potsdam, N. Y. 



17 
iS 

20 

21 

22 
23 

24 

25 



26 

27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 



(2) 



35 
36 

37 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 347 

VIII. Nancy Ann H.^ b. April 2, 17^52; m. James 
Henderson, q. v. 
IX. e/b/m, b. April 10, 17S4; d. April S, 17S5. 
X. John, b. July 20, 1786.4- 
XI. Harriet, b. Nov. 14, 178S; d. Oct. 27, 1857, 

unm. 
XII. Polly, b. March 24, 1792; d. Aug. 11, 1846, 
unm. 

XIII. Hervey, b. Dec. 7, i795-+ 

XIV. /Selina, b. IMarch 3, 1799 ; m. Joseph Kelly ; re. 

to Hartford, N. Y. ; d. Sept. 22, 1S69. 
Three ch. 
XV. Charles G., b. May 3, i8o2.-|- 

RoBERT GiLMORE, from Londonderry, settled on lot 
10, range 3, afterwards the residence of John Cutter, 2**, 
now uninhabited. He left town about 1795 ; was taxed 
for the last time that year. He re. to Surry, N. H. 
He m. Elizabeth (surname unknown), and left recorded 
the birth of nine children : 

I. Jemima, b. March 6, 1778 ; d. Nov. 30, 1800. 

II. Jereiniah, b. Oct. 3, 1779. 

III. Anna, b. July 16, 1781. 

IV. Sarah, b. April 27, 1783 ; d. Aug. 7, 1786. 
V. Elizabeths b. Aug. 4, 1785. 

VI. Sally, b. March 26, 17S7. 
VII. Andrew, b. March 32, 1789. 
VIII. Aaron, b. June 20, 1791. 
IX. Asa, b. Dec. 26, 1793. 

David Gilmore, Esq., settled on lot 5, range 6, the 
place formerly owned by David Hunter, now the resi- 
dence of Marshall C. Adams. He was an active, 
leading man in town affairs ; a worthy man and a good 
citizen. He m., i'', Sally, dau. of Thomas and Mary 
Kenny Mower, of Jaffrey ; m., 2**, Merriel, relict of 
Paul Powers. His first wife d. June 8, 1805, a. 34. 
Second wife d. Oct. 13, 1842, a. 73. He d. Aug. 19, 
1850, a. 82. 

I. John, b. April 20, 1795 ; d. May 2, 1795. 
II. Sally, b. April 21, 1796; m. Samuel Stratton, 

q. V. 
III. David Harvey, b. 1797; m. Marinda, dau. of 
Lieut. Oliver and Polly Perkins Bailey. He 



348 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



38 



(6) 



39 
40 

41 



43 
43 



(11) 



44 

45 
46 

47 
48 



(12) 



settled on the homestead with his father ; was 
an active member of society ; was command- 
er of the noted rifle company, and colonel 
of the 1 2th Regt. N. H. M. After the death 
of his Either, in 1S50, he re. to Fitchburg, 
and d. there 1S69. They had ten children. 
IV. Olive 31., b. 1S02 ; d. at Fitchburg, Nov. 20, 
1868, a. 66 ; unm. 



James Gilmore m., Aug. 28, 1808, Nancy, dau. of 
Lieut. Samuel and Lydia (Lincoln) Buss. He d. Sept. 
2, 1S50. His widow re. with her son, George Gilmore, 
Esq., to Pittsburgh, Fa. Mr. Gilmore settled on the 
homestead of his fother ; was a worthy man and a good 
citizen. 

I. Caroline, b. 1804; m. Col. Abner Bailey, q. v. 
II. Sumtier,h. 1S06; d. Aug. 26, 1S2S. 

III. /Samuel S., m. Almeda, a dau. of Benj. ]SL and 

Lydia (Spaulding) Stanley; d. Nov. 17, 
1849, a. 43. One child, — George, d. July 
I, 1S41, a. 4 days. His widow m. Thomas 
A. Stearns, q. v. 

IV. John If., d. June 7, 1820, a. 11 mos., 20 days. 
V. George, studied law ; r. Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Robert Gilmore m. Phebe, dau. of Josiah and 
Sarah (Bowers) Ingalls, Feb. 27, iSoi. He settled on 
the homestead, and about 1816 re. to New Hartford, 
N. Y. Children b. in Jaftrey : 

I. Almi7Xi,h. Dec. 28, 1802; m. John French; 9 
children. 

II. Hohert A., b. April 4, 1S04. 

III. Adaline^ b. Oct. 6, 1S05. 

IV. Sally Ann, b. Oct. 25, 1807. 

V. Lyman, b. March 26, 1815 ; d. March 28, 18 15. 



David Gilmore (Dea.) m. Lucy, dau. of George 
Wellington. He was an active member of the church, 
and for many years deacon. He d. April 22, 1838, a. 
66. His widow d. Feb. 17, 1868, a. 90. Three chil- 
dren : 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



349 



49 

50 

5^ 



(19) 



52 

53 



(22) 



54 



55 
56 

(24) 



57 
58 



I. Xwcy, b. Sept. 30, iSoi ; m. John S. Ripley, 

q. V. 
II. Eliza An?i, b. July 24, 1S06 ; m. John H. Shedd, 

q. V. 
III. Emily, m., Oct. 18, 1S30, Joseph W. Allen; r. 

Boston, and d. there. He m., 3'^, Mrs. Lucy 

Ripley, a sister of his first wife. 



John Gilmore was for a time engaged in trade at 
East Jatl:rey. He m., May 15, 1S22, Nancy, dau. of 
Joshua and Mary (Crombie) Chadwick, of Rindge. He 
d. Sept. 15, 1S33. She m., 2'', Arthur Taylor, and d. 
June 29, 1845. 

I. George, killed by being thrown from a carriage, 

July 19, 1S27, a. 44. 
II. A daughter, d. young. 

She had one child by Arthur Taylor, second husband ; 
d. young. 



Hervey Gilmore m. Mary, dau. of John and Sarah 
(Haywood) Byam. He d. Jan. 12, 1874, a. 78. 

I. Mary 3falvina, b. 1830 ; m. Eleazer W. Heath. 
Seven children : 

(i) Walter, b. 185S ; (2) Dora M., b. i860 ; 
(3, 4) Addie and Ellen, twins, b. 1864; 
(5) Lucien W., b. 1867; (6) Elton 
J., b. 1868; (7) Allen M., b. 1869. 

II. Fernando, b. 1S32 ; went to sea and never was 

heard from. 
III. George F., b. 1840; m. Anna R. . Two 

children: (i) Bertha A. ; (2) Winnie. 



Charles G. Gilmore m., Dec. 25, 1829, Pamelia, 
dau. of Capt. Moses and Rachel (Turner) Cutter; d. 
May 12, 1S38, a. 36. She m., 2^, Dea. John Sander- 
son, Sept., 1852, and d. Oct 11, 1866. 

I. Nancy Ann, b. June 27, 1832 ; m. Jonas Rice, 

q. V. 
II. Caroline Maria, b. 1835 ; d. 1839. 



350 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

59 III. Charles G.^ m , Oct., iS6o, Fanny M. Dicken- 

son, of Swanzey, and r. there. 



2 

3 



(2) 



(4) 



5 
6 



(5) 



8 
9 

lO 



GOFF FAMILY. 

Thomas Goff was impressed into the British ser- 
vice in the time of the American Revolution. He came 
with the British troops to tliis country, and then desert- 
ed. His name appears on the town records as early as 
17S5. He m. Diademia, dau. of John and Mary (Mack- 
entire) Eaton, b. in Bedford, Mass., May 18, 1750. He 
d. 1S13. She d. 1S16. They had two children: 

I. Robert, b. Feb. 27, 1787.-]- 

II. Diademia, m. Oliver Hathorn, son of Ebenezer 
and Lucy (Proctor) Hathorn, of Jaffrey. 



Robert Goff m., i*', Oct. 27, 1810, Sally, dau. of 
John and Lucy (Lawrence) Briant, of Jaftrey. She d. 
July II, 1S47. He m., 2"*, Nabby, widow of William 
Dutton ; was a farmer, and r. on the farm now owned 
by his son, Kendall Goft". He was a soldier in the War 
ofi8i2. He d. July 15,1858. One son, — Kendall. -|- 

Kendall Goff, b. April 12, 1811 ; m,, Nov. 3, 1S33, 
Mary Pratt. 

I. Thomas Kendall, b. April 6, 1837.-}- 
II. Edxoard Pratt, b. Jan. 8, 1840. 
III. Mary, b. March 19, 1841 ; d. Jan. 6, 1870. 



Thomas Kendall Goff m., i'', Louisa Farnum. 
She d. May 31, 1767. He m., 2"^, Sarah Sprague. Had 
by first wife, one child ; second wife, two children. 

I. Charles E., b. 1867. 
II. Henry. 
III. Mary. 



GOULD FAMILY. 

Oliver Gould was son of Capt. Jacob and Dorothy 
(Goodridge) Gould, of Lunenburg, who was a descend- 
ant of Zacheus Gold, one of the earliest settlers of that 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



351 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 



(10) 



II 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 



(12) 



17 



18 



part of Ipswich and Salem which was incorporated as 
the town of Topsfield in 1650. Zacheus is supposed to 
have come to this country in 163S, and settled in Tops- 
field in 1643. Oliver was b. in Lunenburg, Oct. 3, 
1733 ; married, JNIay 3, 1759, Mary Stock well, of 
Petersham. They resided first in Lunenburg, where 
most of their children were born. At what time he re. 
to Jaftrey is not precisely known. He settled in what 
is now called Squantum, and d. of small-pox in 1792, 
a. 59. His widow d. Jan. S, 1820, a. 84. 

I. Oliver^ b. ^Lay 30, 1760 ; re. to N. Y. state 



II, Sarah^ b. Aug. 16, 1762; m. 



McClintock. 



III. Lucy, b. Sept. 9, 1764; m. Asa, son of Samuel 

Parker, q. v. 

IV. Mary, b. Oct. 16, 1766; re. to Ludlow, Vt. 

V. Susannah, b. 1769; m, and re. to Shutesbury, 

Mass. 
VI. Mercy, m. Enos Mayo; d. Nov. 8, 1844. 
VII. Sibel, m. Amos Temple, of Deerfield, Mass. 
VIII. Jesse, d. 1856. 
IX. Seioall, b. i^S6.-\- 

Sewall Gould was a miller in Squantum village ; 
m. Ketura Mayo; d. Dec. 29, 1836, a. 50. His widow 
d. Oct. 10, 1865, a. 83. 

1. Maria, b. iSoi ; m. Richard Warren, q. v. 

II. Gilnian, b. Dec. 25, 1802 -}- 

III. Eliza, m. Mathews ; r. Marlboro', Vt. 

IV. Emily, b. 1808 ; m. John Garfield, q. v. 
V. Sarah Angeline,h. 1S19; r. Jaftrey ; unm. 

VI. Lucius A., m. ; r. in Pittsburgh, Pa. 



GiLMAN Gould m. Mersylvia Walton, of Temple ; 
settled in Peterborough, and in 1875 re. to Harrisville, 
where he now (1880) resides. 

I. Sewall A.,h.Yeh. 2S, 1829; m. C. T. Clark, 
of Richmond, Va., May 26, 1857, by whom 
he had a son and a daughter. She was b. 
Sept. 25, 1833; d. at Richmond, Dec. 28, 
1862. He m. again, and r. in Chicago. 

II. Oilman T.,h. Nov. 24, 1836; m Augusta G. 
Barnard, of Danvers, Mass., April 10, 1858. 
He was in service over three years in the 



352 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Rebellion, in the Second Regiment, Co. G., 
N. H. V. ; promoted to first lieutenant, 
Feb., 1865; d. March, 1S77. His wife d. 
1875. Two children. 

19 HI. Daniel IF., b. Aug. 10, 1S38 ; m., Oct. 8, 1863, 
A. Maria Symonds, of Rindge, b. March 31, 
1S34. On the outbreak of the Rebellion he 
enlisted in the service of the United States, 
a member of Co. G., 2d Regt. N. H. V. ; 
was wounded in the battle of Williamsburg, 
and lost an arm. He represented the town 
of Peterborough in the state legislature in 
1S73 and '73, and was appointed inspector 
in the custom house, Boston, 1S75, which 
office he now holds. 

20 IV. Sarah Eliza^ b. Jan. 10, 1841 ; m., Oct. 8, 
1863, Winslow Royce ; r. in Harrisville. 



3 

4 



GOWING FAMILY. 

James Gowing came from Lynnfield, Mass., 1777. 
He settled on lot 16, range 2, now uninhabited. He was 
b. Jan. iS, 1736; m. Lydia Wellman, b. May 7, 1S35. 
He d. June 6, 1805, falling dead on the road near his 
house. His widow d. Jan. 4, 1826. He was of 
Scotch and his wife of Welch descent. Mr. Gowing 
was a man of some note in town, held the offices of 
moderator, selectman, tythingman, &c. Twelve ch. : 

I. Lydia, b. Aug. 13, 1760; m., 1794, Joab Ev- 
leth, who was b. in Princeton, Mass., 1764 ; 
settled in Dublin, and d. Aug. 29, 1847. 
She d. Sept. 30, 1830. Five children: (i) 
Joseph, m. Seba Barns. (2) William, m. 
Sarah Lawrence. (3) Oilman, m. Laura 
Pratt. (4) Lydia, m. Abraham Stanley. 

(5) Augusta, m. Isaac White, of Nelson. 
II. Samuel, b. Jan. 6, 1762 ; r. Vt. 

III. James, b. April 16, 1763; settled in Dublin; 
m., i^', 1792, Abigail Greenwood; m., 2'', 
Mrs. Lucy Wilder. Thirteen children, — 
twelve by first wife: (i) Anna, m, Rufus 
Piper. (2) Elmira, m. Jackson Greenwood. 
(3) Moses G., m. Lucy Derby. (4) Alme- 
rin, m. Sarah Sanders. (5) Harriet and 

(6) Lyman, d. young. (7) Betsey, m. Sam- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 353 

uel Twitchell. (8) James and (9) Jonathan, 
d. young. (10) Abigail, m. Charles W. 
Pierce. (11) James, d. young. (13) Har- 
riet, unm. (13) James R. 

5 IV. £ef7jamin, h. Jan. 4, 1765; m. Pollj^ Emery; 
r. Vermont. 

6 V. William, b. March i, 1767; m., 1^*, Abigail 
Miller; m., 2*^, Lucy Adams. He d. Oct. 
25, 1S54. Three children: (i) Margaret, 
m. Daniel Chapman. (2) William H., m. 
Laura Hale. (3) Moses, m. Mary Jewett. 

7 VI. Azeal, b. June 10, 1769.-I- 

8 VII. Zevi, b. May 16, 1771 ; m. Achsah Hill; r. 
Vermont. 

VIII. Hosannah, b. May 10, 1773 ; m. Oliver Hale, 
r. Vermont. 

10 IX. /Simeon (twin), b. July 3, 1775; m. Mary 
Fi-ost.+ 

11 X. Thirza (twin), b. July 3, 1775; m. Samuel 
White, of Peterborough; d. March 18, 
1851. Two children : (i) Irene, b. 1S08. 
(2) James G., b. 1810; m. Sarah S. Gibbs ; 
three ch. 

12 XI. Joseph, b. Dec. 12, 1777; m. Hepsibah Fair- 
banks ; d. Jan. 26, 183S. Eight children: 
(i) Asa F., b. 180S; m., i'*, Agnes Robbe, 
and 2**, her sister, Catherine Robbe ; d. June 
30, 1872 ; two children, — Lizzie R. ; Fred- 
erick, d. 1S51, a. 3 mos. (2) Joseph M., 
m. Harriet Brown; r. Batavia, N. Y. (3) 
Zaman A., m. Mary Greenwood. (4) Louisa 
H,, m. James Adams. (5) Anna A., m. 
Abel Wilder. (6) Charles W., m. Julia 
Foster. (7) Lavata L., d. 1851. (8) Lydia 
R., m. Joseph W^. Powers. 

13 XII. Esther, b. June 5, 17S0 ; m., i'*, Perley Fassett, 
and 2^, Josiah Burbank. 



(7) AzEAL GowiXG settled on the homestead, and in 
1833 re. to New York state. He m. Mary, dau. of 
Capt. John Taggart, of Sharon ; m., 2*^, Betsey Hazen, 
of Nashua. Five children : 

14 I. Roancy, b. June 5, 1S03 ; m., Sept. 7, 1830, 

Benj. Lawrence. 

24 



354 
15 

i6 

18 



(10) 

20 
21 
22 

23 



24 
25 

26 



27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

II. Hodney^ b April 29, 1805 ; m. Rebecca Saw- 
telle ; re. to Batavia, N. Y., and to Indian- 
apolis, Ind. ; d. Jan. 9. 1877- Three ch. 

III. Hoxikma, b. April 12, 1807 ; d. Dec. 6, 181 1. 

IV. Iia?isom, b. Jan. 26, 1810; m. Lucy Ann 

Smith ; re. to Pembroke, N. Y. Eight ch. 
V. Jioswell, h. May 2, 181 2; m. Jane Brooks, of 
Hancock ; re. to Hudson, Mich., and d. 
Oct. 7, 1874. Three ch. 



Simeon Gowing m., Sept. 4, 1803, Polly Frost, dau. 
of Benj. Frost; re. to Grafton, Vt. 

I. Simeon^ b. ISIarch 20, 1804; d. Feb. i, 1805. 
II. Simeon, b. Nov. 19, 1805 ; d. May 31, 1806, at 
Windham, Vt. 

III. Cyrus, b. July 10, 1807 ; d. at Brandon, Vt., 

Feb. 26, 1808. 

IV. Mary, b. May 15, 1809; m., Jan. 19, 1832, 

Elias O. Dart, of Weathersfield, Vt. Two 
children : 

1. Mary E., b. Feb. 2, 1834, at Haverhill, 

N. H. ; m. Lovell B. Rowe, of 
Bethel, Vt. Two ch. : (i) Mary 
E., b. April 20, 1855 ; m. Augus- 
tus A. Newell, June 22, 1873, of 
Stockbridge, Vt. (2) Edgar C, 
b. Sept. 17, 1859. 

2. Harriet M., b. April 14, 1841. 

V. Benjamin F., b. Oct. 13, 1810, at Brandon, Vt. ; 

m., Dec. 29, 1835, Sarah E. Hubbard, of 
Weathersfield, Vt. One ch. : 

I. George H., b. Feb. 24, 1837; d. Dec. 
I, 1853. 

She d. Dec. 18, 1872. He m., 2"*, Oct. 15, 
1873, Mrs. Rosetta M. Shattuck, of Bethel, 
Vt. 
VI. Juliana, b. July 21, 1812; d. March 16. 1813. 

VII. Lorenzo, b. Aug. 30, 1814; d. March 9, 1815. 

VIII. Yerona, b Jan. 8, 1816; d. Aug. 19, 1818. 

IX. Cyrus, b. April 10, 1818; d. June 24, 1820. 

X. Henry W., b. April 24, 1821 ; d. Jan. 20, 1822. 
XI. Oliver K., b. July 26, 1S23 ; d. in Boston, Oct. 

25, 1847. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



355 



33 XII. Lewis, b. July 2, 1825 ; d. July 16, 1825. 

34 XIII. Fanny, b. Dec. 12, 1829; m. Marion C. Rowe, 
, of Bethel. He d. Nov. i, 1S76, a. 58. One 

ch., — George E., b. July 23, 1S54. 



GRAGG FAMILY. 

Hugh Gragg was a resident of Jaffrey previous to 17S0; d. 
1814 ; m. Lucy , and had eight children ; 

(i) Jenny, b. Feb. i, 1780. (2) William, b. Aug. i, 1781. 
(3) Jerusha, b. April 9, 1783. (4) Fanny. (5) Polly, m. 
Charles Butters. (6) iitephen. (7) Betsey. (8) Lem. 



GREEN FAMILY. 

In 1774 Hiram Green signed a petition against the 
annexation of a portion of the town of JaftVey to Peter- 
borough and Sharon. 



Nehemiah Green came, probably, from Mason to 
JaflVey previous to 1778, and settled on lot 16, range 6, 
now owned by Samuel W. Pierce. He was chosen 
that year one of a committee to procure preaching. 
He was a shoe-maker by trade, as well as farmer. He 
was a member of Mr. Ainsworth's church ; and the 
baptism of a son, Amaziah, is on the church records. 
He re. to Cavendish, Vt., about i795' 

Eleazer Green, and Sarah his wife, warned from 
town in 1786. 

Simeon Green came from Pepperell to Jaffrey about 
1777; re. to Townsend, Mass., about 1791. He m. 
Mary Shattuck, of Pepperell ; d. Sept. 16, 1813, in 
his eighty-third year. She d. June 27, 1810, in her 
eightieth year. He settled on lot 13, range 4, now the 
property of Michael Fitzgerald. 

Solomon Green, son of Simeon, came to Jaffrey with 
his father, and re. with him to Townsend. He m. 
Sarah Hilton, of Lunenburg; and d. May 31, 1S03, a. 
39. His widow d. Sept. 2, 1850, a. 82. Nine ch. : 

I. Simeon, h. at Jaffrey, Aug. 5, 1788; m., Dec. 



356 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



lO 



II 



14, 1S14, Nancy, dau. of Calvin Eaton, of 
Lunenburg; r., first, Townsend, then re. to 
Lunenburg. On the death of his youngest 
brother, he went to Tallahassee, Florida, to 
settle his estate, and d. there, Jan. 18, 1842. 

6 II. Solomon^ b. at Jaffrey, 1790; m. Emily Potter, 
1S13 or '14; d. April 16, 186S, a 78; r. 
Townsend. 

7 III. Ralph, b. at Townsend, Sept. 21, 1791 ; m., i*', 
Nov. 7, 1S20; m., 2*^, May 6, 1S30; d. May 
23, 1848, at Palmer, Mass. 

IV. Samuel^ b. May 24, 1793; m., i", March 9, 
1820; m., 2*^, Dec. 3, 1827; r., first, in 
Palmer, second, in Springfield, Mass. 
V. Sarah, b. Nov. 10, 1795 ; m., 1S19, Robert 
Jefts ; r. Mason ; re. to Townsend, where he 
died. 
VI. Asahel^h. July 27, 1797; m. Nancy, dau. of 
Abijah Shattuck, of Pepperell, b. June 6, 
1806; d. Feb. 10, 1787; r. Lunenburg, 
Mass. 
VII. Asher, b. Sept. 29, 1799; m., i", Rebecca Hall, 
of Pepperell ; m., 2*^, Mrs. Lucy (Hutchinson) 
Gay, of Pepperell ; r., first, in Fitchburg, 
second, in Townsend (where she d.), third, 
in Dorchester. 

12 VIII. Jiebecca, b. March 5, 1801 ; m., Sept. 26, 1S30, 
Andrew Shattuck, of Pepperell, son of Abi- 
jah ; r. Shirley nine years ; re. to Townsend 
Harbor, where he d. Oct. 5, 1844, a. 42. 
M., 2*^, Walter Russell, of Ashburnham, 
May I, 1845 ; r. Cambridgeport four years ; 
re. to Ashburnham, where he d. May 5, 
1856, a. 66. M., 3<*, Hosea Green, of Ash- 
burnham, Feb. 15, 1858: r. Ashburnham. 

IX. Alvin, b. July 26, 1803 ' ^ carpenter by trade ; 
re. to Tallahassee, Fla. ; was extensively 
engaged in the building of that city ; d. 

13 about 1S40, a. 36. 

14 Susannah Greene m. Rufus Sawyer, March 15, 

1793? q- V. 



15 Polly Greene m. Laban Skinner, Nov. i, 1795. 

16 Isaac Green paid taxes in Jaffi-ey, 1806 and '7. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



357 



GRIFFIN FAMILY. 

Dudley Griffin was an early settler in Jaffrey. He settled 
on lot 2, range 8, in school-district No. 5. He was among the 
first who enlisted in the Revolutionary war ; was in the battle 
of Bunker Hill ; sustained losses in tlie engagement, for which 
he was remunerated. He appears to have been a man of prop- 
erty, being one among ten of the highest tax-payers in town. 
He re. to Canada about 1803. M. Esther Bowers, of Groton, 
Mass., Nov. 24, 1773. Thirteen children: 

(i) David, b. Dec. 2, 1774; (2) Lucy, b. Jan. 29, 1776; (3) 
Hepsey,h. Feb. 14, 1779; d. Feb. 17, same year; (4) Joseph, 
b. Jan. 30, 1780; d. Feb. 17, 1780; (5) Jonathan, b. May 9, 
1783; (6) Dudley, h. May 16, 17S5 ; (7) Permason, b. July 
23, 1787; (8) Silas, b. .Sept. 8, 1789; (9) Sarah, b. March 3, 
1791 ; (10) Daniel, b. Jan. 31, 1793; (11) Polly, b. Jan. 17, 
1795 ; (12) Joseph; (13) Edward, b. Nov. 2, 1798 ; d. Aug. 3, 
1800. 



GROUT FAMILY. 

John Grout, the first settler in JaftVey, was born in 
Sudbury, Mass., Oct. 14, 1704. He was the son of 
Jonathan, the son of John Grout, who settled, first, in 
Watertown ; second, in Sudbury, where he d. in 1697, 
a. 81. 

He m. Joanna Boynton ; settled, first, in Lunenburg, 
where his children were born ; re. to Rindge, and from 
thence to Jaffiey, and settled on lot 20, range 10. He 
is represented as having received a classical education, 
and was a lawyer by profession. In connection with 
Roger Gilmore, he made the first report of the progress 
of the settlement to the Masonian Proprietors, at Ports- 
mouth. He d. in 1771, two years before the incorpora- 
tion of the town, and was buried, according to tradition, 
where the meeting-house was afterwards built, in 1775. 
He had thirteen children : 

I. Silkiah (Ma].), b. July 23, 1728; m. Submit 
Hawks ; settled near Fort Hinsdale, where 
his wife and three children were taken by 
the Indians, and carried captive to Canada, 

in 1755- 
II. Johanna, b. Jan. 8, 1730; m- Parker. 



3 

4 



III. John, b. June iS, 1731 ; d., a lawyer, at Mont- 
real. 



358 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



5 IV. Elijah^ b. Oct. 29, 1732: m. Molly Willard ; 
d., 1807, in Charlestown, N. H. 

6 V. Joel (Hon.), b. March 6, 1735 ; m. Sarah Hud- 
son ; d. in Richmond, 1797. 

VI. Jonathan (Hon.), b. July 23, 1737; elected in 
1789 member of congress ; m. Sarah Page ; 
had thirteen children. He d. at Dover, Sept. 
8, 1807. 

VII. /Sara A, b. Nov. 28, 1738; d. Oct. 27, 1817 ; m. 
Capt. Ephraim Stockwell. 

VIII. Patience^ b. Aug. 23, 1740 ; m. Wm. Judevine ; 
r. Charlestown, N. H. 

10 IX. Peter, b. Oct. 9, 1743 ; r. West. 

11 X. Abigail,}}. March 23, 1745; m. Col. Nathan 
Hale, of Rindge; d. Sept. 14, 1838. 

12 XI. Josiah, b. Nov. 28, 174S. 

13 XII. Solomon, h. June 27, 1751 ; m. Ruth Putman, 
of Charlestown, N. H. ; settled in Jaflrey, 
on lot 13, range 9 ; was road surveyor in 
1774; selectman in 1776. 

14 XIII. Jehoshaphat, b. Aug. 7, 1753 ; m. Anna Parker ; 
d. at Keene, Sept. 6, 1S06. 



GUY FAMILY. 

Luther Guy settled in Jaftrey about 1S13 ; m. Olive ; 

d. Jan. 3, 1828, a. 41. Six children : 

(i)) /Samuel; (2) John, d. at sea; (3) Olive/ (4) Marshall; 
(5) Lxike ; (6) Luther, d. Jan. 21, 1828, a. 8 mos. 



HADLEY FAMILY. 

Abraham Hadley r. in the Mineral Spring village, 
on the east part of lot 7, range 5. He left town about 
1806. M. Eunice , and had eleven children : 

I. William, b. April 9, 1781. 
II. Deborah, b. June 28, 1783 ; m. John Priest. 

III. Eunice, b. May i, 1786; m. Oliver Wright. 

IV. Abraham, b. March 31, 1788. 
V. Isaac, b. March 18, 1790. 

VI. Jacob, b. April 15, 1792. 

VII. Elizabeth, b. May 28, 1794. 

VIII. Peter, b. May 20, 1796 ; d. May 3, 1797. ) 
-- - u ] 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 



IX. John, b. 



twins. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 359 



11 X. Peter,h. May 3, 1798. 

12 XI. Aaron^ b. July 17, 1801, 



3 

4 

5 
6 



2 

3 
4 

5 



HALL FAMILY. 

Nathan Hall, son of Dea. Nathan Hall, of Brad- 
ford, was b. Aug. 23, 1748 ; came to Jaffrey about 1775, 

and settled on lot 16, range 5 ; m. Eleanor , and 

left a birth record of five children : 



I. Mary, b. March 31, 1771. 
II. Nathan, b. March 28, 1773. 

III. Eleanor, b. " 

IV. Jonathan, b. May 2, i775- 
V. Betty, h. Sept. 12, 1777. 



twins. 



HARDY FAMILY. 

Nathaniel Hardy m. Sarah ; settled on lot 

, rangfe 6. 



I. Samuel, b. July 22, 177^- 

II. Sarah, b. Feb. 24, 1781. 

III. Molly, h. Jan. 19, 1783. 

IV. John, b. June 7, 1784- 



HALE FAMILY. 

Enoch Hale (Col.) was a descendant of Thomas 
Hale, b. at King's Walden, Herts, England, May 15, 
1606. He was a resident of Newbury, Mass., in 1635 
and 1682. He had a son, Thomas, who m. Mary 
Hutchinson, of Salem, and a grandson, Thomas, who 
m. Sarah Northend. The last Thomas had a son, Mo- 
ses, the father of Enoch, who was b. at Rowley, Mass., 
Nov. 28, 1733. Moses came to Rindge, with his fam- 
ily, in 1760. Enoch settled in Jaflrey in 1768, and in 
1770 re. to Rindge, and was a resident of that town till 
1784, when he re. to Walpole, and from thence to 
Grafton, Vt, where he d. April 9, 1813, a. 79. While 
in Jaffrey he made a report of the settlement of the 
town to the Proprietors. In the town of Rindge he 
was a very prominent man in town affairs ; was magis- 
trate, town-clerk, and selectman, and was much em- 
ployed in the military and state affairs. He was coun- 
cillor, high sheriff, and colonel of the 14th Regiment, a 



36o 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 



II 

12 

H 

16 
17 



detachment of which, under his command, was sent 
for the defence of Rhode Island. He m. Abigail, dau. 
of Jonathan and Abigail (Gould) Stanley. Had eight 
children : 

I. Joshua^ b. Aug. 24, 1764; m. Sally Cutler; d. 
July 22, 1825, at Wells River, Vt. 

II. Lucy^ b. April 29, 1766; m., i", Hezekiah 

Wetherbee ; m., 2*^, Jona. Lake; d. 1857. 

III. Daniel^ b. in Jaftrey, July 19, 1768; d. Aug. 

12, 176S. 

IV. Hannah^ b. in Jaflrey, June 10, 1769; m. Jon- 

athan Lake; d. 1S3S. 

V. Daniel^ b. April i, 1772; d.Jan. 6, 1773. 

VI. Sherburn,h. Dec. 30, 1773; m. Callia Cutler; 

d. June iS, 1825, at Woodstock, Vt. 
VII. Enochs b. May 30, 1777; d. June 16, 1777. 
VIII. Enochs b. Feb. 24, 1779; m. Bathsheba Stone; 
d. 1 82 1, at Clarendon, Vt. 



Oliver Hale, or Hail, as first spelled in the town 
records, came from Leominster, and was in town when 
organized in 1773. He settled on lot 13, range 8. In 
1774 he was chosen tythingman ; fence-viewer in 1783 ; 
and selectman in 17S6. He m. Mary Wilder. He d. 
about 1807. Eleven ch. : 

I. Luhe^ b. Aug. 17, 1773 ; m.Mary, dau. of Sam- 
uel and Sibel (Page) Stanley, March 12, 
1796; re. to Brandon, Vt, and 'd. thei-e in 
1843. Three ch. 
II. Oliver^ b. Sept. 18, 1775 ; m. Rosamond, dau. 
of James and Lydia (Wellman) Gowing, in 
1 801 ; re. to Southerland, Canada East, and 
d. there. 

III. Mary.h. Sept. 27, 1777; m. Whitcomb ; 

r. Henniker. 

IV. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 14, 1779 ; m. Campbell ; 

r. Henniker. 
V. Sarah, b. Feb. 11, 17S2 ; d. unm., in Brandon, 

Vt. 
VI. Josiah, b. Nov. 23, 1783 ; m. Rhoda Green ; r. 
Brandon, Vt. ; was a physician by profes- 
sion. 
VII. Susamiah, b. Jan. 23, 1786; m. John Gibson; 
r. Henniker. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



361 



18 VIII. Katherine^ b. Dec. 6, 17S7; d. unm., at Bran- 
don, Vt. 

19 IX. Hannah^ b. April 11, 1790; m. Abel Whit- 
comb, of Henniker. 

20 X. Luther, b. March 3, 1793 ; d. in Charleston, S. 
C, unm. 

21 XI. Thomas, h. July 15, I'jg^; m. Julia, dau. of 
Joseph Lincoln ; re. to Shetibrd, Canada 
East, and d. there. 



22 (Family) Hale was reported by Grout and Gilmore 

as one of the nine first families that settled in Jaffrey. 



23 John Hale came from Leominster with Samuel and 

Jacob Pierce and Ephraim Whitcomb ; settled with 
them in the south-east part of the town, and m. a sister 
of Ephraim Whitcomb. After a short residence he left 
town. 



4 
5 



HAMMON FAMILY. 

Jacob Hammon came from Waltham to Jaffrey in 
1821 ; settled on the farm of Jonas Brooks, lot 8, range 
4, now uninhabited ; was twice married ; had one child 
by first wife ; two children by second wife. He d. Aug. 
25, i860, a. 85. Olive Newell, his second wife, died 
Aug. II, 1859, ^- ^°- 

I. Jacob, by first wife, b. 1801 ; settled on lot 6, 
range 1^, formerly known as the Samuel Jos- 
lin farm, now without inhabitants; m. Su- 
sannah , and had one child, — George 

H., b. Nov. 3, 1844 ; he re. from town about 
1850. 
II. So2)hia, m. and re. West. 
III. Jane, m. and re. West. 



ROBERT HARKNESS 

came from Lunenburgh to Jaffrey previous to 1793 ; paid tax 
that year; settled on lot 15, range 5 ; m. Sarah, dau. of John 
and Priscilla French. He d. Nov. 16, 1807, a. 57. She m., 2*^, 
William Stevens, Esq., second wife. 



362 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



HASTINGS FAMILY. 

Ira Hastings, from Marlborough, came to Jaffrey 
in 1S35 ; settled, first, on lot 9, range 3, second, on lot 
5, range 5 ; r., 1S73, in East JaftVey. He m. Rebecca, 
dau. of John and Mary (Batchelder) Cutter. Two 
children : 

I. Martha A. Melissa, b. July 16, 1S37 ; d. Sept. 

28, 1S55. 
II. Mary A. Malvina, b. Sept. 19, 1840; m. Josiah 
M. Darling, of Dublin, June, 1863, 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



HARPER FAMILY. 

Lieut. John Harper was one of the pioneer settlers 
of the town. His name appears in the report of Cjrout 
and Gilmore, and subsequently that of Enoch Hale. 
The headstone in the Centre burying-yard bearing the 
earliest date was erected in memory of Mrs. Jean Har- 
per, wife of Mr. Andrew Harper, who " departed this 
life Nov. y^ 29, 1777, in the 65 year of her age." The 
relationship is unknown. 

When the town was organized he was chosen field- 
driver, and afterwards constable. When the alarm 
reached the town produced by the advance of the Brit- 
ish from Boston, Mr. Harper was one of the first to 
take up the line of march to the scene of conflict ; and 
soon after his arrival, April 23, he enlisted for three 
months, and was appointed lieutenant of Capt. Philip 
Thomas's company, from Rindge. He was in the bat- 
tle of Bunker Hill ; met with losses in that engagement 
for which he was afterwards remunerated. 

He settled on lot 9, range 7i which was afterwards in 
possession of his son, William Harper, now (1873) the 
farm of Seth D. Ballon. 

He m. Elizabeth Proctor, and had eleven children. 

He re. to Watertown, N. Y., and d. there. 

I. John, r. Whitestown. 
II. Oliver, r. Whitestown. 
HI. Betsey, m. Hugh Smiley, q. v. 
IV. Anna, d. in Jafirey. 

V. Lucy, m. Jonathan Sawyer ; r. Whitestown. 
VI. Polly, m. Joseph Sawyer; r. Whitestown. 
VII. William, m. Mary Poor, of Dublin; d.-|- 
VIII. Sarah, m, Elijah Sawyer ; r. Whitestown. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



363 



10 
II 

12 


IX. Esther^ m. Samuel Rogers; r. Ohio. 

X. Jane, m. Moses Fairbanks, of Dublin ; d. Oct. 

5' 1873- 
XI. Olive^ m. Job Rogers; r. Ohio, and d. there. 


(S) 

13 

15 


William Harper m. Mary Poor, of Dublin ; d. Feb. 
38, 1S23, a. 38. 

I. Mary Ann^ his dau., d. Dec. 26, iSiS, a. i 

year. 
II. William^ b. Feb. 33, 1819. 
III. 3Iary An7i, h. Oct. 2, 1S20. 



HATHORN FAMILY. 

The origin of the Hathorn family we have been unable to 
learn. In 1774 the names of Elias and Ebenezer Hathorn ap- 
pear on a petition signed by the inhabitants of Jatirey at that 
time against the annexation of four hundred rods from the east 
part of the town to Peterborough and Peterborough Slip. His 
brother, Collins Hathorn, came soon after, as his name appears 
in the transcript of a road, March, i775- 

Ebenezer Hathorn was a soldier in the French 
and Indian war of 1755, and, after the surrender of Fort 
William Henry by the English, he was taken prisoner 
by the Indians, and afterwards made his escape by his 
strategy and fleetness. He was a blacksmith by trade ; 
settled on lot 18, range 7, and carried on the business 
with his brother Collins, and also manufactured steel- 
yards. He afterwards re. to lot 15, range 7, now the 
residence of Dea. Liberty Mower. In 1775 he was 
elected constable, and in 1777 and 1796 highway sur- 
veyor, and in 1796 was one of the auditing committee. 
We have found no record of his marriage or death, nor 
the birth of his children. 

Collins Hathorn settled near Ebenezer. He was an 
enrolled soldier in 1784, and also 

Collins Hathorn, Jr. He d., probably, previous to 

^793- „ . , 

Elijah Hathorn was taxed 1794 to 1802, niclusive. 

Eleazer paid a tax in i795- 

Ebenezer, Jr., b. 1763; m. Lucy Proctor, dau. of 
Oliver and Elizabeth Proctor; d. June 11, 1847, a. 85. 
His wife d. Oct. 13, 1824, a. 57. 



3^4 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Francis, on the tax-list in 1S04, '5, and '6. 

Oliver paid taxes from 1S16 to 1821, inclusive ; he m. 
Diademia, dau. of Thomas and Diademia (Eaton) Gotf ; 
one child, — Sally, m. Rufus P. Smith ; r, Fitchburg. 

Ebenezer Hathorn, 3d, r. for a time on the home 
farm, now owned by Dea. Liberty Mower; he re. to 
the Mineral Spring village, where he d. Oct. 4, 1S65, 
a. 77. He m. Mrs. Mary Chapin, adopted her daus., 
Sophia M., Maria E., and Caroline. She d. April 10, 
1861, a 69. 

Henry, d. Dec. 23, 1847, a. 24. 



MARRIAGES. 

Polly m., Aug. 28, 1788, Almond Bourdy. 

Sally m., 17S8, Ebenezer Jaquith. 

Keziah m., 17S8, Jesse Jaquith. 

Anna m., Sept. 14, 1792, Elijah Ware. 

Hepsibath m., May 5, 1795, Moses Sawyer. 

Pamela m., Sept. 19, 1797, Erastus Benton. 

Olive m., March 12, 1798, Eliakim Davis. 

Betsey m., May 22, 1803, Benj. Nutting. 

Peggy m., Nov. 8, 1809, Moses Stearns, of Lexington. 

Diademia m., Oct. 26, 1828, James Poor, of Am- 
herst. 

Sophia M. m., Sept. 11, 1838, Geo. W. Waters. 

Maria E. m., April i, 1S41, Charles Cutter. 

Caroline S. m., Oct. 13, 1S47, J°^^ Whittemore, of 
Fitzwilliam. 

Betsey m. Isaac Nutting. 

List of tax-payers in Jaffrey belonging to the Hathorn 
family. 

Ebenezer was taxed till 1818. 

Widow Sara, probably the wife of Collins, 1793- 
1796. 

Elijah, 1 794-1 802. 
Eleazer, 1795. 
Francis, 1804-1806. 
Ebenezer, Jr., 181 1, i8l3. 
Oliver, 1816-1821. 
Elijah heirs, 1818-1820. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 365 



3 
4 



DEATHS. 



Ebenezer Hathorn, Jr., d. Dec. 23, 1847, ^- ^5- 
Lucy Proctor, his wife, d. Oct. 3, 1S24, a. 57. 
Henry Hathorn, d. Dec. 23, 1S47, a. 24. 
Ebenezer Hathorn, 3d, d. Oct. 4, 1865, a. 77. 
Mary Chapin, his wife, d. April 10, 1861, a. 69. 



HAYWOOD FAMILY. 

James Haywood came to JafiVey previous to i779 ' 
was chosen highway-surveyor that year. In 1780 he 
was chosen selectman ; and was a member of the 
church, with his wife Keziah, when incorporated in 
17S0. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and in 1784 
his name was enrolled in the company of militia belong- 
ing to Jaffrey. 

Benjamin Haywood was b. in Chelmsford, Mass., 
Oct. 22, 1753. He was the son of James, the son of 
Benjamin, a descendant of John, who settled in Con- 
cord, Mass., and was m. in 1656. He had a family of 
sixteen children, and d. in 1707. Benjamin, a descend- 
ant, settled in Billerica ; afterwards re. to Chelmsford, 
and settled on a farm which is now owned by his 
descendants. James, his son, b. Dec. 13, 1724? ni. 
Sarah Emery. Benj., his son, came to Jaflrey about 
1780, settled on lot 21, and one hundred acres of lot 20, 
range 8, and eight acres of lot 21, range 9, on which he 
raised a frame house, June 7, 1782. He was a farmer 
and blacksmith, and for several years occupied a shop 
under the old elm tree on the Prescott farm. He after- 
wards built a shop on the ledge, across the road from 
the new house now (1873) occupied by Alfred Sawyer. 
Benj. Haywood m., i^', Jan. 21, 1783, Hannah Robbins, 
who d. July 26, 1783, a. 18 yrs., 3 mos., 7 dys. ; m., 
2*^, Jan. 27, 1785, Sally Flag, of Concord, ISIass., b. 
May 12, 175 1, d. May 5, 1827. He d. Feb. i, 1829, a. 
76. Five children : 

I. Senjatnin^ b. Oct. 21, 1785.4- 

II. Joseph, b. Jan. 16, 1787; d. Oct. 17, 1837; m. 

Jerusha Fairbanks. She d. Oct. 28, 185S, 

a. 6S. He was a goldsmith by trade. 

III. Timothy, b. Feb. 8, 1789 ; d. Nov. 28, 1S19, in 

Bloomfield, N. Y. ; m. Urana Durham, 



366 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



(3) 



H 



(9) 



15 
16 

17 



(11) 



18 

19 
20 



N. Y. One dau., — m , and d. i860, in Rock- 
ford, 111. He was a blacksmith. 

IV. Jlimes, b. Oct. 7, 1790 ; d. in Brocton, Chautau- 

qua Co., N. Y. He was one of the first 
settlers in Stockton, and the first man who 
opened a store in that town. He was also 
a blacksmith. Had ten ch. 

V. John, b. Oct. 20, 1791 ; d. Feb. 22, 1792. 



Benjamin Haywood m. Polly, dau. of Josiah and 
Patty Sawyer, of Peterborough, Nov. 22, 1795. She 
d. July 23, 1S42, a 46. M., 2'', 1843, Betsey W. 
Wright, of Westford. She d. May, 1S75. He d. Feb. 
3, 1S53, a. 67. Seven children : 

I. Adeline, b. Jan. 25, 181S ; m. Harvey Sawyer, 

q. V. 
JRufus, b. IVIarch 6, iS20.-|- 
Mary A., b. Sept. 26, 1S23 ; d. Aug. 17, 1S30. 
Albert, b. Aug. 10, 1825.4- 
Luke, b. March 2, 1831 ; d. Oct. 17, 1833. 
Abbie, b. Oct. 23, 1S34; m., Oct. 23. 1862, 

Freeman F., son of Jona. J. Comstock, q. v. 
Ellen, b. March 26, 1S38; m., Jan., 1859, ^'^" 

man H. Avery ; r. in Peoria, 111. Three 

sons, — two living. 



9 


11 


10 


III 


II 


IV 


12 


V 


13 


VI 



VII. 



RuFus Sawyer Haywood m. Elizabeth, dau. of 
Oliver Prescott, May 6, 1841 ; r. Fredonia, N. Y. ; was 
paymaster in the war of 1866; served during the war, 
holding the rank of colonel by brevet. Three ch. : 

I. Oliver, b. April 19, 1S43 ; d. Dec. 9, 1843. 
II. Oliver, b. Sept. 2, 1S44; ^- Sept. 3, 1845. 
III. Eddie A., b. Jan. 26, 1861. 



Albert Haywood m. Frances, dau. of Joseph and 
Sarah (Parker) Joslin ; r. in Fredonia, N. Y. Four 
children : 

I. Benjamin, b. May 14, 1844. 
II. Cassius R'lifus, b. April iS, 1847. 
Two daughters, b. in New York. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



367 



DESCENDANTS OF BENJ. HAYWOOD. 



Children, 
Grandchildren, 
Great-grandchildren, 
Great-great-grandchildren 



5 
18 

S=6i 



4 

5 
6 

7 

8 

9 
10 



HENDERSON FAMILY. 

James Henderson, b. 1769; re. from Boston to 
Westford, Mass., in 1804. He re. to Jafirey in 1S06, 
having. Sept , 1S05, received a deed of a tract of land 
in lot 10, range 6, of Samuel Buss, on which he built a 
house and store the following winter and spring. He 
opened his store in 1S06. In iSiS, after the death of his 
wife, he leased the same to William Ainsworth, Esq., 
and re. to East JaflVey. In 1S33 he sold the same to a 
Mr. Robbins. The buildings were burned. He m., 
i^', Martha , who d. at JaflVey, Oct. 12, 1S16, 



a. 



44 



m. 



Nancy Ann H. Gilmore, dau. of 



Roger and Molly (Blodgett) Gilmore, Feb. 5, 1S28. 
She d. April 15, 1S33, a. 50. In 1S33 he took up his 
residence in Boston, and Marlborough, Mass., where 
he d. May 11, 1S49, a. 80. Children b3^ first wife : 

I. William Henry ^ b. in Boston, April 18, 1800; 
r. Boston. 

II. Caroline^ b. in Boston, Nov. 11, 1801 ; m. Col. 
Wm. H. Wood, of Marlboro', Mass., now 
Hudson, Nov. 5, 1826. He d. 

III. Frederick A., b.. in Boston, Aug. 14, 1S03 ; a 

merchant ; r. Boston. 

IV. e/(:<w?es, b. at Westford, June 17, 1805; d. Oct. 

19, 1848, at Juliet, 111. 
V. Martha (twin), d. at JaflVey, April 4, 1836, 

unm., a. 31. 
VI. Elizabeth, b. at JaflVey, March 19, 1807 ; m. 
John Holman, of Wilbraham, Mass. She 
d. Oct. 5, 1848. 
VII. Harriet, b. June 1 1 , 1809 ; m. Joseph Reynolds ; 

r. Westfield, O. ; now (1873) a widow. 
VIII. e/wZta, b. Nov. 27, 181 1 ; m. Russell Reynolds 
(a brother of Jos.) ; r. in Clyde, O. 
IX. 3Ioses Wood, b. in Peterborough, Dec. 27, 1814; 
graduated at Western Reserve College ; d. 
Sept. 6, 1843. 



368 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



John Henderson, an early settler in the west part of the 
town. 



5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
lo 

II 

12 

^5 



(9) 



HODGE FAMILY. 

Three brothers from Londonderry, Scotch-Irish, 
settled, one in Peterborough and the other two in 
JaflVey. The original name was Hogg. The name 
was afterwards changed to Wilder and Hodge. The 
JaftVey settlers, Joseph and William, assumed the name 
of Hodge ; Simpson, who settled in Peterborough, that 
of Wilder. Joseph settled on lot 10, range 9, in the 
south part of the town ; and William, on lot 17, range 
6, now East Jaffrey. In 1773, when the town was or- 
ganized, William Hogg was chosen field-driver ; and in 
1774, Joseph Hogg was chosen constable. William m. 
Nancy; had one son, — William, b. 1776; d. Feb. 28, 
1827. He d. about 1780. William, his son, m. Sally 
Searl, of Temple ; had one dau., — Elmina. He d. Feb. 
28, 1827. His widow m. Benj. Prescott, Jr. The 
widow of William Hodge, Sen'r, m. Jonathan Dean. 



Joseph Hodge m. Elizabeth Alexander, of Leomin- 
ster, Mass. ; d. Aug. 26, 1S31, a. 90. His widow d. 
Nov. 13, 1841, a. 84. 

I. Polly ^ m. Ezra Wilder, Jr., of Jaffrey ; re. to 

Vermont. 
II. Betsey^ m. Oliver Wilder, brother of Ezra. 

III. Agnes, m. Elijah T. Smith, of Fitzwilliam. 

IV. Jerusha^ d. in infancy. 

V. Jerusha^ m. Ira Ingalls, son of Simeon. 

VI. Joseph^ b. 1787.-!- 
VII. Sally ^ d., a. 26. 
VIII. Joanna^ m. William Savage, of Greenfield. 

IX. Willkmi, d. young. 

X. Simjjson^ b. Feb. 19, 1797.-I- 

XI. John^ b. Feb. 13, i779.-|- 
XII. Eunice^ b. Sept., 1S02 ; m. Jacob Priest. 



Joseph Hodge m., i^', Eunice Hutchinson, who d- 
Nov. 6, 1828, a. 31. M., 2*^, Nabby Twiss, who d- 
May 24, 1863, a. 71. He d. Aug. 11, 1874, a. ^"j. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 369 

16 I. William,, d. Oct. 20, 1S44. 

17 II. Samuel, b. 1S24; m. Mary B. J. Smith, Nov. 
2"], 1856. She d. April 19, 1867, a. 31. 
Four ch. : (i) Charles S., b. 1859. (2) 
Mary A., b. 1861. (3) Eva E., b. Nov. 13, 
1865. (4) Abbie F.,'b. 1867. 

18 III. Joseph Jackson, d. at Sherburne, Mass., Feb. 

22, 1874, a. 46. 

19 IV. Almira X., b. 1833. 

20 V. Abigail E., b. 1836. 



(13) Simpson Hodge m. Elmira, dau. of Levi and Sarah 

(Nichols) Johnson, Dec. 3, 1822. She d. May 8, 1861, 
a. 61. 

21 I. Sarah A., b. 1824. 

22 II. Jonas F., b. 1827; m. Lydia F. ; d. 

April 6, 1876. Ch. : (i) Harlan F., b. 
1849; m. Mary C Streeter ; one ch., — Ger- 
tie, b. 1872. \2) Maria F., b. 1852 ; m. 
Charles A. Baldwin. (3) Lillie, b. 1861. 

23 III. Ahner W., d. Aug. 23, 1831, a. 4. 

24 IV. Lydia F., b. 1830. 

25 V. Andrew J., b. 1835. 

26 VI. Albert TF., b. 1S36. 

27 VII. Emily E., b. 1838. 



(14) 

28 
29 

30 



31 
32 
33 



John Hodge m. Polly Page, of Rindge ; r. home- 
stead. 

I. Flvira,h. 1826; m. Col. George Briant, q. v. 

II. George W., b. 1828 ; m. H. Augusta Knowlton ; 
d. June II, 1857. 

HI. Amasa F. S.,h. 1S30; m. Emily F., dau. of 
Abel and Mary (Spaulding) Cutter. She d. 
March 18, 1872. M,, 2^ Mrs. Page, of 
Peterborough. Ch. by first wife: (i) Will- 
iam S., b. March 7, 1854. (?) Freddie A., 
b. Feb. 9, 1858. (3) Emma M., b. Oct. 26, 
1864; d. March 3, 1S66. 

IV. Lemuel E., b. 1837. 
V. John, b. 1 84 1. 

VI. Calista, b. 1843. 



25 



370 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



HOUGHTON FAMILY. 

Qiiite a number of persons by the name of Houghton appear 
on the town records, during the last part of the last century 
and the first of the present. 

Silas Houghton, in 1778, from Sterling, Mass., was 
warned from town. 

2 Polly Houghton, in 1791, m. Squire Britton. 

3 James Houghton was a tax-payer from 1793 to 
1804. inclusive. 

4 James Houghton, Jr., in 1793, m. Polly Hall. 

5 Houghton, Sept. 14, m. Lota Dole. 

6 David Houghton, March 3, 1798, m. Ann Briant ; 
re. to Albany, N. Y., 1804. 

John Houghton, a brother of Capt. Rufus Hough- 
ton, settled in school-district No. ir, about 179S ; paid 
taxes in 1799; ^iic^ was chosen school-agent that and 
the following year. He afterwards re. to district No. 6, 
and left town about 1810. He was a brick-mason by 
trade. 

Jonathan Houghton, a brother of John, was a 
highway-surveyor in 1802; was taxed in 1797, and for 
the last time in 1806. 

Rufus Houghton (Capt.) settled on lot 15, range 5, 
also in other places. He appears to have been a prom- 
inent man in the affairs of the town — a teacher of the 
public schools ; constable from 1799 to 1801, inclusive ; 
selectman in i8o3, '6, and '7 ; grand juror in 1807 ; and 
one of the auditing committee in 1808 ; was taxed from 

1795 to 1809, inclusive. He m. Dorothy , and 

left a birth record of six children : 

(i) Rufus, b. Sept. 19, 1796. (3) Dorothy, b. July 
4, 1799. (3) DarticmSjh. ]u\y iS, 1801. (4) Betsey, 
b. April 39, 1803 ; d. Aug. 8, 1804. (5) Abigail, b. 
March 32, 1805. (6) Betsey, b. Feb. 23, 1807. 



HORTON FAMILY. 

Joseph HoRTON came to Jaftrey about i777' ^^^ 
chosen highway-surveyor in 17S0; settled on lot 5, 
range 9 ; was twice married ; had several children ; and 
d. May 13, 1841, a. 92. On the same headstone, in 
addition to his death, is inscribed the name of his first 
wife, Hannah, and the names of three children, Joseph, 
Hannah, and Ebenezer, without the date of their deaths. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



371 



2 

3 

4 

5 



In the town record of births, the following names are 
recorded : 

I. Hannah^ b. Aug. 35, 1777. 

II. Ehenezer^ b. March 28, 1779 ; m., Dec. 15, 1802, 
Ruth Foster, of Templeton, Mass. 
By second wife, Mary : 

III. Sarahs b. March 26, 17S2 ; m., Sept. i, 1803, John 

Buswell, of Rindge ; r. Mt. Holly, Vt. ; d. 1865. 

IV. Asa, b. Sept. i, 1783 ; m. Susan, dau. of Joseph 

Breed; re. to Mt. Holly, Vt, in 1S13. 
Nine ch. : (i) Susan ; (2) Cyrus ; (3) Asa ; 
(4) Louisa; (5) Joseph; (6) Mary; (7) 
Julia Ann ; (8) Vienna ; (9) Harriet, 



Cyrus Horton, son of Asa, b. 1810; m., i"', Sally 
Horton ; m., 2'', Dolly Robbe. Thirteen children : 

(i) Sarah E., b. 1S37. (2) Cyrus E., b. 1838. (3) 
Wilber^h. 1839. (4) ^a^y -Louisa, h. 1840; m. George 

Potter, of New Ipswich. (5) Elizabeth, m. Dean ; 

r. Mt. Holly, Vt. (6) Nathaniel, b. 1842 ; m. Mary, dau. 
of Edmund and Polly Burpee. By second wife : (7) 
Ilona Rosette, b. 1S44. (8) Ariel Andrews, b. 1848. 
(9) Asa Kenny, b. 1S49. (10) Susan Vienna. (11) 
Freeman Edward. (12) Joseph Preston. (13) Ada May. 



n 



OWE FAMILY. 



Adonijah Howe (Dr.), son of Abner and Sarah 
Howe, was b. in Brookfield, Mass., in 1757; came to 
Jaffrey and settled there, as a physician, in 1776, at the 
age of 19. His brother James, and two sisters, settled 

in Lebanon. One m. Kendrick, and the other 

m. Allen. He also had another sister, who m. 

Storrs, and one who m. Arnold, and set- 
tled in Mansfield, Conn., and one who m. King^ 

settled in Canterbury, Conn. His mother came with 
him to Jaftrey, and m. there a second husband, Samuel 
Parker, and d. Dec. 30, 1795, a. 59. Dr. Howe m., i^', 
Sarah, dau. of Noah and Lydia (Kent) Riple}', sister 
of Rev. Dr. Ezra Ripley, of Concord, Mass., who d. 
Dec. 13, 1800, a. 40; m., 2^, Persis Wood, of Concord, 
who d. Sept. 5, 1834, a. 71. He d. July 31, 1832, a. 74. 
[See page 102.] Children : 



372 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 



lO 



(4) 



II 

12 



(5) 



13 
14 



I. Abner, b. Oct. 14, 17S0: m. Sarah, dau. of 
Joseph and Sarah Thorndike ; d. May 18, 
1S26. Nine children. [See College Grad- 
uates.] 
II. Lydia^ b. March 7, 1783 ; m. Solomon Proctor; 
r. Cavendish, Vt. Three children. 

III. Adonijah, b. June 21, 1784.-!- [See page 103.] 

IV. Lvke^h. March 28, 17S7.-I- [See College Grad- 

uates.] 

V. Sally^h. July 8, 17S9; d. Jan. 26, 1790. 

VI. /Scdly, h. March 15, 1791 ; d. March 29, 1840; 

unm. 
VII. Liicretia, b. Feb. 13, 1704; d. Jan. i, 1796. 
VIII. James, b. Aug. 13, 1796; m. Fanny Nason, ot 
Harvard, Mass., and d. at Pepperell, Mass., 
July 19, 1S40. Six children. [See College 
Graduates.] 

IX. Mary (second marriage), b. 1806; m. Asa 
Crosby ; r. Rockford, Illinois. Three chil- 
dren. 



Adonijah Howe m. Mary, dau. of Peter Woodbury, 
of Francestown, May 15, 1S07. He d. Aug. 7, 1815, 
a. 31. [See page 103.] Two children : 

I. Mary Eloisa, b. 1808 ; m. John Fox, m. d., q. v. 
II. Elizabeth, b. 1813 ; d. July 31, 1837, a. 24; 
unm. 



Luke Howe, m. d., m. Mary (Woodbury) Howe, 
widow of his brother, Adonijah Howe, Jan. 26, 1819 ; 
he d. Dec. 24, 1S41, a. 54. His widow d. Jan. 18, 
1875, a. 88. [See College Graduates.] Two children : 

I. Isabel W., b. Dec. 22, 1819; m. John Fox, m. 

D., Jan. 3, 1843. 
II. Adonijah W., b. 1825 ; m. Martha Butterfield ; 
r., first, in Dunstable; second, Lancaster, 
Mass. [See page 102.] Ten children : 

(i) Woodbuiy ; (2) Mary Dunster ; (3) 
Mary Elizabeth ; (4) Edward Dexter ; 
(5) Emma I. ; (6) Charles L. ; (7) 
Helen W. ; (8) Fanny B. ; (9) Fred- 
erick W. ; (10) An infant. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



373 



HUNT FAMILY. 

The families by the name of Hunt who settled in Jaffrey are 
descendants of William Hunt, who was born in England about 
1605, emigrated to this country, and settled in Concord, Mass., 
in 1665. He was twice married, and d. in Marlborough, Mass., 
1697. His eldest son, Nehemiah, m. Mary Toll, and had I3 
children. His son, John Hunt, m. Mary Brown ; had 9 chil- 
dren. Dea. Simeon Hunt, of Concord, son of John, m. Mary 
Raymond. Ephraim, who settled in Jaflley, and Simon, who 
settled in Acton, were his sons. 



Ephraim Hunt m. Tabitha Raymond, and Simon 
m. Lucy Raymond. Ephraim was an early settler. In 
the report of Grout and Gilmore, Family Hunt is men- 
tioned, and in the report of Enoch Hale, at a later date, 
we find the name of Ephraim Hunt, owner of mills on. 
lot No. 21, range 10, now known as Squantum village, 
now (1873) owned by Annett & Murdock. In 1791 he 
re. to Rindge, and d. Dec. 21, 1S21. He was b. in 
Concord, May 28, 1736. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



8 



I. Tahitha, b. July 3, 1757 ; m. Nathaniel Ingalls, 

of Rindge. 
II. Hepsiheth. b. July 10, 1761 ; m. Nathan Page; 
re. to Jackson, Me., and d. about 1840. 

III. James^ b. April 10, 1766. 

IV. Paul Raymond, b. Nov., 176S. 

V. Ephraim, b. March 25, 1771 ; m. Persis, dau. 
of John Perry; he d. Sept. 2, 1856; she d. 
Feb. 16, 1832. One child. 



Nathan Hunt, son of Simon and Lucy (Raymond) 
Hunt, of Acton, Mass., was b. July 17, 1760; m. Abi- 
gail, daughter of Moses and Abigail (Emerson) Hale, 
of Rindge, b. Feb. i, 1768; d. Sept. 13, 1842; he d. 
Jan. 18, 1853, a. 93. Ten children : 

I. Abigail, b. Nov., 1788 ; m. Reuben Streeter, a 
clothier ; r. Chester, Vt. Five children : 
(i) Rhoanna, d. young; (2) Nathan, m. 
Alice Parker ; d. in Boston ; (3) Alice, m. 

Whitington, r. Boston ; (4) Charles, a 

tailor, r. Boston ; (5) Cora, d. Aug. 27, 



^875- 
II. Nathan, b. April 17, 1791.4- 



374 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



ID 
II 



12 



13 

15 



16 



17 



(9) 

18 

19 



III. Grata, b. June 26, 1793 ; m. Benj. Cutter, q. v. 

IV. Moses, b. Nov. 9, 1795 ; m. Maria Rouse ; r. in 

New York. Seven children : (i) Elizabeth 
A.,b. 1826, d. 1828; (2) John; (3) Eliza- 
beth, m. Wm. B, Robinson, of New York ; 
(4) Moses ; (5) Frances, d. 1835 ; (6) 
Amanda, m. Edward Salmon ; (7) William 
Henry, d. in the Union army. 

V. Harriet, b. June i, 1798; m. Ezra Bennett, of 

Rindge. Seven children: (i) Harriet; (2) 
David ; (3) John ; (4) George ; (5) Maria ; 
(6) Mary Ann ; (7) Fanny, d. in Whately, 
Mass. 

Sally, b. Sept. 3, iSoo; m. David French; r. 
New Ipswich ; he d. in 1852. One child, — 
Pamela T., b. 1852. 
Fanny, b. Dec. 3, 1802 ; m. William H. Salis- 
bury, of Groton, Mass. ; d. Jan. 5, 1868, in 
Sharon, Mass. 

John Edwards, b. Nov. 24, 1805 ; m. Elizabeth 
White, of Boston. He kept a public house 
on Commercial street, and the Albion House, 
Tremont street, Boston ; re. to New Yoi'k, 
and was the proprietor of Hunt's Hotel ; 
has been in the U. S. Custom House, New 
York. Four children: (i) Julia, b. and d. 
in Boston ; (2) Julia ; (3) John Edwards ; 
(4) Nathan Henry. 

IX. Elvira, b. March 24, 1808 ; m. George A. Wil- 

lard, of Ashby ; a farmer ; r. in Ashburn 
ham. Nine children : (i) Elvira; (2) Ma- 
ria, d. ; (3) Catherine ; (4) George ; (5) 
Caroline ; (6) Lizzie ; (7) Abby Jane ; (8) 
Ann Maria ; (9) Sarah Frances. 

X. Raymond, b. May 18, iSio; m. Marie Antoin- 

ette, dau. of Zadoc Chapman, of Dublin and 
Jaftrey.+ 



VI. 



VII 



VIII. 



Nathan Hunt m.,Jan. 10, 1814, Violentia Hodg- 
man, of Scranton; d. April 23, 1869. She d. July 2, 
1838, a. 38. 

I. Abigail, b, Dec. 11, 1821 ; m. Appleton ; 

re. 111. 
II. Emeline, d. April 24, 1832, a. 8 yrs. 



20 

31 

22 

(17) 

24 

25 

26 

27 
28 

29 

30 
31 



32 

33 

34 

35 
36 

37 

(35) 
38 

39 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 375 

III. Julia Ann^ b. May 2, 1825 ; m. James Cogs- 

well, of Brighton. 

IV. Edward Pay son ^ d. April 4, 1832, a. 11 mos. 
V. William Sylvester, d. June 23, 1848, a. 31 yrs. 



Raymond Hunt m. Maria A. Chapman, Nov. 25, 
1828 ; r. Boston. Eight children : 

I. Christiana Chapman^ b. Sept. 20, 1830; d. in 

1848. 
II. Helen Mar, b. Dec. 10, 1833 ; m. Joseph W. 

Donett, of Boston. 

III. Marie Antoinette, b. Sept. 10, 1834; ^' Sept. 

13, 1838. 

IV. Raymond R., b. Dec. 16, 1836; d. Sept., 1837. 
V. Cynthia A., b. Aug. 3, 1838 ; d. Nov. 3, 1S55. 

VI. Edwin Ruthven, b. Jan. 14, 1840; enlisted in 
the Union army. 
VII. Esther M. M. Chapman, b. Dec, 18, 1842. 
VIII. Benjamin Cutter, b. Sept. 4, 1845, 



Paul Hunt, son of Simon Hunt, of Acton, Mass., 
m., Nov. 17, 1789, Betsey Parkhurst, of Chelmsford, 
Mass., who d. Aug. 34, 1839, a. 75. He d. June 6, 
1852, a. 87. 

I. John Parkhurst, b. Sept. 27, 1790 ; r. Saratoga, 

and d. 
II. Clarissa, b. Oct. 15, 1791 ; m. Capt. Eldad 
Prescott, of Jaffrey, March 37, 1816, q. v. 

III. Betsey, h. ]\x\y <,, 1793; m. Capt. Eldad Pres- 

cott, q. V. 

IV. Paul, b. April 15, 1795.4- 

V. Durocsy, b. 1799; m. William Pomeroy, of 
Winchester; d. 1876; r. Warren, N. Y. 
Three children, — one son, two daughters, 
all d. 
VI. Addison, b. Feb. 18, 1803 ; r. Saratoga, N. Y. ; 
m. and d. 



Paul Hunt m. Ann Jewett, of Temple, N. H. 

I. Lucy Ann, b. Sept. 37, 1837 ; m., April 17, 

1S50, David Barker, of Temple. 
II. Ruth Augusta, b. 1839 ; d. May 9, 1839. 



376 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



40 III. Oliver ParJchurst, b. May 2, 1830, Sarah A. Up- 
ham, of Dudley, Mass. 

41 IV. Adoniratn Judson, b. April 25, 1832 ; d. May 
19, 1832. 

42 V. Samuel Augustus ^h. Sept. 15, 1834; d. Aug. 
16, 1839. 

43 VI. William Pom,eroy^ b. Jan. 13, 1837; ^^- Mary 
Upham, of Dudley, Mass. ; r. Detroit, Mich. ; 
re. to Minnesota. 

44 VII. Ruth Elizabeth, b. Nov. 8, 1843 '■> '^- 

Morse. Five children: (i) Etta E; (2) 
Fred S. ; (3) Ervin C. ; (4) Lillian A. ; (5) 
Oliver H. 



INGALLS FAMILY. 

Edmond Ingalls, from Lincolnshire, England, settled in 
Lynn, Mass., in 1629 ; m., and had a family of nine children ; 
d. 1648. Josiah, a descendant, settled in Rindge in 1760; was 

deacon of the church in that place ; m. Eunice ; had 

six children : 

Ebenezer Ingalls, his eldest son, settled west of 

the mountain in JaftVey ; m. Mercy ; one son, 

Asa, b. Aug. 28, 1797. 



5 
6 

7 
8 



9 
10 

II 



Josiah Ingalls, second son, b. Oct. 31, i747' ^^^' 
tied in Jaftrey, on lot 7, range 10, in 17S7; >""• Sarah 
Bowers, Jan. 25, 1750. Eleven children : 

I. John, b. at Rindge, Dec. 15, 1771 ; d. Feb. 23, 

1772. 
II. James, b. March 5, 1773 ; d. July 24, i775- 

III. Sarah, b. Dec. 21, 1775 ; d. Sept. 25, 1777. 

IV. Phehe, b. Feb., 1778; m. Robert Gilmore, q. v. 
V. Josiah, b. April 5, 1780; m. Lois Capron, of 

Marlborough; d. in Fitzwilliam, March 18, 
1855. She d. March 20, 1855. No chil- 
dren. 
VI. James, b. Feb. 27, 1781.-]- 
VII. Sarah, b. Aug. 13, 1783 ; m. Moses Sawyer, of 

Sharon. She d. Nov. 16, 1771. 
viii. Deborah, b. Aug. 27, 1785; m., i"', May 9, 
1816, Rev. Charles Mavery ; he d. Sept. 25, 
1830,3.38; m., 2^, Robertson Perkins, of 
Fitzwilliam ; he d., and she d. Feb. 16, 
1872. One child : 



12 



15 



17 



(9) 



18 

19 
20 

21 

22 

23 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 377 

I. Sarah Maria, b. Feb. 7, 1818 ; m. John 
Smith, of Rindge. 

IX. Flint, h. April 27, 1789; d. 1834. 
X. Sitneon, b. Sept. 22, 1791 ; d. young. 
XI. Charles, b. Sept. 23, 1794; re. to Keene ; d. in 
Windsor, Vt., 1873. 



Simeon Ingalls, b. Aug. 24, 1749, third son of Jo- 

siah, settled in Jaffrey ; ni. Mercy ; d. in Rindge, 

1790. Two children : 



16 I I. John, b. Feb. 24, 1779; d. June 2, 1806. 



II. Ira, b. Feb. 11, 1781 ; m. Jerusha, dau. of 
Joseph Hodge. 



James Ingalls, m. Rebecca, dau. of Daniel and 
Alice (Shedd) Twiss, of Jaftrey ; d. in Rindge, April 7, 
1830. She d. April 9, 1868. Five children : 

I. Abigail, m. John Kendrick, of Dover, Mass. 
II. Caroline, m. George Chessman. 

III. James M., r. Marlboro', Mass. 

IV. Amos, d. 1S64. 

V. Lucy, m. James M. Small, Nov. 5, 1S46; r. 

Jaflrey. 
VI. Lois A., m. Sumner Deeth ; d. Rindge, 1870. 



JAQUITH FAMILY. 

Benjamin Jaquith came to Jaftrey previous to 1779 ; 
settled on lot 20, range 6; was field-driver in 17S5, and 

highw^ay-surveyor in 1787 ; m. Phebe , and left a 

birth record of three children : 

I. Lydia. b. Nov. 3, 1780. 
3-4 II. Reuben, and (in.) Asa, twins, b. Aug. 15, 17S3. 



Ebenezer Jaquith, son of Abraham and Hannah 
Jaquith, was b. Dec. 24, 1732; m., Jan. 19, 1758, 
Esther, dau. of Ebenezer and Esther French, b. Feb. 
22, 1736 ; both of Billcrica, Mass. ; came to Jaflrey, and 
settled on lots 13 and 14, range 9. He d. Dec. 29, 
1S02, a. 70. She d. May 7, 1823, a. S^. 



378 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



7 
8 



9 

lO 

II 

13 

H 

15 

(6) 



17 

18 



19 



20 
21 

22 

23 
24 

25 



28 
29 

(7) 



I. Ehenezer^ b. Nov. 20, 175S.-I- 

II. Samuel^ b. Oct. 6, 1760.-I- 

III. Esther, b. Sept. 22, 1762 ; m. William Marshall, 

q. V. 

IV. Jesse, b. Nov. 37, 1764; m. Keziah Hathorn, 

1 788. 
V. Hannah^ b. Nov. 12, 1766 ; m. Jonathan Emery, 
17S8. 

VI. Olive^ b. Oct. 19, 1768 ; m. Samuel Emery. 

VII. Abigail, b. July 31, 1773. 

viii. Betsey, b. July 15, 1777; m. Henry Thompson. 

IX. Hispah, b. Nov. 16, 1779; m. Joel Wright, of 

Troy ; d. May 7, 1S63, a. 84. 

X. Xevi, h. Dec. 11, 1781. 



Ebenezer Jaquith m., June 22, 1786, Sarah 
Hathorn, dau. of Collins Hathorn, b. Aug. 9, 1767 ; set- 
tled on the homestead ; d. Jime 19, 1844, a. 85. She d. 
May 19, 1834, a. 6^. He was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion. 

I. Sarah, h. Nov. 13, 1786; m. Luther Hemming- 

way ; d. Feb. i, 1864, a, 78. 
II. Esther, b. Dec. 32, 1787; d. Nov 21, 1789. 
HI. Ebenezer, b. June 25, 1789; re. to the state of 

Maine. 
IV. Collins, b. March 4, 1791 ; m., Sept. 16, 1816, 
Miriam B., dau. of Whitcomb and Miriam 
Bond Powers ; a large shoe dealer ; r. 
Keene ; re. to Oakfield, N. Y. Eleven ch. 
V. Joseph, h. Oct. 8, 1793.-!- 
VI. Luke, b. Jan. 30, 1794 ; re. to Tvle. 
VII. Asa, b. Aug. 38, 1797- 
VIII. John, b. Aug. 3, 1799 ; d. Aug. 5, 1802. 
IX. Ira, b. April 19, 1802 ; d. num. 
X. Seth, b. July 13, 1804.4- 26 xi. Infant son, 
d. Aug. 26, 1805. 27 XII. Infant son, d. 
Feb. 14, 1807. 

XIII. Elijah, b. June 27, 1808 ; m., April 23, 1833, 

Sarah Crosby. -f- 

XIV. Abigail, b. April 24, 181 1. 



Samuel Jaquith m. Lois, dau. of Thomas and 
Mary (Kenney) Mower; d. Sept. 5, 1803, a. 43. 



30 
31 

32 
33 
34 

35 

(20) 

36 
37 

38 

39 
40 

41 
42 

43 
44 
45 

46 

(25) 

47 

48 

49 

50 
51 
52 

(28) 
53 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 379 

I. Olive, d. Oct. 2, 180S, a. 19. 11. Eliza, d. 
Oct. 4, 1796, a. 5 yrs., 7 mos., 16 dys. 

III. Esther, b. March 9, 1794; m., i^', Silas Pierce ; 

2*^, Joseph Pierce. 

IV. David, b. 1795.4- 

V. Billy, d. Dec. 5, iSoo, a. 3 yrs., 8 mos., 20 dys. 
VI. Samuel, d. Dec. i, iSoo, a. i yr., 8 mos., 19 

dys. 
Vii. Sally, d. May 6, 1S03, a. i yr., 11 mos. 

Joseph Jaqltith m., Jan. i, 1822, Hannah Gleason, 
of Weston, Mass. He d. Feb. 3, 1859, ^- 4^- C"*- • 

I. Henry, b. Oct. 20, 1S22 ; d. Sept. 2, 1S67. 
II. William, b. Jan. 22, 1824; d. Nov., 1876, at 
Springfield, Mass. 

III. Sumner, b. Sept. 9, 1825. 

IV. Marshall, b. Sept. 10, 1S27. 

V. Albert, h. March 2, 1829; m., April 8, 1856, 

Emily Wilder, of Hancock; r. in Hancock. 
Children : 

1. Walter A., b. March 27, 1857. 

2. Lucetta E., b. Jan. 3, 1859. 

VI. Susan A., b. Dec. 30, 1830. 
VII. Mary, b. Oct. 21, 1832. 

viii. George, b. Aug. 11, 1834; d. in the Union 
army, 1863. 

IX. Mary, b. Sept. 11, 1836. 

Seth Jaquith m. Anna, dau. of Asa Robbins, of 
Nelson ; d. March 27, 1S66, a. 62. She d. Jan. 9, 1878. 

I. Levi. 
II. Sarah. 

III. Asa S., b. 1830; m. Ellen F. Wilber, of Ches- 

terfield. 

IV. Horace, d. June 4, 1837, ^- 5- 

V. An infant son, d. April 6, 1835, a. 2 dys. 

VI. Azero. 



Elijah Jaquith m, Sarah Crosby; d. Nov. 19, 
1866, a. 58. 

I. Levns Sylvanus, b. Dec. 5, 1833; m. Abbie, 
dau. of Orlando Cragin ; d. May 31, 1873. 



380 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



54 
55 

56 

57 
58 

59 
60 



II. Emeline Serajyhine^ b. May 19, 1835 ; m. David 
W. Lacy. 

III. Amanda Theresa^ b. Oct. 26, 1837 - '''^•' Sept. 

9, 1852, Orlando B. Cragin ; r. Gardner, 
Mass. 

IV. Je7'ome £onaparte, h. Nov. 2^, 1839; '• Phila- 

delphia. 
V. Lafayette Morton, b. Aug. 28, 1841 ; d. Jan. 7, 

"1S50. 
VI. Anna Josephine, b. Dec. 7, 1844; m., and r. in 

Columbus, O. 
VII. Edward Byron, b. Sept. 20, 1847; '"• Norwich, 

Conn. 
VIII. Walter Herbert, b. Oct. 22, 185 1 ; r. Boston. 



(32) David Jaqltitii m., Dec. 29, 1S17, Sally, dau. of 

Rufus and Susannah (Green) Sawyer. He d. June 
25, 1859, a. 64. She d. July 4, 1853, a. 56. 

61 I. Samuel, b. Dec. 19, 1818; m. Marv, dau. of 
Samuel and Polly (Felt) Nay, ""of Peter- 
borough, N. H. He d. 1879. Two ch. : 

62 I. Emma, b. Sept. 17, 1845. 

63 2. Ella S.,b. Feb. 13, 1S56; d. at Wil- 
ton, May 22, 1S64; r. Vineland, N. J. 

64 II. Iiosyra,h. April 5, 1S21 ; m. Feb., 18^6, Aaron 
S. Libbey, of Maine ; r. Boston. 

65 III. David A., h. June J, 1S26; m., i^', Lizzie Ty- 
ler; m., 2'^, Eliza A. Tyler, of Boston. 

66 IV. Sally Augnsta, b. June 7, 1826; m., July 20, 
1856, John Howland ; r. Boston. 

[David and Sally, twins.] 

67 V. Syrena Sawyer, b. June 29, 1828; m., Jan. 3, 
1850, George W. Buss, of Peterborough. 



JE\A'ELL FAMILY. 

Jacob Jewell was b. in Marlborough, Mass., Sept. 
6, 1767 ; came to Jaftrey in 1S08 ; settled in school- 
district No. 10, on the farm of Silas Adams, afterwards 
owned by John Pierce. He was a descendant of 
Thomas Jewell, b. in England about 1600 ; came to 
this country, and settled in Braintree, Mass., in 1639. 



2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 



9 

lO 

II 

12 

(6) 



(9) 



13 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 38I 

Mr. Jewell was not only a farmer, but a large dealer in " 
cattle, and drove large numbers annually to the Bright- 
on market. He re. to the Bates farm, now (1873) 
owned by Dea. Isaac S. Russell. He m. Mary Smith, 
who d. March 10, 1840, a. 74. He d. June 3i, 1844, 
a. 76. 

I. Mary^ b. 1787; d. young. 

II. Sophia^ b. Sept. 16, 1788 ; m. Thomas French, 
Jr., q. V. 

III. Betsey^ b. Sept. 26, 1790; m. Ithamar Law- 

rence, q. V. 

IV. Abigail^ h. ]i\\y 10, 1792; m. Shubael Cleave- 

land. Twelve ch. 
V. Isaac, b. May 23, 1794.-I- 
VI. Mary IT., b. May 2, 1799; m. Ralph Jewett, of 

Pepperell, Mass., Nov. 4, 1844. 
VII. Roxanna. b. Sept. 9, 1800; m. Col. Oilman 

Mower, q. v. 
VIII. Dexter., b. June 24, 1803.-!- 
IX. Almira, b. Dec. 18, 1805 ; m. John Perry, of 

Dublin, q. v. 
X. Cordelia, h. May 20, 1808; m. Reuben Pierce, 

q. V. 
XI. Charles A., b. Feb. 2, 1811.+ 



IsAAC Jewell (Capt.) m., i^', Sally Nutting, Jan., 
1820, who d. May 27, 1844, a. 46 ; m., 2'^, Abigail, dau. 
of William and Jane (Wright) Davidson, and widow of 
Capt. Moses Cutter, June, 1849 ' ''^ *° Medina, Mich., 
from thence to Hudson, where he d. Dec. 25, 1875- 
Seven ch. : 

(i) Fanny Parker, m. Asaph Pierce; (2) Isaac 
Parker, d. March 23, 1837 ' (3) ^^(^^^"^ 
Jackson; (4) Mary TFl, m., and d. Oct. 11, 
1855 ; (5) Elhridge G. ; (6) Sarah, b. 1840, 
d. 1 841 ; (7) Adelbert. 

Dexter Jewell m. Sally, dau. of Col. Josiah and 
Rebecca (Cutter) Mower. He d. April 29, 1873, a. 
69. She d. May 16, 1S73, a. 65. 

I. Samuel Dexter, b. Jan. 18, 1831.-!- 
II. Liberty Mower, b. Nov. 9, 1836 ; m. Martha A- 
Lebourveau, 1862. 



382 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



15 

16 

18 



(12) 



(13) 



26 

27 



III. Sarah E., b. Dec. 27, 1839 '■> ^'^- Wilbur F. Whit- 

ney, of Ashburnham, Mass., 1866. 

IV. Ellen E., b. March 28, 1842 ; d. Nov. 15, 1865. 
V. Jacob Ai b. June 19, 1844. 

VI. 3fary H., b. July 19, 1S48. 

Charles A. Jewell m. Lydia Ann, dau. of Benja- 
min M. and Lydia (Spaulding) Stanley, of Jaftrey. 

Horace B., b. May 12, 1833. 
Ellen A., b. Aug. 18, 1835. 
Ann 31., b. Sept. 6, 1837. 
Charles A., b. Sept. 8, 1839. 
Emily S., b. Aug. 20, 1845. 
George 3L, b. May 7, 1S47. 
Halph Jeioett, b. Jan. 20, 1852. 



Samuel Dexter Jewell m. Mary F., dau. of Na- 
thaniel and Mary B. (Averill) Cutter, April 15, 1859. 
She d. Oct. 5, 1873. 

I. Willis Bradford, b. Aug. 9, 1857. 
II. Ernest H., b. April 19, 1864. 



19 


I 


20 


II 


21 


III 


22 


IV 


23 


V 


24 


VI 


25 


VII. 



JEWETT FAMILY. 

The ancestors of the Jewett family, who settled in New 
England, were Maximilian and his brother Joseph. They 
came from Bradford, Yorkshire, England, about 1638. The 
name was written originally, Juet, Juit, Jewit. They settled 
in Rowley, Mass. Ezekiel, son of Maximilian, settled in the 
same place, and m. Faith Parrot, by whom he had ten ch. He 
was a deacon of the church, and representative. Thomas, his 
second son, m. Hannah Snow, and settled in Boxford ; had five 
children, — one son and four daughters. Ezekiel, his son, m. 
Martha Thurston, of Newbury, by whom he had twelve ch., 
three of whom settled in Rindge. 

Jonathan Jewett, son of Ezekiel, b. in Boxford, 
March 12, 1739, m. Martha Belcher, of Wrentham ; x. 
in Rindge ; re. to JatlVey about 1772? 'i"tl settled on lot 
5, range 7, now the farm of Jona. J. Comstock, his 
grandson. He d. at sea, while on a voyage to Maine, 
April 28, 1786. His widow d. March 19, 1S28, a. 94. 
They had nine children : 



3 
4 



5 
6 

7 
8 

9 

lO 

(3) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 383 

I. Benjamin^ b. Oct. 13, 1763 ; m. Ruth McBride ; 

r. Utica, N. Y. ^ 

n. Samuel, b. Nov. 17, 1765.-I- 

III, David, b, April 6, i']6'j \ settled on the home- 

stead ; m. Lucy Clark, of Sullivan ; d. Aug. 
27, 1S19. She d. Nov. 16, 1851, a. 77. 

IV. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 19, 186S ; m. Artemas Cha- 

pin ; r. Oneida Co., N. Y. 
V. Jonathan, b. April 19, 1770; d. Aug. 25, 177S ; 

r. Ohio. 
VI, Henry, b. June 13, 1772 ; m. Martha Howe; r. 

Ohio. 
VII. Hannah (twin), b. June 13, 1772; m. Joseph 

Osburn ; r. Sangerfield, N. Y. 
VIII. Martha, b. April 13, 1774; m. VVm. Comstock, 
q. V. 
IX. Moses, b. July 2, 1777 ; ni. ; r. Ohio. 



Samuel Jewett m. Sarah, dau. of Capt. James and 
Sarah (Lamson) Gage ; r. New Hartford, N. Y. She 
d. Feb. 12, 1861, a. 92. Nine children : 

11 I. Samuel, b. Jan. 13, 1795 ; d. Aug, 4, 1861. 

12 II. Sarah, b. INIay 9, 1797 ; num. 

13 III. David L., b. Oct. 3, 1799; m. Ann. Kelley ; d. 
Aug. I, 1855. 

14 IV. Abigail, b. April 2, iSoi ; d. Oct. 7, 1S45, unm. 

15 V. Betsey, b. Nov. 28, 1802; d. Dec. 29, 1833, 
unm. 

16 VI. Benj. F., b. Aug. 21, 1805 ; m. Sophia S. 
Hastings. 

17 VII. James, b. Aug. 17, 1S07; m. ; d. Aug. 25, 
1870. 

18 VIII. Mary Ann, b. Feb. 2, 1810 ; d. March 11, 1863, 
unm. 

IX. Phebe, b. Nov. 5, 181 2 ; unm. 

20 Oliver Jewett came from Littleton, Alass,, to Jaf- 
frey about 1798; settled on lot 10, range 5; a brick- 
maker by trade ; m. Mary, dau. of Lieut. William 
Turner. He d. June 13, 1842, a. 73. She d. July 26, 
1S41, a. 71. 

21 I. 'William Turner, b. Nov. 28, 1798; a school 
teacher ; d. in New York state. 

22 II. Ezra^ b. Feb. 5, i8oo.-)- 



384 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



23 III. Mary^ b. Jan. i, 1803 ; m. Abel Shedd, q. v. 

24 IV. Roxana, b. Dec. 5, 1804 ; d. Jan. 22, 1842. 

25 V. Naomi^ b. Nov. iS, 1806 ; d. Nov. 14, 1845. 

26 VI. Oliver^ b. May 27, iSio; m. Eliza Heming- 

way. + 

27 vii. George W.. h. Feb. 25, 1812; m. Adeline 

Adams. He d. Nov. 5, 1857. 

(22) Ezra Jewett m. Elvira Maynard. He d, June 2, 
1841. 

28 I. Eliza Ann, h. Feb. 6, 1827; m. George Mar- 

shall, of Dublin. 

29 II. Maria Elvira, b. Dec. 21, 1828 ; m. Luther W. 

Durant. 

30 III. Prudence Augnista, h. Jan. 30, 1830; m. Eli 

Hannaford : r. St. Alban's, Vt. 

31 IV. (Tulius Clinton, b. Nov. 26, 1832 ; d. June 29, 

1836. 

32 V. Amanda Etneline, b. May 22, 1833 ; m. Stillman 

A. Eaton, of South Reading. 

33 VI. An infant daughter, d. Jan. 18, 1836, a. i d. 

34 VII. Julius Clinton, b. May 4, 1837 ; d. Oct. 4, 1861. 

35 VIII. Naomi Josephine, b. April 21, 1841 ; d. Oct. 2, 

1 841. 

(26) Oliver Jewett m. Eliza Hemingway, dau. of Capt. 

Luther and Betsey (Cummings) Hemingway, May 21, 
181 1 ; re., 1857, to Marlborough. 

36 I. Clara E., b. Oct. 23, 1847 ; m. Lavater M. Flint ; 

r. Marlborough. 

37 II. Otis E., b. Feb. II, 1849; d. Aug. 2, 1850. 

38 HI. Willie A., b. Dec. 27, 1851, 



2 
3 



JOHNSON FAMILY. 

Levi Johnson was b. in Leominster, Mass., Jan. 29, 
1767 ; m. Sarah Nichols, of Leominster; re. to Jaffrey 
in 1794, to Dublin, 1836. She d. Oct. 19, 1856, a. 83. 
He d. Dec. 12, 1856, a. 89. He followed the business 
of farming, and the manufacturing of horn combs. 
Fourteen ch. : 

1. Sally, b. Nov. 18, 1790; d. March 19, 1810. 
II. Levi, b. March 12, 1794; d. Sept. 4, 1796- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



385 



4 III. A child, b. Feb. 2, 1795 ; d. Feb. 4, 1796. 

5 IV. Sardis, b. April 26, 1796; m. Charlotte Good- 
rich, of Bedford, Mass. ; had two ch., d. in 
infancy ; r. in Mont Vernon, N. H. He d. 
April 22, 1865. 

V. Cynthia, h. May 14, 179S; m. Mark D. Per- 
kins, of Mont Vernon. She d. 1867. 
VI. Elmira, b. June 23, 1800; m. Simpson Hodge, 
q. V. 

8 VII. Polly, b. June 29, 1802; d. March 19, 1810. 

9 VIII. Betsey, b. July 20, 1S04; d. March 19, 1810. 

10 IX. Julia, b. July 17, 1806; m., May i, 1834, Will- 
iam Darricott, of Dublin. Ch. : (i) Sarah 
Jane ; (2) Bessie M. ; (3) Julia ; two ch. 
(twins), d. in infancy. 

11 X. Azubah,h. July 20, 1808; m. John Powers, of 
Leominster. Ch. : (i) Sarah F. ; (2) Al- 
bert ; (3) Ellen S. ; (4) Charlie; (5) George 
M. She d. June, 1869. 

12 XI. Mary, b. Aug. 21, 1810; m. Charles Sinclair, of 
Leominster. Ch. : (i) Charles H. ; (2) 
George ; (3) Mary Frances ; (4) James ; 
(5) William ; (6) child, d. in infancy. 
She d. Sept., 1861. 

13 XII. Sarah, b. Nov. i, 1813 ; d. Oct. 5, 1813. 

14 XIII. Levi N'.,h. Jan. 17, 1S15 ; m., i^', Susan M. 
Pierce. She d. Dec. i, 1852, a. 37; m., 2*, 
Rebecca Farnum, of Peterborough. He d. 
March 12, 1858, a. 43. Four ch., three by 
first wife, one by second wife : 

15 I. Frances A., b. April 3, 1843 ; d., a. 5 

mos., 3 days. 

16 2. Charles Addison, b. 1845 ; m. Ann 

Grossman. One ch., — Albert L., b. 
March 23, 1876 ; d. 

17 3. George E., d. Nov., 1852, a. 14 weeks, 

I day. 

18 4. Mary T., d. Sept. 22, 1854, a. 11 days. 

His second wife m. second husband, Elijah 
A. Robbins, of Peterborough. 

19 XIV. Sarah J., h. July 18, 1820; m., Nov. 7, 1844, 
Jonathan Wetherbee, of Leominster ; r. in 
Princeton. Ch. : 

(i) George F. ; (2) Charles E. ; (3) Al- 
bert B. 

26 



386 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



20 Eliphalet Johnson, son of Isaiah, and grandson of 
Judge Johnson, of Bridgewater, Mass., was b. at 
Stoughton, Mass., March 14, 1758; m. Hepsibah, a 
descendant of Col. Oliver and Sarah Perkins Appleton, 
who came from England and settled in Ipswich, Mass. 
She was b. at Ipswich, Jan. 5, 1759 ; d. at Fitzwilliam, 
March 9, 1848. He d. at Fitzwilliam, Aug. 18, 1834. 
Nine children : 

21 I. Thomas, b. July 23, 1784; d. at St. Domingo, 
1803, a. 19. 

22 II. John, b. March 9, 1785 ; a merchant and chem- 
ist ; r. Providence, R. I., and d. there. Two 
children. 

23 III. Samuel, b. July 29, 1786: a merchant; r. Port- 
land, Me. ; d. May, 1825, leaving a wife and 
son. 

24 IV. Lucinda, b. Sept. 27, 1789 ; d. at JaftVey, Aug. 
16, 1863. 

25 V. Betsey, b. Dec 13, 1791 ; d. 1793. 

26 VI. James, b. Jan. 13, 1793 ; d. Oct. 15, 1821 ; r. in 
Marion Co., Miss. ; a tanner by trade, and 
one of the judges of the court. 

27 VH. Olivia, b. June 11, 1795. For ten years she 
taught school in New York city, and a num- 
ber of years in Richmond, Va. She m. 
Rev. William Mylne. 

28 VIII. Electa, b at Jaffrey, May 4, 1801 ; m. Nathan 
Blodgett, q. v. 

29 IX. Eliphalet, b. Aug. 28, 1803; a merchant; r. 
New Orleans. 



JOSLIN FAMILY. 

Two brothers by the name of Joslin came from England to 
this country, and settled in Lancaster, Mass. Joseph, one of 
their sons, settled in Leominster and d. there. 



2 

3 
4 



Samuel Joslin, his son, came to Jaffrey previous to 
1793, and settled on lot 6, range 6, now uninhabited. 
He m. Betsey Wilder, and d. Nov. 17, 1815, a. 64. She 
d. Dec. 14, 1821, a. 63. Three children; 

Betsey, r. Oberlin, Ohio. 
Thomas^ r. Oberlin, O. 
Lucy, m. Millot Ellis, q. v. 



7 
8 



9 

lO 

II 



12 
13 



(9) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 38/ 

John JosLiN (Capt.), b. in Leominster; came to Jaf- 
frey previous to 1787 ; settled on lot 8, range 5 ; kept a 
public house. At a later period he became the propri- 
etor of the Monadnock Mineral Spring House. In 1824 
he re. to Marlborough, N. H., and spent the remainder 
of his life with his nephew, David Joslin. He was a 
man highly respected, held many town offices, and was 
a captain in the militia. He m., and d. Dec. 22, 1S36, 
a. 78. His wife d. Aug. 22, 1841, a. 79. They had 
no children. 



Joseph Joslin (Dea.), son of Joseph, was b. in 
Leominster, Mass., March 21, 1766; came to Jaffiey 
previous to 1793. He settled on lot 15. range 7? now 
the farm of Caleb K. Martin. He was a ver}' industri- 
ous man, deacon of the Baptist church, and held in high 
estimation by his fellow-citizens. He m. Lucretia 
Wilder, Feb. 14, 1788. Her death resulted from being 
accidentally thrown from a chaise while on a visit at 
Charlton, Mass., Aug. 24, 1826. She was b. in Leom- 
inster, Feb. I, 1769. He m., 2^, Mrs. Spear, of New 
Ipswich. He d. Sept. ri, 1852, a. 86. 

1. jSukey, d. April 23, 1791. 

II. Lucretia., b. Jan. 16, 1795 ; d. Jan. 15, 1864, a, 
69 ; unm. 

III. Joseph, b. Jan. 26, 1798.-!- 

IV. Wilder., b. Aug. 21, 1800. -|- 

V. Vashti, b. Oct. 16, 1802 ; m. Amasa Wyman, 
of Woburn, Mass., Dec. 29, 1840 ; he d. June 
16, 1857, a. 62 ; m., 2^, Samuel P. Parker, Oct. 
29, i860; he d. March 18, 1870, a. 69. She 
now (1876) r. Jaftrey. 

VI. Emily, b. Nov. 16, 1805. 

VII. Austris, b. May 5, 1808; m. Dr. Willard 
Adams, son of Thomas Adams, of Marl- 
borough, N. H. Dr. Adams was b. in New 
Salem, Mass. : settled, first, in Wells, Me. ; 
re. to Woburn, and from thence to Swanzey, 
N. H. 



Joseph Joslin m. Sarah D. Parker. He was a man- 
ufacturer of boots and shoes, a finished workman, and 
had no equal in fashionable work in this vicinity. He 
d. Feb. 12, 1775, a. 77, much lamented. 



388 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



14 I. Francis. 

15 11. Sarah Lucretia, m. Charles Cutter, q. v. 

16 III. Ann J., b. 1S30; m. Alonzo Bascomb, Esq., 

q. V. 

17 IV. Ellen P., h. 1837; m., Feb. 22, i860, Charles 
Mason, of Sullivan. 

18 V. Joseph H.^ b. 1840; in service during the rebel 
war; d. May 9, 1866, a. 26. 



(10) Wilder Joslin m., Sept. 24, 1827, Fanny Nichols, 

b. in Hopkinton, N. H., Feb. 4, 1803. She d. Oct. 16, 
1853, a. 50. He settled in Massachusetts, and w^as for 
a time one of the workmen employed in the erection of 
the monument on Bunker hill. He afterwards re. to 
JaftVey, where he now resides. 

19 I. Augustus Wilder., b. June 21, 1828; m., March 
3, 1853, Lucy Malinda, dau. of Orlando 
Cragin. One child, — Herbert Augustus, b. 
Feb. 23, 1858. 

20 11. Albert Nichols., b. Feb. 23, 1830; d. in the 
army. 

21 III. Otis Malcolm., b. Nov. 28, 1831 ; m. Mary A. 
Partridge, of Gardiner, Mass. One child, — 
Alfred Hutchinson ; b. in Somerville. 

22 IV. Theodore Cooledffe,h. April 31, 1834; m. Mary 
H. Ellsworth, Sept. 6, 1855, who was b. in 
Troy, N. Y., April 13, 1836. Four ch. : 



23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 



1. Fannie Otis, b. Aug. 30, 1856. 

2. George T., b. Oct. 22, 1859; d. Sept. 
22, i860. 

3. Mary T., b. April 6, 1862 ; d. Oct. 26, 
1862. 

4. Willie Ernest, b. March 26, 1869; d. 
same day. 

V. Joseph Randolph., b. Nov. 14, 1835 ; m., and 

r. Union Square, N. Y. 
VI. Henry Harrison., b. July 8, 1840; d. 
VII. Levi Willard, b. Oct. 9, 1847; r. Fitchburg. 



KIMBALL FAMILY. 

Joseph Kimball became a resident of Jaffrey in 
1796. His name was on the tax-list that year. He set- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 389 

tied in the south part of the town. He m. Lucy Robin- 
son, who d. Sept. 23, 1853, a. 94. He d. Oct. 9, 1813, 
a. 64. 

2 I. Mehitable^ b. 1791 ; m. Stephen Cutter, q. v. 

3 II. Lucy,h. 1799; r. Jaffrey. 

KINGSBURY FAMILY. 

Benjamin Kingsbury (Dea.), son of Benjamin and 
Jedediah Kingsbury, of Walpole, Mass., and grandson 
of Nathaniel Kingsbury, of Dedham, Mass., wash. Oct. 
30, 1742; re. to Rindge, 1792; to Jaftrey, 1800; re. 
back to Rindge in 1816. Late in life he studied divin- 
ity, and was afterwards a public preacher. He m., 
I'', Dec. I, 1768, Abigail Sawin, who d. Oct. 6, 1793 ; 
m., 2^. Sept. 3, 1794, Lucretia Locke, who d. in Tem- 
ple, Nov. 6, 1843. ^^ ^- J""^ 10- 1827. 

Children by first wife : 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



7 
8 



I. Joseph^ b. Oct. 29, 1769. 
II. Abigail, b. Aug. 17, 1777. 

III. JBevjamin, re. to N. Y. or Pa. 

IV. N^ancy, m. Woolsoncraft. 

V. Jedediah, d. 1840, unm. 

Children by second wife : 

VI. Lucretia, h. Sept. 8, 1795; d. Aug. 12, 1839, 
unm. 

VII. Lucinda (twin), b. Sept. 8, 1795 ; d. Aug. 12, 
1839. 

VIII. Nathaniel, b. June 28, 1798. He entered Mid- 
dlebury college, 1816, and Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1817 ; was there two years; was en- 
gaged in teaching in Georgia and Massa- 
chusetts a few years ; studied medicine, and 
received his medical degree at Brunswick, 
Me., in 1829. He practised medicine first 
in Rindge, and re. to Temple in 1834. He 
became a distinguished physician, and as 
such had few equals. He was the leading 
physician in this section, and of wide influ- 
ence as a counsellor and man of business. 
He represented the town in the state legisla- 
ture, and was a member of the state senate. 
He m., i^', 1827, Catherine Sawin, who d. 
same year ; m., 2^, Linda (Raymond) Ward, 



390 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



widow, who d. Oct. 15, 1834 5 '^m 3^ Nov. 3, 
1835, Lydia (Barnes) Patten, widow of 
Jesse Patten, wiio d. Aug. 10, 1837 - "^•'» 'l'*** 
Nov. II, 1840, Ann Hazen, of Shirley, 
Mass. ; she d. He d. at Temple, March 3, 
1870, a. 72. Two children. 

10 I. Catherine Sawin, b. March 28, 1834. 

11 II. Benjamin B., b. in Temple, May 15, 1837; 
graduated at Bowdoin college, 1857. 



KNOWLTON FAMILY. 

Dexter B. Knowlton, b. Jan. 19. 1813 ; m., Dec. 
2, 1834, Mary A. Newell, settled in Hancock, and af- 
terwards re. to East JaftVey. Children : 

I. George D., b. Aug. 2, 1835 '■> ^- '" the army, 

Co. I, 26th Mass. Regt. 
II. Mary E.^ b. April 30, 1837; '"•' Feb. 13, 

1856, Chaplain Deeth ; d. at Sunderland, Vt., 

July 24, 1805. 
III. Hannah «/., b. July i, 1839; "^- Chaplain 

Deeth. 

5 IV. Charles X., b. Sept. 17, 1845. 

6 V. William A., b. May 11, 1849; m. Mary E. 
Mansfield. 

VI. Katie JE.^ b. and d. June 21, 1856. 



LACY FAMILY. 

David Lacy came from Andover, Mass., and settled 
in Jaffrey, on lot 14, range 8, previous to 1790. His 
name is among the list of highway-surveyors that year. 
He m. Charlotte, dau. of Jonathan and Molly (Fitch) 
Blodgett, Nov. 2, 1788. He d. Feb. 17, 1827, a. 6?,. 
She d. July 6, 1834, ^- ^5- 

I. Betsey.\>.]u\y 2,0-, 17S9 ; m. Jonas M. Melville, b. 
at Nelson, May i, 1823. He came to Jaftrey 
in 1822. In 1859 ^^ ''^* to Pepperell, Mass., 
where he d. She d. at Pepperell, May 30, 
1863. Mr. Melville was a man of wealth 
and influence ; was a proprietor and benefac- 
tor of the Melville academy : a leading man 



3 

4 

5^ 
6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 



(5) 



II 



12 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 39I 

in the formation of the Second Congrega- 
tional Church, at East JaftVey, and con- 
tributed much towards the erection of the 
meeting-house ; built the elegant stone man- 
sion, now the summer residence of Leonard 
R. Cutter, of Boston. 
II. Charlotte, b. Aug. 11, 1791 ; d. at Pepperell, 
May 8, 1863, unm. 

III. Polly, b. Sept. 13, 1793; "i- Joseph Saunders, 

q. V. 

IV. William, b. Nov. 9, 1795.+ 
V. David, h. Nov. 13, 1796.-I- 

VI. Sally, h. March 10, 1799; m. John Saunders, 

q. V. 
VII. Harvey, h. July 8, i8o3.-|- 

VIII. T'ryphosa, b. May 24, 1S04; d. Nov. i, 1834. 
IX. An infant daughter, b. Nov. 2, and d. Nov. 5, 
1808. 



William Lacy m. Betsey Bronsdon, May 26, 1829; 
settled in Jatirey, and engaged in mercantile business 
in the Ainsworth store, in company with Ethan Cutter 
and Luke Sweetzer. The copartnership was continued 
for several years, and, on dissolution, he continued the 
business in the Thorndike store, now the residence of 
Dr. Phelps. By diligence and economy, he found 
means to enlarge his trade, and, in the spring of 1854, 
he bought and stocked the Foster store at East JafFrey, 
in which he placed his son James S. Lacy, who after- 
wards became a partner and remained as such till his 
death, June 20, 1869. In possession of imusual prudence, 
and never risking hazardous adventures, he slowly and 
surely accumulated a good estate, rendering comfort- 
able his declining years, and leaving behind him, as a 
legacy to his children, the name of an honest man. 

I. James Stone, b. March 3, 1830; m., July 22, 

1856. Dorcas C, dau. of Moses and Cozby 
(Cooledge) Perkins. He is now extensively 
engaged in trade at East JafTrey, and is a 
prominent man in town aflairs. 

II. Sophia Ursula, b. Sept. 3, 1831 ; m., Jan. 8, 

1857, William W. Slason ; r. in West Rut- 
land, Vt. Children: (i) Annette, b. Jan. 
7, 1858. (2) Celia Frances, b. April 12, 
i860. (3) William M., b. Oct. 18, 1861 ; 



392 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



(6) 



13 

15 



16 

(8) 



17 

i8 



19 

(13) 

20 
21 

(H) 
22 

23 

24 

(17) 



d. Dec. 23, 1864. (4) Ann Maria, b. Sept. 
25, 1862; d. Oct. 8, 1862. (5) Charles 
Hiram, b. Sept. 26, 1863 ; d. Dec, 18, 1864. 
(6) Minnie Sophia, b. Oct. 23, 1S64; d. 
Dec. 15, 1864. (7) James Lacy, b. Dec. 
27, 1865 ; d. Nov. 8, 1866. 



David Lacy m. Phebe Melvin, Dec. 14, 1828. She 
d. April 19, 1861, a. 58. He d. May 20, 1870. 

I. Andrew 31., b. Sept. 20, 1829; m. Caroline H. 

Baker.+ 
II. Jonas M. Melville, b. Sept. 17, 1831.-I- 

III. Mary A. C, b. 1835; m. Ebenezer W. Mcin- 

tosh, of Peterborough. She d. Feb. 19, i86i, 
a. 26. 

IV. Joseph S., h. 1842 ; d. in the Union Army. 

— — / 

Harvey Lacy m. Martha Whitney, 1828. He d. 
June 6, 1843. 

I. David TF., b. Sept. 26, 1829.4- 
II. Frances //., b. Nov. 15, 1833 ; m. Rev. John E. 
B. Jewett, Jan. 10, 1854. Children : (i) 
Mary Minot, b. March 15, 1857. (2) Mar- 
tha Frances, b. Jan. 27, 1859; d. Dec. 9, 
i860. (3) Ella Frances, b. July 4, 1862. 
(4) Bessie Melville, b. Nov. 19, 1871, at 
Pepperell, Mass. 
III. George, b. June 26, 1836.4- 

Andrew M. Lacy m. Caroline H. Baker, Sept. 6, 

1853- 

I. Ida Phehe, b. July 22, 1855, at Jaffrey. 
II. Elmer Eugene, b. March 29, 1869, at Rindge. 



Jonas M. M. Lacy m. Mary J. Tarbox, Oct. 4, 1855. 

I. Mary J., b. Nov. 13, 1856. 
II. Effie, b. April 11, 1S63 ; d. April 15, 1863. 
III. Susie G. P., b. March 9, 1867. 

David W. Lacy m. Emma L. Jaquith, Sept. 29, 

1857- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



393 



25 
26 

27 



(19) 

28 
29 
30 



I. Everette C, b. Nov. 5, 1859; ^- ^^J ^7' 1S63. 
II. Harry C, b. Sept. 24, 1865. 
III. NedM., h. Nov. 17, 1868. 

George Lacy m. Sarah M. Hodkins. 

I. George E., b. June 20, 1865, at Winchendon. 
II. Nettie M., b. April 14, 1867, 
III. Elton TF., b. June 19, 1870, 






LAWRENCE FAMILY. 

John Lawrence, b. at Wisset, England, came to this coun- 
try, and settled in Watertown, Mass., about 1636. He was 
twice married, and had thirteen children by first wife, and two 
by the second. He d. in Groton, July 11, 1667. 

Benjamin Lawrence, fifth generation, was b. at 
Groton, Sept. i, 1746; m. July 3, 1778, Rebecca 
Woods, of Pepperell ; re. to Jaffrey about 1778, and 
settled on lot 16, range 3, previously owned by Daniel 
White, and now in possession of Frederick J. Law- 
rence, a great-grandson. 

The Lawrence family is one of distinguished English 
origin. Robert Lawrence, of Lancashire, England, b. 
A. D. 1 150, so distinguished himself in the war of the 
Crusades in the Holy Land, that he was knighted "Sir 
Robert of Ashton Hall," and obtained a coat of arms. 

Mr. Benjamin Lawrence was an officer, and served 
in the Revolutionary war. He was a strong man, bod- 
ily and mentally, and a successful farmer. They were 
the parents of ten children, all of whom reached the 
age of maturity, and in their turn became parents of a 
numerous progeny. He d. June 9, 1824, a. 77. His 
widow d. Sept. 30, 1830, a. 75. 

I. Ephraim, b. April 9, 1779.-}- 
II. Artemas, b. Feb. 13, 1781.-}- 

III. Moody, b.Jan. 15, 1783.-I- 

IV. Joshua, b. Jan. 18, 1785. 
V. Ithamar, b. April 8, 1787.-]- 

VI. Rebecca, b. April 8, 17S9; m., Sept., 1817, 
Stephen F. Warner ; r. Pembroke, N. Y. 
She d. Jan. i, 1848. Seven children: 

I. Sarah F., b. June, 1818; m. William 
Ellis ; r. Lafayette, Ind. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



8 



394 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



9 
lO 

II 

12 



16 

17 
18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 

26 

27 

28 



(2) 



2. Benjamin L., b. 1820; d. 1846. 

3. Mary T., b. 1822 ; d. Nov., 1846, 

4. Hannah L., m. Wm. Walters; r. Bat- 
tle Creek, Mich. 

5. Stephen W., r. Springfield, Pa. 

6. Isadore I., b. Jan., 1831 ; d. Nov., 
1848. 

7. Lucy A., b. June, 1833 ; m. Levant R. 
Brown, m. d., Lowell, Mich. 

VII. Milla^ b. Sept, 18, 1791 ; m. Cyrus Brown, 
Dec, 1810. He d. Oct., 1846, a. 61. She 
d. April 18, 1849, ^' 57- Children: 

1. Joshua L., b. Aug., 1812; m., i**, 
Eliza Ann Colby, 1835; d. 1836; m., 
2**, Diana Osburn, b. 1842 ; r, Batavia, 
N. Y. ; attorney-at-law. 

2. Abigail W., b. Dec, 1814; m. Daniel 
W. Noble ; d. in Pembroke, N. Y. 

3. John W., b. May, 1817; m. Roxanna 
L. Noble ; r in Pembroke, N. Y., 1835. 

4. Harriet M., b. Aug., 1819; m. Joseph 
M. Gowing; r. Batavia, N. Y. 

5. Martha, b. March, 1821 ; m. Robert 
Durham ; r. Pembroke, N. Y. 

6. Cyrus, b. 1824, d. 1849. 

7. Sarah T., b. Sept. 3, 1827 ; m. Nathan 
W. Stowell ; r. Lancaster, N. Y. 

8. Edward Dana, b. June, 1830; d. Tuly^ 
1850. 

9. Levant R., b. March, 1832 ; m. Lu 
A. Warner, a physician ; r. Lowell, 
Mich. 

10. George T., b. and d. Oct., 1834. 

VIII. Manasseth^ b. Jan. 21, 1794.-I- 
IX. Sarahs b. Nov. 2, 1796; m. William Evleth, of 
Dublin ; r. Gilsum, N. H., Alexandria and 
Pembroke, N. Y. She d. April 18, 1880. 
X. JSenJami7i, b. Dec, 1799; m. Roancy Gowing; 
r. Pembroke. 



Ephraim Lawrence m. Nancy Bruce, Sept., 1804, 
of Berlin, Mass. He d. in Windham, Vt., April 18, 
1845. His widow d. Feb., 1849. Eleven children: 



29 

30 

31 

32 
33 
34 

35 
36 
37 

38 
39 

(3) 



4o 

(4) 



42 

43 

44 

45 
46 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 395 

I. Sabra, b. 1805 ; m. Cobb ; d. Aug., 1856. 

II. Rufus, b. Oct., 1S07; m., 1831, French ; 

r. Windham, Vt. 

III. Mary, b. 1S09; m. Mack; r. Windham, 

Vt. 

IV. Joshua^ b. 1811 ; m., 1831, Achsah Jewett ; d. 

Nov., 1856. 

V. Eli^ b. 1813 ; m. Hastings; r. Windham. 

VI. Artemas, b. 1815 ; m. Woodward ; r. in 

Windham. 
VII. Harriet, b. 1817; d. 1834. 
VIII. Sarah, b. [820; d. Oct., 1821. 

IX. Henry, b. 1821 ; m. Ann Gilbert; r. Ashburn- 

ham, Mass. 

X. George, b. 1823 ; m. Smith ; r. Grafton, 

Vt. 
XI. Albert, b. 1825 ; d. 

Artemas Lawrence m., 1804, Lucy, dau. of Capt. 
Samuel and Lucy Spofford Adams. He d. May 15, 
1841. She d. Jan. 4, 1852, a. 67. He was an active 
business man, carried on the business of blacksmith- 
ing in JafFrey Centre, and was one of the company that 
built the Cheshire factory. Two children : 

I. Lucy S., b. April 8, 1805 ; m., i^', Henry Bar- 
rett, in 1823 ; m., 2'^, Smith Seymour; r. in 
Jamestown. N. Y. 
II. Mary Ann, b. Sept., 181 1; m. Richard Fen- 
ton ; r. Jamestown. 

Moody Lawrence m., i^', Sept., 1805, Dorcas 
Briant; m., 2^, Mrs. Polly (Pratt) Spaulding. His 
first wife d. Aug. 3, 1810, a. 29 ; second wife d. Jan. 
4, i860, a. 84. He d Dec. 29, 1856. He was an inn- 
keeper, auctioneer, sexton, and deputy-sheriff. He had 
five children by first wife : 

I. Ijucy JB., b. Nov. 29, 1806; m. Norman Jenks. 
He d., and she lives with a daughter in Van 
Buren, Lid. 
II. Grace, b. Aug. 25, 1808; m., 1828, Samuel 
Stearns ; he d. She lives in Lynn, Mass. 

III. Ayer,h. Feb. 15, 1810; m., 1830, John Felt; 

r. Woodstock, Me. 

IV. Calvin, d. March 10, 181 2, a. i day. 
V. Luther, d. July 21, 1843, a. 30. 



396 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



(6) 



47 
48 

49 



50 

51 
52 

(26) 



53 

54 

55 
56 

57 
58 

59 
60 

(47) 



Ithamar Lawrence settled on the homestead ; m., 
i", Betsey, dau. of Jacob and Mary Smith Jewell. She 
d. May 6, 1830, a. 39. Children by first wife : 

I. Sylvester B.^ b. Feb. 9, i8i3.-[- 
II. Mary Ann^ b. June 16, 1814; d. May 7, 1841. 

III. John S., b. May 23, i8i6.-|- 

M., 2**, Mrs. Rebecca Emery, dau. of Col. Josiah and 
Rebecca (Cutter) Mower, June 11, 1834, ^7 whom he 
had three children : 

IV. George F., b. April, 1832 ; m. Elizabeth, dau. 

of Ethan and Elizabeth (Blodgett) Cutter ; 
r. Boston. 
V. Elizabeth J. ^ b. Jan., 1834; m., 1S55, Lewis 

Glazier; r. in Ashburnham, Mass. 
VI. Benjamin F.,h. Feb., 1838.-!- 

Ithamar Lawrence d. Jan. 27, 1850, a. 63. 



Manasseth Lawrence m., i^', Dec. 14, 18 19, Mary 
Morse ; r, Alden, N. Y. She d. 1852. He m., 2^ 
Mrs. Mary Abbot ; r. Pembroke, N. Y. Eight chil- 
dren : 

I. Emily IT., b. Nov. 24, 1820; d. March 23, 1841. 
II. 3Iary 31., b. June 25, 1822 ; m. Abraham 
Thomas; d. Oct. 31, 1848. 
Bebecca W., b. March 23, 1825; m., 1846, Hi- 
ram Root, Mount Morris, Mich. 
William C.,h. March 12, 1S27 ; m., April 6, 
1856, Frances H. Smith ; r. Montrose, Iowa. 
Eunice e/., b. Jan. 8, 1829 ; d. Feb. 15, 1852. 
Cyrus B., h. Nov. 19, 1830 ; m. Nancy Derby ; 
r. Flint, Mich. 
VII. Ann JE., b. June 19, 1832 ; m. John Torrey ; r. 

Flint, Mich. 
VIII. BJllen A., b. June 17, 1S35 ; m. John Brookins ; 
r. Flint. 

Sylvester B. Lawrence m. Mary R. Emery ; r. 
Hudson, Mich., where they both d. Nine children : 

(i) Albert. (2) Charles. (3) Calvi?i. (4) Loren A. 

(5) . (6) Henry. (7) Clara E. (8) 

EffieB. (9) Mary B. 



III. 

IV. 

V. 
VI. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



397 



(49) 



6i 

62 

63 



(52) 



64 



John S. Lawrence ni. Sarah E. Emery ; settled on 
the homestead. He d. April 9, 1876. She d. July 2, 
1873, a. 50. 

I. Carra E., m. Lucius Cutter, q. v. 
II. Ella F., m. Albert A. French, q. v. 
III. Frederick J., m. Clara A. Cutter, dau. of Nehe- 

miah and Emily Bailey Cutter ; r. on the 

homestead. One child. 



Benj. F. Lawrence m. Sarah E., dau. of James D. 
and Betsey P. (Livermore) Sawyer. One child, — 
Walter F., b. 1870. 



Peter Lawrence, b. in Ashby, Mass., May 26, 
1768 ; came to Jaftrey about i779 '■> was appointed post- 
master in iSoo; m. Mary Spaulding, of Townsend, 
Mass. ; re. from Jaftrey in 1801 ; d. April 16, 1S27. 
Six children : 

(i) Mary, b. May 24, 1795. (2) Frances, b. Nov. 
27' 1796- (3) JEUza, b. July 9, 179S. (4) 
Sumner, b. at Jaftrey, Aug. 27, 1800. 



LITCH FAMILY. 

Thomas Litch was b. in Ireland, and came to this 
country when quite young ; settled in Lunenburg, 
Mass. ; m. Jane Kennedy ; d. Feb., 1802. He had three 
children, — Samuel, Betsey, and Samuel. Samuel, his 
son, m. Betsey . Four children : 

2 I. Samuel, b. in Lunenburg, July 9, 1779.-!- 

3 II. Betsey, b. March xo, 1781 ; m. Abner SpofFord, 
q. V. 

III. Thomas, b. July i, 1781 ; m. twice, and was the 
parent of a large number of ch., one of 
whom was a seaman. He d. in Charles- 
town, Mass. 

IV. Jonas, re. to Fredonia, N. Y. One ch., a son. 



(2) Samuel Litch settled in Jaftrey, on lot — , range — , 
in 1S06 ; m., June 13, 1808, Martha, dau. of Lieut. 
James and Elizabeth (Lacy) Stevens. She d. Dec. 3, 



398 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



1841, a. 51 ; he d. July 3, i860, a. 81. At the age of two 
years he re. witli his father to Winchendon, Mass. 
When nine years of age, his father was killed by a limb 
while felling trees. He then went to Weathersfield, 
Vt. , and lived with his grandfather, and worked on a 
farm. His means of education were extremely limited. 
He had no opportunity to attend school, but few books, 
and no opportunity for study till his day's work was 
completed, and no light, even then, but the fire, or a 
torch-light of his own manufacture out of pine knots. 
With these limited means, by patience and perseverance 
he made such literary acquirements as to be enabled, at 
the age of eighteen, to become a public school-teacher. 
He taught his first school in Winchendon, under the 
following: circumstances : For the first time in his life 
he attended a district school in Winchendon, and the 
teacher of that school, failing to give satisfaction, was 
dismissed, and Mr. Litch iiad the distinguished honor 
of being his successor by a vote of the scholars. He 
afterwards became a distinguished teacher, and was 
master of his profession. He had a power of govern- 
ment, and a knowledge of the branches then taught, 
that but few possessed. For many years he was the 
leading teacher in town ; taught the school in his own 
district nineteen years, and the one in the centre of the 
town a large num.ber, besides schools in other districts. 
Many of the sons and daughters of Jaftrey have attended 
his schools and received his instruction, and will long 
remember Master Litch. He was for many years an 
active member of the superintending school-committee. 
The first report of that committee on record was signed 
by Laban Ainsworth, Samuel Litch, and Luke Howe, 
1820. We find, in the possession of tlie family, certifi- 
cates of his appointments on that committee till 1846. 
We find, also, a certificate dated, — 

Winchendon, Jan. 19, 1803. 

Thiss may certify that, in the opinion of the sub- 
scriber. Ens. Samuel Liech is qualified to teach English 
Grammar, Arithmatic, and Writing, as taugh in com- 
mon English Schools. 

Levi Pilsberry, Pastor. 

Mr. Litch received the commission of ensign from 
Gov. Strong, of Mass., May 27, 1802. Mr. Litch took 
a deep interest in the public schools ; wrote many inter- 
esting essays relating to them, which were read in 



8 
9 

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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 399 

lyceums and other public meetings, — one giving a full 
account of the early schools, books used, method of 
teaching, with a description of the early school-houses. 
He also published school-books, — a primary school 
geography, an astronomy, and a concise treatise on rhet- 
oric, a novel thing for that day. He also had a taste 
for poetic effusions, with which he spiced his essays. 
In early life he was troubled with an impediment in 
his speech, which made it impossible to pronounce 
many words. His father was a cooper ; and one day, 
while engaged at his trade, he placed him upon a bar- 
rel and requested him to say boot. He tried, but failed. 
His father then told him he would give him a pair of 
boots (a tempting offer in those days) if he would say 
boot. He made the attempt, and, with the greatest 
effort, succeded ; and he not only obtained a pair of 
boots, but full power of speech. The impecUment was 
entirely removed. He was the parent of five children : 

I. Maria Josephine, b. Sept. 11, 181 1; d. April 
22, 1S43. 

II. Louisa Augusta, b. July 16, 1814; d. Aug. 18, 

1S19. 

III. Caroline America, b. June 23 ; d. Feb. 21, 1853. 

IV. Almira X., b. May 16, 1827 ; m. Fred. M. 

Hollingvvorth ; d. in Charlestown, Mass., 
Feb. 4, 1863. 
V. Malvina A., b. March 18, 1833 ? '"• Henry 
Chamberlin, of Holden, Mass., Aug. i8, 
1859 ' '• ^^^ ^^^^ homestead. Two ch. : 

1. Samuel Litch, b. Aug. 8, i860. 

2. Martha Stevens, b. March 4, 1861. 

MARSHALL FAMILY. 

William Marshall came from Tewksbury, Mass., 
during the Revolution, and settled on lot i, range 10; 
m. Esther, dau. of Ebenezer and Esther Jaquith. She 
d. June 29, 1803, a. 41. He m., 2*^, Sarah, dau. of John 
and Susannah (Hastings) Carter, and widow of Isaac 
Kimball, of Temple. He d. April 5, 1828, a. 71. She 
d. April 28, 1852, a. 82. Mr. Marshall was a thrifty 
farmer, a worthy man, and a good citizen. Eight ch. : 

I. William, b. Sept. 28, 1783 ; m. Harring- 
ton, of Troy ; re. to Greenfield, Mass. ; d. 
May 19, 1834. Three ch. 



400 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



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II. Esther^ b. Jan. 7, 1785; m., Sept. 22, 1818, 
Naomi Spaulding, of Temple. One son, — 
. Jonathan Spaulding, living in Temple. She 
d. May 28, 1S80. 

III. Abigail^ b. July 30, 17S7; m. Benj. Davidson; 

r. Fitzwilliam ; d. there Feb. 5, 1820. Two 
ch. 

IV. Abel, b. Aug. 17, 1789.-J- 

V. Betsey, b. Jan. 3, 1793 ; m. Phineas Ross, of 
Winchendon, Mass. ; d. April 20, 1874. 
Nine ch. 
Children by second marriage : 

VI. Thomas Hastings, b. Dec. 2, 1806 ; m. Abigail 
S. Havvkes ; d. Dec. 16, 1872. [See Col- 
lege Graduates.] 
VII. Susan, b. Dec. 16, 1808 ; m. Lyman Spaulding, 
q. V. 



Abel Marshall m., i*', Roxana Rice. She d. Nov. 
5, 1841, a. 46. M., 2^, Laura A. Pratt, a widow. She 
d. Aug. 24, 1856, a. 49. He d. Jan. 27, 1871. Six 
children : 

I. Sarah a., m. YA'xsha Chaplin; r. Fitzwilliam. 
II. Addison A., b. 1827. 

III. Abby, m., Nov. 26, 1849, Moses Chaplin; r. 

Fitzwilliam. 

IV. Betsey, m. A. Haskell, of Troy, Sept. 10, 1852. 

V. Lydia Ann E., b. 1S41. 

VI. George H., d. July 11, 1864, a. 19 — killed by 
lightning. 



VII. Mary, b. 1848. 



Silas Marshall, brother of William, came to Jaf- 
frey at an early date. He settled on lot i, range 8 ; was 
road surveyor in 1779, selectman in 1786, and consta- 
ble in 1789. It seems quite probable that he left 

town soon after. He m. Eunice , by whom he 

had nine children : 



1. 
II. 

HI. 
IV. 
V. 



Silas, b. Aug. 6, 1769. 

Elsie, b. March 22, 1771 ; d. March 4, 1790. 

Mary, b. Jan. 24, 1773. 

Thaddeus, b. Feb. 5, 1775. 

Hannah, b. Oct. 24, 1776. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4OI 



22 VI. Elizabeth^ b. Nov. 16, 1778. 

23 VII. Rhoda^ b. Feb. 29, 17S0. 

24 VIII. Thomas, b. Feb. 16, 17S2. 

25 IX. John, b. March i, 1785. 



MATHEWS FAMILY. 

John Mathews was impressed into the British ser- 
vice during the Revohition. On his arrival in this 
country he deserted and joined the American army. 
After the close of the war he received a pension for mil- 
itary service. He lived in East JaftVey ; m. Sarah 
Wesson; d. June 26, 1S22, a. 70. His widow d. Feb. 
5, 1S45, a. 84. 

I. John, b. Aug. 5, 1784. 

II. Isaac, b. Nov. 13, 1790. 

III. James, b. Feb. 19, 1792. 

IV. Stephen, b. Feb. 16, 1794. 

V. William, b. Feb. 24, i']()6.-\- 
VI. Thomas, b. April 2, 1799; m., and r. in Peter- 
borough in 1844; re. West.-)- 
VII. Arvilla, d. unm. 

William Mathews m., i'', Phebe Frencli ; she d. 
at Peterborough, Dec. 10, 1835. a. 39. Two infant ch. 
d. in Peterborough. M., 2"^, Elvira Russell, of Rintlge, 
dau. of Simeon, June 7, 1836. She d. Aug. 12, 1842, 
a. 35, leaving four children. M., 3*^, Sarah Craig, who 
d. Dec. [3, 1 85 1, a. 39. He r. first in Peterborough, 
and afterwards in New Ipswich. His three wives lie 
buried in Peterborough village cemetery, and five 
ch. : 

An infant son, d. Oct. 6, 1830, a. i day. 

A71 infant son, d. April i, 1834, a. i day. 

An infant son, d. April 12, 1837, a. 5 weeks. 

Edxoard, d. Dec. 14, 1S40, a. i yr., 7 mos., 21 days. 

Henry, d. Feb. 24, 1842, a. 6 mos., 4 days. 

Eliza Jane, b. 1819; m. James Butler, who d. Sept. 
6,1871,3.59. Three children: (i) Hat- 
tie G.,b 1855: (2) Flora T., b. i860; (3) 
Alfred, b. 1865. 



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Thomas Mathews, a shoemaker by trade, r. in Pe- 
terborough till 1844, when he re. to Council Bluffs, la. 

27 



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HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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He m. Mercy 
borough : 



Four of his children d. in Peter- 



I. Horace TF., d. Dec. 12, 1S31, a. 3 yrs., 6 mos. 

11. Lucy H., d. Sept. 26, 1S31, a. i yr., 4 mos. 

III. F'rancis W., d. April 17, 1838, a. i yr. 

IV. /Sally Eliza, d. July 25, 1841, a. 2 yrs., 3 mos. 



MAYNARD FAMILY. 

John Maynard, the emigrant, with his son John, settled in 
Sudbury, Mass., in 1630. John, Jr., was 8 years of age at the 
time of his arrival. He m., 1656, Mary Gates, and in 1660 
settled in Marlborough, Mass., and became a leading man in 
that place. She d., and he m., 2'', 1675, Sarah B. Keyes ; had 
ten children. 

David, his son, b. 1660, m. Hannah Nair ; had eleVen chil- 
dren. 

Jesse, his son, m. Phebe Fisk ; had three children. 

Lemuel Maynard, his son, m. Sarah Craig; settled 
first in Townsend, Mass. ; re. to Jaftrey about 1785 ; 
had eight children : 

I. Jesse, settled on the homestead ; he was b. Feb. 
9, 1765. His father d. May 4, 1808, a. 65. 
In 1815 he re. to Burlington, Vt., where he 
d. His mother d. at the same place. While 
in JafiVey he was for a time deacon of the 
church. 

3 II. John, re. to Springfield, Vt., and d. there. 

4 III. Amos, re. to Madison, N. Y. 

5 IV. Parker, h. July ^1, 1769. -|- 

6 V. Lemuel, h. May 10, 1773 ; a Methodist minister ; 
lived and d. in Suny, N. H. 

VI. Moses, h. Oct. 10, 1775 ; re. to Madison, N. Y. 
Dr. Edward Maynard, of Washington, D. C, 
is his son. 

VII. JElias, b. Oct. 11, 1779; le. to Boston and d. 
there. 

VIII. Hannah, b. Oct. 11, 1779; married Ebenezer 
Thompson, and d. in Boston. 



8 
9 

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Parker Maynard (Capt.) settled on lot 19, range 
3, now (1876) in possession of Philip Hahn. He m., 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



403 



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H 



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16 



June 6, 1796, Peggy, dau. of Capt. John and Agnes 
(Miller) Taggart, of Sharon. Capt. Maynard was a 
highly-respected citizen, and for a time held the office 
of captain of the Jaffi'ey and Rindge cavalry company 
with distinguished honor. He d. May 20, 1836, a. 66. 
She d. Nov. 11, 1S50, a. 75. They had eight children: 

I. Sally ^ b. Oct. 4, 1799 ; m. Capt. Abijah Pierce. 

q. V. 
II. John Miller, b. May 12, iSoi ; m. Harriet H. 
BuUard, of Mason. He d. at Lowell, Mass. 
He was a prominent railroad man. Five 
children: (i) John Edward, b. Nov. 22, 
1829. (2) Julia Ann, b. June 21, 1832. 
(3) Ellen A., b. Feb. 2, 1834. (4) George 
P., b. April 29, 1838. (5) Harriet A., b. 
March 28, 1846. 

III. Lucinda, b. Feb. 6, 1804; d. Aug. 6, 1811. 

IV. Elvira, b. July 23, 1806; m., i'\ Ezra Jewett, 
q. v. ; m., 2*^, Capt. Abijah Pierce, q. v. 

V. Jesse, b. Aug. 21, 1809; m., April 23, 1835, 
Augusta M. Marshall, of Dublin ; re. to 
Waukegan, 111. Children: (i) Sarah J. 
(2) John H. (3) Augusta M. (4) Mar 
shall P. 

VI. Parker, b. May 27, 1812 ; d. March 10, 1847. 
VII. Lucinda, b. June 2, 1816; m., Oct. 6, 1835, 
William E. Mansur, of New Ipswich ; re. to 
Chicago, 111. Children: (i) James P. (2) 
Helen M. (3) Abby L. (4) Maria E. 
(5) Frank R. 

17 VIII. Eliza, b. May 9, 1818 ; m., Feb. 5, 1840, Edwin 

F. Perkins, of Jaffi-ey. Children: (i) Ade- 
line E., b. July, 1841. (2) Ella M. 



MELVILLE FAMILY. 



Jonas Minot Melville, son of Josiah and Sarah (Minot) 
Melville, was b. in Nelson, N. H., in 1791 ; re. to Jaffrey about 
1822 ; was a tax-payer that year. He settled at Jaffrey village, 
now East Jaflrey, and built a house east of the river, and after- 
wards the stone mansion now the summer residence of Hon. 
L. R. Cutter, of Boston. The name of the family was origi- 
nally Melvin. In 181 1 it was changed, by an act of the legisla- 
ture, to Melville. He was the eldest of four children, — Jonas 
M., Lydia, Josiah, and Henry. His father d. in 1818, Jan. 8, 



404 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



a. 60. His mother d. July 30, 181 1, a. 49, His father left a 
large estate to be divided among his children. This inheritance 
enabled him to become a man of power and influence, and to 
engage in any important pnblic enterprise that was presented. 
In the religious society he was an active member. He lent his 
aid in the erection of the brick church in the centre of the town ; 
was the principal leader in making an enlargement of the same. 
He also took a deep interest in the growth and prosperity of the 
village now East JaftVey. He was instrumental in the erection 
of the Second Congregational meeting-house in that place, and 
the formation of that society and church. He was also an ac- 
tive leader in procuring a charter for an academy, and contributed 
very liberall}- in aid thereof, for which it was named Melville 
academy, in honor of the donor. He took a deep interest in 
the railroad enterprise, and was among the first who took stock 
in the Cheshire Railroad. He was one of the active men in 
procuring the Monadnock Bank charter, and was one of its 
directors. May i, 1823, he m. Betsey, dau. of David and 
Charlotte (Blodgett) Lacy. In 1S59, he re. to Pepperell, 
Mass., and d. there. His wife d. May 30, 1S63, a. 74. No 
children. 



MILLIKEN FAMILY. 

In 1774, Samuel and William Milliken signed a petition 
against the annexation of a part of JaflVey to Peterborough and 
Sharon. They afterwards became residents — one of Peter- 
borough, and the other of Sharon. 



2 

3 

4 



Alexander Milliken came from 



-, and set- 



tled in JaftVey, on lot 5, range 5. He m, Betty Emery, 
dau. of Dea. Daniel Emery; d. Oct. 9, 181 1, a. 56. 
His widow d. May 9, 1823, a. 64. He built the large 
brick tavern near the base of the Grand Monadnock 
mountain, — the first brick house, probably, built in 
town, — and was proprietor of the same til! the time of his 
death in 181 1. His son John remained in possession 
of the premises till the death of his mother in 1S23. 
The property was then sold to Tilly Whitcomb, and by 
him, in 1825, to John Felt. They had ch. per town 
record : 

I. John^ b. Dec. 27, 1781 ; d. March 10, 1783. 
II. Molly, b. April 24, 1784; m. Moses Hill. 
III. Betty, b. Nov. 29, 1786; m., May 20, 1803, 
Jona. Gilmore. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4O5 

5 IV. John^ b. Feb. 26, 1790.+ 

6 V. Amasa^ b. Oct. 20, 1792 ; m. Sophia Hill. 
Two children : (i) Arvilla. (2) Louisa. 

7 VI. Alexander^ d. 1796. 

8 VII. Nahby^ d. 1800. 
VIII. Nabhy, b. 1802 ; m. Edward Bailey, q. v. 



(5) John Milliken (Capt.) m. Dolly Stevens, June, 
1810. In 1S25 he re. to Vermont; from thence to 
Mich, and 111. Three children : 

(i) James, b. 1816. (2) Charles S., h. 1819. (3) 
George, d. 

MOWER FAMILY. 

Thomas Mower came from Topsfield, Mass., to Jaf- 
frey, previous to 17S0. He was one of a committee 
to procure preaching in 17S0. He m. Mary Kenney, 
and d. Oct. 9, 179S, a. 62. His widow d. Feb. 15, 
1816, a. 86. Children: 



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4 

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6 

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I. Thomas, m. Phebe . One child, — Ezra 

T., d. July 16, i793t ^' 6 weeks. 
II. Jbsiah, b. 1769.-!- 
iii. Deborah, m., June 4, 1788, Hezekiah Chaplin. 

IV. .Betsey, m., 17S9, Towns. 

V. Lois, m., 1789, Samuel Jaquith. 
VI. Sally, m., May 18, 1794, David Gilmore. 
VII. Polly, m. May 28, i8oi,Joel Wright. 
viii. Hannah, m. David Chadwick. 



JosiAii Mower (Col.) m. Rebecca, dau. of John and 
Rebecca (Browning) Cutter, of New Ipswich. He d. 
May 5, 1852, a. 83. She d. Sept. 22, 1867, a. 93. He 
was a captain in the militia, and colonel of the Twelfth 
Regiment. 

I. Rebecca, b. March 7, 1799; m. Zachariah Em- 
ery, q. V. M., 2'', Ithamar Lawrence, q. v. 
II. Josiah, b. May i, i8oo.-[- 
iii. Qihnan, b Feb. i, i8oi.-f- 
IV. Liberty, b. Jan. 21, 1803.-}- 
V. Watson, b. June i, 1806; drowned while bath- 
ing, near Boston. 
VI. Sally, b. April 7, 1808 ; m. Dexter Jewell, q. v. 



406 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

(ii) JosiAH Mower (Dea.) m, Louisa Severance. Four 
children : 

i6 I. Nahum W., b. 1829; m. Lydia A. Three ch., 

(i) Clara A.; (2) Frank W. ; (3) Mary L. 

17 II. Thomas S. 

18 III. Enos. 
IV. William H. 



(12) Oilman Mower (Col.) m. Roxana, dau. of Jacob 

and Mary Smith Jewell. She d. Feb. 22, 1S73, a. 72. 

20 I. Sophia jR., b. April 13, 1S26 ; m. Amos E. Per- 
ry, 1S46. 

21 II. Sarah A., b. Jan. 20, 1829; m., 1°*, Joseph 
Whitney ; m., 2^, Nathaniel Holmes. 

22 III. Mary £J., b. Sept. 4, 1830; d. Alarch 14, 1842. 

23 IV. Oilman J., b. Oct. 3, 1832 ; m. 

24 V. Calvin A., b. March 23, 1834; d. March 14, 
1842. 



(13) Liberty Mower (Dea.) m., i^', Dec. 29, 1829, 
Emily, dau. of Samuel and Lucy (Emery) Buss, who 
d. July 14, 1845. a. 41 ; m., 2**, June 3, 1846, Mary 
Ann, her sister. Children by second marriage : 

25 I. Ellen E.^ b. May 16, 1847; '^•' Dec. 31, 1S74, 
[ William Moore, of Peterborough. 

26 ] II. Samuel H., b. July 31, 1849. 

27 III. Willie J. ^ b. June 23, 1855. 



McNEE FAMILY. 



William McNee was b. in Ireland, 171 1 ; m. Mary Esless 
Brownly, and emigrated to this country ; settled in Peter- 
borough, and d. Dec. 23, 1789, a. 78. His wife d. Oct., 1759, 
a. 48. He m., 2^, widow Sarah Smith Bell, who d. Jan. 31, 
1 814, a. 98. Four children by first wife. 

His son, William, m. Betsey Russell ; settled in Dublin ; re. 
to Peterborough in 1765 or '66 \ settled on the homestead, and, 
like his father, was elected deacon of the church. He d. April 
13, 1810; shed. 1815 ; nine children. 

The name McNee was changed to Nay, as it appears on the 
records. 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 40/ 

William Nay (third gen.), b. Mar., 1763 ; m. Lydia 
Sawyer. In 1798 he re. to Jaffrey, and settled in 
the south part of the town ; paid taxes there from 1798 
to 1804, inclusive. Two or three of his children were 
b. there. He returned to Peterborough, and d. June i, 
1813, a. 50. She d. Aug. 28, 1850, a. 82. 

I. William, h. 17S8; m. Rebecca Foster; re. to 

Indiana ; twelve ch. 
II. Lydia, h. July 15, 1791 ; m. Walter Gilbert; d. 
N. Y.,' 1856, a. 65. 

III. i^amuel, b. Feb. 24, 1794; m. Mary Felt. 

IV. Asdal, b. March 12, 1797; m. Polly Milliken ; 

re. to N. Y., and d. Oct., 1830, a. 33. 
V. Cynthia, b. Feb. 5, 1799; m. Cyrus Frost, 

q. V. 
VI. Gardner, b. Aug. 9, iSoi ; m. Amelia Symonds ; 

r. 111. 
vii. Arvilla, b. Nov. 28, 1804; m. N. B. Buss; d. 
VIII. Jeff^erson, b. May 26, 1S08 ; m. Sally Loring ; 
he d. 1S37. 



Samuel Nay (Maj.) settled in Sharon ; was a promi- 
nent leading man in that place; was moderator of their 
town-meeting, town-clerk, six years representative to 
the General Court, a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1850, was county commissioner, and justice 
of the peace. He m., i^', April 13, 1815, Mary, dau. 
of Oliver Felt, who d. Dec. 24, 1861, a. 69. He m., 2*^, 
April 2, 1863, Mrs. Elizabeth (Flint) Gray, b. in Han- 
cock. 

I. Harriet, b. Dec. 24, 1815 ; m. Horatio N. Por- 
ter ; one child, — Samuel N. Porter, D. d. s. ; 
r. Peterborough. M., 2^, John Bullard ; one 
child ; d. 

II. Samuel, b. May 19, 1818 ; m. Nancy Vose ; r. 
Antrim. 

III. Mary, h. ]u\y 10, 1820; m. Samuel Jaquith, 

q. V. 

IV. Marshall, b. April 2, 1823 ; m. Sarah Wells. 
V. Sarah, b. June 20, 1827 ; m. S. I. Vose ; d. Oct. 

25, 1875. 

VI. Henry H, b. Sept 4, 1832 ; m. Mary J. Shedd, 
dau. of George Shedd ; d. Aug. 23, 185S, a. 

26. She d, March 6, 1867, a. 28.' 



4o8 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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NEWELL FAMILY. 

Jacob Newell was b. in Scituate, Mass. ; came 
to Jaffrey, and m. Keziah L., dau. of Whitcomb and 
Keziah Loring Powers. Before marriage he led a sea- 
faring life, and was taken prisoner by the British in the 
War of iSi2. He d. March 4, 1S34, ^- 74- ^'s widow 
d. Sept. 22, 1872, a. 84. Children : 

I. Mar}/ A., b. May 8, 1814; m. Dexter Knowl- 



ton. 



q. V, 



II. Elizabeth, r. Jaftrey. 

III. Hannah^ m. Timo. G. Temple ; r. Milford. 

IV. George, d. Dec. 9, 1836, a. iS. 

V. Jane^ b. Jan. 17, 1820; m. John Stone; r. in 

Peterborough. 
VI. James, m. Elizabeth Wheeler; r. in Sharon. 
VII. Jacob, m. Deborah Emery, of Rindge ; d. in the 
army, at Baton Rouge, La., April 5, 1863, a 
40. Children : 
(i) George. 

(2) Frances H., d. April 6, 1856, a. 6 
w., 4 days. 

(3) Henry C, d. Nov. 6, 1865, a. 8 years, 
8 mos. 

VIII. Josiah P., m. Catherine Porter; d. 
IX. William, m. Jane Deeth ; re. to Vermont ; in 
Co. H., U. S. Sharpshooters ; pro. to cap- 
tain. 
X. Harriet A., d. Sept. 19, 1S54, a. 25. 



James Newell, a brother of Jacob, d. Dec. 2, 1830. 
His daughter m. Dea. Natlian Moors, of Sharon, N. H. 



NUTTING FAMILY. 

Simeon Nutting, an early settler, was road survey- 
or in 1779; he settled on lot 22, range 8, afterwards 
owned by Benjamin Nutting. 

Benjamin came from Groton, Mass., previous to 
1781 ; was chosen field-driver that year. He settled 
first on lot 13, range 10 ; sold the same to Isaac Bailey, 
and re. to lot 22, range 8, where he lived till his death, 
about 1804. He m., i^', Lucy Wyman, who d. about 
1791 ; m., 2^, widow Nathan Boynton, Oct. 14, 1792. 
She d. Jan., 1847, a. 89. 



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(5) 



(6) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4O9 

Children by first wife : 

I. Benjamin^ m., May 22, 1803, Betsey Hath- 

orn. 
II. Jonas, b. i775.-f- 

III. Joshua, b. 1781.-I- 

IV. Iteuhen.-\- 

V. Betsey, b. 1789; d. Nov. 14, 1809, a. 20 yrs., 2 

mos. 

Children by second wife : 

VI. Jeremiah, b. March 7, 1795 ; d. Aug. 17, 1857. 
VII. Sally, b. May 27, 1798. 
VIII. Lucinda, b. June 12, iSoo. 



Jonas Nutting settled on lot 17, range 5 ; m. Jane, 
dau. of Lieut. William and Jane (Wright) Turner. She 
d. Nov. 13, 1814, a. 41. M., 2*^, Nancy Kittredge, who 
d. Jan. 19, 1847, a. 66. He d. Feb. 26, 1822, a. 47. 

Children by first wife : 

(i) Lucy. (2) Rachel. (3) William T. (4) Eliza 
Jane. (5) Joshua. (6) Emily. (7) Jonas. 

Children by second wife ; 

(8) Charles. (9) John. (10) Harriet. (11) Hosea. 



Joshua Nutting m. Martha French, who d. Aug. 
27, 1S61, a. 80. He d. March 10, 1844, a. 63. Five 
children : 

(i) Martha. (2) Mary Aim, m. Dexter Patrick; d. 
Oct. 28, 1845, a. 28. (3) Sally. (4.) Lo- 
rinda, b. 1822. (5) Luke H., b. 1827. 



Reuben Nutting m. Dec. 4, 1808, Sarah Walton, 
of Rindge, b. July 13, 178S; settled on the homestead 
of his fcither ; re. to New Ipswich about 1836. Chil- 
dren b. in Jaftrey : 

(i) Isabella, b. Sept. 28, 1809. (2) Benjamin, d. 
Sept. 6, 181 2, a. 9 days. (3) Rebecca IF., 
b. June I, 1818; d. Sept. 29, 1819. (4) 
Sarah R., b. April 4, 1821. 



410 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



II 



12 



13 



14 



15 



William Turner Nutting, son of Jonas, m. Grata 
He d. Sept. 8, 1S69, a. 67. She d. May 6, 



1S79, a. 68. 

(i) Caroline, b. Jan. 12, 1834; m. Oren Prescott, q. 
V. (2) Cordelia, b. 1835 ; d. March 22, 
i860. (3) Hannah, d. Nov. 9, 1839, ^- ^4 
mos., 8 days. (4) Alonzo, d. Jan. 25, 1843, 
a. 14 mos. (5) Alonzo, b. 1S44; d. Nov. 
12, i860, a. 16. (6) Jonas, b. 1848; d. 
April 6, 1S52. 



Charles Nutting, son ofjonas, m. Nancy S. Towns, 
b. 1815. 

(i) Adeline M.,h. 1839; ^- ^§67. (2) Charles H.., 
b. 1841 ; d. April 24, 1S75. (3) Adaliza Z., 
b. 1843 ; m. Roderick R. P. Adams, Sept. 
25, 1 86 1. (4) Edward, b. 1S44. (5) George, 
b. 1847. (6) Arabella, h. 1848; m. Edwin 
J. Russell, of Rindge, July 3, 1866. (7) 
Martha C.,h. 18=^1 ; m. Xenophon Shedd, 
Jan. 5, 1S74. (8) Ella A., b. 1857. (9) 
Ered H., b. 1859 ; d. Nov. 30, 1875. 



Luke H. Nutting, son of Joshua ; m. Mary Ann 
Upton. 

(i) Frank H.,h. 1858. (2) Fred H.,h. i860. (3) 
Mary E., b. 1864. (4) Willie E.,h. 1865. 
(5) Alice P., b. 1S70. 



Isaac Nutting came from Groton, Mass. ; paid 
taxes in 1803. He settled on lot 20, range 6, which he 
purchased of Nathan Cutter ; sold the same to Jonas 
Pierce, and bought the farm of Josiah Priest, lot 18, 
range i. He was drowned in the Frost pond while 
bathing, July 10, 1825, a. 44. He m. Betsey, dau. of 
Ebenezer Hathorn, who d. May 18, 1846, a. 63. Nine 
children : 

I. Ebetiezer, h. May 22, 1806; m. Sophia Byam 
Gilmore ; d. in Worcester, Mass. ; two chil- 
dren. 



i6 



17 

18 
19 

20 
21 

22 

23 



(18) 

24 

25 
26 



27 
28 
29 

(21) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4II 

II. Hepsey JElizabeth. b. Julj- 22, 181 2; m., i^*, 
Charles Blodgett ; m., 2"^, Lyman Percival. 
He d. at Peterborough, Aug. 10, 1S77, a. 78. 
Four children. 

III. Mary. b. Aug. 22, 1S13 : m. Jacob Bohonnon ; 

r. Danbury ; d. Dec. 4, 1S66. 

IV. Abel. b. March 13, 1S15 -j- 

V. Frances., b. June 13, 1817 ; m. Edward, son of 

Ralph Emeiy. 
VI. Susan, b. Dec. 30, 1818 ; m. Patrick Daly. 
VII. Isaac, b. May 25, 1820; m. Susan Marv^le.-[- 
VIII. William, b. Sept. 4, 1S22. 
IX. Asa, b. Feb. 23, 1S24; m. Maria Moore. One 
child. — Marian A., b. 1S54; m., Nov. 21, 
1S78, Wallace Clarke, of Peterborough. 



Abel Nuttixg m. Mary A. Turner, of Peterborough. 
I He d. March 8, 1848. She d. Aug. 8, 1847, a. 33. Six 
1 children : 

I. Mary C, b. Aug. 13, 1835 ; m., i''. Benjamin 

Swan; m., 2"^, Joseph Holliston. 
II. David, b. 1S37. 

III. Sarah Jane, h. Feb. 20, 1839; '^•' ^^j James 
^lerrill ; m., 2*^, George Prescott. 

IV. Edward D.., d. Jan. 20, 1864, a. 21. 
V. Ahhy Ann, m. John Miles. 

VI. Ahd. 



Isaac Nutting m. Susan Marvle. He d. Sept. 18, 





1875. 


Four children : 


30 

31 

32 

33 


I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 


Sarah C b. 18,^4. 
George IT., h. 1846 
Adelbert. 
Marcdlus, b. 1849. 



OBER FAMILY. 

Samuel Ober was an inhabitant of Jaffrey during 
the Revolution, and was a soldier in that war. He r. 
in District No. 6. In 1784 his name was on the roll of 
the militia, and he was highway surveyor the same 

year. He m. Hannah , and left a birth record 

of four children : 



412 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



2 

3 

4 

5 



I. Hannah, b. April 17, 1779. 
11. Samuel^ b. Jan. 26, 17S1. 

III. Kindal, b. Feb. 15, 1783, 

IV. Polly ^ b. April 30, 1787. 



OSGOOD FAMILY. 

William Osgood was a soldier of the Revolution ; 
on the roll of the militia in 17S4; held town office in 
1786. 



3 
4 

5 



OAKS FAMILY. 

Beriah Oaks, b. in Massachusetts in 1797 ; came to 
Jaffrey about 1849; paid tax that year. He re. on the 
Davis place, lot i, range 2, west of the mountain ; left 
town 1853 o^ '54- -^^ ""*• Polly , and had chil- 
dren : 

I. Appleton, b. in Vermont, 1827. 
II. Joel^ b. in Vermont, 1832. 

III. Mary, b. in Mass., 1835. 

IV. Amanda, b. in Mass., 1837. 



'54 



OLMSTEAD FAMILY. 
Henry Olmstead paid poll tax in 1852, '53, and 



O'BRIEN FAMILY. 

Peter O'Brien paid tax in 185 1 ; Edmund in 1857. 
John O'Neal, Patrick. Osha, 1857. 



PAGE FAMILY. 

David Page was b. in Bedford, Mass., Feb. 7, 1766 ; 
came to JaftVey about 1802. He was a merchant, and 
kept a store in JaflVey in 1803, '4, and '5. It was on 
the site of the brick church in the centre of the town, 
and was burnt in 1805 or '6. In 1808 he re. to Middle- 
bury, Vt., and in 1S28 to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he 
d. April 5, 1856, a. 90. While in JaflVey he was a very 



2 


I. 


3 


11. 


4 


III. 


5 


IV. 


6 


V. 


I 


VI. 

VII. 


9 


VIII. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 413 

prominent leading man ; was moderator of their town- 
meeting, town-clerk, selectman, and representative. 
He also held the office of major in the Twelfth Regi- 
ment N. H. Militia. He m. Elizabeth Minot, dau. of 
Minot, of Concord, Mass., by whom he had 

Elizabeth, b. March 16, 1792. 
Abigail, h. Sept. 26, 1793. 
David, b. July S, 1795. 

Mary Minot, b. Aug. 19, 1796; d. Nov. 14, 
1796. 

William, b. Sept. 16, 179S. 
An infant son, d. March 27, iSoo. 

Thomas B., b. March 30, 1S02. 

Christopher, b. Jan. 13, 1804. 

10 Jonathan Page, son of Elias, b. in Rindge, March 

6, 1S16, m. Lorinda H. Porter ; settled in Jaftrey, on 
lot 4, range 10, in 1S39. Ten children: 

(i) Mary Ann, h. 1845. (2) Olive M., b. 1847. 

(3) Jane A., b. 1848. (4) Lydia M, h. 1S50. 

(5) Harvey, b. 1853. (6) Harriet, h. 1856. 

(7) Adeline, b. 1859. *-^) Lizzie, b. 1861. 

(9) John, b. 1864. (10) Clara M., b. 1869. 



PARKER FAMILY. 

Abraham Parker, a native of Marlborough, in 
Wiltsclaim, England, came to this country and was a 
resident of Woburn, Mass., in 1644. Nov. 18, in that 
year, he m. Rose Whitlock. He was admitted a free- 
man in 1645 ; re. to Chelmsford, Mass., about 1653, 
with three brothers, Jacob, James, and Joseph, and d. 
there, Aug. 12, 1685. His wife survived him, and d. 
Nov. 30, 1691. Children: 

I, Anna, or Hanna, b. at Woburn, Oct. 29, 1645 ; 

m. Nathaniel Blood. 
II. John, b. Oct. 30, 1647 ; m. Mary Danforth ; d. 

April 14, 1699. 

4 III. Abraham, h.McWchS, 1650; d. Oct. 20, 1651. 

5 IV. Abraham, b. Aug., 1652 ; m. Martha Lemmons. 

6 V. Mary, b. at Chelmsford, Nov. 15, 1655, m. 
James Parker. 



414 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



7 
8 



lO 

II 



VI. Hoses, h. about 1657 ; m. Abigail Hildreth ; d. 

Oct. 12, 1732.4- 
VII. Jsaac,h. Sept. 13, 1660; in. Esther Fletcher; 

d. Feb. 22, 1 688 or '9. 
VIII. Elizabeth, h. April 10, 1663 ; m. James Fierce ; 

d. March 5, 1688. 

IX. Lydia, b. Feb. 7, 1665 ; m. John Kidder. 

X. Jacob, b. March 24, 1669. 



(7) Moses Parker m. Abigail Hildreth. Children : 

12 I. Abigail, b. May 8, 1685 ; m. Benj. Adams. 

13 II. Moses, d. July 28, 1702. 

14 III. Aaron, b. April 9, 1689; m., i**, Abigail 
Adams; 2*^, Dorothy Fletcher ; d. Dec. 19, 

I775-+ 
\c IV. Elizabeth, b. Dec. 26, 1691 ; m. Ebenezer Par- 

ker. 

16 V. Joseph, b. March 25, 1694; d. April 22, 1738. 
He was lieutenant of a snow-shoe company, 
formed in 1724 to operate against the 
Indians ; and was the father of Lt. Col. 
Moses Parker, who was mortally wounded 
at Bunker Hill, and d. a prisoner in Boston. 

17 VI. Benjamin, b. April 14, 1696. 

18 VII. Mary, b. Sept. 6, 1698 ; m. Benj. Chamberlain. 



(14) Aaron Parker m. Abigail Adams. Children by i'* 
wife : 

iQ I. Aaron, b. Aug. 19, 1713 ; m. Mary ; d. 

Sept. 30, 1762. 

20 II. Samuel, b. Jan. i, 1717 ; m., i", Sarah Fletcher ; 

2^, Mary (Proctor) Robbins ; t,^, Mrs. 

Fletcher; d. Aug. 7, 1795. -|- 

21 III. Moses, b. May 16, 1718. 

22 IV. Abigail, b. Oct. 17, 1720: m. John Senter. 

23 V. Mary, b. Oct. 20, 1723 ; m. Oliver Proctor. 

24 VI. Lucy, b. Jan. 11, 1725 or '6 ; m. Stephen Corey. 

25 VII. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 8, 1728 ; m. Gershom Proc- 
tor. 

26 VIII. Isaac, b. May 20, 1731. 

27 IX. Joseph, b. Jan. 2, 1735. 

Ch. by 3'' wife, Dorothy Fletcher: 

28 X. Esther^ b. July 4, 1738. 



(20) 



29 

32 
33 



34 

35 

36 

37 
38 

(36) 

39 
4o 

41 



42 

43 
44 

45 
46 

47 



(40 
48 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 415 

Samuel Parker m. Sarah Fletcher. Children by 
1"' wife : 

I. Samuel, b. Feb. 27, 1739 ; d. in Maine. 
II. Sarah, b. Oct. 23, 1740; m. Solomon Button. 

III. Joseph, b. May 20, 1742 ; m. Susanna Fletcher; 

d. Sept., 1S07. 

IV. Silas, b. Jan. 23, 1743 ; d. at Mt. Desert. 

V. Leonard, b. Nov. 10, 1745 ; d. at Holland Fur- 
chase. 

Children by 2^ wife, Mary (Proctor) Robbins. 

VI. Mary, h. Feb. 14, 1749; m. Thomas Wright; 
d. July 16, 1823. 
VII. Jonathan, b. March 28, 1751 ; unm. ; d. March 

20, 1S20. 
VIII. Abel, b. March 25, 1753 ; m. Edith Jewett. He 
d. May 2, 183 1. Shed. Oct. 23, 1848, a. 96. 

IX. Elizabeth, b. May 9, 1755 ; m. Tenney. 

X. Lydia, b. July 13, 1757 ; unm. ; d. Feb. 7, 1774. 



Abel Parker m. Edith Jewett. Nine children : 

I. Edith, b. July 20, 1778 ; d. Feb. 23, 1784. 
II. Abel, b. Sept. 18, 1780; unm. ; d. Oct. 28, 1807. 

III. Edmund, b. Feb. 7, 1783 ; m., i^', Susan Cut- 
ter ; she d. July 28, 1826. M., 2^ Sarah 
King Leland Boynton. He d. Sept. 5, 
1856. -|- [See Coll. Graduates.] 

IV. Silas, b. Feb. 11, 1785 ; d. March 21, 17S5. 

V. Asa, b. March 12, 1786 ; m. Fanny Jewett. -|- 
VI. Isaac, b. April 14, 1788; m. Sarah Ains- 

worth.-(- 
VII. Calvin, b. July 23, 1790; d. Aug. 17, 1790. 
VIII. Luther, b. Oct. 10, 1791 ; d. Oct. 25, 1791. 
IX. Joel, b. Jan. 25, 1795 ; m. Mary Morse Parker ; 
d. Aug. 17, 1875. Three ch., two living. 
[See Coll. Graduates.] 

Edmund Parker m., i'', Susan, dau. of Joseph and 
Rachel (Hobart) Cutter. Ch. by i^' wife : 

I. Charles Edmund, b. Aug. 14, 1813 ; graduated 
at Dartmouth college in 1834 ; m. d. at Yale 
college in 1837; "^•' ^^'' Sarah E. Parker; 
2^, Anna Pierce ; r. Beardstown, 111. 



4i6 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



49 
51 



(43) 



52 



53 

54 



55 
56 



II. Mary Ann m. John Prentice; r. Chicago, III. 

III. William d. at Amherst, Jan. 4, 1840, a. 19. 

IV. One ch. by 2'', wife ; d. young. 



Asa Parker m. Fanny, dan. of Dr. Stephen and 
Nancy Colburn Jewett, of Rindge, b. March 6, 1788. 
He settled on the homestead of his father. On his 
death he re. to the centre of the town ; and d. Oct. 15, 
1S33. His widow d. Jan. 4, 1866. Mr. Parker was a 
prominent man. In his early days he was a distin- 
guished school-teaclier ; held the commission of captain 
in the JaflVey and Rindge cavalry company ; held many 
important town oflices ; was a member of the state 
senate in i826-'7. He was afterwards appointed reg- 
ister of probate for the county of Chesliire, which office 
he held till the time of his death. He was a man 
highly esteemed and respdcted by his fellow-citizens. 
Five children : 

I. Calvin Jewett, b. Jan. iS, 1S09; m. Abigail 
Kendall, of Dublin. She d. He d. in Bos- 
ton, April 4, 1859. Children : (i) Joel K., 
m. Clara C. Willard ; one ch. (2) Adaline 
S. (3) Mary L., m. Joel Bullard, May, 
1S66 ; d. Sept. 23, 1866, at Worcester, Mass. 

(4) Flora E., m. Worcester, 1865 ; d. 

July 25, 1S66. 

II. Clementine, b. Jan. 4, 181 1 ; m. Daniel B. Cut- 
ter, M. D,, q. V. 

III. Adaline, b. Sept. 15, 1S15 ; m., 1835, Milton 

Kilburn, of Fitzwilliam. He d. Feb. 16, 
1863. Children: (i) John Wood, b. in 
Rockford, 111.; d. Oct. 22, 1851. (2) Sarah 
Frances, d. 1858. (3) George. (4) Henry. 

(5) Adda. (6) Clara A. (7) Charles. (8) 
Asa. 

IV. George S., h. Feb. i, 1820; d. in the army at 

Jefferson City, Mo., Nov. [8, 1862. Two 
children : (i) Charles F. (2) Theodore H. 
V. Columbus 6"., b. Oct. 24, 1833 ; m., 1853, Fran- 
ces, dau. of James and Chloe (Murdock) 
Wilson, of Royalston, Mass. ; settled, first, 
in Rockford, 111., second, in Winchendon ; a 
merchant in that place. Two children : 
(i) Ida Frances, b. at Rockford, June 3, 



(44) 



57 

58 
59 

6o 
6i 

63 

64 



65 



66 
67 

68 
69 
70 

71 

72 



73 

74 

76 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 417 

1855 ; graduated at Mt. Holyoke Female 
Seminary, 1S74 ; lias since been a teacher in 
Wellesley Female College, Wellesley, Mass. 
(2) Alary Edith, b. June 12, 1S64. 



Isaac Parker m., Nov. 17, 1813, Sally, dau. of 
Rev. Laban and Mary (Minot) Ainsworth. She d. 
May 27, 1S57. He d. May 27, 1858. They had eight 
children, — four sons and four daughters. 

I. Sarah M. m. Dea. Ezra Farnsworth, of Groton, 

Mass. ; r. Boston, where she d. 
II. William M. m. and d. 

III. -fel^j^ar^i? ^ graduated at Dartmouth college in 

1S46 ; M. D., Jefferson Medical College. 

IV. Edith, m. EUery Stedman, m. d. 

V. Henry M., d. ; was a lawyer by profession ; r. 

Boston. 

VI. Isabel m. Rev. George A. Oviat. 

VII. Francis J. was a colonel in the rebel war. 
VIII. Mary, 



Samuel Parker was an early settler ; b. in Groton, 
Mass. ; came from New Ipswich to Jaffrey ; settled on 
lot 19, range 3, afterwards the farm of Capt. Parker 
Maynard. He m., i", Abiah Cook ; m., 2*, Mrs. Sarah 
Howe, April 15, 1792, mother of Dr. Adonijah Howe. 
She d. Dec. 30, 1795, a. 59. He d. Nov. 26, 1806, a. 
77. Ch. by first wife : 

I. Samuel m. Sarah Bullard, of Dublin. 
II. Abigail m. Ebenezer Champney, of New Ips- 
wich. 

III. Asa, b. 1757 ; m. Lucy Gould, dau. of Oliver. -|- 

IV. Eunice m. Eli Ames, of Groton. 

V. Ebenerer m. Lydia Richardson, of Groton ; left 

town in iSoo. 

VI. Phebe m. Benj. Bancroft, of Rindge. Four ch. 

VII. Daniel m. Jenny Cochran, of Peterborough ; re. 

to Waitsfield, Vt, thence to Brookfield, Vt. ; 

left Jaffrey in 1800. 

VIII. Amos m. Ruth ; d. Feb. 27, 1797, a. 26. 

IX. Nathan, unm. 

X. Mercy m. Benj. Champney, of New Ipswich. 
XI. Lucy d., a. 19. 

28 



4i8 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



(68) 



11 
78 

79 
80 

81 

82 

83 
84 

^S 
^6 



Asa Parker m. 
(Stockwell) Gould. 
Nov. 8, 1844, a. 80. 



Lucy, dau. of Oliver and Mary 
He d. April 13, 1838. She d. 



I. Asa^ b. at Jaftrey ; re. to Cuba, W. T. 

IT. Oliver^ b. ; re. to Baltimore, Md. 

III. Nathan^ b. 1794; le. to Baltimore; d. 



d. 1819. 

; re. to Baltimore, Md. 

Nathan^ b. 1794; le. to Baltimore; d. 1851. 
IV. Abner Howe, b. 1796 ; re. to Guiana, S. A. 
V. Lucy, b. 1798; r. Jaftrey, 1873. 
VI. Abigail Champney, b. 1797 ; d. 1859. 
VII. Mary Stockwell, b. iSoi ; d. 1841. 
VIII. Eliza, b. 1803 ; r. Jaftrey, 1873. 
IX. Abiah Cook, b. iSoS; d. 1873. 
X. Edwin Lewellyn, b. 181 1 ; m. Cassandra Lews- 
dale ; re. to Baltimore, Md. ; d. 1S68. 



HENRY PAYSON. 

Henry Payson, son of Rev, Seth Payson, d. d., of 
Rindge, was b. March 22, 1792; m., Jan. 20, 1S21, 
Sarah, dau. of Nathaniel and Sarah (Wyman) Cutter, 
b. at Bolton, Mass., Nov. 5, 1792. He came to Jaftrey 
in 1815 ; opened a store under the firm name of Wilder 
& Payson, in the building then known as the Thorndike 
store, now the dwelling-house of Dr. Phelps. In 1817 
the firm was changed to H. Payson & Co., which con- 
tinued in trade till 1824, when he re. to Boston. Pie 
was iiighly esteemed as a citizen, and was the leading 
trader in town. He was for many years town-clerk. 
While in Boston he was elected deacon of the Old 
South Church. He re. from Boston to New York city ; 
d. June 14, 1S59, a. 67. Mrs. Payson r. with her dau., 
Mrs. Ayers, at Galesburg, 111., in 1871. Two ch. : 

2 I. Sarah Cutter, b. July 2, 1822 ; m. Nelson 
Ayers, of Galesburg, 111. 

3 11. George Phillips, b. March 29, 1827 ; m. Abbie 
Harris ; r. in Brooklyn, N. Y. 



PERKINS FAMILY. 

Joseph Perkins (Capt.) came from Methuen, Mass., 
to Jaftrey in 1778; settled on lot 2, range 9; m. Ruth 

. He d. Jan. 28, 1821, a. 77. She d. Oct. 23, 

1815, a. 74. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4I9 

2 I. Moses, b. 1769; m. Rhoda Spofford.-j- 

3 II. Polly, b. 1 77 1 ; m. Oliver Bailey, q. v. 

4 III. Robinson m. Peddy. Children: (i) Jared, b. 
Feb. 12, 1793; (2) Lucinda, b. June 14, 
1796 ; (3) John, b. Sept. 16, 1801. 

5 IV. Edward, b. 1777.-}- 

6 V. John. 

7 VI. Elizabeth.. 

8 VII. Joseph. 
VIII. Ruth, b. Nov. 16, 1782 ; m. John Stone. 



(2) Moses Perkins m., i'', Rhoda, dau. of Dea. Eleazer 

and Mary (Flint) Spofford, Nov. 6, 1793. She d. at 

New Ipswicli. He m., 2^, Mercy , v^^ho d. Feb. 

28, 1865, aged 86. He d. at Jaffrey March 27, 1854, a. 
85. Eleven children : 



10 
II 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 

18 

19 
20 



(5) 



21 

22 

23 
24 



I. Mary, b. March 24, 1795 ; d. Oct. 29, 1831. 
II. Moses S., b. Feb. i, 1797.+ 

III. Rhoda, b. Dec. 26, 1798; m. March 10, 1851, 

Aaron Hodkins. 

IV. Harriet, b. Aug. 23, 1800; d. Nov. 17, 1802. 
V. Eleazer, b. Jan. 25, 1S03 ; m. Mary A. Law- 
rence ; d. March 11, 1837. 

VI. Harriet, h. ^une i, 1S05 ; m. Lucius Crone ; d. 

June, 1834. 
VII. Ruby W , b. April 27, 1807 ; m. Cyrus Trull 

and John Mead ; d. July 9, 1852. 
VIII. Aphia, b. July 10, 1809; d. Sept. 30, 1812. 
IX. Mercy, b. June 14, 181 1; m. Ezekiel Blake, 

Sept. 10, 1S33 ; r. Chicopee Falls. 
X. Ajyhia, b. July 4, 1815 ; m. John H. Smith ; r. 

Chicopee Falls. 
XI. Aaron, b. June 16, 1817; m. Maria, dau. of 
David Howe, of Rindge ; r. East Jaffrey. 



Edward Perkins settled in Jaffrey, and m. Ruth 
He d. June 5, 1856, a. 82. She d. May 30, 



i860, a. 83. Ten children : 

I. Adelia, h. Feb. 14, 1801 ; m. Isaac Adams, 
II. Daniel G., b. Nov. 11, 1802 ; d. Jan. 3, 1827. 

III. Phebe, b. Oct. 23, 1804; d. Feb. 7, 1810. 

IV. Hannah W., b. Nov. 26, 1806; m., June i, 

1824, Abraham Corey ; ten children. 



420 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



25 
26 

27 

28 

29 

30 



(11) 



31 
32 

33 

34 
35 
36 
37 



38 

39 
40 

41 
42 
43 



V. Ruth (?., b. Feb. 3, 1S09. 
VI, Phebe, b. Jan. 33, iSii ; d. Feb. 7, 1S13. 
VII. Joseph^ b. Dec. 16, iSi3 ; d. June 25, 1S66. 
VIII. Mary Jane., b. Nov. 20, 1815. 
IX. Edward 6'., b. March 11, 18 18. 
X. Ira., b. Jan. 11, 1821. 



Moses S. Perkins m. Cosby Cooledge. Mr. Per- 
kins was highly esteemed by his fellow-citizens ; was a 
worthy member and chief supporter of the First Con- 
gregational Church in Jaftrey at the time of his death, 
Feb. 27, 1875. Seven children : 

I. Sarah^ b. Sept. 7, 1S22 ; m. M. P. Farrar ; d. 

1854. 
II. Phebe, b. Nov. 17, 1824; m. James L. Bolster. 

III. Hart., b. Sept. 26, 1828 ; m. Paulina P. Flow- 

ers. 

IV. Charles, b. Oct. 27, 1833 ' *^- Sarah R. Evleth. 
V. Dorcas, b. June 24, 1835 ; m. James S. Lacy. 

VI. Cozbie^ b. June 28, 1828; m. John V. Tenney. 
VII. Mercy ^ b. May 24, 1840; m. Fred W. Bailey; 
d. Dec. 8, 1867. One child, — Mary F., b. 
1 868. 



Freeman Perkins was b. in Sterling, Conn., Jan, 

28, 1791. He m. Susan A. , by whom he had 

five children. She d. Aug. 10, 1836, a. 43 yrs. 

I. Alvah J.^ b. in Killingly, Conn., July 9, 1815. 

II. Edwin F., b. June 13, 1817. 

III. Gustavus JErastus, b. Feb. 24, 1820, at North- 

borough, Mass. ; d. Nov. 28, 1837. 

IV. Henry G., b. at Framingham, Mass., Oct. 13, 

1823. 
V. /Susan A., b. at Jaftrey, Oct. 22, 1825. 



PIERCE FAMILY. 



Daniel Pierce, a descendant of John Pierce, the 
emigrant who settled in Watertown, was b. in Lunen- 
burg, 1713 ; d. May 13, 1758, a. 45. Sarah, his wife, 
1717 ; d. April 13, 1795, a. 78. Seven children: 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 421 

2 I. Daniel^ b. Oct. 3, 1743. 

3 II. Reuben^ b. March 17, 1747. 

4 III. Samuel, b. May 21, 1749,-!- 

5 IV. Jacob, b. Aug, 3, 1751.-J- 

6 V. Sarah, b. Aug. 3, 1754. 

7 VI. Abigail, b. April i, 1756. 

8 VII. Regia, b. May 13, 1758. 



(4) 



9 

10 

1 1 
12 



13 

15 



16 
18 



(5) 



Samuel Pierce came from Lunenburgh with his 
brother Jacob, John Hale, and Ephraim Whitcomb, — 
Samuel in 1773, Jacob in 1777, — and built a log cabin 
on what was called Whitcomb hill, and their settlement 
was known as the Leominster district. Samuel was the 
owner of a horse, the first one in the district, if not in 
town. Jacob Pierce and John Hale m. sisters of Eph- 
raim Whitcomb. Samuel m. Abigail Carter, b. 1751, 
who d. Feb. 28, i777i while on a visit at Leominster. 
He m., 2^, 1778, Elizabeth Whitney. He d. Dec. 27, 
1824, a. 75. She d. Oct. 23, 1S23, a. 72. Ten children : 

I. Asaj)h, b. July 9, 1776.-I- 
II. Samuel, b. May 9, 1778.-]- 

III. Betsey, b. March 29, 1779; m. Jacob Pierce, 

q. V. 

IV. Caleb, b. Jan. 30, 1781 ; m. Dec. 20, 1805, 

Lucy Gale; r. Alstead, Lyme, N. Y., and 
Mich. 

V. Annis, b. April 12, 1783; m. Benjamin Frost, 

q. V. 

VI. Abigail, b. Oct. 4, 1785 ; m. Jude Carter; r. in 

Rindge. In 181S re. to Pennsylvania. 
VII. Sarah, b. Sept. 3, 1787 ; m., i^', Joel Fisk, who 
d. Jan. 19, 1S33 ; m., 2*^, James Bridges, 
Sept., 1825 ; d. in Wilton, Feb. 20, 1836. 
One child, d. young. 
VIII. Lucy, b. Nov. 28, 1789 ; d. same day. 
IX. Joseph, b. March 23, 1793.-I- 
X. Silas, b. Jan. 4, 1794; m., May 7, 1818, Esther 
Jaquith ; d. July 29, 1819. 



Jacob Pierce (Lieut.) was a man of integrity, firm 
in his religious belief, a member of the church, and a 
constant attendant on religious meetings. Afflicted 
with the infirmity of deafness in the latter part of his 



422 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



19 



20 
21 



23 

24 

25 



26 

27 

28 
29 

30 
31 



(9) 



life, he was seated in the pulpit with the minister, 
where, witli the aid of a hearing-trumpet, he was ena- 
bled to liear his sermons. He was a soldier in the 
Revolution, and was in the battle of Bunker Hill. He 
m. Rebecca Whitcomb, and d. Aug. 9, 1826, a. 75. 
She d. March 3, 1843, ^- ^9- 



27. 
to 

d 



I. Jacob, b. April 28, 1778; m., i", Nov. 
1800, Mary Sawtelle, of Rindge ; re 
Alstead ; she d. Oct. 7, 1812. He m., 2 
Electa Evans, of Alstead; she d. April i, 
1S17. He m., 3^ Feb. 19, 1818, Betsy 
Pierce, dan. of Samuel Pierce ; she d. May 
18, 1822. He m., 4"*, March 23, 1823, 
Sally Garfield. He was a cabinet-maker. 
II. Rebecca, b. Dec. 2, 1780; d. Dec. 13, 1823. 

III. £enjaniin, b. Feb. 2, 1782 ; m. Sally Erskines, 

of Winchester, Aug. i, 1813. Children: 
(i) Benjamin ; (2) Hillman. (3) Marshall. 
rie re. to Richland, Oswego county, N. Y. 
He d. 1S64, a. 82. She d. Dec, 1851. 

IV. JRegia, b. Sept. 29, 1783; m. Alvin Jewell, of 

Winchester, F'eb. 6, 1806. 
v.. Deborah, b. Oct. 4, 17S5 ; m. Oct. 19, 1826, 

Alvin Jewell, 2'^ wife. 
VI. Reuben, b. Sept. 4, 1787; re. to Bloomfield, 
N. Y. 

VII. Miriam, b. July 6, 1789; m. Benj. Hale, of 

Rindge, Oct. 29, 181 2. He d. Feb. 12, 
1832. She d. April 26, 1863. Five children : 
(i) Tryphosa. (2) Almina. (3) Benjamin O. 
(4) Jacob W. (5) Moses. 

VIII. Daniel, b. April 2, 1791 ; d. April 22, 180S. 
IX. Moses, b. Jan. 22, 1793; m. Betsey Jewett ; 

many children. He was a blacksmith. 
X. Josiah, b. March 15, 1795 ; d. April 11, 1795. 
XI. Nancy, h. July 10, 1796; m. Sewell Hosmer ; 

r. New Ipswich. 
XII. Josiah, b. June 19, 1798.-I- 
XIII. Tryphosa, b. April 15, 1800; d. May 19, 1803. 



Asaph Pierce m., Feb, 10, 1797, Hannah Stickney ; 
re. to Barre, Vt., afterwards to Berlin, and from thence 
to Moretown, where he d. Feb. 4, 1840. She was b. 
Dec. 24, 1773 ; d. Dec. 29, 1836. Seven children : 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 423 

32 I. Phebe, b. Jan. 4, 1798; d. Dec. 8, 1813. 

33 II. Samuel, b. Dec. 23, 1799; his wife d. 1S73 ; r. 
Moretovvn. 

34 III. Kimball P., b. Jan. 12, 1S02 ; d. May 19, 1804. 

35 IV. Lottis, b. Oct. 26, 1804; m. Girdon Gurley ; r. 
Berlin. 

36 V. Hoxana, b. Jan. 20, 1S06 ; m. Daniel Dodge ; r. 
Randolph. 

37 VI. Rebecca, b. Nov. 13, 1807 ; m. Ira Cameron ; d. 
June 20, 1872. 

38 VII. Hannah, b. Dec. 13, 1809; m. Uriah Howe; r. 
Moretown. 



(10) Samuel Pierce settled on lot 18, range 2; built a 
fine brick house thereon, now uninhabited ; m.,Fel:). 21, 
1S06, Hitty. dau. of Joseph Brooks, in her early days a 
prominent school-teacher. He d. April 8, 1858, a. 82. 
She d. April 7, 1866, a. 88. Ten children : 

39 I. L^^ke C, b. Jan. 11, 1807.+ ) Twins 

40 II. Luther P., b. Jan. 11, 1S07.-)- ' 

41 III. Samuel W., b. Aug. 31, i8o8.-(- 

42 IV. PJuridice, h. Oct. 11, 1810; d. Sept. 2, 1863, 
unm. 

43 V. Charles W., b. May 27, 181 2. -f- 

44 VI. Rostra, b. Dec. 19, 1S13 ; m. Edwin F. Wheel- 
er, of Ashby, Mass., who d. in the army, Aug. 
6, 1S63. She r. East Jaffrey. 

45 I. John F., b. at Griswold, Conn., Sept. 

21, 1S44; r East Jaftrey ; unm. 

46 2. James A., b. at Saquoit, N. Y., Mar. 

12, 1849; m.. July 4, 1872, Madeline 
P.. dau of Rev. Enville J. Emery; r. 
East JafiVey, two children: (i) Albert 
F., b. Oct. 29, 1873. (2) John E., b. 
Sept. 20, 1875. 

47 3. Mary J., b. at Hornellsville, N. Y., 

Sept. 27, 1853 ; m., June 30, 1S73, 
Frank P. Wellman ; one child, — Frank 
Chester, b. March 24, 1876. 

48 VII. Asa2yh, b. Nov. 17, 1815 ; d. Sept. 10, 1818. 

49 VIII. Hitty, b. May 28, 1818 ; d. July 16, 1819. 

50 IX. Nancy, h. Jan. 2, 1820; m. March 23, 1843, 
James H. Holt, of Wilton. 



424 

51 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

I. Samuel Pierce, b. Sept. 9, 1S44; ^" '" 

the army. 
I. James A., b. May 22, 1847 ; m. Mary 

Dodge ; one child. 

3. Nathaniel K., b. Nov. 24, 1855. 

4. Charles D., b. Nov. 29, 1S57. 

5. Emma R., b. Sept. 21, 1863. 

X. Asaph, b. Feb. 25, 1823 ; m. Fanny P., dau. of 
Capt. Isaac Jewell, Feb. 7, 1846; r. Michi- 
gan. 



(17) 



57 



5S 
59 

60 
61 

62 

63 
64 



(30) 



65 
66 

67 



(39) 



Joseph Pierce m., Dec. 13, 1S21, his brother Silas's 
widow, Esther Jaquith Pierce. He d. at Auburn, 
Mass., April 22, i860. She d. March 29, 1S66. Seven 
children : 

I. Frederick Sumner, b. Sept. 5, 1S22 ; m., i^*, 
Dec, 1848, Martha Holden, who d. May 4, 
1850, a. 26; m., 2^, Mary A. Grant, Jan. 
29, 1S53 ; one dau. (adopted), Angeline, b. 
1864. 
II. Sarah Elizabeth, h. March 12, 1S24. 

III. Samuel Jaquith, h . Dec. i, 1825; d. Sept. 9, 
1827. 

IV. Diantha Maria, b. June 18, 1S30. 

V. Samuel Sylvester, b. July 14, 1828 ; m. 

Clark ; r. Worcester, Mass. 

VI. Esther Louisa, b. July 29, 1832 ; m. Hollis 
Clark ; r. Providence, R. I. 

VII. Silas, b. Nov 27, 1835 ; d. Oct. 22, 1S40. 
VIII. EmiJy, b. Sept. 29, 1837 ; d. Oct. 15, 1837. 



JosiAH Pierce m., Feb. 9, 1824, Paulina Erskins; 
re. to Mexico, Oswego county, N. Y., in 184S. Three 
children, b. in JaflVey : 

I. Orilla JR.,h. ]?Ln. 24,1825. 
II. Sarah M., b. April 13, 1826; m., Oct. 5, 1847, 

Stephen Emery. 
III. Jacob A., b. Nov. 27, 1828 ; teacher of martial 
music. 

Luke C. Pierce (twin), b. Jan. 11, 1807 ; m.. May 
5, 1836, Margaret, dau. of William and Olive (Gray) 



68 
(4o) 



70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 
76 



(40 



77 
78 
79 

80 
(43) 

81 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 425 

Smith, of Peterborough ; re. to Franklin, Mich. His 
wife d. March 9, 185 1, a. 37. M., 2'^, Hester E, Lem- 
mons, of Sturgis, Mich. He d. Jan. 4, 1S55, from the 
effects of a blow from a broken limb of a falling tree. 
Three eh. by first wife. One son and daughter d. in 
infancy. 

III. Sarah T.^ b. Nov. 25, 1839; m., and r. Mar- 

shaltown, Iowa. 

IV. Samuel, b. April 29, 1853 ; re. with his mother, 

now Mrs. White, to Michigan City, Ind. 



Luther Brooks Pierce m., Sept. 29, 1831, Ann 
Wilson, b. in Me. ; r. Boston. 

I. Mosiria, b. Feb. 5, 1832 ; d. 
II. Martha, S., b. Jan. 27, 1834. 

III. Mosira A., b. March 5, 1836. 

IV. Samuel W., b. Feb. 3, 1837. 
V. Mary E., b. Feb. 22, 1841. 

VI. Lucinda J/., b. Aug. 2, 1844. 
VII. Eliza e/i, b. May 13, 1846. 



Samuel W. Pierce m., i'', April 27, 1837, Mary, 
dau. of William and Nabby (Smith) Button ; r. on the 
John Stearns farm. She d. Jan. i, 1847. Three ch. 
M., 2^, Martha Plummer, of Goffstown, Sept. 28, 1847. 
One ch. 

I. Mary Eveline, b. April 30, 1838 ; m., Feb. 24, 

1861, Joseph F. Carr ; r. Carlisle, Mass. 
II. Henry W.^ b. March 21, 1842; m. Helen N. 
Butrick ; a carpenter ; r. Winchendon. 

III. Albert S., b. March 15, 1845 ; m. Mary B. 

Chamberlin, Dec. 11, 1872; a machinist; r. 
Fitchburg. 

IV. J. I^lummer, b. Feb. 25, 1851 ; r. on the home- 

stead. 



Charles W. Pierce (Col.), m. Abigail G., dau. of 
James Gowing, of Dublin, May 27, 1835. ^^^^ ^^^ ^• 
May 15, 1811. In 1838 he re. to Dublin; became the 
proprietor of the Twitchell Mills. He d. Aug. 25, 1865. 

I. Phebe, b. Feb. 18, 1836 ; d. 



426 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



82 

83 
84 

85 

86 

87 
88 

89 

90 

91 



93 
94 
95 



96 



97 



98 
99 

100 

lOI 

102 
103 



II. Charles Henry^ b. June 6, 1837 ! ^• 

III. James Echoin, b. July i, 1839 ; d. 

IV. Asaph Webster, b. Sept. 28, 1840; d. in the 

army. 
V. Harriet Almira, b. Oct. 6, 1842 ; m. John E. 

Baldwin ; r. Jaffrey. 
VI. Almoji Gowing, b. Oct. 29, 1843; d. in the 

army. 
VII. Rufus Piper, b. May 11, 1846; r. Dublin. 
VIII. Eudora Francina, b. Oct. 31, 1847 ; d. 

IX. Willard Holt, b. Feb. 5, 1849 ! *"• Dublin. 

X. Clara Gleason, b. March 23, 1851. 
XI. Frank Elmer, b. Feb 3, 1853. 



Mary, widow of Reuben Pierce, d. Aug. 22, 1839, 
a. 85. 

Zebediah Fierce d. March 12, 1848, a. 43. 
Phebe K. Tyler, his wife, d. July 13, 1869, a. 83. 
Miss Sally Pierce d. .Sept. 29, 1837, ^- 5^- 



Reuben Pierce, b. 1809 ; m. Cordelia, dau. of Jacob 
and Mary (Smith) Jewell. Two children : 

(i) Eloiza, b. 1839. (2) Delia J., b. 1850. 



Abijah Pierce (Capt.) wash, in Leominster, Mass., 
Oct. 7, 178S; came to JafFrey about 1812; settled in 
school-district No. 9 ; m., i^', March 13, 1817, Sally, 
dau. of Parker and Peggy (Taggart) Maynard, who d. 
Oct. 6, 1S40; m., 2^, Mrs. Elvira (Maynard) Jewett, a 
sister of his first wife. In 1830 he purchased the tavern 
stand of Zadoc Chapman, and afterwards sold the same 
to N. R. Corning; d. Oct. 
days. Ch. by first wife : 



23, 1870, a. 82 yrs., 16 



I. Abijah A., b. March 9, 1818 ; a carpenter. 
II. Lewis Lorenzo, b. March 20, 1820 ; a carpenter 
and joiner.-j- 

III. Reuben P. Pierce, b. Feb. 19, 1823 ; d. Aug. 2, 

1827. 

IV. Sarah, b. June 3, 1S26; d. Dec. 27, 1829. 

V. Mary E., b. Sept. i, 1828 ; m. George Follens- 

bee, Aug. 29, 1846. 
VI. Reuben P., b. June 4, 1831. 



(99) 
I04 

io6 
107 



108 



109 
no 
in 
112 



"3 
114 



115 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 427 

Lewis L. Pierce m. Christine M. Billings, dau. of 
Paul H. and Rachel Billings, Mav 2, 1841. Children : 

I. Sarah E., b. Sept. 4, 1843 ' "''• Charles AI. 
Caldwell, of Methuen, Mass., Dec. 7, 1S65. 
II. Xenophon Jachon^ b. April 9, 1846. 
III. Ellery Charming, b. Aug. 13, 1848; d. Nov. 
14, 1864. 



JoHx Pierce came to Jaffrey about 1816 ; paid taxes 
that year. He settled on lot 16, range 2, formerly 

owned by Silas Adams. He m. Sally ; d. 

April 28, 1853, a. 67 She d. Feb. 28, 1873, a. 82. 



Jonas Pierce, son of Asa and Betsey (Pike) Pierce, 
was b. in Dublin, April 8, 1788. His father came 
from Weston, Mass., and settled in Dublin about 1786. 
After a few years he d., leaving a widow and two 
sons, — Asa and Jonas. July 29, 1790, his widow m. 
Thomas Davidson, and re. to Jaffrey. Jonas, his 
(second) son, m. Lucinda, dau. of Benjamin Bailey, of 
Jaffrey, Sept. i, 1811. She was b. July 22, 1791 ; d. 
Feb. 3, 1838. He m., 2<^, Mrs. Polly Bowers, Sept. 11, 
1838, who d. March 2, 1875, a. 85. He d. May 28, 
1857. ^^ ^^^ *-"^^ °^ ^^^^ prosperous farmers of Jaf- 
frey, and the parent of a large and respectable family 
of ch. 

I. Asa, b. July 17, 1812 ; m., Dec. 5, 1839, Lodisa 

Dike; r. Maine. He d. Oct. 21, 1874. 
II. Abigail, b. Nov. 10, 1815 ; m. Fuller Dike, 
June 13, 1838; r. Me. 

III. Addison, b. March 14, 1817; m., Oct. 25, 1838, 

Millie Prince.4- 

IV. Jonas, b. April 28, 1819; m. Sarah W. Briant, 

May 4, 1843: d. in Livermore, Me., April 

12, 1864. 
V. Benjamin, b, July 11, i82i.-[- 
VI. ^mo5, b. May 31, 1824; m., March 11, 1845, 

Susan Whittemore ; d. in Canton, Me., Nov. 

20, 1S62. 
VII. Dexter, b. Sept. 4, 1827; m., Feb. 6, 1851, 

Mary C. Buswell. He d. Aug. 19, 1875. 

She d. June 18, 1876. 



428 

ii6 
117 

(III) 

118 
119 

120 

121 

122 

(113) 



123 

124 



(115) 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

VIII. Betsey^ b. Aug. 30, 1829; m. Orlando B. Bus- 
well, Sept. 26, 1S49: d. April 17, 1856. 
IX. Emily ^ b. March 6, 1833 ; d. March 24, 1834. 



Addison Pierce m. Millie Prince, of Thompsonville, 
Conn. ; r. on the homestead. 

I. Myron L., b. Aug. 3, 1840; d. Sept. 9, 1842. 
II. Addison, b. Sept. 8, 1844 ; m. Ella M. FoUans- 
bee, March 30, 1869. 

III. Caroline Elizabeth, h. March 8, 1847; ^- ^'^^Y 

8, 1855. 

IV. Clark Myron, b. Jan., 1853 ! '""• 
V. Caroline E., b. Jan. 9, 1855. 



Benjamin Pierce m. Lucinda, dau. of Isaac and 
Betsy (Bailey) Stratton, May 12, 1846. He settled in 
Boston ; accumulated a large estate ; re. to his native 
town, Jaftrey, and purchased tlie Shedd place, lot 19, 
range 7, where he has since resided. In 1877 li^ built 
the present Granite State hotel, a valuable addition to 
East Jaftrey, and a great convenience to the travelling 
public. Mr. Pierce is a prominent man in town affairs ; 
has held many positions of trust; represented the town 
in the state legislature in i87o-'7i ; and is now one of 
the directors in the Monadnock National Bank. 



II. 



George A.,\>. 1849. 
Ada E., b. 1852. 



Dexter Pierce m. Mary C. Buswell, and settled on 
lot 21, range 6. He d. Aug. 19, 1875. She d. June 
18, 1876. Eight children : 



(i) James M.,h. 1852. (2) Loren D.,h. 1854. (s) 
^yillieB.,h. 1856. (4) Dora, d. May 19, 1858, a. 16 
dys. (5) Jessie C.,h. i860. (6) Austin 0.,h. 1862. 
(7) Myron E., b. 1865. (8) Jane L., b. 1869. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 429 

PATRICK FAMILY. 

The head of the family in this country was Thomas Gill or 
Kill Patrick (he was called by both names), a Scotch-Irish 
Presbyterian. 

In the centuries of early Christianity, and up to the ninth or 
tenth century, the north of Ireland and the Scottish shores were 
peopled by the same race, virtually, northern Ireland being 
known to primitive liistory as " Scotia." The name Patrick 
was equally common on both sides, and it is to this time. It 
is known that about the ninth century one of these Patricks 
built a church, from v/hich he took the name " Kirk " or " Kill 
Patrick." Those bearing the name "Kirk" in the south, of 
"Kill" in the north of Scotland, of" Kill " or " Gill " in the 
north of Ireland, are all regarded as descendants of the same 
branch — of the Kirk Patrick of Dumfries, Scotland, who built 
the church. Cille, Kill, or Gill, signifies, in the Celtic and 
Gaelic, a place of worship. Kirk, also, has the same significa- 
tion. 

The Kill or Kirk Patricks recognized their fealty to the 
crown of Scotland as late as the days of Bruce, figliting under 
the banner of their chief until he won his crown. Wlien Bruce 
wounded the Red Comyn, at Gray Friar's Church, Dumfries, 
in 1306, one of his followers, Sir Roger Kirk Patrick, or Kill 
Patrick (half the historians of that day wrote it " Kill "), who 
would have no doubt on such a matter, said, " I mak sikar " 
(I make sure), and slew the man outright. The crest in the 
Kirk Patrick arms is a hand holding a dagger hi pale ^ distilling 
drops of blood, and their motto is, " I mak sikar." The suc- 
cessors of the Closeburn, Dumfries, estates are baronets, and 
the present head of the house is Sir Thomas Kirk Patrick. 
Dumfries was their original home. During the troublous times 
in the early part of the seventeenth century, some of the fami- 
lies known as Covenanters crossed the Mull of Cantyre to An- 
trim in 1628, and were active in the wars terminating with the 
siege of Derry. One family of this Dumfries branch of Kirk or 
Kill Patricks was among them, and from this family descended 
Thomas Gill or Kill Patrick. A member of this Scotch fam- 
ily (Carl Kill Patrick) separated himself from them in the 
English interest, and became Lord of Osraighe. Thomas Kill 
or Gill Patrick was a Scotch-Irish Presbyterian, b. 1674, who 
came from Coleraine, county Antrim, Ireland, in 171S, with 
nine sons and one daughter, who was drowned. They came 
first to Boston, thence to Wells, York county, Maine, where 
he did not long remain, but, leaving some of his family there, 
removed with five sons to Biddeford, Maine, where afterwards 
he was known to be an active member of the church. He died 



430 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



in Biddeford. 1762, aged 88 years. His descendants are scat- 
tered over the United States, known as Gill Patricks, Kill Pat- 
ricks, Patricks, and some drop the suffix " Patrick," and are 
known as the "Gill" family. We learn, from Eaton's "His- 
tory of Fort St. George," that on April 18, 1735, twenty- 
seven men, Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, from Bidcleford, Saco, 
and Wells, entered into a contract with Col. Waldo to set- 
tle upon his lands. Among these men were Thomas, John, 
and Andrew, sons of Thomas Kill Patrick, of Biddeford. In 
1745, on account of the war, the Waldo settlers, many of 
them, left St. George, and went to Boston and neighboring 
towns. Andrew removed to Dedham. Elizabeth, the married 
sister left in Ireland, sailed for this country, and landed at Pem- 
aquid in 1732. Slie ever after kept house for her brother 
Thomas (a bachelor), who left his estate to her son. Thomas 
commanded the Provincial militia from about i745 uiitil bis 
death, 1770. 

From an old record in Stoughton, Mass., this is gleaned : 
" Samuel Kill Patrick, b. 1733, was apprenticed to Joseph 
Billings at 14 years of age. Says he is the son of Andrew Kill 
Patrick, late of St. George, Knox county, Me. He lived in 
Stoughton as late as 1765." 

Andrew Kill Patrick, son of Thomas Kill Patrick, 
b. in Coleraine, Antrim Co., Ireland ; came to this 
country in 171S; and tradition says he was seven or 
eight years old when he crossed the water. He prob- 
ably d. in Dedham, Mass., for John Patrick, second 
(father of General Marsena R. Patrick, N. Y.), visited 
him there, soon after the battle of Bunker Hill. Six 
children : 



2 

3 



I. Samuel, b. 1733.-}- 

II. William, b. 1741 : killed in battle. May 30, 
1778, a. 37. He m. Deborah Smith, of 
Dedham, soon after which he re. to Stough- 
ton, which was his home until his death. 
On the church records of Dedham, where 
the marriage is recorded, his name is writ- 
ten "Kill Patrick," and in early life he was 
called "Kill Patrick," but in 1777 he some- 
times signed his name "Patrick." In 177^ 
he was captain in Col. Alden's Fourth Alass. 
Regt., and was killed in the engagement 
WMth the Tories and Indians, at Cherry Val- 
ley, on the 30th of May, that year. He had 
a son, Andrew. 



4 

5 
6 



(2) 



7 
8 



lO 



II 



12 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 43 I 

III. John, b. 1739; d. in Bane, Mass., 1807, a. 68. -|- 

IV. Robert, had twelve ch. 
V. Jacob. 



Samuel Kill Patrick was apprenticed to Joseph 
Billings, in Stoughton, Mass., when fourteen years of 
age, and worked seven years to learn a trade. He m., 
I*', Jerusha Harris. He afterwards re. to Fitchburg ; 
thence, in i773' ^^ Fitzwilliam. His house was there 
destroyed by fire, and the town records were burned 
with it, for he was town-clerk at that time. His wife 
d. in 17S0. M., 2*^, Mrs. Relief Oakes, Winchendon, 
Mass. He professed the religion of his fathers, and 
was a man of good sense and Christian character. He 
was reserved and distant in his manners towards his 
children, and trained them strictly to observe the Sab- 
bath, — as one daughter remarked, not allowing them 
to enter the orchard, on Sunday, for apples. He drop- 
ped the prefix "Kill" before removing to Fitzwilliam, 
and was known, ever after, as "Patrick." Here, to 
Jaffrey, Dec, 1809, and d. Aug. 6, 1817, a. 84. Eight 
children : 

I. Samuel, b. at Stoughton, Mass., April 29, 

I764-+ 
II. Hufus, b. May 4, 1766; r. in Fitzwilliam ; re. 

to Jaffrey ; d. Sept. 10, 1797, a. 31. He had 
a son, William. 

III. Betsey, b. Dec. 22, 1770; m. Edward Calley ; 

re. to Windsor, Vt., and d. Had a son, 
Samuel. 

IV. jOameZ (twin), b. Nov. 6, 1772; m. Susannah 

McLane : r. Hinesburg, Vt. ; d. Nov. 6, 
1842, a. 70. Children: John, Rufus, Eliza- 
beth, Susan, and Daniel. 
V. Sally (twin), b. Nov. 6, 1772 ; m., Oct. 9, 1793, 
Whitcomb French ; r. Dublin ; re. to Marl- 
borough, where he d. July 30, 1865, a. 92. 
Children: Whitcomb, Daniel, Jerusha H., 
Sumner, Stillman, Betsey G., Malancy B., 
Abigail, and Leander. 
VI. Hannah, b. Feb. 23, 1774; m. John McLane; 
r. Lyme, N. H. ; re., in 1851, to Loveland, 
Ohio; d. Dec. 17, 1831, a. 57. Children: 
Susannah, Hannah, Stevenson, Thomas, 
Robert, Dollv, David, and Marv. 



432 

13 

H 
(4) 



15 
i6 

17 



(7) 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

VII. Dolly^ b. Aug. 23, 1776 ; m., i'*, David Goodell, 
of Lyme ; m., 2*^, Asahel Gilbert. Shed. 
Jan. 30, 1S56, a. 79. 
VIII. Abigail^ b. Oct. 23, 1778 ; d., a. 7 weeks. 



John Patrick (Lieut.), b. 1739; m., i", Sarah 

, b. 173S. She d. April 28, 1799, a. 61 yrs. M., 

2**, Airs. Lilley ; r. in Barre, Mass. In the commission 
(still preserved) given him, Feb. 5, 1776, by the gov- 
ernor and council of the province of Massachusetts Bay, 
he is styled "John Patrick, Gentleman." He was 
known by the name of "Patrick" in Barre, where he 
d. March 6, 1807, a. 68 yrs. 

I. Anna m. Elihu Beaman, of Wendell, Mass. ; d. 
II. John, b. 1766; d. He had children; one is 



livuig. 



III. 



Marsena R. Patrick (Gen.), b. in Jefferson 
Co., N. Y., Alarch 15, 181 1 ; graduated at 
West Point, 1S35. Joining the Second Inf., 
he became first lieutenant in 1S39 ; captain, 
Aug. 22, 1847; brevet-major in 1849, "foJ* 
meritorious conduct in Mexico;" resigning 
June 30, 1850, he retired to his farm. In 
i859-'6i, was president of the State Agri- 
cuhural College. When civil war broke 
out, he was made inspector-general of the 
N. Y. militia ; brigadier-general of volun- 
teers, March 17, 1862. In Dec. he com- 
manded a brigade in Doubleday's division, 
first army corps, with which he took part in 
the battle of Antietam. Provost marshal 
general, Army of the Potomac, Oct. 6, 
1862, to March 17, 1865 ; resigned June 12, 
1865. President of New York Agricultural 
Society since Feb. 14, i86i ; r. at Manlius, 
N. Y. 



Samuel Patrick m., i^', Sarah Davidson, of Peter- 
borough, Dec. 27, 1792. She d. Jan. 25, 1824, a. 58. 
M., 2*^, Ann Wright, who d. Oct. 24, 1853, a. 77. He 
was a merchant in Fitzwilliam, and was also a carpen- 
ter and joiner by trade. He purchased a farm in 
Jaffrey, of James Davidson, in 1799, where he resided 



iS 
20 

21 

22 

23 



24 

25 

26 

27 
28 

(18) 



29 



30 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 433 

until death, Jan. 10, 1S33, a. 6S. He was prosperous 
for the times in which he lived, and was a member ot 
the Congregational Church. He was called an odd 
man, doing things in his own peculiar way, regardless 
of the opinion of others. Many years before his death 
he gave his farm to his son Samuel, 3d. Children : 

I. Joel Oakes, b. in Fitzwilliam, Nov. 8, 1793.4- 

II. Samuel, b. in Jaffrey, Dec. 30, 1795.-)- 

III. William Wright.) b. Dec. 24, 1797. -|- 

IV. /Sally, h. May 5, iSoo; m., 1819, Jona. Jewett 

Bacon, q. v. 
V. Relief, b. Dec. 6, 1803 ; m. Perkins Biggelow, 

q. V. 
VI. Mary Ami, b. Nov. 24, 1809 ; m. David Hall ; 
d. March 20, 1880 ; r. Waltham, Mass. Five 
children : 

1. Wright P., b. April 26, 1835 ; r. Cali- 
fornia ; clerk of the county, and a large 
dealer in cattle and horses ; m. ; four 
children. 

2. Davis C, b. Aug. 7, 1836; m. M.J. 
Parker ; r. in California ; a public offi- 
cer in the place where he lives. 

3. Samuel R., b. May 6, 1S41 ; r. Cali- 
fornia. 

4. William H., b. April 29, 1843 ; m. ; 
owns mills ; r. Cal. ; one son. 

5. Edwin, b. Oct. iS, 1848; r. Waltham. 



Joel Oaks Patrick m, Dec. 11, 181 7, Sally Brig- 
ham, b. Sept. 9, 1790. He was a merchant, hotel- 
keeper, and a carpenter and joiner by trade. He d. 
March 31, 1870. She d. March 3, 1879, a. 88. 

I. Dexter, b. Dec. 9, 1818 ; m., i'', Mary Ann 
Nutting, July, 1845 ; she d. Oct., 1845. M., 
2^ Eliza J. Wentworth ; r. Waltham, Mass. 
Two children: (i) Mary E., b. July 19, 
1848 ; m., April 7, 1S67, Leroy Brown; r. 
Waltham ; two children. (2) Dexter B., b. 
April 2, 1S51 ; m. Rosella Biggelow; r. in 
Waltham, Mass. ; i child. 
II. Joel, b. Oct. 31, 1820. 

29 



434 
31 

(19) 



32 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

III. Sarah, b. Jan. 26, 1825 ; m., May 8, 1859, 
David A. Cutler ; r. East JafiVey. 



Samuel Patrick m., June 9, 1822, Mrs. Abigail, 
widow of Samuel Twitchell, of Dublin, a brotber of Dr. 
Amos Twitcbell, of Keene. Sbe had two daughters, — 
Maria W., b. April 29, 1815 ; m. Jan., 1838. Lewis 
Thorpe, a merchant ; r. Athol, Mass. ; d. Dec. 31, 1850, 
a. 35. Caroline, b. Aug. 3, 1818 ; m. Dec. 24, 1845, 
Rev. Simon Barrows; r. Templeton, Mass.; d. Dec. 
25, 1852, a. 34. One child, d. in infancy. 

Airs. Patrick d. Sept. 16, 1S39, a. 44. He m., 2^, 
Dec. 30, 1840, Mrs. Eliza Bailey, who d. Aug. 10, 1877. 
He d. March 6, 185 1, a. 55. Eight children, — six by 
first wife, two by second wife. 

In 1818 he joined a colony from Middletown, Vt, 
which made a settlement in Ohio. His uncle. Dr. Ezra 
Clark, was among them, and the doctor persuaded him 
to commence the study of medicine. He purchased 
land and returned East to marry. The idea of a home 
in the far West (as it then seemed) away from kindred 
and friends, did not please his wife ; therefore he re- 
mained on the farm until the death of his father, soon 
after which he sold the farm, and purchased mills in 
the village now called East JaftVey. He was a very 
social man, and exceedingly enjoyed the intercourse of 
his fellow-townsmen. They often conferred upon him 
their best town offices, and once he was sent to the 
state legislature as their representative. He was a 
member of the Congregational church. He was fond 
of books, and was well read in law, but financial suc- 
cess was not his fate. He took advantage of the bank- 
rupt law in 1840, and soon after re. to Bolton, where 
he survived his misfortunes but a few years. 

I. Elizabeth, b. in Jaflrey, March 31, 1823; m., 
June 21, 1849, William R. Lincoln, b. April 
II, 1818. He was thirty-six years superin- 
tendent of reformatory institutions for boys. 
He commenced in Boston, Mass. He aided 
in planning the Massachusetts State Reform 
School buildings in Westboro', and was their 
first superintendent. He was the first su- 
perintendent of the Maine Reform School, 
and for seventeen years was at the head of a 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 435 

similar institution in Baltimore. He de- 
signed the plans of the Maine and New 
Hampshire Reform School buildings ; also, 
the Maryland Deaf and Dumb Inst., and 
other public buildings. He is now in mer- 
cantile business in Baltimore, Md. Ch. liv- 
ing : M. Lizzie, Flora M., and William R., 

33 II. Samuel C.^ b. in Jaftrey, March 31, 1S25 ; m., 
March 7, 1S53, Mrs. Harriet R. Marsh, of 
Woodstock, Vt. ; b. Feb. i, 1S17. He was 
b. on the farm where three generations of 
Samuel Patricks had lived before him. He 
left town in 1841, and entered a cigar man- 
ufacturing establishment in Bolton, Mass. 
He afterwards went to Salem, Mass., thence 
to New Ipswich, N. H., where his health 
failed, and a sea voyage was advised. He 
sailed from New Bedford, for the north-west 
coast, in 1845, — doubling the Cape of Good 
Hope on the outward voyage, and Cape 
Horn on his return. He took with him 
about seventy volumes of reading matter, and 
Bowditch's Navigation. He kept the ship's 
reckoning, and a journal, during the voyage. 
After being absent nearly three years, he re- 
turned to his former occupation. He would 
have followed the sea, probably, had he not 
received a permanent injury during the voy- 
age. He r. in Lowell, Mass., and is now a 
manufacturer of and dealer in cigars and 
tobacco. 

34 III. Abigail, h.\n Jaffrey, Dec. 15, 1829; d. Dec. 
26, 1830, a. I yr. 

35 IV. George, b. in Jaffrey, Nov. 16, 1831 ; d. July 
25, 1834, ^' 2 yi's., 8 mos. 

36 V. Henry, b. in Jaffrey, Nov. 8, 1836; d. Dec. 31, 
1843, a. 6 yrs. 

37 VI. Mary Abbie, b. in Jaffrey, June 28, 1839 '■> "^-5 
July 31, 1865, Frederick D. Morrison, of 
Md., b. Sept. 30, 1837. He is superintendent 
of white and colored "Institutions for the 
Instruction of the Blind," in Baltimore, Md. 
Ch. living, — George, Clarence. 

38 VII. Eliza, b. in Bolton, Mass., Sept. 30, 1841 ; d. 
July 18, 1S42, a. 9 mos. 



436 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



39 



(20) 



40 



VIII. George Henry ^ b. in Bolton, Mass., Sept. 28, 
1S43 ; received academic education in Bolton 
high school, Clinton grammar school, Lan- 
caster academy, and Westbrook seminary, 
Me. ; entered the Union army as sergeant 53** 
Mass. Vol. Militia, Sept. 6, 1S62 (at the age 
of 19), serving in the campaign of the Red 
River, Port Hudson, &c., of 1862-3, where 
he w^as w^ounded ; afterwards joined the 36"^ 
and 56"' Mass., serving in the campaign of 
i864-'5, of the Army of the Potomac. Re- 
tained in service, after mustered out of regi- 
ment, by special order of the secretary of 
war, July 14, 1865 ; appeared before exam- 
ining board, Washington, D. C, Aug. 7, 
1S65 ; mustered out of volunteer service, and 
Aug. 15, 1S65, commissioned second lieuten- 
ant 20"^ U. S. C. T. ; Sept. 19, 1865, com- 
missioned second lieutenant 82"^ U. S. C. T. ; 
Nov. 6, 1865, appointed A. D. C, and Act. 
Asst. Adj. Gen. Dist. Middle, Northern, and 
Southern Florida, Staff' of Brig. Gen. John 
Newton ; Feb. 10, 1S66, appointed A. D. C, 
Staff' of Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, com- 
manding Dept. Fla. ; April 26, 1866, ap- 
pointed first lieutenant 82'* U. S. C. T. ; 
May 2, 1866, appointed judge advocate, 
Dept. Fla. ; June 21, 1866, appointed adju- 
tant 82-^ U. S. C. T. ; Sept. 7, 1866, 
mustered out of service ; March 17, 1867, re. 
to Montgomery, Ala., where he has since 
resided as a practising lawyer ; m., April i, 
1869, in Montgomery, Jennie M. Todd, of 
Hyde Park, N. Y., b. May 27, 1844. Ch. : 
Henry Ewing, b. July 3, 1870; Ruth 
Stoughtenburg, b. March, 1872; a son, b. 
Aug., 1877. 



William Wright Patrick m. Caroline Davidson ; 
r. Canada West; re., 1841, to Sun Prairie, Wis., where 
he d. April 6, 1867. His wife d. Aug. 16, 1855. Five 
children : 

I. William Wright., b. Jan. 29, 1828; m. Lidoma 
Winsor ; r. Brigham's Lane, Cottonwood 
Co., Minnesota. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 437 

41 II. Mary Ann, b. July 6, 1831 ; m. Wm. Hunter; 
r. Lowell, Dodge Co., Wis. 

42 III. /Sarah Dorothy, b. Aug. 6, 1S34; m. David J. 
Munroe ; r. Prescott, Grape-vine Co., Arizo- 
na Territory. 

43 IV. Irene Caroline, b. Nov. 21, 1839; m. Thomas 
A. Hawkins ; r. St. Paul, Minn. 

44 V. Eliza Ann, b. Sept. 18, 1845 ; m. Otis P. Bar- 
rett ; r. Central City, Col. 



PERRY FAMILY. 

John Perry, son of John and Esther Emery Perry, 
was b. in Dublin, Aug. 29, 1807. His grandfather. 
Ivory Perry, came to Dublin from Sherborn, Mass., 
previous to 1767, and m. Kezia Broad. He m., 2^, Nov. 
16, 1837, Elmira, dau. of Jacob and Mary Smith 
Jewell, b. at Jaflrey, Dec. 18, 1807. Mr. Perry fol- 
lowed the business of farming, first in Dublin, after- 
wards in JaffVey, on the farm formerly owned by Judge 
Abel Parker. He is now (1880) a resident of Peter- 
borough. Seven children : 

I. Catherine E., b. Jan. 20, 1838 ; m. Munson 
McClenning ; r. Peterborough. One child : 
Mabel Harris. 

3 II. Harriet, b. May 16, 1839; ^- Oct. 10, 1839. 

4 III. Mary S., b. Aug. 17, 1S42 ; m. Henry McClen- 
ning ; r. Worcester, Mass. 

5 IV. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 9, 1834. 

6 V. Harriet, b. Aug. 24, 1846. 
VI. Edwin, b. Aug. i, 1848 ; d. 



PHELPS FAMILY. 

1 Francis Phelps d. in the reign of Edward VI. 

2 John dwelt on Nether Tyne, Eng. 
William m. Mary Dover, and came to this country, 

and landed at Hull, Mass., May 30, 1630; settled in 
Winsor, Ct., of which he was the founder, in 1635. 

4 Timothy, b. Sept. i, 1639 ; m. Mary Griswold. 

5 Nathaniel, b. Jan. 27, 1677 ; m. Hannah Bissell. 

6 Solomon, b. July 29, 1716 ; m. Temperance Barker. 



438 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



7 
8 



lO 



II 

12 
13 



BissELL (Capt.), b. Feb. 16, 1754 ; m. Lovina Skinner. 

Alexander, b. Oct. 6, 17S0; m. Rachel Steele, dau. 
of John and Sarah (Cobb) Steele, b. in Tolland, Ct., 
June 12, 1780; a descendant of George Steele, who 
came from England ; settled, first, in Cambridge, Mass., 
afterwards in Hartford, Ct. 

GuRLEY Artemas Phelps, m. d., b. in Waitsfield, 
Vt, June 30, 1822 ; came to Jafirey in 1849 ' '^•' ^P^'i^ 
10, 1851, Adaliza, dau. of Benjamin and Grata (Hunt) 
Cutter. Shed. June 3, 1852. One child : 

I. Grace 3Ima,h. April 12, 1852. 

He m., 2"^, Nov. 2, 1858, Nancy Priscilla Stoughton, 
b. Jan. 23, 1824, dau. of Asa and Anna (Stevens) 
Stoughton, of Gill, Mass. Three children : 

II. Charles Stoughton, b. Dec. 23, 1859. 

III. 3Iary Eliza, b. July 7, 1862. 

IV. William Steele, b. July 12, 1867. 



POLLARD FAMILY. 



Levi Pollard, b. at Harvard, Mass., April i, 1809 ; 
m. Sarah Bassett, of Westmoreland ; settled on the 
Fortune lot, in JaftVey. 

2 I. Sarah JE., b. Nov. 22, 1834 ' ^' March 31, 1866, 
unm. 

3 II. Levi, b. Sept. 16, 1837 « "^- Louisa Leach, of 
Westmoreland. 

4 III. Joseph, b. Feb. 23, 1840; d. May 30, 1868. 

5 IV. Andrew, b. June 29, 1845 ; m. Louisa M. Cole, 
Sept. II, 1878. 



POOLE FAMILY. 



2 
3 



Ebenezer Poole came to Jaftrey about 1803 ; settled 
on lot 4, range 6 ; m. Olive Ward, who d. Oct. 9, 1846, 
a. 72. He d. Dec. 31, 1857, a. 83. 

I. Mary M., b. Aug., 1802 ; r. Brookline ; unm, 
II. Catherine, b. Sept. 17, 1803. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



439 



4 

5 
6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 

II 



(9) 



12 



13 

15 



III. Samuel (7., b. Oct. 23, 1804. 

IV. Hannah C, b. March, 1805. 
V, Martha S.^ b. July 11, 1807. 

VI. Caroline^ b. Nov. 19, 1808 ; m. Parsons Darling ; 

d. Jan. 13, 1858. 
VII. Ehenezer, b. July 5, 1810. 
viii. John TF., b. Aug. 13, i8i2.-(- 
IX. William J/., b. May 10, 18 14. 
X. Olive JE. B.^ b. June 10, 1820. 



John Ward Poole m., i'*, Edith, dau. of Abel Cut- 
ter ; 3^ Dorothy Holt, of Fitzwilliam ; 3**, Sybil, dau. 
of John and Polly (Batchelder) Cutter, widow of Joel 
H. Cutter; and 4"", Nancy Witt, widow of James 
Howe. First wife d. July 23, 1839; second wife d. ; 
third wife d. Aug. 31, 1S65. He d. Jan. 7, 1875, a. 62. 
He was a blacksmith ; r. Jaffrey Centre. Three ch. by 
third wife : 

I. Joel Hohart^ b. Jan. i, 1842 ; m. Feb. 25, 1868, 
Elizabeth P., dau. of Edmund and Rachel 
R. (Cutter) Shattuck. One child : 

I. Arthur Eugene, b. March i, 1869. 

II. Joh7i Ward, b. March 21, 1846; m. 

III. Mary Cutter, b. July 9, 1856 ; m., July 35, 1875, 

Lewis K., son of James and Nancy (Witt) 
Howe, widow of John W. Poole ; re. to Ply- 
mouth, Wis. ; and d. Sept. 7, 1877. One 
child. 



POPE FAMILY. 



William Pope (Capt.) came to Jafirey at an early date, 
and settled on lot 20, range 6, now owned by Joseph Davis. 
He was in service during the Revolution, and on committees 
to procure provisions for the army ; member of the board of 
selectmen ; and held other offices of honor and trust. Of his 

origin we have no knowledge. He m. Mary , who d. 

May 7, 1821, a. 73. He d. Nov. 16, 1820, a."^8o. One ch. : 



440 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Polly, m. Nathan Cutter, of New Ipswich, q. v. 

POWERS FAMILY. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



8 
9 

lO 

II 

12 

13 

14 

15 



16 



Whitcomb Powers came from Hollis, and settled in 
school district No. 9 ; re. to Peterborough about 1809. 
He m., i^', Keziah Loring, of Lexington, Mass., b. 
April 19, 1 761 ; d. March 6, 1790. M., 2'^, Miriam 
Bond, of Dublin, April 21, 1791 ; d. Dec. 20, 1839, a. 
76. He d. at Peterborough, Nov. 19, 1826. Four ch. 
by first wife, and ten by second wife. 

I. Joseph^ d. 
II. Whitcomb^ d. 
in. Francis, d. 

IV. Keziah, b. 1786 ; m. Jacob Newell, q. v. 
V. Polly D., b. June 29, 1793 ; m., Nov. 3, 1S30, 
Riley Goodrich, of Peterborough ; d. June 
12, 1870. He d. Sept. 8, 1851, a. 56. 
VI. Miriam B., b. Nov. 17, 1795; m., Sept. 17, 

1816, Collins H. Jaquith. 
vii. Nahhy, b. May 22, 1798 ; d. Nov. 9, 1800. 
VIII. Betsey, b. June 21, iSoo; m., Dec. 11, 1S23, 
Charles M. Howe. 
IX. Mehitable B., b. Sept. 2, 1802 ; d. Nov. 2, 1873, 

unm. 
X. Lydia A., b. April 28, 1805 ; m., i", Hugh 

Smith, and 2'^, James Williams. 
XI. Francis JV. G., b. June 27, 1808 ; m. Elizabeth 
Hunt; d. May 31, 1871. 

XII. William 31., b. July 28, 181 1 ; m., Sept. 10, 

183S, Mary Clark. 

XIII. Stephen F., b. July 11, 1814 ; d. April 20, 1815. 



Paul Powers settled on lot 7, range 7 '■> d. Dec. 6 
1797, a. 38. His widow, Merriel Powers, m. David 
Gilmore, and d. Oct. 13, 1842, a. 73. 



Peter Powers settled in Jaffrey, on lot 11, range 8, 
about 1808 ; was a tax-payer for the last time in 1829. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



441 



17 Charles Henry Powers was the son of Cyrus and 
Lucretia (Pierce) Powers, and grandson of Asa and 
Rachel (Cutter) Powers, of Temple. He was b. in 
Newmarket, April 14, 182S. His mother d. Sept., 
1833, and his father m., 2*^, Mary J. Hilton, of New- 
market, re. to Pittsfield, and d. Nov, 9, 1S34, when his 
son Charles was a little more than six years old. After 
the death of his father he went to Dublin, and lived 
with an uncle till 1847, when he went to work in a 
store in JaflVey, and has since been engaged in trade 
there, except while in Canada as consul. 

He received his education at the common-school, and 
there, by his own industry and application, qualified him- 
self for the many important public stations which he 
has since held. In the town of his adoption he has 
been chosen moderator of their town-meetings for a 
longer period than any other man since the incorpora- 
tion of the town ; has for many years been town-treas- 
urer, member of the state legislature in i860, '6r, and 
'79 ; was bank commissioner four years, — i86i-'2-'3-'4 ; 
elected railroad commissioner in 1875 for three years; 
and appointed United States consul to Coaticook, Can- 
ada, by President Lincoln, Oct. 14, 1864, and remained 
in office till July i, 1869. During 1861 and '62 he was 
clerk for a military committee of the state to raise troops ; 
and was four years master of Charity Lodge, No. 18, of 
Free & Accepted Masons in the town of Jaffrey. 

In 1 85 1 he m. Eliza A. Bailey, dau. of Rev. E. K. 

18 Bailey, of Jaffi-ey, by whom he has one son, Fred L., b. 
1858. 



PRESCOTT FAMILY. 

The Prescott family is of English origin. James was a resi- 
dent of Standish, in Lincolnshire, England, about 1564. He 
m. a dau. of Roger Standish, Esq., by whom he had six chil- 
dren. His second child m. Ellen Shaw, of Standish. They 

had four children, the youngest of whom, Ralph, m. Ellen , 

of Shovington. The youngest of their five ch., John, m. Mary 
Platts, of Wygan, in Lancashire, Jan. 21, 1629, and in 1640 
emigrated to New England, and settled in Watertown, Mass., 
but afterwards re. to Lancaster. They had nine ch., four b. in 
America. His youngest child, Jonas, b. at Lancaster, June, 
1648, m. Mary, dau. of John and Mary (Draper) Looker, of 
Sudbury, by whom he had four sons and eight daughters. 



442 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Among their descendants was William Prescott, the historian, 
who m. Susan Amory, of Boston. The grandfathers of this 
couple had been engaged on opposite sides, during the war for 
independence, and even in the same battle. Col. Prescott was 
the American commander at the battle of Bunker Hill, while 
Capt. Linzey was commander of the sloop Falcon, in Charles 
river, and cannonaded the Americans, under Prescott, on Bun- 
ker Hill. The swords, worn on that occasion by the soldier 
and sailor, came down, in their respective families, until they 
met in the family of the historian. 

James, the oldest son of Jonas and Mary Looker, b. Oct. i6, 
1678, m., 1°*, Thankful Wheeler, of Concord. She d. ; and he 
m., 2^, Mary Page. They had six children. The oldest, 
Ebenezer, b. July 19, 1700, m. Hannah Farnsworth. He d. 
Dec. I, 1771. His second son, Oliver, b. May 5, 1725, m., 
June 8, 1779, Bethia Underwood. He was a farmer in West- 
ford, Mass. ; d. Jan. i, 1S03. 

Benjamin Prescott (Col.) and his brother Oliver 
were among the early settlers of Jaftrey. Oliver m. 
Keziah Haywood, Nov. 15, 17S8, and re. to Whites- 
town, N. Y. Benjamin re. to Jaftrey, and settled on 
lot 21, range 9, in 1774, living in a log house until i775' 
At the raising of his frame house, a party from Rindge, 
on their way to the defence of Charlestown, assisted. 
Mr. Carlton, one of their number, was killed on Bunker 
Hill, While acting as a spy, on the day previous to 
the battle, he was taken prisoner by the British, and 
made his escape the same day. Col. Prescott was a 
man of gigantic power, bodily, intellectually, and mor- 
ally. He was an active, energetic, and influential man ; 
highly esteemed for his integrity, uprightness, and 
sound judgment. He represented the town in the 
state legislature for a period of eleven years, nine in 
succession — a longer period than any other man in the 
town of Jaftrey. He was early appointed by the gov- 
ernor a justice of the peace, and continued in that office 
for many years, during which he was much employed in 
public business. He was a director and contractor for 
building the third New Hampshire turnpike. He was 
also a deacon of the Baptist church, which he was 
active in forming, and prominent in its support until his 
death, which occurred March 7, 1S39 ! ^"<^^ ^* *^^^ ^S^ °* 
85 he went down to the grave "like a shock of corn 
fully ripe in its season." In his own business affairs, 
in connection with his farm, he was for many years the 




^^ 



s 



ew 



' cL 




^^^e/c^/?^. 



2 

3 



4 
5 



6 

7 
8 
9 

lO 

II 

12 

(4) 



H 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 443 

proprietor of a public house, which was well patronized 
by the travelling public. 

Benjamin Prescott m. Rachel Adams, of Chelms- 
ford, Dec. 5, 1775- She was b. Aug. 19, 1757; d. 
March 9, 1826, a. 68. He d. March 7, 1839, ^- ^5- 

I. Benjamin, b. Sept. 2, 1773; d. Sept. 16, 1777. 
II. Benjamin, b. Sept. i, 1778; was a machinist 
and farmer ; r. East JaflVey village ; m. 
widow Sally (Searle) Hodge, May 17, 1830. 
She was b. in Temple, Nov. 26, 1781 ; d. 
Sept. 7, 1869. He d. Sept. 14, 1S52. 

III. Oliver, b. Feb. 9, 1781.-I- 

IV. Rachel, b. Aug. 30, 1783 ; m. James, son of 

James and Betsey (Warner) Clay, of Putney, 
Vt., 1815. He was b. Dec. 16, 1783; d. 
Jan. 4, 1838. She d. He was a farmer ; r. 
in Rindge : 

1. James P., b. April 7, 1817; a farmer; 

r. Rindge. 

2. Rachel, b. April 15, 1819; d. Nov. 20, 

1S67. 

3. Susan B., b. Feb. 23, 1826; r. Rindge. 

V. Eldad, b. Nov. 13, 1786.-I- 
VI. Nobby, b. Sept. 13, 1789; d. Aug. 24, 1800. 
VII. John A, b. Nov. 7, 1793.-!- 
VIII. Susannah, b. Sept. 8, 1797 ; d. Aug. 30, 1800. 
IX. Bethia, b. April 2, 1800; d. June, 1807. 



Oliver Prescott (Col.) was a farmer and inn-keep- 
er ; erected the large and commodious public house on 
the turnpike, east of his father's. He was a prominent, 
leading man; held many positions of honor and trust; 
was moderator, town-clerk, selectman, representative, 
justice of the peace, and colonel of the Twelfth Regt. 
N. H. militia. Ke m. Mary, dau. of James and Betsey 
(Warner) Clay, May 23, 181 1. She was b, at Putney, 
Vt., March 12, 1782 ; d. March 31, 1839. M., 2^, Mrs. 
Phebe (Coffin) Brown, Jan. 7, 1S41. She was b. April 
14, 1795 ; d. Aug. II, 1844. M., 3*^, Mrs. Mary (Bon- 
ner) Stratton, March 27, 1845. She was b. June 23, 
1789, now (1876) living in Fredonia, N. Y. He d. 
Nov. 25, 1850, a. 61. 

I. Oren, b. May 17, 1813 ; d. Sept. 23, 1816. 



444 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



15 
16 

17 



(9) 



18 

20 
21 



22 
24 



(") 



25 
26 



27 



(15) 



II. Daniel^ b. July 11, 1815.-I- 

III. Elizabeth^ b. Aug. 21, 1S17; d. April 25, 1818. 

IV. Elizabeth^ b. June 20, 1819; m. Rufus Hay- 

wood, q. V. 

Eldad Prescott (Capt.) was a farmer ; settled on 
the homestead of his father ; was a captain in the state 
militia; m. Clarissa, dau. of Paul and Betsey Hunt, of 
Jaftrey, March 27, 1S16. She was b. in Acton, Mass., 
Oct. 4, 1791 ; d. Sept. 20, 1826. M., 2^^, Betsey, sister 
of Clarissa, June 10, 1829. She was b. in Acton, July 
5, 1793 ; d. Oct. I, 1S52. He d. May 23, 1872. 

I. Eldad A. ^ b. Feb. 22, 1817.4- 
II. Benjamin, b. Dec. 21, i8iS.-|- 
iii. Oliver P., b. Jan. 22, i82i.-(- 
IV. Oren^ b. March 24, 1823.4- 

By second marriage : 

V. John A., b. Aug. 19, 1830 ; d. April 28, 1863. 
VI. Henry, b. Aug. 11, 1832 ; d. Aug. 19, 1852. 
VII. Addison, b. June 9, 1836.4- 



JoHN A. Prescott was a farmer and manufacturer, 
and lived in Squantum village until about 1850, when 
he re. to East Jaftrey. He was captain in the Jaftrey 
rifle company ; county commissioner ; represented the 
town in the state legislature, i858-'9 ; and was justice 
of the peace. He m. Martha, dau. of Samuel and 
Patty (Wyman) Ryan, of Sharon, April 10, 1828. She 
was b. June i, 1S06. He d. at East Jaftrey, Oct. 7, 
i860. She d. May 19, 1879, in Fredonia, N. Y. 

I. George R., b. Nov. 12, 1833 ; d. Dec. 25, 1834. 
II. Martha C, b. Nov. 20, 1835 ; m. Spencer L., 
son of Rev. Ephraim K. and Amanda Bai- 
ley, Jan. 28, 1S55. She was b. March 13, 
1829 ; r. Fredonia, N. Y. One ch. : 

I. Annie, b. July 20, 1S57. 



Daniel C. Prescott, b. July 11, 1815 ; a farmer; 
settled on the homestead of his father. Col. Oliver Pres- 
cott. In 1 866 he re. to Fitzwilliam. He m. Abigail, 



28 



29 

30 

31 

32 
33 
34 



(i8) 



36 
37 
3S 



39 
40 

41 
42 

(19) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 445 

dau. of Benj. Davidson, of Fitzwilliam, Sept. 12, 1844. 
She was b. July 2, 1814. He d. July 18, 1866. 

I. Oren D., b. April 29, 1843; enlisted, Sept. 23, 
1S62, in the Fourteenth Regt. N. H. V., 
and served during the war. He m. Ella, 
dau. of Wm. E. Boynton, of Sharon ; was a 
merchant in East Jaftrey ; d. Dec. 31, 1875. 
II. George 0., b. Feb. 24, 1845. + 

III. 3Iary^ b. Sept. 21, 1S47 ; '^* John W. Poole, 

q. V. 

IV. Susan Z., b. July 25, 1850; m. Charles B. 

]<.obbins, May 2, 1875. 
V. Martha^ b. Sept. 13, 1852. 
VI. Marshall X>., b, April 9, 1854; ^' J^"-? 1866. 
VII. Freddie IT., b. Feb. 23, 1859 ; d. Jan. 29, i860. 



Eldad a. Prescott was a deaf mute. He was 
educated at the Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, at 
Hartford, Conn. ; was a cabinet-maker, and r. in Squan- 
tum village. He m. Frances P., dau. of Elisha and 
Phebe Hammond, of West Bradford, Mass., Nov. 2, 
1843. She was b. Sept. 5, 1819; d. Sept. 20, 1853. 
He m., 2^*, Mrs. Sarah Greenleaf Smith, of New Boston, 
Nov. 29, 1855. She was b. July 4, 1S31 ; r. in Glou- 
cester, Mass. He d. Oct. 9, 1865. 

I. Charles E., h. March 13, 1845. 
II. Daniel TF!, b. July 13, 1S47 ; d. the same day. 
HI. Caroline F.^ b. Nov. 18, 1848 ; d. Sept. 9, 1852. 
IV. Thomas U. ^., b. Oct. 26, 1851 ; d. Sept. 5, 

1852. 

By second marriage : 

V. Annie, b. Dec. 23, 1857 5 ^- Topeka, Kan. 
VI. Addie F.^ b. March 23, 1861 ; d. Dec. 6, 1861. 
VII. Eliza M., h. March 16, 1864; r. Gloucester, 

Mass. 
VIII. Austin E., b. Nov. 30, 1865 ; r. Topeka, Kan. 



Benjamin Prescott, a farmer and starch manufac- 
turer, m. Lovina, dau. of Joseph and Martha (Wilder) 
Brown, Oct. 21, 1846. She was b. at Winchendon. 
In 1856 he re. to Prairie City, 111., and in 1S75 to 
Topeka, Kan. 



446 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



43 
44 



(20) 



45 



(21) 



46 

47 
48 

49 
50 



(24) 



51 
52 
53 
54 



(29) 



I. Mary E., b, April 35, 1844; d. March 7, 1846. 

II. Francis Jf., b. April 23, 1848; m. AUie, dau. 

of Wm. P. McClure, of Topeka, Kan. 



Oliver P. Prescott m. Addie L., dau. of Josiah 
Biggelow, Dec. 8, 1846. She was b. in Framingham, 

Mass., March, 1827; d. Jan. 7, 1849. ^-i '^^•> Susan 

M., dau. of Josiah and Mary (Bonner) Stratton ; r. in 
Fredonia, N. Y. 

I. Ellery B.^ b. Nov. 22, 1848; m., and r. in 
Fredonia. 



Oren Prescott is a farmer in Jafirey ; m. Martha 
L., dau. of Jacob and Martha Adams, of Rindge, June 
16, 1846. She was b. April 10, 1827; d. June 25, 
1850. He m., 2*^, Caroline A., dau. of Wm. T. and 
Grata Nutting, of Jaffrey, June 8, 1852. She was b. 
Jan. 12, 1S34; d. April 30, 1861. He m., 3**, Louisa J., 
dau. of Jesse T. Plummer, of Goffstown. 

I. Martha i,'., b. April 27, 1850; d. March 3, 

, ^^53- 
II. Elliot O.^ b. Sept. 7, 1854, by second marriage. 

III. Julius E., b. March 7, 1856, " 

IV. Carrie M., b. July 14, 1858, " 

V. Willie E., h. Feb. 10, 1869, by third marriage. 



Addison Prescott m. Mary A., dau. of Harvey and 
Adeline (Haywood) Sawyer, March 14, 1865, She was 
b. in Sharon, N. H., Nov. 16, 1841. He represented 
the town in the state legislature, in 1866-7 ' ^' *-*'^ *^be 
old Prescott farm, in JaftVey, until 1872 ; and is now in 
the real estate loan business, in Topeka, Kan. 

I. tTohn A., b. Oct. 2, 1866. 

II. Bessie A., b. Dec. i, 1S68. 

III. Alice, h. Aug. 21, 1871. 

IV. Wifini/red /S'., b. Sept. 16, 1880, in Topeka, 

Kansas. 



George O. Prescott m. Electa, dau. of William 
and Lona Lennox, of Elroy, N. Y. ; r. Minneapolis, 
Minn. 



55 
56 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 447 

I. Freddie A., b. Jan. 7, 1S69; d. Aug. 14, 1S71. 
II. Ziillian G., b. Aug. 4, 1S73. 



RICE FAMILY. 

Laban Rice, son of David and grandson of Abra- 
ham, was b. in Fitzwilliam, March 23, iSoi. His 
father, David, was b. in Framingham, March 19, 1769; 
m. Dorcas, dau. of Philip and Eunice (Slmmway) 
Amsden, b. at Oxford, Mass., Dec. 10, 1769; r. in 
Fitzwilliam. After the death of her husband she spent 
the remainder of her life with her son in Jaffrey, where 
she d. April 15, 1874, a. 104 years. 

Laban Rice m., Oct. 14, 1827, Esther, dau. of John 
and Abigail (Demary) Cutter. He d. Dec. 3, 1873. 
Mr. Rice was the proprietor of the Cutter homestead. 
He fitted up the house for summer boarders, which has 
been well patronized by many of the citizens of Boston. 
He represented the town in the state legislature in 1846. 
Eight children : 

I. jPaidi?ia, b. Sept. 28, 1828; m., Dec. 26, 1850, 
Ebenezer Upton, merchant, East Jaftrey ; 
she d. Jan. 15, 1857. ^^ d. June 25, i860, 
a. 41. One child, — Paulina C., d. Aug. 15, 
1857, a. 7 mos. 

3 II. Fllen Maria, b. June 14, 1830; d. June 26, 
1846. 

4 III. Jonas Cutter, b. Sept. 2, 1832; m. Nancy Ann, 
dau. of Charles and Pamelia (Cutter) Gil- 
more. 

5 IV. Emily Adelaide, b. Oct. 31, 1834; d. Oct. 24, 
1859. 

6 V. Esther Louisa, b. June 3. 1837; ^- -^"g- ^1 
1852. 

7 VI. John Cutter, b. Feb. 12, 1839; "''• Judith A. 
Butts, of Mass. 

8 vii. George Laban, b. March 25, 1841 ; m. Lucy H. 
Baldwin. 

9 VIII. William Kimball, b. Feb. 14, 1843 ; d. Oct. 8, 
1854. 



RITCHIE FAMILY. 

Robert Ritchie, a descendant of William Ritchie, 
an early settler of Peterborough, was b. July 27, 1798 ; 



448 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



2 

3 

4 
5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

lO 

II 

12 
13 



re. to Jaffrey about 1S35 ; settled on lot 20, range 6 ; m. 
Mary Hutchinson, of VVilton, March 4, 1S23, b. March 
20, 1S02. 

I. t/ames, h. Jan. 11, 1S24; went West. 
II. Saniuel.1 b. July 19, 1825 ; m. Caroline Jackson ; 
r. Charlestown, Mass. 

III. John, b. June 21, 1827. 

IV. William Robert, b. April 16, 1829; r. Califor- 

nia. 
V. George C, h. May 5, 1831. 

VI. Mary Jane, b. Jan. 20, 1833 ; m. W. H. Pratt. 

He d. in the war of the Rebellion. One 
child, — William H., b. Sept. i, i860. 

VII. Alvi?i, b. Feb. 24, 1835 ; supposed to have d. 

in service. 
VIII. Darius, b. Aug. 12, 1836 ; d. at Buffalo, on his 
way home from the war. 
IX. Henry, b. Nov. 7, 1837 ; killed in battle, Sept. 

30, 1864. 
X. Edmund F.,h. Dec. 10, 1S39; d. in service, 

Oct. 2, 1862. 
XI. Sarah M., b. May 27, 1842. 
XII. Adelbert, b. Feb. 13, 1846. 



ROBBINS FAMILY. 

Qiiite a number of families by the name of Robbins have at 
different times been residents of Jaffrey. Of their origin and 
early history but little is known. The first tax-payer of the 
name was 



I 

2 

3 



David Eobbins, who paid taxes in 1824, '25, and '26 ; 
Lyman Robbins from 1828 to 1833, inclusive; and 
Samson Robbins, who settled in town in 1826; m, 

Chloe , and d. Oct. 22, 1859, ^' 59- -^^^ widow 

d. June 12, 1S52, a. 71. 



Harvey H. Robbins, b. 1807 ; m. Nancy A. , 

b. 1807. He d. Nov. 17, 1849. Children: 

(i) Eliza, d. April 14, 1839, ^- ^ J^'-' ^° vcio?,. (2) 
Mary S., b. 1832. (3) Luther G., b. 1833. (4) Susan 
C, d. April 14, 1855, ^' ^9- (5) Laura A., d. March, 
1851, a. II. (6) Lucy A., b. 1843. (7) Albert E., b. 
1 845 . (8) Paulina A.,h. 1 847 . 



9 

lO 



II 



12 



2 

3 

4 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 449 

Daniel L. Robbins m. Elizabeth . Children : 

(0 Caroline E.^ b. 1844. (2) Edwin E., b. 1845. 
(3) Mary A., b. 1S4S. (4) Emma Jf., d. July 29, 
1849, a. 14 mos., 2 days. 



Jacob Robbins, b. in Peterborough, came to Jaflrey 
in 1S31 ; m. Jane W., dau. of Jacob and Sarah (Turn- 
er) Baldwin. He d. Dec. 4, 1S55, a. 49. Children: 

I. Sarah Eveline^ b. Nov. 24, 1834. ^^^^ '^ ^"^ 
of the most distinguished school-teachers in 
Jatirey, and has taught probably more terms 
than any other teacher in town ; is now 
(18S0) still engaged in teaching at East Jaf- 
frey. 
II. Alfred Jacobs b. May 20, 1836; d. June 21, 
1868. 

III. Joseph H.^ b. Aug. 20, 1839; ^- J^"* ^O' 1S58. 

IV. William B., b. May 31, 1841 ; m. Anna M. 

, b. 184S; is now (1880) one of the 

selectmen of JaflVey. 

V. Charles Benjam,in, b. Aug. 20, 1846. 



Leonard E. Robbins settled in Jaffrey in 1869 ; m. 
Ellen M., dau. of Leonard and Elvira (Dutton) Stiles, 
of Peterborough. 



ROSS FAMILY. 

Abraham Ross came from Bolton to Jaffrey previous 
to 1777 ; was road-sui-veyor that year. He was in ser- 
vice during the Revolution. He settled on lot 4, range 
7 ; m., and had several children. He d. July 14, 1841, 
a. 97. Children : 

I. Betsey, b. 1775 ; m. Jonathan Stanley. 
II. Paul, re. to Barre, Mass. 

III. Abraham,h. 1781; settled on the homestead; 

m. Nancy, b. 179S. He d. Dec. 5, 1865, a. 
85. Two children: (i) John, b. 1832; (2) 
Jonas W., b. 1835. 

IV. Jonas, b. 1784.-I- 

30 



450 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



7 
8 



(5) 



9 

lO 

II 

12 
13 



V. John m., May 8, 1804, Nabby Merriam. He 
was a hatter by trade, and d. about 1844. 
One child : Nabby, 

VI. Pn^o?ewce m., July 11, 1S09, Jedediah Stanley. 

VII. Persis m., Jan. 22, 181 2, Thomas Browning, of 
Barre, Vt. 



Jonas Ross m. Abigail Worcester; settled on lot i, 
range 9, and d. May 31, 1861, a. 77. His widow d. 
Nov. I, 1865, a. 79. Five children: 

I. Martin^ b. Nov. 9, 1807 ; d. Sept. 11, 1825. 
II. Persis TF., b. Jan. 26, 1809; d. Oct. 11, 1839. 

III. Abigail, b. Sept. 7, 181 1; m. Benj. Fay; d. 

Dec. 7, 1839. 

IV. Jonas, b. Sept. 7, iSii ; d. April 14, 181 2. 

V. Jonas TF., b. June 19, 1815 ; d. March 20, 1816. 



2 

3 

4 
5 



(4) 



RYAN FAMILY. 

Daniel Ryan, m. d., came from Ireland, as surgeon 
of a vessel, about 1750, and settled in Marblehead, 
Mass. He afterwards re. to Tewksbury, where his son 
Samuel was b. Aug. 26, 1771. 

Samuel Ryan, m. d., in 1790 came with his parents 
to Sharon, N. H., and in 1802 m. Mrs. Patty Sawyer. 
Children : 

I. Abigail. 
II. Martha, b, June i, 1806 ; m. John A. Frescott. 

III. Samuel, b. Aug. 6, 1810. 

IV. Paniel. 



Samuel Ryan settled in Sharon ; was a farmer, 
dealer in lumber, and the principal owner of the famous 
Ryan steam mills. He was a leading man in town 
affairs ; — held most of the important offices in the gift of 
the town ; and was colonel of the 22'^ Regt. N. H. 
militia. In the autumn of 1854 he re. to East Jaffrey, 
and became a prominent man in that place ; was several 
years a selectman, and represented the town of Jaffrey 
in the state legislature in i863-'4. He was also for 
many years, till his death, a director in the Monadnock 
National Bank. He m. Hannah, dau. of George and 



*' , 




-",V'i 



^^-^^^.^.^^ 




6 

7 



9 

lO 

II 

12 
13 



14 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 45 I 

Alice (Sawyer) Shedd, of Peterborough, b. July 14, 
181 1. He d. at Brookline, Minn., at the residence of 
his son, May 5, 1876. Three children : 

I. George, b. Nov. i, 1833 ; d. young. 
II. Samuel W. m., 1858, Hattie Joslin, of Lynd- 
borough, N. H. ; r. Brookline, Minn. ; is a 
distinguished farmer in that place. 
III. Martha Louisa, b. Nov. 30, 1845 ; m., Jan. 6, 
1865, John H. Cutler, m. d., son of Charles 
and IVlelinda Wright Cutler, of Rindge, b. 
Feb. 16, 1S34. ^^ received his early edu- 
cation in the common and high schools of 
his native town, the Merrimack Normal 
Institute at Reed's Ferry, and at the West- 
minster seminary, Vt. He commenced the 
study of medicine with Dr. O. H. Bradley 
of East JaftVey ; attended medical lectures at 
Fittsfield and Burlington, at which latter 
place he received the degree of m. d., June 
9, 1861. He commenced the business of his 
profession in New Ipswich and Mason Vil- 
lage ; joined the army as assistant surgeon 
in the spring of 1864, and remained till the 
close of the war. In 1865 he settled in 
Peterborough, and has since been engaged 
in an extensive practise. Children : 

1. Samuel Ryan, b. April 29, 1866. 

2. Charles Henry, b. Sept. 9, 1867. 

3. Costella Melinda, b. Nov. 21, 1869. 

4. Martha Evangeline, b. Oct. 20, 1875. 

5. Anne Louise, b. Aug. 22, 1877. 



Thomas Ryan d. April 7, 1874, a. 85. 



SANGER FAMILY. 

Jedediah Sanger, son of Richai'd, a descendant of 
Richard Sanger, the emigrant who settled in Sudbury, 
Mass., in 1646, re. to Watertown, and d. Aug. 20, 
1690. Was b. in Sherborn, Mass., Feb. 29, 1751 ; came 
to Jaffrey previous to 1783, and settled on lot 3, i^ange 
7. He was a man of great business talent, and held the 
most important offices in the gift of the town, and was 



452 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



3 

4 



the first man in town who held the title of colonel. In 
17SS he re. to New Hartford, Oneida Co., N. Y. The 
settlement was commenced that year, and he built the 
first mill in that place. He became a large land pro- 
prietor, and a tract of his land was formed into a town- 
ship in i795> named Sangersfield, in honor of Colonel, 
subsequently Judge Sanger. In 1771 he m. Sarah 
Rider. She d. Sept. 26, 1S13, a. 66. M., 2'^, Mrs. 
Sarah Betts. She d. April 25, 1S25, a. 48. M., 3^, 
Mrs. Fanny Deuch, Washington, D. C, Oct. 3, 1827. 
She d. May 17, 1842, a. 65. He d. June 6, 1829, a. 78. 
Children by first marriage : 



I. Sarah, b. March 8, 1778; m. Eames ; d. 

Aug. 12, 1 86 1. 
II. Walter, b. March i, 1781. 
III. Zedekiah, b. April 26, 17S3; d. Sept. 27, 1786. 



SAUNDERS FAMILY. 



2 
3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



(4) 



Samuel Saunders, a carpenter and farmer, came 
from Fitchburg, Mass., where he was b. July 15, 1762. 
He settled on lot 22, range i, and m. Rachel, dau. of 
Joseph and Mary (Scott) Turner. He d. Oct. 16, 
1841, a. 79. She d. March 13, 1836, a. 71. 

I. Samuel, b. Oct. 19, 1787 ; m. Rachel Turner. 
II. Joseph, b. Dec. 9, 1789; m. Mary, dau. of 
David and Charlotte Lacy. 

III. John, b. Dec. 13, 1791.-4- 

IV. iLlisha, b. Oct. 16, 1794. 

V. Rachel, b. May 26, 1796; m. Asa Jones, of 

Rindge. 
VI. Nancy, b. Aug. 16, 1802 ; m. Joseph Hayes, of 

Dublin. 
VII. Sally, b. Aug. 9, 1806; m. Almerin Gowing, of 
Dublin. 



John Saunders was a blacksmith by trade, and 
carried on the business, at different times, in Jaflrey, 
Dublin, and Peterborough. He m., i^*, Ruth Jones. 
M., 2**, Sally, dau. of David and Charlotte Lacy. She 

Lucretia Hastings. She d. 



d. June 21, 1840, a. 41. M., 3*^, Sarah Ann Ward, of 



Peterborough 



M., 4% 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



453 



lO 

II 

12 

H 
16 



17 



Dec, 5, 1S61, a. 65. M., 5"", Louisa Greenwood, of 
Dublin. He d. in Rindge, Aug. 29, 1877. Ch. by first 
wife : 

I. Caroline A., b. Dec. 6, 1S12 ; m. Asa Morrill ; 

r. Boston. 
II. Samicel, b. May 6, 1S14 ; d. May 20, 1814. 

III. Harriet C, b. Sept. 14, 1815 ; m. Edwin W, 

Buswell. 

IV. Jiary X., b. Aug. 31, 1S17; m. John Clough ; 

d. Nashua. 
V. Susati, b. Feb. 18, 1820; m. Lemuel W. Page. 
VI. Emily, b. July 20, 1822 ; m. Charles Moulton. 
VII. Elvira, b. Dec. 5, 1824; m. Jedediah Truman. 

Ch. by third wife : 

VIII. Sally, b. Jan. 31, 1S42 ; d. May 6, 1842. 

David Saunders paid taxes i794-'5-'6-'7-'8. 



4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 



(4) 

II 

12 

13 



SAWTELL FAMILY. 

Daniel Sawtell came from Athol, Mass., pre- 
vious to 1793 ; settled on lot 18, range 3 ; m. Rebecca 
, wlio d. Dec. 31, 1832, a. 67. He d. Nov. 16, 



1841, a. 78. Nine children 

I. Sarah, b. 1788; m. Capt. Thomas Adams, 

q. V. 
II. Betsey, b. Jan. 11, 1792; d. Nov. 19, 1859; 
unm. 

III. Aaron, b. Nov. 13, 1793.+ 

IV. Polly, b. Dec. 9, 1795. 

V. David, b. Dec. 6, 1797.-I- 
VI. Warren, b. April 29, 1800. 
VII. Henry, b. May 8, 1S02. 

VIII. Rebecca, b. Jan. 2, 1S05; m. Rodney Gowing. 
IX. Amos, b. March 15, 1809. 



Aaron Sawtell m. Lucy Davis, of Dublin, Feb. 
25, 1827. He d. March i, 1859. 

I. Aaro7i W. B., b. Sept. 30, 1828. 
II. Warren J., b. May 29, 1832. 
III. John F., b. Aug. 24, 1834. 



454 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 





IV, George H. M., b. Dec. 17, 1S38. 
V. Lucy A., b. 1843 ; d. Nov. i, 1880. 
VI. Sarah JE., d. May 18, 1S54, a. 9. 


(6) 

18 

20 
21 


David Sawtell m. Abigail Capron, Aug. 27, 1834. 
He d. July 16, 1870. 

I. Mary A., d. Nov. 2, 1859, a. 24yrs., 4 mos. 

II. Susan Ji., d. Sept. 30, 1870, a. 32 yrs., 10 mos., 

10 days, 
in. Cynthia A., b. 1841. 
IV. Amos, d. April 4, 1845, a. 11 mos., 14 days. 

v. Sylvia jR.,h. 1849. 




Solomon Sawtell paid taxes 1826, '27, '28, '29, '30. 




Moses Sartell d. Feb. 16, 1857, ^- ^4- 




Rosina Sartell d. Oct. i, 1870, a. 33. 



SAWYER FAMILY. 

The name of Sayer (now Sawyer) appears on the early rec- 
ords. Bezaleel was a soldier of the Revolution. Bezaleel, Jr., 
Rufus, and Nathaniel Sayer belonged to the training-band in 
1784. They lived near the Gilmore pond, on lot 11, range 9, 
the late residence of Rufus Sawyer, a descendant. 

Rufus SAv\rv^ER, Sen'r, m., i^*, Susannah Green, who 
d. Oct. 15, 1810, a. 40. M., 2^, Eunice Darling, who 
d. July 27, 1S34, a. 62. He d. Sept. 29, 1845, a. 87. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



(6) 

8 
9 



I. Susan, h. 1794; d. May 13, 1868, unm. 
II. Syrena, d. Feb. 13, 1800, a. 4 yrs., i mo. 

III. Sally, m. David Jaquith, q. v. 

IV. Edward, d. Oct. 11, 1829, a. 29. 
V. Rufus, m. Elmira .-|- 

VI. James, b. 1813 ; m. Betsey P. Livermore ; last 
tax, 1867. 



Rufus Sawyer m. Elmira 



He d. Sept. 10, 



1869, a. 60. His widow d. Aug. 31, 1872, a. 71. 

Emily, b. 1835 ; m. Wm. Jewett, of Nelson. 
William L., b. 1838 ; m. 



lO 



II 



12 



13 



15 
16 

18 

19 
20 

21 



(17) 
22 
23 



(20) 

24 
25 



26 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 455 

Uriah Sawyer, origin unknown, came to JaftVey 
about 1803, paic' tax that year; his last tax was in 
I Si 7. He settled on lot 12, range 2, now owned by 
Susan A. Woodruff'. We have no knowledsre of whom 
he married or the number of his children. He re. to 
Ohio. 



Asa Sawyer r. on lot 16, range 4; paid taxes in 
1803 to 1817. 



Moses Sawyer m. Hepsey Hathorn in 1795. 

JosiAH Sa\\'yer, son of Josiah and Patty Wyman 
Sawyer, b. in Sharon, July 9, iSoo ; m. Margaret, dau. 
of Thomas and Hannah Cummings French, Dec. 30, 
1823 ; came to JaftVey in 1836, and settled on the Benj. 
Nutting farm, lot 22, range 8. He was killed by a run- 
away horse, Sept. 14, 1864. 

I. Cummings^ b. Nov. 26, 1824; m. Elizabeth 

. Children: (i) Albert, b. i860; (2) 

Emily J., b. 1S63 ; (3) Fred L., b. 1866. 
II. Emily C'., b. April 19, 1827. 

III. George TF., b. June 21, 1829; d. Nov. 23, 

1830. 

IV. Alfred^ b. Aug. 12, 1831.-I- 
V. Lydia A?in, b. Dec. 2, 1S33. 

VI. Adeline H., b. Feb. 3, 1836. 
VII. Leonard^ b. Aug. 8, 1839.-I- 
VIII. Levi, b. Oct. 12, 1841. 



Alfred SAW"i^ER m. Lucy M. 

I. Mary A. 
II. Clifton A. 



Leonard F. m. Mary B. 

I. Etta M. 
II. Ella M. 



Harvey Sawyer, b. in Sharon ; came to JaftVey in 
1854; m. Adaline Haywood, and settled on the Hay- 
wood farm. 



456 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



2 

3 

4 
5 



7 
8 

9 

ID 

II 

12 

13 



SHATTUCK FAMILY. 

Vryling D. Shattuck was b. in Pepperell, Mass. ; 
April 21, 1836, came to JaftVey, and settled on lot 11, 
range 5 ; m. Sally M., dau. of Daniel and Sally (Jones) 
Cutter. Four children : 

I. Josephine Jf., b. April 3, 1S37; m. Edwin R. 

Spaulding, q. v. 
II. Edxoard Cutter^ b. July 30, 1839; ^' April 4, 
1S42. 

III. Henry Vryling^ b. Nov. 20, 1841 ; m. Clara 

Mixer. She d. Oct. 26, 1S74. 

IV. Lucy Vrylena, b. Feb. 10, 1844; m. Austin A. 

Spaulding, Oct. 19, 1871, q. v. 



Edmund F. Shattuck, brother of Vryling D., came 
to Jaffrey, and settled on the farm formerly owned by 
Dr. Adonijah Howe; m. Rachel R. Cutter, dau. of 
Daniel and Sally (Jones) Cutter, May 18, 1837. Seven 
children : 

I. Mary Ahbie,h. Sept. i, 1840; m. Leonard E. 

Spaulding, Feb. 25, 1868, q. v. 
II. Sarah Joties^h. Sept. 4, 1842; d. Sept. 17, 

1873. 

III. Elizabeth Parker^ b. Feb. 20, 1844 ; m. Joel 

H. Poole, Feb. 25, 1868, q. v. 

IV. Susan Maria^ b. March 19, 1S46 ; d. March 26, 

184S. 

V. Lucy Maria, b. May 21, 1848. 

VI. Edmund Cutter, b. April 20, 1851. 

VII. Daniel Cutter, b. April 29, 1854; '^* Deborah 
M., dau. of George A. and Mahala (Baker) 
Underwood, Oct. 19, 18S0. 



SHEDD FAMILY. 

The Shedd family came from England, and settled in Groton, 
Mass. Abel was b. there ; m. Ruth Haskell ; re. to Rindge 
about 17S0, and d. Sept. 21, 1819. He was the son of Jona- 
than and Sarah (Barron) Shedd, who were m. April 13, 1722. 

(i) Abel; (2) Samuel; (3) John H.; (4) Henry ; (5) Josiah; 
(6) Timothy; (7) Ebenezer. 



2 

3 

4 
5 



7 
8 



lO 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 457 

Abel Shedd was b. in Mason, Aug. 15, 1769 ; settled 
in JaftVey in 1793, and in 1800 re. to Rindge. He m., 1°*, 
Priscilla, dau. of John and Priscilla French, of Jaftrey, 
Oct. 23, 1793- She d. Sept. 27, 1799. He m., 2'', 
July 20, 1802, Rebecca, dau. of Ephraim and Lydia 
(Kinsman) Adams, of New Ipswich, sister of Prof, 
Ephraim Adams, of Dartmouth college. He d. Sept. 
17, 1819. His widow d. Sept. 11, 1823. 

I. Ruthy, b. Aug. 15, 1794; m. William Kimball. 
II. /iSa^ (twin), b. Aug. 15, 1794; tn. Cummings 
French, q. v. 

III. Abel, b. May 11, 1797 : m., June 16, 1S25, Mary, 

dau. of Oliver and Mary (Turner) Jewett. 

IV. Charles, b. Oct. 21, 1802 ; graduated from Dart- 

mouth college, 1826; was eight years an 
instructor in Kimball Union Academy at 
Meriden, N. H. ; from 1834 to 1841, princi- 
pal of the Appleton academy, New Ipswich. 
In 1842 he was ordained pastor of the Con- 
gregational church in Campton, N. H., 
where he remained fifteen years, when he 
re. to Minnesota ; m. Elizabeth, dau. of Rev. 
J. Rowell, of Cornish, N. H. 
V. James Adams, b. Feb. 25, 1804; m. Augusta 
Adams, of New Ipswich. M., 2**, Carrie 
Brown. He practised law in Detroit, Mich., 
and Dayton, O., and farming in Denmark, 
Iowa. 
VI. Curtis, b. Feb. 2, 1809; m. Sophronia Taylor; 

re. Denmark, Iowa. 
VII. George, b. May 13, 1810; graduated from Dart- 
mouth college, 1839; settled, as a physician, 
at Denmark, Iowa. 
VIII. Rebecca, b. March 20, 1813 ; m. Dr. William 
Gallup, who settled in New Ipswich ; re., in 
1836, to Concord, Mass., where she d. Dec. 
17. 1838. 



John Haskell Shedd was b. March i, 1771, in Ma- 
son, N. H. ; re. to Rindge with his parents about 1780 ; 
carried on the blacksmith trade ; exchanged the home 
farm in Rindge, with his brother Abel, for his farm in 
Jaftrey; m., Nov. 30, 1800, Susannah, dau. of Josiah 
and Tabitha Carter White, b. in Leominster, Mass., 
Oct. 21, 1783 ; re. to Jaftrey, Dec, 1800 ; was a thrifty 



458 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



II 

12 

H 
15 



farmer; d. July 17, 1S19. His widow m., Sept. 24, 
1822, Abel Kendall, of Leominster, Mass., a farmer, b. 
Nov. 13, 1770, who d. at New Ipswich, Aug. 13, 1846. 
She d. in Derby, Vt., July 27, 1852. Eight ch. by first 



marriage 



16 

18 



(") 



I. Alvin, h. Sept. 7, i8oi.-|- 

II. Henry, b. May 16, 1803.-I- [See College 
Graduates.] 

III. «7bA?i Haskell, b. March 19, 1805. -f- 

IV. A daughter, b. and d. May 26, 1806. 

V. Susan Maria, b. Oct. 27, 1807; ^'^- Charles 

Adams, son of Benj. and Olivia (Everett) 
Adams, of New Ipswich, b. Dec. 21, 1802; 
was a tanner in that place. In 1834 he re.' 
to Derby, Vt. ; was a farmer there. In 
1869 he re. to Ann Arbor, Mich,, where 
they now reside. Three children : 

1. Susan Augusta, b. March 29, 1826; d. 

d. Nov. 19, 1838. 

2. Charles Kendall, b. Jan. 24, 1835 ; 

graduated at the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1861 ; teach- 
er and assistant professor in the 
University, i862-'7 ; spent a year 
in travel and study in Europe ; 
now professor of history in the 
University; m, Aug., 1863, Mrs. 
Abigail (Disbro) Mudge, of Ann 
Arbor. 

3. Emily Maria, b. Sept. 10, 1840; m., 

July 20, 1859, James Stanton ; d. 
Jan. 25, 1862, while her husband 
was in the army, leaving one son, 
now, with his father, living in Ne- 
braska. 

VI. A son, b. and d. Dec. 26, 1809. 
VII. A son, b. and d. Dec. 10, 181 1. 

VIII. A son, b. and d. April 10, 1813. 



Alvin Shedd settled in New Ipswich ; was a tanner ; 
re. to Derby, Vt. ; afterwards to Salem, Vt, and carried 
on the business of farming. He m. Laurinda Smith, of 
HoUis, Dec. 27, 1825 ; d. at Salem, Oct. 13, 1842. 



19 

20 
21 

22 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 



(12) 



29 



30 



31 



32 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 459 

I. Xaiirmda, h. Oct. 17, 1826; m. Darius Good- 
win ; r. in California. Two sons. 
II. Lewis., b. Nov. 16, 1827; m. Mary Jane Hun- 
toon ; r. in Salem, Vt. Two ch. 

III. Josiah, b. July 9, 1829 ; m. Ann E. Durgin ; r. 

in Derby, Vt. Two ch. 

IV. Alvin, b. July 6, 1831 ; m. Alice Salmon, d. ; 

r. Cal. 
V. George Henry., b. Feb. 8, 1833 ; r. Cal. 
VI. Mary Jane, b. June 11, 1834; d. 1842. 
VII. tTohi Haskell., b. April 11, 1836 ; r. Cal. 
VIII. Amos Farley, b. July 24, 1838 ; d. 1848. 
IX. Abel Kendall, b. April 4, 1840; d. 1S42. 
X. Lydia Jane, b, Aug. 7, 1841 ; m. Zebbord T. 
White ; r. in Winchester, Mass. 

The widow of Alvin r. in California with her ch. 



Henry Shedd m., Sept. 28, 1829, Mary Gerrish, 
dau. of Joseph and Sarah (Chandler) Gerrish, of Can- 
terbury, N. H. His wife d. in Mt. Gilead, March 12, 
1835. M., 2^, Sept. 13, 1838, Lucretia C. George, dau. 
of James and Hannah (Church) George, of Dunbarton, 
N. H. 

I. Charles, h. in Mt. Gilead, O., June 23, 1830; 
m. Caroline E. Mateer ; r. Mt. Gilead ; in 
the shoe and leather business ; have had five 
ch. 
II. John Haskell, b. in Mt. Gilead, July 9, 1833 ; 
graduated at Marietta college, 1S56 ; Andover 
Theological Seminary, 1859; was a mis- 
sionary to Persia eleven years ; now profes- 
sor in Biddle Institute (for the education 
of colored young men), Charlotte, N. C. ; 
m. Sarah Jane Dawes, of Marietta, O. 
Eight ch., — six b. in Persia (three not 
living), and two b. in Charlotte. 

Ch. by second wife : 

III. Mary Lucretia, b. in Mt. Gilead, Oct. 26, 1840 ; 

graduated at the Western Female Seminary, 
Oxford, Ohio, 1S60; now assistant teacher 
in the high school of Mt. Gilead. 

IV. James G., b. in Pleasant Valley, O., June 23, 



460 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



1842 ; graduated at Western Reserve Col- 
lege, O., 1865 ; was tutor one year in that 
college ; is now a professional teacher in 
Illinois ; m. Helen Lescure, of Danville, 
111., where they now reside. 

33 V. Henry Gilman, b. in Delaware Co., O., Sept. 

25, 1S45 ; enlisted in the 26"' Regt. O. V. I., 
Feb., 1S64 ; discharged Nov., 1865, and d. 
April I, 1867, from disease contracted in the 
army. 
William Edgar, b. in Marysville, O., Aug. 18, 
1847 ; enlisted into the 15th Regt. O. V. I., 
March, 1S64 ; was taken prisoner May 27 ; 
held in Andersonville prison four months, 
also in Millen six weeks ; released Nov. 25 ; 
continued in service till Dec, 1865 ; m. 
Alice M. Scott, of Kansas City, Mo. ; r. in 
Danville, 111. ; a hardware merchant. 

35 VII. Ambrose White, b. in Marysville, O., June 14, 

1S51 ; d. May 31, 1852. 



34 



VI. 



(13) 



36 

37 
38 



39 



40 
41 



John Haskell became a merchant in the store of 
Henry Payson, in JaftVey for some years, also in Hart- 
land, Vt. ; m., April 28, 1829, Eliza Ann, dau. of Dea. 
David and Lucy (Wellington) Gilmore ; settled in Bos- 
ton. She d. Jan. 29, 1844. He m., 2*^, Susan Flint, 
of Lincoln, Mass., June 26, 1845. She was b. Jan. 30, 
1825. He d. in Lynn, April 18, 1865. Three children: 

I. Henry Ripley, b, in Cambridgeport, Sept. 16, 

1830; d. Dec. 19, 1831. 
II. Lyman Munson, b. Dec. 8, 1835 ; r. Newport 

or Derby, Vt. 
III. John Henry, b. Sept. 18, 1838; d. Nov. 13, 

i860; was in a jewelry and silverware 

store. 



Reuben Shedd was b. in Billerica, Mass., Nov. 24, 
1781 ; m., Dec. 25, 1819, Lucy Cummings, b. Oct. 13, 
1782; r. Sharon, N. H. He d. Jan. 12, 1868, a. 86. 
She d. Oct. 30, 1S69, a. 87. Three children : 

I. James Parker, b. May 14, 1820; m. Martha 

Nichols ; r. Chautauqua, N. Y. 
II. Nathan Cummings, b. Sept. 2, 1823.-}- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



461 



42 III. John Br ooJcs, h. A^rW 20, 1829; m. April 12, 
1853, Sarah Jones, dau. of John and Sarah 
Jones (Smith) Verder, b. April 20, 1825. 
Child, — one son. 

43 I. Frank E., b. July iS, 1856. 



(41) Nathan Cummings Shedd m. Sally M., dau. of Lot 
Nichols, of Sharon, 1). April 19, 1832 ; r. JaftVey. 

AA I. Zenophon Brooks^ b. April 20, 1849 ' ^- Mar- 

tha, dau. of Charles Nutting ; r. Fitchburg, 
Mass. 

AC II. Merick iV'icAo/s, b. Jan. 18, 1852; d. July 13, 

1852. 

46 III. Frederick Elery^h. July 3, 1859; d. Aug. 10, 
1S62. 

47 IV. Mark Daiie, b. Oct. 2, 1869. 



SHERWIN FAMILY. 



Samuel Sherwin was chosen one of a committee to 
count, with the selectmen and constable, at the meeting 
for the organization of the town in i773* ^^ seems 
quite probable that he afterwards went to Rindge, as 
his name does not again appear on the town records. 



David Sherwin, son of Jonathan, who came from 
Boxford and settled in Rindge, was b. March 28, 1764; 
m., Nov 28, 1786, Hannah, dau. of Paul and Hannah 
(Perley) Pritchard, from Boxford, then of New Ips- 
wich, b. March 28, 1864. Mr. Sherwin r. Rindge till 
1790, when he re. to Jatfrey, and occupied the mills in 
that place. In 1795 he left Jafirey, and afterwards re- 
sided in Westmoreland, New Ipswich, and Temple. 
While in Rindge he held the offices of town-clerk and 
selectman ; was in the Revolution, and at the battle of 
Bennington, His wife d. in Temple, Oct 
Eight children : 



I, 1806. 



I. Sally^ b. in Rindge, Nov. 20, 1787 ; m., Aug. 

8, 1822, Abram Mead, and d. in Littleton, 

Mass., March 30, i860. 
II. Hebecca, b. Nov. 16, 1789; d. young. 



462 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



III. Mary, b. in Jaftrey, Aug. 25, 1791 ; m. Chris- 
topher P. Farley, and d. in Hollis, Nov. 23, 
1S13. 

6 IV. Hannah^ b. May 21, 1795 ; d. in New Ipswich, 
Sept. 21, 1S19. 

7 V. Thomas^ b. in Westmoreland, March 26, 1799; 
graduated Harvard college, 1S21 ; tutor of 
mathematics in 1827 ; elected master of the 
English high school in 1S37, ^^^^ '" 1868 a 
member of the New England Historic-Gen- 
ealogical Society. In addition to many val- 
uable communications, he published two 
valuable works on algebra, now in extensive 
use in the schools of the United States. He 
m., June 10, 1836, Mary King Gibbens, of 
Boston. He d. July 23, 1869, leaving three 
sons: Henry, a merchant, N. Y. Thomas, 
breveted brigadier-general for distinguished 
service in the late war ; now city collector 
in Boston. He m. Isabel Fiske, dan. of 
Hon. Thomas M. Edwards, of Keene, N. H, 
Edward, paymaster in the navy during the 
war, now agent of the Philadelphia Coal and 
Iron Co. 

8 VI. Betsey, b. in Westmoreland, April 16, 1801 ; d. 
unm. 

9 VII. Anna, b. in New Ipswich, Nov. 5, 1803. 



SMILEY FAMILY. 

William Smiley (Dea.) was b. in Ireland, in 1727, 
of Scotch-Irish origin. He was one of the earliest set- 
tlers. His family was one of the nine reported by 
Grout and Gilmore to the proprietors of the township. 
He settled on lot 13, range 8, on the eastern borders of 
the Gilmore pond, and resided there till he left town, 
about the year 1810. This pond was first known as 
the Smiley pond. The place is now uninhabited. Dea. 
Smiley was one of the prominent men. When the 
town was organized he was chosen town-clerk and one 
of the board of selectmen. He was the first town treas- 
urer, and the first representative chosen under the state 
constitution, in 1784. He was also a delegate to the 
state convention in 17S1, for the formation of a constitu- 
tion. He appears to have held almost every office in 
the gift of the town. He was one of the first members 



2 


I 


3 


II 


4 


III 


5 


IV 


6 


V 


7 


VI 



8 



lO 



II 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 463 

of the church, and deacon of the same. Two of his 
sons, David and Robinson, were the first college gradu- 
ates from the town of JaftVey. David graduated at 
Harvard and Robinson at Dartmouth. David was a 
lawyer, the first one who opened an office for that busi- 
ness in Jatlrey. In iSio Dea. Smiley removed, with 
his son Robinson, to Springfield, Vt., and d. March 4, 
1813, a. 86. He m. Sarah Robinson, of Boston, who 
d. Nov. 14, 1815, a. S6. Ten children : 

I. John, h. Aug. 21, 1754 ; d. in the state of New 
York at a great age. 

Agnes, b. Dec. 8, 1755 ; m. Robert Smith, of 
Peterborough; d. Oct. 10, 1791. Two ch., 
William and Fanny. 

William, h. July 12, 1751 ; d. in the service of 
his country at Ticonderoga, Oct. 14, 1776. 

Francis, b. Feb. 21, 1759; I'e. to Elba, New 
Yoi'k, and d. March 23, 1S44. He was a 
physician. 

David, b. Nov. 16, 1761 ; d. Feb. 27, 1763. 

Sarah, b. Oct. 5, 1763 ; m. Josiah Belknap. 
They re. to Springfield about 1818 ; d, Feb. 
20, 1846. He d. April 27, 1845, a. 85. He 
owned a fulling-mill near the Davidson 
mill, south of the centre of the town, now 
owned by Heath and Gilmore. 
VII. James, b. May 7, 1766; re. to Buford, Canada 
West; d. Sept. 27, 1845. He m. Hannah 
Hathorn. One ch., — James, b. in JaftVey, 
April 15, 1795. 
VIII. David, b. March 16, 1769 ; graduated Harvard ; 
studied law ; practised in JaftVey till 1807, 
when he re. to Grafton, N. H., and d. May 

19, 1845. He m. Mary ; had one ch., 

b. in JaftVey, — Mary, b. and d. June, 1804. 
IX. Mohinson, b. April 12, 1771 ; grad. Dartmouth 
college, 1798; studied divinity; settled in 
Springfield, Vt., and d. there June 26, 1856, 
a. 85. 
X. Hugh, b. March 29, 1793; m. Elizabeth, dau. 
of Lieut. John and Elizabeth (Proctor) 
Harper ; a farmer ; settled on the home- 
stead in or about 1810; he re. to Pennsylva- 
nia and d. there. 



464 



HISTORV OF JAFFREY. 



12 Elias Smiley, son of Dr. David Smiley, of Peter- 

borough, N. H., b. July 10, 1783; m. Betsey Bowers, 
ofRiiulge. He d. Dec. 2, 1S65, a. 82. Shed. Dec. 
14, 1865, a. 82. No children. 



3 

4 



5 
6 

7 
8 



SNOW FAMILY. 

Jesse Snow was a soldier in the Revolution from 
Jaftrey, as reported by the state. 

Asa Snow was a tax-payer in 1793 ! resided on lot 
10, range 6, now owned by James T. Brown. 

JosiAH Snow was a tax-payer in 1796 and 1797. 

Samuel Snow came from Sterling, Mass. ; settled 
on lot 16, range 5 ; was taxed in Jaffrey for the last 
time in 1793. He re. to Dublin and d. there; was 
buried in Jaftrey. He m. Dorothea Richardson. They 
were both members of Mr. Ainsworth's church soon 
after its incorporation. 

I. Samuel, re. to New York state. 

n. £Jzra, b. Aug. 19, 1785 ; re. to Dublin. -|- 

iiL Tilly, re. to Boston. 

IV. Dorothea, m., 1812, Jas. Phelps; r. New York 
state. 

V. 3Iark studied medicine in Rochester, N. Y. ; 
commenced the practice of his profession in 
the state of Ohio. In 1820 re. to St. Francis- 
ville. La., and r. there four years ; re. to Jef- 
ferson county, Miss., and re. there two years ; 
re. to Hinde county. Miss., and was a pioneer 
settler in that place ; became a distinguished 
physician in that section. In May, 1844, 
while in Vicksburg for the purpose of pur- 
chasing medicine, he was stabbed in the 
neck, robbed, and thrown from a window at 
the Glidden House in that place. The as- 
sassin made his escape ; the doctor was 
maimed for life, and obliged to retire from 
the practice of his profession, and d. at Au- 
burn, Hyde county. May 12, 1866, having 
been an esteemed citizen of that vicinity for 
a period of thirty years, and a resident of 



(6) 



lO 

II 



12 

H 

15 
16 



17 

iS 



19 



20 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 465 

Mississippi forty-two years. He m. Aman- 
da Whittaker, and had six children, — Olivia 
C. ; Marcus, d. ; Abram, d. ; Gertrude ; 
Mary ; Frank. 



Ezra Snow settled in Dublin; a farmer; m., Dec. 
15, 1807, Mary, dau. of Moses and Mary (Twitchell) 
Rider, b. Aug. 13, 1788. He d. Feb. 4, 1850. She d. 
at Peterborough, Dec. 4, 1872, a. 84. 

I. Mary, b. March 3, 1809 ; d. July 4, 1844. 
II. Dorothea M., b. May 2, 181 1 ; m. Rev. Augus- 
tus Berry, of Pelham, Mass., a distinguished 
minister of that place. She d. March 15, 
1873, a. 62. 

III. Edward, b. May 29, 1813 ; d. Feb. 14, 1861. 

IV. Ezra G., b. Dec. 9, 1815 ; d. Oct. 3, 1839, 

while practising medicine with his uncle, 
Mark Snow. 
V. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 25, 1818; r. Boston. 
VI. Julia, b. Oct. 5, 1820; d. Peterborough, Feb. 
20, 1877. 

VII. Harriet «S'., b. Alarch 22, 1823; m. Aaron B. 

Grant, who d. Sept. 29, 1850, a. 33. One 
child, d. M., 2^, John Wilder, a merchant 
in Peterborough. 

VIII. Emma A., b. July 4, 1825. 

IX. Francis M., b. March 2, 1829. In 1848 re. to 
Buffalo, N. Y. ; was employed by the firm 
of Howard and Whitcomb, importers and 
dealers in dry-goods; became a partner of 
the firm in 1854. •'■'^ 1S56 he m. Julia F 
Miller, youngest dau. of James Miller, one 
of the oldest residents in the place. He d. 
of typhoid fever, Sept. 28, 1861, leaving a 
widow and two children. 

I. Albert F., b. March 2, 1858; fitted for 
college and entered the University of 
Rochester. His health failed at the 
close of his junior year, and he went 
with his mother to Colorado Springs, 
Col., where he now (1S80) resides. 

II. James Miller, b. Jan. 23, i860; grad- 
uating with credit at the high school, 
and after a partial course at Rochester 

31 



466 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



22 
24 

25 



University he commenced the study of 
medicine, and will probably graduate 
from the Buffalo Medical College in 
iSSi. 



Joseph Snow, brother of Samuel, Sen'r, came to 
JaftVey about 1794; settled on lot 22, range 3, after- 
wards owned by John Wilder, now (1873) uninhabited. 
In 18 1 7 he re. to Washington ; last tax that year. 

I. Joseph^ Jr., paid tax in 1801 ; re. to Georgia. 
11. Abigail, m. Eli Upton, May 10, 1809 ; she d. 
May 19, 1830,3. 40; r. Sharon. 

III. Lydia, m., Dec. 26, iSoo, Thomas Upton, of 

Peterborough. She d. Oct. 20, 186S, a. 76. 
He d. May i, 187 1, a. 84. 

IV. Sally, m. Zadoc Merriam. 



SPAULDING FAMILY. 

Phineas Spaulding was the first man of that name 
who settled in the town of JaftVey. He was a descend- 
ant of Edward Spaulding, who came from England to 
this country between the years 1630 and 1633. He had 
five sons. — Edward, John, Joseph, Benjamin, and An- 
drew. The order of descent was, first, Edward the 
emigrant, Edward his son, Edward, third, Phineas, 
fourth, and Phineas, fifth, who settled in JaftVey on lot 
3, range S, about 1772. He was b. in Nottingham 
West, now Hudson, N. H., April 27, 1745, Old Style, 
or May 8, New Style. His father d. when he was 
quite young, and he was bound out, during the period 
of his minority, to a man by the name of Hamlet. Af- 
ter the time expired he went to Chelmsford, now Low- 
ell, for the purpose of teaching school, and while thus 
employed he heard much said about the rich and fertile 
lands around the Grand Monadnock. This induced him 
to visit that locality. The appearance of the land meet- 
ing his expectations, he purchased a tract of Mr. Henry 
Cofteen. It was then a dense forest, no inhabitants 
within two or three miles. He commenced levelling 
the forest, cleared a small spot, built a cabin, and then 
returned to Chelmsford for a wife, and m. Miss Eliza- 
beth Bailey, whom he had previously engaged. An 
opportunity was now given for a wedding tour. With 
foot-paths or cart-paths for roads, marked trees for 
guide-boards, and fords for bridges, they started on their 
tour ; not in a coach or car, but in an ox-cart, which 



3 

4 



6 

7 

8 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 467 

contained all their household furniture, an indispensa- 
ble spinning-wheel, and a cow tied behind. Hope and 
high expectation made bright the future and easy the 
task. How long the tour lasted is not on record. The 
last day of their journey was from Rindge to their cab- 
in, which they reached at nine o'clock at night. 

Mr. Spaulding became a very prominent leading man 
in town affairs, and held all the important offices in the 
gift of the town. He was a member of the first board 
of selectmen, moderator of their town-meeting, and was 
the first delegate chosen by the town to attend a con- 
vention at Concord, in 1778, for the purpose of forming 
a plan of government. He was a man of industrious 
and frugal habits, reserved in his manners, strict in the 
discipline of his children, Calvinistic in his faith. His 
memory comes down to his descendants as a man who 
bore an unsullied name, and in his dealings with his 
fellow-men ever maintained integrity, uprightness, and 
truth. He was interested in the cause of education — a 
school-teacher himself, the first one employed in the 
district where he lived. He sent two of his sons to 
Dartmouth college, one of whom, Oliver, was drowned 
while a member. The other, Rev. Levi, graduated, 
and afterwards became a distinguished missionary at 
Ceylon, East India. Mr. Spaulding d. Jan. 14, 1809, ^ 
64. His widow, Elizabeth, b. July 5, 1751, d. Sept. 29, 
1819, a. 68. 

I. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 31, 1774; m. Moses Flint, of 
Lyme, N. H. ; r. there, and had a large 
family of children. 
II. Phineas, b. Feb. 28, i776.-f- 

III. Mary, b. Jan. 22, 1778; m. Samuel Flint, a 

brother of Moses ; r. in the same town. 
They had a large family, one son of whom, 
Samuel, was the Labor Reiorm candidate 
for governor in 1871. 

IV. Sarah, h. Jan. 20, 1780; m. Abraham Spoffbrd, 

q. V. 
V. Edward, b. Oct. 19, 1781.-}- 

VI. Lydia, b. Sept. 20, 1783 ; m. Benj. M. Stanley, 

q. V. 

VII. Oliver, b. Aug. 10, 1785 ; drowned in the Con- 

necticut river while a member of Dartmouth 
college, July 29, 1S07. 
VIII. Daniel, b. Dec. 20, 788 ; m. Lucinda Perkins. 
Five children. -|- 



468 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



ID 
II 

12 



(3) 



13 



(6) 



15 



(9) 



i6 

i8 
19 



IX. Xevi, b. Aug. 22, 1791.-!- 
X. Mhoda.h. May 22, 1793; d. Dec. 11, 1856; 

unm. 
XI. Darnel^ b. May 17, 1795.4- 



Phineas Spaulding m. Sally, dau. of Thomas and 
Sarah (Shiple)') Fisk, of Jaffrey. He settled near the 
hometead of his father, afterwards re. with his son Ly- 
man to the farm now owned by Thomas Stearns, where 
his wife d. April 21, 1844. After her death he and his 
son re. to Medina, Mich., and d. there. 

I. Lyman^ b. Aug. 27, iSo3.-f- 
II. Sarah Elizabeth^ m. Thomas Stearns, q. v. 



Edward Spaulding settled on the home farm. For 
many years he was quite a prominent man in Jaffrey, 
filling the offices of town agent, deputy sheriff, select- 
man, representative, and justice of the peace with 
marked ability. He was one of the distinguished school- 
teachers, and held the commission of captain in the 
state militia. He m. Nabby Newton, of Fhillipston, 
Mass., and d. Jan. 20, 1843. His widow d. Dec. 6, 
1861, a. 81. One child by adoption. 

I. Ambrose W., b. iSiS; m., i^*, Caroline, dau. 
of Levi and Mary (Jewett) Benjamin. Had 
one son, Charles. She d. Oct. 12, 1849, ^* 
28. He m., 2'', Elizabeth Robinson, of 
Royalton, Vt., and has two daughters, — 
Carrie L., b. 1853, and Minnie, b. 1864. 
He d. March 5, 1878. 



Daniel Spaulding m. Lucinda Perkins, dau. of 
Robertson Perkins, of Fitzwilliam ; r. Fitzwilliam ; had 
five children : 

I. Mary Elizabeth d. Oct. 9, 1848, a. 26. 
II. Jar ed Perkins d. Aug. 25, 1827, a. 2 yrs. 

III. Daniel Robinson d. Oct. 26, 1875, a. 47. 

IV. Julia Ann, b. March 5, 1831 ; m. Oscar Holmes 

Bradley, m. d. Dr. Bradley was b. in the 
city of Louisville, state of Kentucky, Feb. 
10, 1826. His mother was the daughter of 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 469 

Jonathan Holmes, of Londonderry, N. H., 
an officer who served under Gen. Stark at 
Bennington, and under Washington through 
the dark and memorable winter at Valley 
Forge. His ancestors were of Scotch-Irish 
extraction, and among the number of those 
who early settled at Londonderry. His 
parents were poor, with a family of six chil- 
dren, and, in those early days in the south- 
west, found it a stern and laborious task to 
obtain the means of their support. When 
the subject of our sketch was about four 
years of age, he re. with his parents to the 
western part of Vermont, where he lived 
until he reached the age of seventeen. The 
means of obtaining an education in that sec- 
tion of the state were very meagre at that 
time, but every advantage within his reach 
was improved, and, by dint of perseverance 
and application, teaching the district school 
in the winter months, and afterwards as an 
assistant instructor in the Black River acad- 
emy, at Ludlow, Vt, he succeeded in grad- 
uating with honor from that institution in 
the autumn of 1847. He taught school at 
Mt. Holly, Vt., in the following winter, and 
in the spring of 1S48 entered the law office 
of Hon. D. E. Nicholson, of Rutland, where 
he pursued the study of law for several suc- 
ceeding months. Not finding the law con- 
genial io his tastes, he abandoned it, and in 
the autumn of 184S commenced the study of 
medicine with Drs. Amos and George B. 
Twitchell, of Keene, N. H. He found here 
his favorite science, and began at once, by 
diligent application, to lay the foundation of 
that successful career as a practising physi- 
cian and surgeon, which has so notably 
crowned his subsequent life. He studied 
medicine with the Drs. Twitchell about two 
years and six months, at the same time sup- 
porting himself by teaching the high school 
in the adjoining towns of Troy, Fitzwilliam, 
and Stoddard. He also attended medical 
lectures at Woodstock, Vt., under the in- 
struction of such eminent professors as Alon- 



470 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



zo Clark, of New York ; Prof. Childs, ex- 
lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts ; Prof. 
Moore, of Rochester, New York ; Prof. 
Bartlett, from Yale college ; Prof. Benj. 
R. Palmer, of the Louisville Medical Col- 
lege ; and afterwards graduated, with the 
first honors of his class, from the Castleton 
ISIedical College, in the fall of 1851. In 
January, 1852, Dr. Bradley settled in Jaftrey, 
where he has ever since pursued the practise 
of his profession. Nov. 29, 1853, he m. 
Julia A. Spaulding, dau. of Daniel Spaul- 
ding, Esq., a prominent citizen of Fitzwill- 
iam, N. H., by whom he has two sons, — 
Daniel Edward, b. May 16, 1861, and Mark 
Spaulding, b. Jan. 16, 1868, — both now liv- 
ing, and at present pursuing their educa- 
tional studies, the elder son being in Dart- 
mouth college. Almost every family, within 
a radius of twenty miles from Jafirey, is, 
either professionally or otherwise, familiar 
with the genial face of the "Doctor." No 
physician or surgeon in southern New 
Hampshire is better known, or more gener- 
ally employed in difficult and serious cases, 
than he. In the medical profession he is 
particularly noted for keenness and accuracy 
of perception in the diagnosis of disease, and 
for positiveness of judgment and a self-reli- 
ance that rarel}' err. As a surgeon, with the 
scalpel he is quick and skilful, and he 
inspires the patient with hope and courage 
by the manifest calm and steady nerve of a 
self-reliant hand. In all branches of medical 
practise he is frequently called into consul- 
tation by other practitioners, and is often 
called to attend upon patients in distant 
towns and cities in other states. In 1868 
the Dartmouth Medical College expressed 
its recognition of his high attainments and 
skill, as a medical practitioner, by presenting 
him with the honorary degree of m. d. Dr. 
Bradley has always been a public-spirited 
citizen, and has largely aided in the material 
improvement and growth of his adopted 
town. He was one of the first advocates of 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



471 



20 
(10) 



the incorporation of the Monadnock Raih^oad 
Co., and has been, from its inception, a 
director in its management. Through his 
influence, largely, the Monadnock Savings 
Bank was established at Jaftrey, of which he 
has been the president from its incorporation. 
This institution has become well known in 
New Hampshire as one of the safest and 
best managed savings banks in the state. 
The doctor has always aidefl liberally the 
industrial enterprises of Jaffrey, and has in- 
vested his means, when the interests to be 
established or benefited were commended by 
his judgment. His influence in the public 
aflairs of the town has always been marked, 
and has been invariably exerted in behalf of 
advancement and progress in all worthy 
public movements or objects. He has done 
much for Jaftrey, toward keeping her in the 
front rank of temperate, progressive, and 
prosperous communities Endowed with a 
fine personal presence and an excellent 
voice, and possessing refined and scholarly 
attainments, he is a very attractive public 
speaker, and when speaking upon public oc- 
casions, at home or elsewhere, he is always 
listened to with attention. He is at this 
time in the prime and vigor of life, and 
much employed in the duties of his profes- 
sion, and the cares of large business and 
financial interests devolving upon him, in 
connection with the two banks in Jaftrey, 
and the railroad passing through the town. 

C. A. P. 

V. Lxicinda Viola, b. Jan. 20, 1S34. 

Levi Spaulding, d. d., m. Mary Christie, of Antrim. 
Two children, — Edward and Elizabeth, b. in Cevlon, 
East India ; were sent to this country for an education. 
Edward studied medicine, went South, m., and d. at 
Florence, Alabama, leaving one child, — Frank. Eliza- 
beth m. a Mr. Abbott, from Conn. 



(12) 



David Spaulding settled on a place near the home- 
stead ; m. Hannah Foster, of Fitzwilliam ; re. to Min- 
eral Spring village, and d. Feb. 11, 1S69, a. 74- His 
wife d. Jan. 8, 1S65, a. 6^. 



472 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



21 


I. 


23 


II. 


23 


III. 


24 


IV. 


25 


V. 



26 



(13) 



27 



Laura M,, b. March 15, 1826. 
Elvira A., b. Oct. 29. 1829. 
ieui, b. March 26, 1832 ; d. Aug. 20, 1848. 
ilfory M., b. Dec. 19, 1833. 
Alfred F.^ b. Sept. 11, 1S36 ; a soldier in the 
Rebellion. 

VI. Leander, b. Jan. 3, 1839; served in the Rebel 
war: m. : re. South. 



Lyman Spaulding m. Susan, dau. of William and 
Sarah (Cutter) Marshall, Sept. 13, 1831. She d. at 
Medina, Mich., April 13, 1874. He settled first on the 
homestead, in School District No. 5. In 1839 '^^ '"^• 
to the place now owned by Thomas W. Stearns, and 
in 185 1 he re. to Medina, Mich. Mr. Spaulding was an 
active business man, of sound judgment, and met with 
success in all of his business operations. He is the 
parent of an interesting family of children, one of whom 
has highly distinguished himself in public life. 

I. Oliver L., b. Aug. 2, 1833, fitted for college at 
Melville academy, Jaftrey, N. H. ; entered 
Oberlin college in 1851 ; graduated in 1855. 
After teaching a short time he settled at St. 
John's, Michigan, studied law with James 
W. Ransom, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1858. In the fall of that year he was 
elected regent of the State University from 
the eighth judicial district, for the term of 
six years. In July, 1862, he entered the 
U. S. service as captain in the 23d Regt. 
of Michigan Infantry. He was soon made 
major, and subsequently held the commis- 
sion of lieutenant-colonel and brevet briga- 
dier-general. He was mustered out of ser- 
vice, July, 1865, and returned to the practice 
of law at St. John's, Mich. In 1866 he was 
elected secretary of the state of Michigan, 
and was reelected in 1868. He is now of 
the firm of Spaulding & Cranson, attorneys- 
at-law, St. John's, Clinton county, Michigan. 
In 1880, Nov. 2, he was elected member of 
congress from Michigan. He m., i^', Mary 
Jane Mead, of Hillsdale, Mich., who d. 
Nov. 9, 1S57. M., 2^^, Martha Minerva 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4/3 

Mead, April 12, 1S59 (sister of first wife), 
who d. Nov. 20, i86r. M., 3^ Mary Cecilia 
Swegles, of St. John's, Mich. 

28 II. Eliza Sophia^ b. Aug. 30, 1835 ; m. Franklin 
Gallup, Dec. 16, 1S55 ; r. Medina, Mich. 

29 III. Susan Maria, b. Oct. 28, 1837; m- James W. 
Lewis, June 15, 1865 ; r. Morenci, Mich. 

30 IV. Thomas Hastings, b. Jan. 26, 1840; d. Jan. 11, 
1S61. 

31 V. Echoard Marshall, b. May 5, 1842 ; enlisted in 
Co. G, 23d Regt. Mich. Vols., Sept. 2, 1862, 
as fifth sergeant. In 1S63 he was promoted 
to first sergeant ; went to Bowling Green, 
Kentucky, and d. Feb. 10, 1863. 

32 VI. Hattie Jane, b. April i, 1844; d. at Jafi'rey, 
April 27, 1847. 

SFAULDING FAMILY. 

Benjamin Spaulding (Capt.) was an early settler, 
and his name was on the tax-list in i793i the oldest list 
extant. He was highway surveyor in 177^' ^"'^ held 
other important town offices ; on committee to procure 
preaching, captain of the militia, and a soldier in the 
Revolution. He settled on lot 11, range 8, now (1873) 

the farm of Charles A. Johnson. He m. Sarah , 

who d. Oct. 9, 1796, a. 57. After the death of his wife 
he re. to Marlborough, m. and d. 

I. Susanna, h.^?^x\. i, 1760. 

II. Willard, b. Dec. 27, 1761. 

III. J3enjamin,h. .Sept. 5, 1763 ; m. Sarah French.-}- 

IV. Sarah, b, Sept. i, 1765; d. Dec, 1765. 
V. William, h. Aug. 24, 1766. 

VI. Reuben, b. March 21, 1768.-I- 
VII. Moses, b. Feb. 2, 1770; re. to Cavendish, Vt., 

about 1809. 
VIII. Jesse, b. Sept. 20, 1772. 

IX. Peter, b. Jan. 20, 1774; d. March, 1776. 

X. Sarah, h. Nov. 6, 1778; m. William Bond, of 
Dublin ; r. Cavendish, Vt. 

XI. William, b. Dec. 24, 1780. 

Benjamin Spaulding m. Sarah French. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

II 
12 

(4) 

13 
14 



I. Mebecca, b. May 9, 1784. 
II. Asa, b. Jan. 23, 1786. 



474 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



(7) 



15 
16 

17 

18 

19 



Reuben Spaulding m. Polly Pratt; d. June 23, 
1805. His widow m. Moody Lawrence, and d. Jan. 4, 
1S60, a, 84. 

I. Mary, b. March 31, 1796 ; m. Abel Cutter, q. v. 
II. Sarah, b. March 24, 179S. 

III. Benjamin, b. July 27, 1800. 

IV. Eliza, b. June 17, 1S03. 
V. Reuben, b. May 3, 1805. 



SPAULDING FAMILY. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



8 
9 

10 



Abel Spaulding (Dea.) came from Townsend to 
Jaffrey about 1808 ; was taxed the following year. He 
settled on lot 7, range 7, now (1873) in possession of 
Frederick Spaulding, his grandson. He was a man 
who possessed, in a remarkable degree, all the requi- 
sites of a good neighbor, a good townsman, and a 
consistent Christian. He was an exemplary member 
of the Orthodox Congregational church, and for many 
years one of its deacons. He m. Lucy P. Pierce, Oct. 
4, 1S02, who d. July 18, 1856, a. 72. He d. Nov. 16, 
i860, a. 83. They were the parents of eleven ch. : 

I. Ahel, b. Sept. 14, 1803. -|- 
II. Richard, b. Oct., 1804.-]- 
iii. Alvah, b. Sept. 9, 1807; m. Ambra Tower, of 

Fitzwilliam. [See College Graduates.] 
IV. Lucy, b. July 14, 1809 ; m. Luke French, q. v. 
V. 3Iariel, b. Feb. 3, 181 2; m. Benj. O. Hale, b. 
in Rindge, Jan. i, 1841, son of Benj. and 
Miriam (Pierce) Hale. She d. July 20, 
1849. 
VI. Erastus, h.^^y 31, 1815 ; m. Mahala Baker, 
Nov. 5, 1839. She d. Nov. 18, 1847. M., 
2^, Mary Bush, of Cambridge, Mass. ; r. in 
Troy and Keene. 
VII. Eri, b. Nov. 4, 1816; d. March 20, 1817. 
VIII. Lydia, b. May 22, 1818; m. Benj. O. Hale, 
Dec. 13, 1849 ; d. July 7, 1854. 
IX. Eri J., b. Oct. 17, 1S21 ; m. Betsey Holt, of 
Troy. She d. Aug. 8, 1847. M., 2^ Lucy 
Ann Jones, of Dublin, May 23, 1S48. She 
d. Feb. 14, 1861. M., 3^ Miss Ellis, of 
Wakefield, Vt, Jan., 1868. 



II 

12 
(2) 



16 



17 
18 

19 
20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 



(3) 



26 

27 

28 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4/5 

X. Hannah E.^ b. Feb. 1, 1823; m. Samuel 

Stoughton, of Gill, Mass., Jan. 15, 1842. 
XI. Benj. F., b. Dec. 30, 1824 ; d. May 23, 1836. 

Abel Spaulding m. Mary Templeton, of Boxford, 
Mass., June 4, 1S33. She d. Oct. 30, 1833, a. 23. M., 
2^ Mary Ann Stoughton, of Gill, Mass., Dec. 3, 1835. 
He d. June 11, 1S50. He was a carpenter by trade, 
and a worthy and exemplary man. 

I. Frederick, b. Dec. 11, 1836; m. Mary A. E. 
Eddy, of Rindge, Feb. 10, 1864. Two 
children : 

1. Emma Louisa, b. Feb. 12, 1865. 

2. Edith Belle, b. Jan. 14, 1871. 

II. Mary T., b. March 20, 1838; m. James Rob- 
bins, June 9, 1864; r. in Rindge. Four 
children : 

1. Frank White, b. March 20, 1865. 

2. Arthur James, b. July 13, 1866. 

3. Minnie A., b. Jan. 30, 1871. 

4. Sai-ah, b. Oct. 29, 1872. 

III. Anne S., h. July 11, 1839; d. 

IV. Louisa i>., b. March 16, 1841 ; d. Feb. 14, 1861. 
V. Nancy E.^ b. Sept. 10, 1842 ; d. Oct. 5, 1S55. 

VI. Elmina, b. Oct. 18, 1844; d. Sept. 9, 1847. 
VII. Ermina, b. Oct. 18, 1844. 



Richard Spaulding (Dea.) m. Nancy, dau. of 
Thomas and Hannah (Curamings) French, Feb. 17, 
1833. She d. Sept. 18, 1856, a. 45. M., 2^ Elvira, 
dau. of Isaac and Betsey (Bailey) Stratton, Feb. 4, 
1857. 

I. Nancy E., b. Sept. 4, 1834; m., June 19, 1S70, 

G. A. Blood, of Mason. Three ch. 
II. Edwin H., b. Feb. 17, 1837 > ^- Nov. 24, 1864, 

Josephine, dau. of Vryling D. and Sally M. 

(Cutter) Shattuck. One ch. 
III. Leonard E., b. May 20, 1840; m. Mary A., 

dau. of Edmund P. and Rachel R. Shattuck, 

Feb. 25, 1S63. One ch. 



476 

29 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

IV. Austin A., h. Oct. 28, 1843 ; m. Vrylena S., 
dau. of Vryling D. and Sally M. Shattuck, 
Oct. 19, 1871. One ch. 



2 

3 
4 
5 



SPOFFORD FAMILY. 

Eleazer Spofford (Dea.) was a descendant of John 
Spoftbrd, who came from England and settled in Row- 
ley, Mass., in 1638. He m. Elizabeth Scott, of Ipswich. 
His son John m. Sarah Wheeler, of Rowley. His son, 
Capt. John, m. Dorcas Hopkinson, of Rowley. Dea. 
Abner, his son, m. Sarah Colman, of Byfield ; and his 
son, Dea. Eleazer, m. Mary Flint, of Danvers, and re. to 
Jaftrey in 1778, and purchased of John Borland that tract 
of land, with the mills thereon, which is now known as 
East Jafirey. On it at that time was a saw- and 
grist-mill, which, under the management of Dea. Spof- 
ford, became the largest business mill in the vicinity. 
On the same stream a fulling-mill was built by Lieut. 
Joseph Lincoln, afterwards owned by Samuel Foster, 
who m. a dau. of Dea. Spoftbrd. In 1813 he sold his 
mills to a company, who built a factory for spinning 
cotton yarn. In 18 — he sold his farm to Daniel 
Adams, of Cambridge, Mass.; and in 1821 he re. to 
Bradford, Mass ; d. 1828, a. 89, and was buried in 
Groveland cemetery. His widow d. at Jafflrey, Oct. 
28, 1836, a. 92. Dea. Spoftbrd was an active business 
man ; a prominent leader in town and church affairs, and 
held many of the town offices. When the church was 
incorporated, in 1780, he and his wife were members, 
and he was made a deacon of the same. He was also 
distinguished for his musical talent, and was for many 
years leader of the choir. His sound judgment, strict 
integrity, and strong conscientiousness could not fail to 
command the love and respect of his fellow-citizens. 
They were the progenitors of ten children and sixty-one 
grandchildren : 

I. Polly, b. Oct. 21, 1765 ; m. David Cutter, q. v. 
II. Moses, h. Jan. 14, 1768; d. Feb. 28, 1792. 

III. Abraham, b. Aug. 10, lyjo.-}- 

IV. Rhoda, b. Aug. 7, 1772; m. Moses Perkins, 

q. V. 
V. Miriam, b. June 6, 1775 ; m. Isaac Morse, of 
Winchendon. She d. Aug. 21, 1819. He 
d. Aug. 21, 1850. Eight children: 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 4/7 

7 I. Eliza, b. Jan. 9, 1802; m. Asahel D. 

Shirtleff, m. d., Dec. 9, 1823. 

8 2. Sophia, b. Jan, 9, 1805 ; m. Ephraim 

Murdock, Nov. 24, 1825. 

3. Milton S., b. Nov. 12, 1S06 ; m. Eliza- 
beth Cogswell, Oct. 16, 1836 ; d. 
Oct. 29, 1859. 

lO 4. Roanah, b. Sept. 4, 1808 ; m. Elisha 

Murdock, Nov. 29, 1832. 

u 5. Edward, b. Aug. 15, 1810; d. Aug. 19, 

1810 (twin). 

12 6. Edmund, b. Aug. 15, 1810; d. Oct. i, 

1810 (twin). 

13 7. Miriam C., b. Oct. i, 1812; m., June 

4, 1840, Dr. Joshua Tucker. 

14 8. Mary B., b. Jan. 10, 1819; d. Feb. 27, 

1819. 

15 VI. Ab7ier, b. Jan. 5, 1778 ; m. Betsey Litch.-f- 

16 VII. Isaac, b. April 22, 1780; burnt in the house of 
Rev. Laban Ainsworth, Feb. 13, 178S. 

17 VIII. Sophia, h Jan. 7, 17S3 ; m. Samuel Foster. 

18 IX. Zuke Ainsicorth, b. Nov., 1785.4- 

19 X. Mary Ayer, b. Sept. 29, 1789; m. Jeremiah 
Spoflbrd, M. D., of Groveland, Oct. 14, 
1813. He was a distinguished physician, 
and was engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession for more than fifty years. He has 
published a history of the Spoflbrd family, 
and a Gazeteer of the state of Massachusetts 
in 1817, Nine children: 

20 I. Laura Ayer, b. Sept. 28, 1814; m. 

Moses P. Atwood. 

21 2. Charles Whiton, b. Nov. 20, 1816 ; a 

physician in Groveland. 

22 3. Charlotte E., b. Feb. 8, 1819; m. 

George W. Chaplin, of George- 
town. 

23 4. Herschel Ainsworth, b. July 19, 1821 ; 

m. Sarah Stickney. 

24 5. Mary Futman, b. Nov. 20, 1823 ; d. 

Feb. 5, 1856. 

25 6. Celia Feabody, b. Aug. 5, 1826; m. 

VVm. G. Downie. 

26 7. Morris, b. Sept. 30, 1S29; m. Martha 

J. Nichols, of Haverhill. 



478 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



27 
28 

(4) 

29 

30 

31 
32 

33 

34 

35 
36 
37 

38 
39 

40 
41 

(15) 

42 
43 

44 

45 
46 

47 
48 



8. Lucy Tenney, b. Nov. 25, 1831 ; d. 

July 2, 1833. 

9. Aphia Tenney, b. Aug. 10, 1834. 

Abraham Spofford m. Sally, dau. of Phineas and 
Elizabeth (Bailey) Spaulding, of Jaffrey ; r. in Barre, 
Mass., and Moretown, Vt. ; d. 1850. 

I. /Sally, h. Feb. 19, 1800; m. Joseph Freeman, 

1836. 
II. Polly, h. Nov., 1801 ; m. Lyman Fiske, Oct., 
1828. 

III. Betsey, b. June 30, 1803 ; m. John Taylor, 1830. 

IV. Ayer.h. ]An. 15, 1805; m. Harvey Olmstead ; 

r. Elmore, Vt. 
V. 3Ioses, b. Nov. i, 1806; m. Dorcas Parker, 

1S39. 
VI. Hhoda, b. Aug. 12, 1808 ; m. Ira Carpenter; r. 

in Moretow^n. 
VII. Grata, b. July 27, 1810; d. Aug. 17, 1833. 
VIII. Miriam, b. July 22, 181 2 ; d. at Lowell, Mass. 

IX. Luke, b. June 19, 1814; m. Laura Wood, Sa- 

lem, Vt. 

X. Aaron, b. July 31, 1816; d. Aug. 28, 1833. 

XI. Abraham, b. July 28, 1818; m. Caroline Fisk, 

of Swanzey. 
xii. Isaac, b. April 30, 1821. 

XIII. Harriet, b. Nov. 19, 1823 ; m. Alexander Con- 
ner. 



Abmer Spofford m. Betsey Litch ; r. New^ York, 
Mich., and Wisconsin. Eight children : 

I. Eliza, b. 1S04; m., 1820, D. Pitman. 
II. Samuel Litch, b. March i, 1806; m. Maria 
Hall. 

III. Sumner Flint, h. M-iiy 11, 1808; m. Emeline 

E. Bixby. 

IV. Cynthia Meriam, h. May 16, 1810; m. Theo- 

dore Bissell, 1827. 

V. Luke Ayer, h. Nov. 21, 1813 ; m. Mary Niblar, 

1836; d. 1867. 

VI. Harriet Maria, h. Jan. 16, 1816 ; m., i^\ Milton 

Hoag ; 2^ A. B. Webster. 

VII. Americus McKenzia, b. April 20, 1820; m. 

Maria Glass. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 479 

49 VIII. Mary Augusta^ b. March 9, 1S23 ; m. Dr. 

Armstrong, 1S48; d. July 24, 1S58. 



(18) Rev. Luke Ainsworth Spofford m. Grata, dau. of 
Col. David and Susannah (Hemenway) Rand, of 
Rindge, Nov. 12, 1816. He d. at Rockport, Ind., 
Sept. 27, 1S55. She d. at Williamsburg, Ohio, Feb. 
25, 1851, a. 57. 

50 I. Richard Cecily b. Dec. 22, 1817; graduated at 
Amherst college ; studied divinity ; d. at 
Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, May 25, 1S43. 

51 II. Mary Susan^ b. Feb. 12, 1820; m. John R. 
Wiltsie. 

52 III. Henry Martin, b. Sept. 8, 182 1 ; m. Ophelia 
Martin, of Pulaski. Tenn. 

53 IV. Elizabeth Jane, b. Sept. 19, 1823. 

54 V. Aitisicorth Iia?id, h. Sept. 12, 1S25 ; m. Sarah 
Fatridge. 

55 VI. Ann JTatilda, b. Sept. 22, 1827; d. July i, 
1843. 



STANLEY FAMILY. 

Capt. Jonathan Stanley, son of Samuel and Mary 
(Kinney) Stanley, and great-grandson of Matthew Stin- 
ley, who settled in Lyme about 1646, was b. at Tops- 
field, Mass., May 2, 171 1 ; m. Abigail, dau. of Thomas 
and Marcy (Sumner) Gould, descendant of Zacheus 
Gould, the emigrant, Aug. 2, i737' '• ^'"^^ "^ Lunen- 
burg, Mass., where most of his children were b. ; re. 
to Rindge about 1754. He was a prominent man in 
that town till i773' when his name appears in the rec- 
ords of the town of Jaflrey, calling a meeting for an or- 
ganization of the town under the charter of incorpora- 
tion. He settled on lot 19, range 5, north of the vil- 
lage of East Jaftrey, afterwards owned by his son Sam- 
uel, and now the residence of Luke H. Nutting. He 
not only called the first town-meeting, but was chosen 
moderator of the same, and chairman of the board of 
selectmen. He was also chosen moderator of the sec- 
ond town-meeting, and chairman of a committee to pro- 
cure preaching. In 1778 he was chosen one of the com- 
mittee of inspection. He was a purchaser of a pew in 
the meeting-house when they were sold at auction in 



48o 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 



4 

5 
6 

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8 

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lO 

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1780. His name again appears as highway surveyor in 
1786. Soon after the organization of the church in 
1780, Abigail, wife of Capt. Jonathan Stanley, was 
admitted a member of the same. No record of his or 
his wife's death has been found. He was living in Jaf- 
frey in 1791, and probably d. soon after. In tlie Centre 
burying-yard is a headstone erected in memory of Sam- 
uel Stanley, the only one bearing the name of Stanley 
in that yard. 

I. Abigail^ b. March 20, 1739 ; m. Col. Enoch Hale, 

q. V. 
II. Mary^ b. April 20, 1740; m., probably, Samuel 
Sherwin. 

III. Samuel^ b. March 15, 1741.-I- 

IV. John, b. Jan. 29, 1743.--J- 

V. tToseph, b. Dec. 16, 1745 ; d. young. 

VI. Jedediah, b. Jan. 31, 1747. 

VII. Joseph, b. Jan. 17, 1749; m. Lucy Hosmer, of 

Acton ; r. Rindge ; six children. 
VIII. Hannah, b. Dec. i, 1751 ; m. Jonathan Parker, 

IX. Elizabeth, bap. July 14, 1754. 



Samuel Stanley m. Sybil, dau. of Lieut. Nathaniel 
and Mercy (Gould) Page; re. to Jaftrey about 1780; 
was highway surveyor that year ; settled on lot 19, 
range 5, with his father. He was a soldier in the Rev- 
olution. He met with an accidental death from a fall- 
ing limb v\'hile felling trees, March 27, 179^' ^' 5°' 
Tliey had eleven children : 

I. Samuel m. Candace Arnold, of Clarendon, Vt. ; 
paid taxes in Jaffrey from 1798 to 1805 in- 
clusive ; re. to Hubbardston, Vt, and d. in 
1845. 
II. John, \ . . 

III. Jonathan, j 

IV. Sybil m., March 20, 1788, Johnson Richardson. 
V. Mary m. William Emery, q. v. 

VI. Abigail m. Josiah French, eon of John and 
Priscilla French. 

VII. Hannah. 

VIII. Charlotte. 

IX. Sarah m. Parker. 



X. Betsey m. James Thurber. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



481 



21 XI. Mercy, m. March 12, 1776, Luke Hale, son of 

Oliver Hale. 



(5) 



22 



23 



24 

25 
26 

27 
28 

29 
30 
31 
32 

(24) 



John Stanley m. Sarah 



r. Rindge ; was in 



JaflVey in i775 ! chosen second lieutenant in a military 
company organized that year, and was selectman in 
1778. Six children : 

(i) Ellen, b. 176S; (2) Jedediah, 1770; (3) Jonathan 
P., 1773; (4) JJaniel, 1775; (5) Sarah, 1779, and (6) 
Susannah, 1779, twins. 



David Stanley, son of David and Sarah (Button) 
Stanley (a descendant of Mathew Stanley), was b. at 
Topsfield, Mass., and settled in Jaftrey about i774' 
was highway surveyor that year. In 177^ he was tyth- 
ingman and auditor of accounts. At a town-meeting 
held June 16, the same year, David Stanley and Will- 
iam Smiley were chosen to read the psalm ; likewise 
Jonathan Priest, Abram Bailey, and David Stanley to 
tune the psalm. His name does not again appear on 
the town records. 



Jonathan Stanley, a brother of David, came to 
Jaftrey from Rindge, and settled on lot i, range 9, 
about 1776. He came to Rindge from Acton, Mass. 
He m. Lois, probably a daughter of Benjamin Moors, 
of Rindge. In 1779 he was chosen highway surveyor. 
He was a soldier in the Revolution. He d. July 12, 
1789, a. 41. She d. Dec. 9, 1828, a. 81. 

I. Jonathan, b. in Rindge, July 16, 1774; m. Bet- 
sey Ross.-|- 
II. John. 

III. Benjamin Moors m. Lydia Spaulding.-j- 

IV. Jedediah m. Prudence Ross, July 11, 1809. 

V. Nathan. 
VI. Sarah. 

VII. Abiah, m., 1801, Oliver Warren, q. v. 
VIII. Keziah. 
IX. Abner. 

Jonathan Stanley m. Betsey Ross, dan. of Abra- 
ham Ross. He d. Nov. 4, 1852, a. 78. His wife d. 
Feb. 10, 1842, a. 67. 

32 



482 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



33 

34 
35 



36 
37 

3S 
39 

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40 

41 



42 

43 

44 



I. Abraham m. Lydia Evleth ; 1*. Chester, Vt. 
II. Abner. 

III. Benjamin Moors, b. 1S06 ; m. Abigail Sibley ; 

d. at Newport, N. Y., Feb. 6, 1879. Three 
children : (i) Benjamin B. ; (3) Betsey R. ; 
(3) Eva H. 

IV. Alva/i, b. 1807 ; m. Lucy B. Cutting, who d. 

March 14, 1875, a. 63. 
V. James JRoss (Col.) m., June 7, 1S50, Abby Cut- 
ting ; r. in Troy ; one son. 
VI. Persis, m. ; r. Sterling, Mass. 
VII. Jonathan, m. ; r. Brookline. 



Benjamin Moors S.tanley m. Lydia, dau. of Phin- 
eas and Elizabeth (Bailey) Spaulding ; r. on homestead 
till 1S45 ; re. to Harrisville, and d. there March, 19, 
1852. She d. Sept. 22, 1853. 

I. Lydia Ann, b. June 16, 181 2 ; m. Col. Charles 
Jewell ; r. Adrian, Mich. 
Lois Alm^eda, b. Feb. 24, 1814; m., i*', Sam- 
uel Gilmore, who d. ; m., 2^, Thos. Stearns ; 
r. Jatlrey. 
Elizabeth Bailey, b. Nov. 3, 181 5. 
IV. Mary Christina, b. Aug. 27, 1S22. 
V. Louisa Ay er, b. Nov. 1, 1S26; m., April 18, 
1848, Moses K. Perry, of Dublin ; r. Harris- 
ville. 



II 



III 



3 

4 



STEARNS FAMILY. 

John Stearns, b. July, 1768, m. Chloe, eldest 
daughter of Benjamin Phinney, of Lexington, Mass., 
May, 1794* She was b. at Falmouth, Me., in 1770. 
vSettled in Waltham, Mass., where all of his children 
but Elizabeth were b. In 18 10 he re. to Jaffrey, and 
settled on the farm now (1873) owned by Samuel W. 
Pierce. He d. June 28, 1S40. His wife d. Oct. 19, 
1833. They had nine children : 

I. Mary Morse, b. Feb. 9, 1795 ; m. William Ains- 

worth, q. v. 
II. Caroline, b. Nov. 23, 1797 ; m. Moses T. Run- 
nels, of Cambridge, Vt. One son, — Rev. 
Moses T. Runnels, b. Jan. 5, 1830, a dis- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 483 

guished minister, settled at Sanbornton, N. 
H. She d-. at Sanbornton, April 17, 1876. 

III. Fidelia, b. Oct. 25, 1799; m., Feb. 26, 1S28, 
Dr. Albert Smith, of Peterborough, a well 
known physician of that place. He d. Feb. 
22, 1878, a. 76. Three children: 

I. Frederick Augustus, b. June iS, 1830; 
graduated at Dartmouth college in 1852 ; 
M. D. 1855 ; d. Dec. 20, 1856, at Leom- 
inster, Mass. 

7 2. Susan S., b. Feb. 4, 1832; d. April 

20, 1836. 

8 3. Catherine, b. Dec. 5, 1837 ; m. Moses 

P. Smith, Dec. 6, 1869. Five children. 

IV. Josiah Phinney, b. May 22, 1801 ; unm. ; r. in 
La Harpe, 111. 

10 V. Chloe Frances, b. March 16, 1803 ; d. Oct. 4, 
1825. 

11 VI. Margaret,\).yi?^xz\\ 18, 1805; m. William S. 
Smith ; d. Bellville, Upper Canada, March 
20, 1851. Five children: (i) William A. ; 

(2) Samuel G. ; (3) Josiah P. ; (4) Sydney 
S. ; (5) Elizabeth E. 

12 I VII. Diademia,\i. Kwg. 17,1807; m. Martin Wiers, 
Cambridge, Vt. ; d. 

13 VIII. Susan, b. May 30, 1809; m. Dea. John Smith, 
of Peterborough ; d. Jan. 9, 1870. Seven 
children: (i) Mary Frances ; (2) John S. : 

(3) Jonathan ; (4) Jonathan ; (5) Susan P. ; 
(6) Caroline; (7) Jeremiah. 

14 IX. Elizabeth, b. in JaftVey, March 14, 1813 ; m. 
William wSmith ; r. La Harpe, 111. He d. 
Oct. 25, 1873, a. 72. Four children, — Will- 
iam IL, Jonathan, Albert, Elizabeth. 

15 Thomas A. Stearns, a farmer and brickmaker, 
came from New Ipswich to Jaffrey in 1847, settled on 
lot 16, range 5 ; m., i**, Sarah E., dan. of Phineas and 
Sally (Fisk) Spaulding, by whom he had three children. 
She d. Feb. 26, 1855, a. 37. He m, 2^ Mrs. Almeda 
S. Gilmore, dau. of Benjamin M. and Lydia (Spaulding) 
Stanley. He d. July 28, 1S79, a. 66. 



16 



I. Harriet E., b. 1844; m., April 12, 1849, Geo. 
F. Lowe. 



484 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



17 II. Henry M.,h. 1848; m. Mary C. Lowe, Feb. 

20, 1871. 

18 III. Mary (7., b. 185 1. 

19 IV. Sarah A., b. i860. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



7 



8 



(2) 



9 
10 

II 



STEVENS FAMILY. 

James Stevens (Lieut.) came from Andover, Mass., 
to JaftVey about 1778; settled on lot 12, range 9, now 
occupied by his grandsons, — William P. and Charles 
Stevens. He m. Elizabeth Lacy, of Andover, a sister 
of David Lacy. She d. Jan. 25, 1798, a. 45. M., 2**, 
Betsey Litch, of Lunenburg, in i8oo. She d. Jan. 12, 
185S, a. 86. He d. March 31, 1834, ^- ^5- Seven 
children : 

I. James^ b, Aug. 11, 1779.-!- 

II, Betsey, b. April 9, 1781 ; d. Dec. 20, 1801. 

III. Billy, b. March 5, 1783 ; d. Sept. 3, 1786. 

IV. Sally, b. Aug. 27, 1787 ; d. Feb. 4, 1798. 

V. Patty, b. Oct. i, 1790; m., 181 1, Samuel Litch, 

q. V. 
VI. Dolly, b. March 25, 1793; m. Capt. John Mil- 
liken, June, 1810, q. v. 
VII. Polly, b. Aug. 15, 1796. 



James Stevens m. Mercy, dau. of David and Fhebe 
(Spoftbrd) Adams, of Rindge ; settled on the home- 
stead ; and d. Feb. 5, 1837. She d. Feb. 9, i860, a. 81. 
Three children : 



I. Sally, b. April 15, 1806 ; d. Aug. 22, 1879. 
11. William P.,h. March 19, 1807; m. Mary 



E. 



HI. 



Stratton, 1850. 
Charles, b. Jan. 4, 



1816. 



STICKNEY FAJVIILY. 



Moses Stickney was b. in Boxford, Mass., Nov. 
21, 1751. He was a descendant of William Stickney 
(fifth generation), who came from England to Boston 
about 1638. His father, Moses, with Richard Feabody 
and seven others, made a settlement in the south-east 
part of Jaffrey, in 1752. The settlement was of short 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 485 

duration. The appearance of Indians created an alarm, 
and they soon left. One of their number, known as 
Capt. Platts, had the courage and hardihood to remain. 
He was probably Abel Platts, the distinguished pioneer 
of Rindge. Moses Stickney returned to Boxford ; 
afterwards resided in Holden, Mass., Temple, N. H., 
and Springfield, Vt., where he d. Aug. 10, 1819. His 
wife, Abigail Hale, d. at Temple, June 30, 1791, a. 59. 
While in Jaffrey his son Simon was b., Dec. 9, i753' 
supposed to be the first white ch. b. in Jaff'rey. He 
settled in Holden, and afterwards i"e. to New Haven, 
Vt., and d. there in 1791, leaving a wife and three 
daughters, one of whom settled in Athens, Vt., one in 
the state of New York, and the other in the state of 
Maine. Aloses Stickney, Jr., m. Mary Hastings. 

HIS BIBLE RECORD. 

Princeton, Mass., Sept. 9, 1797. I then entered 
into marriage Covenant with Mary Hastings, the 
daughter of Jonas Hastings and Mary Benjamin, his 
wife, of Waltham, Mass., then resident of Princeton, 
Mass., and I a native of Boxford, then resident of 
Princeton, we were married by Dr. Wilson, of Prince- 
ton, Mass. We arrived at our farm in Jaff'rey, N. H., 
Sept. 10, 1777. We had 8 children born to us. We 
lived together 70 years lacking 4 days, then Mary my 
wife died Sept. 5, 1S46, aged 89 years 4 months and 14 
days. 

He was a soldier in the Revolution. His daughters, 
Lois and Charlotte, living with him on the farm, com- 
posed and read the following verses, on the day their 
father was one hundred years old : 

Behold the man with whitened locks, 
With firm but wrinkled brow, 
Who was a helpless infant born 
One hundred years ago. 

Think on that little band of nine, 
Who to this wild woods came, 
To find a shelter and a home, 
One hundred years ago. 

Amidst the howling wilderness. 
They reared the cottage up : 
The savage foe was all around ; 
The wild bear roamed their lots. 



486 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



But firm they stood, with glowing hearts. 
And felled the lofty trees, 
Until the savage foe they viewed, 
Which caused them all to leave. 

Their wives and children to them clung. 
While tears did fill their eyes ; 
Their friends with anxious care did plead 
For them to leave and fly. 

But now no savage foe we view ; 
No wild bear roams these lots ; 
But youthful hearts, with ardor filled, 
Now range these ancient lots. 

May the same God those fathers armed. 
Our firm protection be ; 
And may we meet, when time is past. 
In blest eternity. 

A gentleman from JaftVey visited Mr. Stickney, Dec. 
13, 1851, and writes, — 

" He lives at the. foot of Grand Monadnock ; vv^as 100 
years old on the 21st of Nov. last. The old gentleman 
enjoys better health than most people younger than 
himself. His appetite is good, and he can relish and 
digest as hearty a meal as any one. He has always 
been an early riser, and tells me that he is the first one 
up in the house. He attended the annual meeting, and 
cast his vote the present year. He walks sometimes as 
many as 4 or 5 miles a day, and takes most of the care 
of his cattle ; yokes his oxen, and goes into his wood-lot 
with his team. During the past season, he has taken 
the charge of his own planting and harvesting. He has 
mowed half a dozen acres or so, and some of it a second 
time. Mr. Stickney's sight is growing dim, but he savs 
he can see to pick up potatoes if the sun shines upon 
them, and he sees white ones better than any other 
color. His hearing is so good that it is not at all ditfi- 
cult to converse with him. His memory seems quite 
tenacious, and he entertains his visitors with any 
amount of stories of the Revolution and long ago. He 
takes quite an interest, of late, in having his trees 
grafted, supposing the grafted fruit will be a source of 
profit to him in the course of a few years. May he live 
to see the fruit of his labors." 

He d. of paralysis, March 2, 1852, a. 100 yrs., 3 
mos., and 9 dys. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 48/ 

2 1. Moses, b. July 23, 1778.4- 

3 II. Mary B., b. July 29, 1782 ; m. Daniel Oilman, 
of Exeter. She d. at Salem, Vt., 1853. 

Orville P., b. Sept. 15, 1805, m. Almira 
Butler ; had eight cliildren ; d. at Sa- 
lem, Vt., 1S63. [See Medical Gradu- 
ates.] 

Mary S., m. David Felton ; r. Mason. 

4 III. Susan 31., b. Sept. i, 17S4; m. Norman Stick- 

ney. 

5 IV. Jonas, b. Dec. 20, 1787; m. Nancy Ripley, of 
Rockingham. -)- 

V. Theophilus, b. Sept. 2, 1790; m. Euta Cook.-j- 

7 VI. Barzilli, b. Nov. 13, 1792.-!- 

8 VII. Lois H., b. April 5, 1795; d. Nov. 16, 1869; 
unm. 

VIII. Charlotte, h. Feb. 26, 1797; d. Nov. 11, 1S69 ; 
unm. 



(2) 



10 

II 
12 



(5) 



13 

H 

16 



17 

18 



Moses Stickney m. Mary Puffer ; r. Athens, Vt. ; 
d. Jan. 17, 1832. 

I. Mercy, b. Feb. 20, 1814; r. Brookline, Vt. 
II. 3Ioses, b. May 27, 1815 ; m. Cynthia Brov^n. 
III. Israel, b. Jan. 2, 1S17 ; d. Sept. 14, 1831 ; 
unm. 



Jonas Stickney m. Nancy Ripley ; d. in Goshen, 
Vt., Feb. 8, 1 86 1 ; had ten children ; re. from Jaffrey 
about 1S13. 

I. Mary An7i, b. Nov. 5, 1812; m. Cyrus Aber- 

nethy. 
II. Augusta, b. Feb. 2, 1814; d. March 5, 1820. 

III. Jonas Ripley, b Jan. 5, 1815 ; m. R. E. Wa- 

ters and P. Sulling. 

IV. Sarah Adeline^ b. Jan. 5, 1815 ; m. Daniel 

Mead. 
V. Shuhael, b. June 2, 181S; d. July 15, 1819. 
VI. Warren Hastings, b. Dec. 14, 1S20 ; d. Jan. 27, 

1848. 
VII. Nancy, b. Jan. 27. 1827 ; m. James Carson. 



488 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



20 

21 

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22 

23 
24 

25 
26 



27 
28 



(7) 



29 
30 

31 



32 



33 
34 
35 

36 



IX. t/awe jK, b. July 29, 1S30; m. Lucius R. Al- 
len. 
X. Boswell, b. Sept. 7, 1833 ; d. Jan. i, 1834. 



Theophilus Stickney m. Euta Cook ; r. Rodman, 
N. Y. ; d. Feb. 14, 1842, a. 52. 

I. Charlotte^ b. Aug. 14, 181 7; m. Edwin P. In- 

galls. 

II. JElmira^ b. Nov. 29, 1819 ; m. David Cady. 

III. Orriyi Cook^ b. Sept. 25, 1822 ; d. March 26, 

1S23. 

IV. Oringe H.^ b. June 28, 1824; d. July 4, 1824. 
V. Mary Ji., h. Aug. 23, 1826 ; m. Constant Wood- 

ard. 
VI. Chloe A., b. Nov. i, 1S29 ; m. Asaph Hall. 
VII. HiUh C, b. Dec. 3, 1833 ' "''• Benjamin F. 
Woodard. 

Barzilli Stickney m. Sarah Perham, of Athens, 
Vt. ; r. Brookline, Vt. 

I. Nancy P. J3I, b. Aug. 19, 1830; d. 1839. 

II. Warren jB., b. Dec. 2, 1837 ; m. Olive B. 

Darling. 

III. Charles P., b. Oct. 10, 1840; m. Martha F. 

Gorham. 

Simon Stickney, first white child b. in Jaftrey, son 
of Moses and Abigail Hale Stickney, was b. Dec. 9, 
1753 ; m. Zerviah, dau. of Elijah Rice, Dec. 12, i77^- 
She was b. Aug. 6, 1760. He settled first in Holden, 
Mass. ; was a private in Capt. James Davis's company. 
Col. Doolittle's regiment, at the battle of Lexington. 
He afterwards re. to New Haven, Vt., and d. in 1791. 

I. Setsey^i m. Rufus Chafty ; r. Athens, Vt. Five 
children. 

II. Lettuce, m. Daniel Griswold ; re. to New York 

state. 

III. Abigail, m. Thomas Brown ; r. Maine ; six 

children. 

Samuel Stickney, b. in Rowley, Mass., May 25, 
1736, m. Nane Wilson, of Haverhill, Mass., who d. 



37 

38 

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41 
42 

43 

44 

45 
46 

47 



(37) 



48 

49 

50 
51 

52 

(47) 



53 

54 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 489 

April 14, 1815 ; r. Haverliill, Andover, Leominster, 
and Jaffrey, where he r. thirty years ; then re. to Dub- 
lin, and from thence to Windsor, Vt., where he died 
March 20, 1829. His last tax in Jaffrey was in 1802. 
Eleven children. 

I. Moses, b. Jan. 31, 1759. 

II. Eunice^ b. Oct. 11, 1761 ; m. Ebenezer Thomp- 
son. 

III. Jonathan, \). Feb. 14, 1764; unm. 

IV. Mary, b. March 28, 1766 ; m. ; d. Feb. 4, 1824. 
V. Susannah, b. July 23, 1768; m. 

VI. Sally, b. July 8, 1770; m. Nath. Cummings, of 

Westford. 
VII. Phebe,h. April 23, 1773; m. 
VIII. Hitty, b. April 23, 1775 : m. 
IX. Samuel, b. May 16, 1777 ; m. ; re. to Maine. 
X. William, b. Feb. 28, 1779; d. Nov. 7, 1821 ; 

unm. 
XI. Jeremiah, b. Feb. 4, 1781 ; m. Esther Meeds, 
Feb. 20, i8o6.-|- 



MosES Stickney m. Mary Bailey, of Andover, Dec. 
9, 1786; r. in Jaffrey till 1792, when he re. to Litch- 
field, Herkimer county, N. Y. In 18 10 he re. to Sara- 
toga Springs, where for two years he kept the principal 
hotel. In March, 181 2, he bought a farm in Northum- 
berland, and d. there Feb. 5, 1838, a. 79. 

I. Moses, b. in Jaffrey, Feb. 23, 1788; m. Hannah 

Rice. 
II. Mary, b. Aug. 5, 1790, at Jaffrey; m. Philip 
Hodges. 

III. Samuel, b. Oct. 13, 1796; d. 1798. 

IV. Jeremiah, twin, m. Sarah J. Steele. 

V. Erastus B., b. Aug. 23, 1800; m. L. Lawrence. 



Jeremiah Stickney m. Esther, dau. of Joseph and 
Meeds, of Jaffrey. In 1808 he re. to Northum- 



berland, N. Y. ; from thence to Hope, Hamilton coun- 
ty, where his wife d. April, 1835. He d. in Lima 
Adams county, 111., Sept. 26, 1839. Five children: 

I. Jonathan, d. unm. 
II. David, b. Feb. 27, 1807. 



490 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



55 
56 

57 



58 



59 
60 

61 

62 

63 

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III. Nancy Jane, b. June 15, iSii ; m. 1S33. 

IV. Joseph Meeds, b. June 26, 1817 ; m. 
V. Alonzo, b. Oct. 5, 1S19 ; m. 



Lemuel Stickney, b. in Boxford, Feb. 7, 1745, m. 
Rebecca Kimball, Nov. 16, 1769, of Andover, Mass. 
He was a Revolutionary soldier, and is said to have 
been in the battle of Bunker Hill. He lived in Derry, 
Pembroke, and Jaffrey ; re. to Berlin, Vt., in 1791. He 
d. May 10, 1S24. Eight children : 

I. Phebeh. Feb. 29, 1770; m. John Wallace; r. 

Thornton, N. H. 

II. Hannah, b. Dec. 24, 1773; m. Joseph Fierce, 

1797. 

III. Isaac, b. March 31, 1778; m. Hannah Smith, 

1815. 

IV. Rebecca, b. May 18, 17S1 ; m. Moses Batchel- 

der. 
V. Polly, b. June 16, 1783; m. Safford Cum- 

mings. 
VI. Lucy JV., b. April 28, 1787 ; d. 1791. 
VII. Lemuel, b. in Jaflrey, April 8, 1790; m. Mary 

Dodge ; r. Berlin, Vt. 
viii. Lucy, b. July i, 1792 ; m. Asa Hyde, 181 2. 



Amos Stickney, b. at Boxford, June 19, 1749, m. 
Elizabeth Thomas ; re. to Jaflrey and settled on lot 17, 
range 8, previous to 1793. He was a carpenter and 
joiner by trade, and held the commission of lieutenant 
in the militia. 

I. Amos, m. Vina Amsdale ; re. to Pa. 
II. John, m. Phebe Gregg ; r. in Rindge and Rox- 
bury. 

III. Hannah, r. in Unity. 

IV. Clarissa m. Daniel Newell. 

V. Rebecca m. Warner Butters ; r. in Antrim. 



STONE FAMILY. 

John Stone came from Leominster, Mass. ; m. Lydia 
Byam, of Templeton. She was b. Oct., 1760 ; d. April 
20, 1849. -^^ ^- Nov., 1813, a. 62. Re. to Dublin in 
1792. 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 49 1 

I. Lydxa^ b. Oct. 10, 1779 ; m. William Robbins ; 

r. Landgrove, Vt. 
II. Samuel^ b. Oct. 3, 17S1 ; d. 

III. John^ b. Nov. 16, 1783; m. Lucy Colbum ; d. 

1851 ; r. Nelson. 

IV. Oliver, b. Dec. 20, 1786 ; m. Charlotte Kittridge, 

of Nelson. 
V. Samuel, b. June 15, 1790; m. Alona More; d. 

Aug. 15, 1832. 
VI. Silas, b, Sept. 12, 1792; d. 1813. 
VII. JBetsey, b. Oct. 11, 1794; m. Calvin Hastings; 

d. June 13, 1832. 
VIII. Asa, h. March 14, 1796; d. 1803. 

IX. Asenath, b. Oct. 6, 1799; m. Silas Stone, of 

Dublin. 

X. Eunice, b. Dec. 28, 1802 ; d. Dec, 181 1. 
XI, Asa, b. Oct., 1807 ; d. Nov., 181 1. 



John Stone came from Swanzey to Jaffrey in 1799 ; 
paid taxes that year ; was a blacksmith by trade, and 
carried on the business at the Spring village. He w^as 
an active business man ; was captain of the Jaffrey and 
Rindge cavalry company. He m. Ruth Perkins. He 
d. May 3, 1853, a. 76. She d. Sept. 7, 1863, a. 81. 



Nathan Stone was in Jaffrey in 1850. From the 
census taken that year, we find his age to be 31 yrs ; 
and his wife, Mary L., a. 28; both b. in New Hamp- 
shire ; and children, — Albert G., a. 7, Flora E., a. 4, 
and Mary L., a. 2 ; paid taxes in 1846 to 185 1, inclu- 
sive. 



Joel Stone, a blacksmith, paid taxes in iS27-'8. 



16 I Jonas S. Stone paid taxes in i85i-'2-'3. 

STRATTON FAMILY. 
The name of Stratton appears on the town records in 1780. 

Ebenezer Stratton was b. in Rutland, Mass., 
Nov. 2, 1751 ; was chosen auditor of accounts in 1780; 



492 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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highway surveyor in 178 1. In 17S4 he re. to Rindge ; 
became a man of distinction there; was many years a 
selectman, and an active member of the Baptist church. 
He m. Tabitha Davis, who d. Feb. 13, 1851. He d. 
March 27, 1837, a. 86. Children : 

I. Ehenezer^ b. in Princeton, July 15, 1778; d. 

Oct. 8, 1785. 
II. Asa, b. in Jaffrey, July 25, 1778 : r. in Ashby. 

III. Josiah, b. in Jaffrey, Feb. 24, 1781 ; m. Hepsi- 

bah Earl ; d. Nov. 30, i8=;6. 

IV, Tabitha, b. in Jaffrey, March 18, 1783 ; d. Oct. 

II, 1786. 
V. Folly, b. in Rindge, May 4, 1785 ; d. May 20, 

1857- 
VI. Ebenezer, b. March 12, 1787; m. Betsey Hil- 

dreth ; d. Jan. 4, 1864. 
VII. Raymond, b. April 6, 1790 ; r. in New Ipswich. 
VIII. Tabitha, b. June 22, 1792. 
IX. Samuel, b. April 12, 1795 ; m. Louisa Gilson ; 

d. Aug. 21, 1840. 



David Stratton, a brother of Ebenezer, was b. in 
Rutland, Mass., April 20, 1756; came to Jaffrey, and 
settled on lot — , range — . He m. Polly Leland, who 
d. April 3, 1846, a. 79. He d. March 8, 1837, ^- 79- 

I, Sam,uel, b. 1787 ; m., i^', Sally Gilmore ; m., 2^, 

Abigail Fife.-|- 
II. Isaac, b. 1789; m. Betsey Bailey. 

III. Nathan m. Susan Carter. 

IV. Jabez. 

V. Polly, b. 1797 ; m. John Towns. 



Samuel Stratton m. Sally, dau. of David and 
Mary (Mower) Gilmore. She d. Jan. 2, 1822, a. 25. 
M., 2*^, Oct. 12, 1823, Abigail, dau. of John and Sarah 
(Seward) Fife, by whom he had seven children. He 
d. Feb. 20, 1S47, a. 60. 

I. George Washington, b. May 6, 1824. 
II. Sam,uel Augustus, b. Sept. 5, 1826. 

III. Sarah Ann, b. Oct. 25, 1827 ; m. Charles A. 

Chadwick. 

IV. Mary Abbie, b. July 25, 1829 ; d. July 25, 1834. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 493 

21 V. Martha Ward, b. Sept. 15, 1832 ; d. July 7, 
1834. 

22 VI. Julius, b. July i, 1839 > ^^' -^"S- ^1 i^^^- It's 

23 VII. Julia, b. July i, 1839. ) 



(13) Isaac Stratton m. Betsey, dau. of Isaac and Bet- 
sey (Wheelock) Bailey, who d, April 9, 1873, a. 85. 
Children : 

24 I. Jonathan W., h. March 3, 1814 ; m. Edna Par- 
ker, of Nelson. 

25 II. Mar]/ Elizabeth, b. May 25, 1816 ; m. Wm. P. 
Stevens. 

26 III. Elvira, b. Aug. 8, 1818 ; m. Dea. Richard 
Spaulding. 

27 IV. Charles, b. 1821 ; m. ; r. Cambridge, Mass. 

28 V. Lucinda, b. Aug. 24, 1823 ; m. Benjamin 
Pierce. 

29 VI. Isaac Bailey, b. April 14, 1828; drowned Jan. 
4, 1853, at Yuba, Cal. 

STUART FAMILY. 

Joseph Stuart came from Leominster, Mass., and 

settled in JaftVey at an early date. He m. Beatrix , 

and d. May 5, 181 1, a. 54. His widow m., 2*^, Samuel 
S. Parker, of Mason, Nov. 3, 1813. They had nine 
children : 



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I. A71 infant, d. Sept. 3, 1783. 
II. Joseph, b. Jan. 2, 1785. 

III. Benjamin d. Aug. 2, 1790, a. 3 mos., 17 dys. 

IV. Elijah d. Aug. 5, 1790, a. 3 mos, 20 dys. 

(twin). 
V. Benjamin, b. April i, 1791 ; m. Susan Thomp- 
son, Dec. 23, 1812. 
VI. Prudence, b. Jan. 31, 1793. 
VII. Polly, b. March 10, 1795. 
VIII. Elijah, b. March 3, 1797. 
IX. John, b. July 20, 1801. 



Simpson Stuart, an early settler, was I'oad surveyor 
in 1787 ; settled on lot 15, range 4, now owned by John 

Quinn. His last tax was in i795 ! ti- Hannah , 

and left a birth record of five children : 



494 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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I. Ephraim H.^ b. Jan. 2, 1781 ; d. Nov. 7, 17S3. 
II. William^ b. May 17, 17S3. 

III. Ephraim H.^ b. April 13, 17S5. 

IV. Betsey^ b. Jan. 5, 17S8. 
V. Luther, b. Jan. 6, 1790. 



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TAYLOR FAMILY. 

Jonathan and Arthur Taylor were early settlers 
in Jaftrey. Jonathan was highway surveyor in 1780, 
field-driver in 1784, and a soldier in the Revolution. 
He settled on lot 3, range 5, now owned by John W. 
Mann. j\L, 1789, Joanna Lacy. 

Arthur Taylor was a resident of the town in 1780; 
settled on lot 18, range 8 ; m. Rebecca Wilder, who d. 
June 23, 1848, a. 78. He d. Feb. 26, 1826, a. 67. Nine 
children : 

I. Arthur, h. Nov. i, 1788; m. Nancy 



had one child, — Eliza, d. July 29, 1838, a. 
eight months. In 1856 he re. to Springfield, 
Vt., and d. March 22, 1868, a. 79 years, 5 
months. 
II. Susanna, h. Sept. 22, 1789- 

III. Rebecca, b. Nov. 18, 1791. 

IV. Caleb, b. Dec. 27, 1793 ; d. at Springfield, unm., 

Oct. 6, 1871. 
V. Mary, b. March 7, 1796. 
VI. EUas, b. Dec. 7, 1797; ^^^^ ^^^ '" J^ffi'^y? 

1848.+ 
VII. Josepjh Wilder, h. Sept. 14, 1801 ; d. Feb., 

1802. 
VIII. Samuel, b. May 5, 1803 ; d. Aug. 15, 1803. 
IX. Luke, b. March 17, 1804; d. in Springfield, 
Vt., Feb. 13, 1873. 



Elias Taylor m. Abigail Brooks Bullard, of Mason. 

I. Mary A7in, b. Dec. 23, 183 1. 
II. Ellen M., b. July 22, 1834. 

III. An7ia A., K . , t ^ o r 

IV. Abba J., ] t^^"^' ^' J""^ 2^' ^^36. 
V. George H. B., b. March 21, 1842. 

VI. Frances, b. May 3, 1845. 
VII. Emma Isabel, b. May 25, 1S47. 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 495 

Nathaniel Taylor was taxed in 1793. 
Phineas Taylor, taxed from 1793 to 1800 inclusive. 
Aaron and Jacob Taylor warned from town 1784. 
Aaron Taylor m. Hannah Dunlap, 17S4. 



TENNEY FAMILY. 

Amos Tenney came to Jaffrey about 1809. He was 
a shoemaker by trade. In 1817 he opened a store at 
JafiVey village, now East Jaftrey, and continued in trade 
till 1S23, when he left town. He m. and left a birth 
record of four children : 

I. Amos e/"., b, July 31, 1808. 

II. Benjamin JB.^ b. June 27, 18 10; d. May 6, 
1813. 

III. Lucy A., b. Oct. 26, 1812. 

IV. Eveline E.^ b. Dec. 16, 1814. 



Rev. Leonard Tenney was settled as a colleague 
of the Rev. Laban Ainsworth in 1845, and held that 
position till 1857, when he re. to Thetford, Vt. He 
m. Melvina Barker. 

Alice i., b. Nov. 22, 1846. 
William., b. June 17, 1849. 



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THOMPSON FAMILY. 

William Thompson came from Rindge to Jaftrey 
about 1778 ; m. Dorcas , and had three children : 

I. William, b. May 30, 1774; m., and d. in 1800. 
II. Tim,othy, b. in Rindge, Jan. 13, 1777. 
III. Dorcas, b. in Jaftrey, July i, 1779. 



Ebenezer Thompson was in Jaftrey about 1781. He 

settled on lot 5, range 5 ; m. Rachel , and had a 

son, — Henry. 



496 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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Henry Thompson, b. March 28, 17S2, settled on the 
homestead, and m. Betsey, dau. of Ebenezer and Esther 
Jaquith. He d. Feb. 18, 1837, ^- 55- ^^^ widow d. 
March 3, 1840. 

I. Betsey^ b. May 9, 1807. 
II. Nahhy^ b. Dec. 31, 1808; d. Aug. 27, 1814. 

III. Machel, b, Aug. 24, 1810; d. June 23, 1836. 

IV. Hannah^ b. March 10, 1812; d. June 23, 1836. 
V. Aphia, b. Oct. 23, 1813 ; m., Oct. 18, 1836, 

Avery Jones, of Billerica, Mass. 
VI. Abel, b. Dec. 13, 1815.-)- 
VII. Mispian, b. July 22, 1818. 
VIII. Cyrus, b. April 22, 1820. 



Abel Thompson settled on the homestead and m., 
i^', Lois Fassett, dau. of Joseph and Tabitha (Wright) 
Fassett, who d. Oct. 7, 1846 ; m., 2^, Fassett. 

I. Elhridge J., b. Aug. 10, 1842 ; d. Sept. 27, 

1842. 
II. Alfred J., b. Jan., 1844. 

III. Henry A., twin, b. Jan., 1844; lost his arm in 

the battle of the Wilderness. 

IV. Loren «/!, b. Aug., 1846. 

Isaac Thompson was chosen field-driver in i777- 

Asa Thompson lived west of the mountain ; taxed 
from 1793 to 1818 inclusive; m. Fletcher. 

Asa Thompson, Jr., m. Sophia Cooledge, Dec. 10, 
1813. 



THORNDIKE FAMILY. 

Joseph Thorndike came from Beverly, Mass., and 
settled in Jafirey, on lot 12, range 3, about 1774. The 
first settler on that lot was Robert Holmes, from Lon- 
donderry, and it is now known as the Conant farm, the 
former residence of John Conant, Esq. He was a man 
of wealth and influence, a prominent leader in town af- 
fairs, represented the town in the state legislature, and 
was for many years justice of the peace. In addition 
to his farm, he built a store in the centre of the town, 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 497 

and was for many years engaged in trade. He m., i^', 

Sarah , who d. July 10, 1794. a. 45 ; m., 2^^, Mrs. 

Lydia Blanchard, of Cambridgeport, who survived him. 
He d. June 25, 1S14, a. 65. 

I. Joseph^ on the tax-list 1795, '96. 
II. Andrew^ b. March 19, 177S; m. Mary Bixby, 
of Dublin ; re. to Livermore, Me., where 
she d. Nov. 3, 1833. 

III. Nancy d. of small-pox, 1792. 

IV. Henry, b. 1781 ; graduated at Dartmouth col- 

lege, 1809. 

V. Mary m. Dr. Luke Lincoln; one child; d. in 

Jaftrey, 1S04. 

VI. Sally m. Dr. Abner Howe, q. v. 

VII. L^ike (captain of a vessel) d. in the West In- 
dies. 
VIII. Timothy. 
IX. Israel re. to Ohio. 
X. Mercy. 



Joshua Thorndike, a relative of Joseph, m. Rebec- 
ca ; had one son, Jonathan, b. 17S1, whose last 

tax in town was in 1S05. His wife Rebecca d. in 1823. 
He d. in 1825. He was a man highly respected for his 
honesty and integrity. His wife, equally meritorious, 
was beloved by all. 



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TILTON FAMILY. 

John Tilton (Capt.) came from East Sudbury, 
Mass., with his son Joseph, and settled in the south-west 
part of Jaftrey about 1802 ; paid taxes that year, and 
was a resident of the town till 181 2. John, his son, 
paid taxes in 1804; last tax in 1810. 



Ephraim Tilton, first tax was in 1810, last tax in 
1819. 

Joseph Tilton was b. in 1779 ; m. Abigail Brooks, 
dau. of Joseph Brooks, of Jaftrey. He re. from Jaftrey 
to Michigan, and purchased a farm near Coldwater, 
where he d. Nov. 26, 1838. His wife d. July 10, 1S64. 
They had nine ch., five b. in Jaftrey : 

33 



498 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



I. William TF!, b. July 31, 1803 ; was twice m. ; 

r. Tecumseh, Mich. 
II. Joseph J3.^ b. Nov. 15, 1804. 

7 III. Elhridge Gerry, b. April 4, 1S06. 

8 IV. Abigail Brooks, b. Feb. 12, iSoS. 
V. Mary Nichols, b. March 12, iSio. 



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TURNER FAMILY. 

Joseph Turner, son of Joseph and Rachel Turner, 
was b. in Ireland, and emigrated to this country with 
his parents and two brothers, Thomas and William. 
Thomas settled in Peterborough, and Joseph and Will- 
iam in JaftVey. His parents died in Peterborough. 
Joseph, Sen'r, died June 10, 17S3, a. 77. Rachel, his 
wife, d. Dec. 23, 17S7, a. 87. Joseph, Jr., settled on lot 
21, range i, now uninhabited, and m. Mary Scott, July 
21, 1760. He was a selectman in 1776; constable in 
1780; d. about 1 791. She d. 1813. 

I. James, b. July 25, 1761 ; m. Betsey Davidson. 
II. 3Iargaret, b. Oct. 25, 1762 ; d. 

III. Machel, b. Dec. 10, 1764; m. Samuel Sanders, 

q. V. 

IV. Elizabeth, b. July 17, 1766; m. Chapin. 

V. Jean, b. May, 176S ; m. Albro ; r. N. Y. 

VI. Mary, b. April 15, 1770; m. Moore; r. 

Maine. 

VII. Sarah, b. Feb. 24, 1772; m. Wm. Robbe ; r. 

N. Y. 

VIII. Agnes, b. Nov., 1773 ; m. John Davidson, Jr. 
IX. Milla, b. Sept. 5, 1775 ; d. 

X. David, b. May 2, 1777 ; r. N. Y. ) . 
XI. Joseph, b. May 2, 1777 ! i- N- Y. i 

XII. John, b. Jan. 27, 1779 ; r. Bolton, N. Y. 

XIII. Milla, b. April 5, 1781 ; m. Mathew Mitchell; 

sixteen ch. 

XIV. Lydia, b. June i, 1782 ; m. James Wilder. 
XV. Susannah, b. May 12, 1784 ; m. Joseph Wilder. 

XVI. Joanna, b. May 14, 1786; m. Simpson W^ilder. 



William Turner (Lieut.), a brother of Joseph, was 
one of the earliest settlers of Jaftrey ; settled on lot 16, 
range 5. He was one of the prominent men ; held 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 499 

many offices of trust, and was an officer in the Revolu- 
tion. He m. Jane, dau. of Mathew Wriglit, and d. Jan. 
5, 1799, a. 60. She d. Feb. 15, 1833, a. 82. 

I. Sarahs b. 1766 ; m. Jacob Baldwin, q. v. 
II. Rachel^ b. Sept. 30, 1769; m. Moses Cutter, 
q. V. 

III. Mary, b. 1770 ; m. Oliver Jewett, q. v. 

IV. Jane, b, 1773 ; m. Jonas Nutting, q. v. 



John Turner, son of Thomas and Jenny (McCoy) 
Turner, b. at Peterborough, Sept. 9, 1763; m., June 
10, 1803, Mary Davis, b. in New Ipswich, June 3, 
1769 ; settled in Jaffi-ey, on lot 21, range 4, about 1803. 
He d. May 22, 1844. His wife d. Nov. 29, 1836. 

I. Sarah, b. Sept. 22, 1S04; m., April 24, 1834, 

H. VV. Green, of Merrimack, N. H. 
II. Jonathan D., b. March 15, 1806; m.-j- 

III. John, b. March 5, 1809; ^' F^^- n? 1810. 

IV. Rachel, b. Nov. 18, 181 1; m., Oct., 1840, 

Orford Capron, q. v. 



Jonathan D. Turner m. Cynthia E. Ames, of Swan- 

zey, Sept. 18, 1834 ' ^- o" ^"^^ homestead till , when 

he re. to East Jaffi-ey, where he now I'esides. 

I. Henry Alanson, b. May 5, 1837 '■> ^-"h 
II. Sarah M., b, Aug. 19, 1839; ^'"* Greenville 
Shedd ; three ch. 

III. Henry A., b. May 12, 1841. 

IV. Clara A., b. April 27, 1847 ; m. Sydney Reed ; 

one ch. 
V. Julia R., b. June 15, 1850; m. Frank H. Co- 
burn ; one ch. 



Henry A. Turner m., Dec. 6, 1865, Lucy A, Rob- 
bins, dau. of Harvey Robbins ; r. East Jaffiey. He is an 
active business man, and chairman (1877) °^ *-^^^ board 
of selectmen. 

I. Ijucy X., b. 1867. 
II. JBmnice JB., h. 1869. 



500 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

35 Solomon Turner, an early settler on lot 17, range 

6, was highway surveyor in 1776; re. to New York 
state. 



36 Nathaniel Turner came to Jaftrey from Rindge in 

1772 ; settled in school district No. 5, on lot 2, range 8 ; 
was in town in 1774- 



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TUFTS FAMILY. 

Cotton Tufts came to Jaftrey in 1816; was taxed 
that year ; was a cabinet-maker by trade. In 1828 he 
re. to New Ipswich, and afterwards to Warsaw, 111., 
where lie d. He m. Abigail Tarbell, of Mason ; had 
four children : 

1. Henry ^ b. April 18, 1818 ; m., i", Susan Mans- 
field, of New Ipswich, by whom he had two 
ch. ; m., 2^, Lydia Wood, dau. of James 
and Betsey (Jones) Wood, of Mason, by 
whom he had one son ; r. Denver City, 
Col. 
II. Lucius^ b. Feb. 15, 1S21 ; d. unm. 

III. Nancy^ b. Jan. i, 1824; d. Jan. 21, same year. 

IV. ^6i^at7, b. Jan. i, 1824, d.Jan. 28 (twin). 



TWISS FAMILY. 

Daniel Twiss came to Jaftrey, and settled on lot 8, 
range 10. He m. Alice Shedd, who d. Dec. 14, 1843, 
a. 86. He d. Jan. 25, 1824, a. 66. 

2 I. Louis d. .July 11, 1828, a. 45. 

3 II. Hachd, b. 1787; m. Samuel Howe, of Peter- 
borough, May I, 1823; d.Jan. 22, 1852, a. 
65. He d. Sept. 18, 1872, a. 81. Had two 
sons. 

4 III. Daniel, b. April 6, 1788. 

5 IV. Rebecca^ b. June 8, 1790. 

6 V. Nobby, b. March 6, 1792 ; m. Joseph Hardy. 

7 VI. Timothy, b. Feb. 7, 1794; m., i^', Almira , 

who d. Feb. 2, 1820, a. 28; m., 2^, Mary 
Wilder ; d. Feb. 9, 1856. 



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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 5OI 

VII. Luther^ b ]May 14, 1795 ; d. in Tewksbury, 

Mass. 
VIII. Lydia^ b. June 29, 1797 ; d. July 15, 1S75. 
IX. Asenath, b. April 28, 1802. 



UNDERWOOD FAMILY. 

Joseph Underwood was an early resident of Massa- 
chusetts, b. in 1681 ; m. Susannah Parker, b. in 1689 ; 
d. Feb. 18, 1769. He d. Jan. 19, 1761 ; had thirteen 
children : 

I. Joseph, h. March i, 1708 ; d. April 4, 1745, a. 

II. Thomas, b. Oct. 7, 1709; d. Oct. 20, 1732, a. 

23- 

III. Mary, b. Oct. 28, 171 1 ; d. Nov. 26, 1803, a. 

92. 

IV. Elizabeth, b. Feb 3, 1714. 

V. Jonathan, b. Jan. 22, 1716; d. at Marlborough, 

N. H. 
VI. Amy, b. Oct. 16, 1717 ; d. May 23, 1770, a. 53. 
VII. Ruth, b. Jan. 20, 1719; d. Sept. 4, 1775, a. 56. 
VIII. Phineas, b. Jan. 3, 1722; d. Sept 24, 1757, ^• 

35- 
IX. Timothy, b. April 11, 1724. 

X. Susannah, b. Dec. 26, 1725 ; d. Dec. 26, 1729, 

a. 4. 

XI. e/bA/i, b. Sept. 15, 1727 ; d. Jan. 3, 1756,3. 29.-!- 

XII. Bethia, b. Sept. 27, 1729. 

xiii. James, b. Dec. i, 1731. 



John Underwood m. Hannah Wright, dau. of Dea. 
Henry and Esther (Adams) Wright, of Westford, 
Mass. ; settled in Westford ; d. 1756. 

I. Jereme, b. Westford, July 21, 1750.4- 
II. Hannah. 17. iii. A son. iS. iv. John, b. 

1755- 



Jereme Underwood m. Lucy Wheat, b. at Con- 
cord, Mass., July 28, 1750. They were m. at Lincoln, 
Mass., Feb. 17, 1774. In 1777 he re. to JaffVey, and 
settled on lots 8 and 9, range 8, now in possession 



502 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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(20) 



30 



(23) 



of George A. Underwood, his grandson. Mr. Under- 
wood was a distinguished man in town and church 
affairs. When the church was incorporated, in 1780, 
he and his wife were members. He held, from time 
to time, most of the public offices in the gift of the 
town ; was member of the board of selectmen six years, 
five in succession. He was also a lieutenant in the 
military sei'vice and a soldier in the Revolution ; was 
at West Point in 1780, when Arnold sold that impor- 
tant post to the British officers, and being an artificer by 
trade, was ordered by Washington to open the traitor's 
trunk after Arnold's escape to the English lines. At 
the expiration of his term of enlistment he returned to 
Jaftrey, where he spent the remainder of his days at 
work on his farm and at his tiade, as business required. 
He d. Oct. 27, 1827, a. 77. His wife d. June 16, 1S24, 
a. 74. 



I. 

II. 

III. 



Jolm^ b. March 24, 1775 ; d. Oct. 9, 1776. 

John, b. Feb. 16, 1777.+ 

An infant son, h. and d. March 2, 1779. 



IV. Infant daughter, b. and d. April 22, 17S0. 
V. Jerenne, b. Aug. 24, 1 781.4- 

JoHN Underwood m., June 28, 1803, Rachel, dau. 
of Joseph and Rachel (Hobart) Cutter, of Jaffiey. Mr. 
Underwood was a carpenter and joiner, and built the 
first cotton factory, in what is now East Jaftrey, in 1814. 
He was also lieutenant in the state militia. 

Lucy Wheat, b. Sept. 16, 1S05 ; r. 111. 
Myra, b. May 17, 1807 ; d. June 16, 1S46 ; m. 
Johi Curtis, b. Jan. 23, iSio; m., and d. 1S74. 
Rachel Hobart, b. Nov. 12, 181 1 ; d. Aug. 31, 

1829. 
Sabra, b. June 15, 1815 ; m. and d. 
Hohanna, b. Nov. 28, 1817 ; m. and d. 



24 


I. 


25 


II. 


26 


III. 


27 


IV. 


28 


V. 


29 


VI. 



Mr. Underwood m., 
b. Aug. 3, 17S6. He 
frey. His first wife d. 
second wife : 



^, Sophia Morrison, of Lowell, 
d. June 16, 1845 ; buried at Jaf- 



Sept. 21, 1825. Children by 



VII. Joseph M., b. Sept. 10, 1828. 



Jereme Underwood m , Nov. 23, 1S07, Nabby, dau. 
of Daniel and Sarah Gage, of Marlborough, N. H. He 
d. Sept. 14, 1859, ^- yS- She d. June i, 1866, a. 81. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 



503 



31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 
38 

(37) 



39 
40 

41 



II 



III. 



Ai, h. April 26, 1809 ; m. Mary Thing, of 
Waterbury, Me., Sept. 9, i860. He d. 
June 3, 1S67, a. 58. 

Sophia, b. Feb. 19, 181 1 ; m. Rev. Andrew O. 
Warren, May 6, 1840; r. Pa. 

George, h. March 16, 1813 ; killed by an over- 
turning cart, Oct. 24, 1822. 
IV. Sally, b. Sept. 12, 1815 ; m. Seneca Partridge, 

June 9, 1844, of New York city. 
V. 3felissa, b. Dec. 3, 181 7 ; m. Adams Partridge, 
Dec. 25, 1848, of Smithville, N. Y. 

Abby X., b. May 30, 1821 ; m. Isaac N. Bul- 
lard, July 4, 1852, of Montrose, Pa. 

George Augustus, b.Jan. 16, 1824. -j- 



VI 



VII 



VIII. Priscilla Gage, b. Jan. 26, 1826. 



George A. Underwood m., Sept. 9, 1851, Mahala, 
dau. of Ezra and Caroline (Adams) Baker. Mr. Un- 
derwood r. on the homestead of his father and ijrand- 
father ; is an enterprising and thrifty farmer, and one 
of the leading men in town. He was captain of the 
distinguished rifle company, and chief-marshal Centen- 
nial day. 

I. George B., b. Oct. 29, 1854. 
II. Deborah 31., b. March 12, 1S58, m. Daniel C. 

Shattuck, q. v. 
III. Abby A., b. May 9, 1870. 



UPTON FAMILY. 

Peter Upton, son of Jonathan and Nancy (Whitte- 
more) Upton, was b. in Tyngsborough, Mass., Oct. i, 
1816. He came to Jaftrey in October, 1837, ^^^^ ^"" 
tered the store of Hiram Duncan as clerk, in which 
capacity he served until March, 1840, when he was ad- 
mitted by Mr. Duncan into equal partnership, and the 
business conducted under the firm name of Duncan & 
Upton, continuing thus until the death of Mr. Duncan 
in December of the same year. 

This event left the whole business of the concern in 
the hands of Mr. Upton, then l)ut 24 years of age, but 
in addition to taking charge of that, lie settled the es- 
tate of Mr. Duncan, and also completed the settlement 
of one other quite large and complicated estate, which 



504 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



Mr. Duncan had in charge at his decease, accomplish- 
ing this in a manner so satisfactory as to receive the 
hearty approval of all those interested, some of whom 
had had a large experience in such business. 

He continued the store business successfully, under 
the firm name of P. Upton & Co., and in March, 1S47, 
admitted to one fourth interest his brother Eben, who 
had served him as clerk for two years, having previous- 
ly been in the employ of William Lacy, in the store at 
the Centre village. 

In 1S51 the firm name was changed to E. Upton & 
Co., and Charles H. Powers, who had been their clerk 
for two years, was admitted to one fourth interest, the 
business continuing thus until the death of Eben in 
i860. 

Mr Upton settled his brother's estate, and sold out 
his (Eben's) share in the store and his own to Mr. 
Powers and J. L. Bolster in 1861. They continued to- 
gether only one year, when Mr. Powers bought out the 
whole, and has since continued it. 

January 6, 1851, the Monadnock Bank went into 
operation, with a capital of $50,000. Mr. Upton was 
chosen cashier at the beginning, and has held tliat posi- 
tion ever since (December, iSSo), though the st}le of 
the bank was changed in 1865 to the Monadnock Na- 
tional Bank, and the capital increased to $100,000. 

During the early part of its existence the bank suf- 
fered severe losses by the bad management of its first 
president, but, notwithstanding this, the shareholders 
under the old organization received an average annual 
dividend of about seven per cent. 

Mr. Upton, having a large pecuniary interest at stake 
in the success of the bank, gradually assumed almost 
entire control of its aflairs, having for the past quarter 
of a century made all, or nearly all, the loans, during 
which time the losses from ba(l paper will not exceed 
$500, nearly all of that being from forged paper. Since 
1S65 the bank paid dividends of eight per cent, for 
about four years, and ever since then of ten per cent., 
without passing any, and has accumulated a cash sur- 
plus of 25,000, and in addition has lost by fire at least 
$10,000. 

From the beginning, in 185 1, the office was in Mr. 
Upton's house until their first building was completed, 
in November, 1873. This edifice cost about $15,000, 
was conveniently arranged, well built, and nicely fin- 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 505 

ished. It was burned March 21, 1875, together with 
the Granite State hotel. The second building was 
similar to the first, built on the same foundations, and 
cost about $11,000, over and above what was saved of 
the ruins of the other. This, too, was burned, March 
23, 1877, the fire doubtless being the work of an incen- 
diary. Each building was insured for $8,000. 

After being thus tried by fire, it was decided to build 
only large enough for the business of the bank. Accord- 
ingly the old site, with the brick walls still standing and 
the nice hammered stone-work remaining iminjured, 
was sold to Mr. Benj. Pierce, who erected the present 
Granite State hotel thereon. The former hotel site 
was seciu^ed by the bank, and a building erected second 
to none in the state in architectural beauty, convenience 
of arrangement, and elegance of finish. 

All three of these buildings were planned and ar- 
ranged by Mr. Upton, and the contracts made and 
every detail looked after by him, while their whole 
construction received his personal supervision. 

In this connection should be mentioned the Monad- 
nock Savings Bank, which went into operation in Jan- 
uary, 1870. In April following Mr. Upton was chosen 
treasurer, which position he still holds, though he has 
not had the almost exclusive control of its affairs which 
he has had of the other bank. Its deposits have accu- 
mulated in eleven years to about $350,000, and its de- 
positors received up to 1875 an average of six per cent., 
and since that time five per cent., while its losses have 
been small and unimportant. 

During the whole time which Mr. Upton has been in 
town, lie has been actively interested in all public 
measures, and closely identified with every important 
enterprise. He represented the town in the legislatures 
of 1848, '49, and '50. At the first session he obtained 
the charter for the East Jaftrey Fire Engine Co. ; at the 
second, the charter for the Monadnock Railroad ; and at 
the last, for the Monadnock Bank. He served as town 
treasurer during i860 and '6r, declining a reelection in 
'62. He was one of the incorporators of the Monad- 
nock Railroad, of the Monadnock Bank, and later of 
the Monadnock Savings Bank. 

To Mr. Upton and Dr. Bradley, perhaps more than 
to any other two men, is due the credit of pushing 
through om^ railroad. They both devoted a great 
amount of time and labor to this work, beside con- 



5o6 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



tributing liberally to its treasury. The town voted to 
aid the enterprise to the extent of five per cent, of its 
valuation, while our citizens contributed to an amount 
even larger. To the credit of our town, we take pride 
in remembering that the voted aid was all paid prompt- 
ly and willingly, without opposition from any source. 
Mr. Upton was chosen one of the directors of the Mo- 
nadnock Railroad at its first meeting, and still holds 
the position. 

The amount of the five per cent, gratuity voted by the 
town was nearly $35,000, and towards the payment of 
it $30,000 bonds were issued, bearing six per cent, in- 
terest, and Mr. Upton was chosen agent for selling 
them, in which work he was very successful, as he 
placed them all at par, while some other towns were 
selling theirs at less than par. 

Later, in 1S79, when the town had decided to call in 
their then outstanding bonds and re-fund them at a 
lower rate, he got up the new bonds, and sold the 
whole amount, bearing four per cent., at par. 

But in building up and improving the East village 
Mr. Upton has been especially conspicuous. The older 
residents will remember the condition of things in 
1S37. The houses were few, and mostly small, while 
some of the other buildings were, seemingly, located in 
the worst possible manner, among them the old black- 
smith-shop and coal-house on the corner ; the old red 
tin-shop on the common, under the elm ; and the long 
string of old hotel buildings, standing almost in the 
street, and the stable quite. The village school was 
half a mile away, out of sight of every house, and no 
good water nearer than the village ; and there was no 
post-office. There was no "River road" to Peterbor- 
ough, and the only road to Cheshire Factory was down 
the turnpike and over the Bacon hill. The road to 
Rindge was even worse, being outrageously crooked, 
and leading over such eminences as the Tyler, Carter, 
and Davis hills. Mr. Upton was largely instrumental 
in changing these roads to their present locations. 

In 1S43, after man}' unsuccessful efforts in previous 
years by others, the district, at last, voted to move the 
village school, the decision being brought about, large- 
ly, by the personal efforts of Mr. Upton. The building 
then erected is now known as the '' Caldwell house," 
and, while a great improvement over the old one, was 
soon found to be inadequate to the wants of the district, 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 507 

it having been built in a manner very inferior to what 
its friends desired owing to the fierce opposition, 
the whole matter having been finally left to the* select- 
men. In 1853, after a great amount of lively agitation, 
the district passed the vote which resulted in the 
present handsome brick structure — at that time, and 
perhaps now, the best village school-house in the 
country. Mr. Upton was one of the prime movers in 
this matter, and alone was the means of selecting the 
site of the building, undoubtedly the best in the village. 
As a consequence of this location, the town laid out 
and built "School street" for its accommodation, which 
has now grown to be one of the best streets in the 
village. 

Until 1S45 every attempt to establish a post-ofiice at 
East Jaftrey had been defeated by the stubborn opposition 
of interested parties at the Centre village. At length, de- 
termined to get a fair hearing at the post-office depart- 
ment, Mr. Upton and Alonzo Bascom, jointly, paid the 
expenses of an advocate to Washington. This quickly 
decided the case, and the office was at once established, 
and, by a curious mistake of the authorities, the office 
at the Centre was discontinued. This error, however, 
was soon after corrected, and the name of "Factory 
Village" changed to East JafiVey. The administration 
being at that time Democratic, Alonzo Bascom was 
appointed post-master, though the office was kept in 
Mr. Upton's store. To accommodate the public, Mr. 
Upton fitted up a set of post-office boxes — quite an 
innovation at that time, and in marked contrast with 
the dingy old show-case in use at the Centre. In 1849, 
on a change of administration, L. L. Pierce was ap- 
pointed post-master, and the office located in the store 
of Foster & Brown, now owned and occupied by 
J. S. Lacy. A few months later, however, Eben Upton 
was appointed post-master, and the office was returned 
to its first location, where it remained several years, 
until, on another change of administration, Alonzo 
Bascom was a second time appointed, and the office 
removed to his "counting-room." In 1861, at a meet- 
ing of citizens to nominate a suitable candidate for 
recommendation to the department, Mr. Upton was 
chosen, receiving every vote cast but one, and was ac- 
cordingly soon after appointed post-master, which posi- 
tion he still holds. 



5o8 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



The most important village improvement was the 
remodelling of the old hotel in 1859, '^ having been pur- 
chased the previous foil by Mr. N. R. Corning, ot 
Boston. As before stated, the old buildings stood 
almost in the street. Mr. Corning was intending to 
repair them where they stood, but Mr. Upton, fearing 
that they would in that case always remain there, pro- 
posed to Mr. Corning to move them back and enlarge 
them. Accordingly, plans were drawn which provided 
for almost entire new buildings, and required a large 
outlay. A subscription of about $i,Soo was collected 
by Mr. Upton in aid of the enterprise, and, at the 
request of Mr. Corning, he took entire charge of the 
work until finished, and advanced the balance of the 
money necessary for its completion, declining all 
compensation for his services in connection with it, 
considering himself as amply repaid by its improved 
appearance and the business it soon drew to the town, 
making the enterprise, from the start, a complete suc- 
cess, contrary to the predictions of many that " such a 
great house would never pay." " The Granite State 
hotel," thus built, would have been a credit to any town 
in the state, while the business of taking "summer 
boarders" has grown, from that as a beginning, to be 
one of the most important and lucrative occupations in 
which our people are engaged, and has made our town 
quite a popular " resort." This house was burned 
March 31, 1875, as already stated, causing the destruc- 
tion of the Bank block. It was owned and occupied, 
at that time, by Joseph S. Wells, formerly of Keene, 
having cost him, the April previous, about $20,000. 
It was insured for $13,000. The ruins remained undis- 
turbed until the summer of 1877, after the burning of 
the second Bank building, when, chiefly by the eftbrts 
of Mr. Upton, an arrangement was effected by which 
Mr. Benj. Pierce bought the ruins of the bank building, 
and the hotel lot secured for the bank. A subscription 
of about $1,100 was raised by his eftbrts, to aid Mr. 
Pierce in the erection of the present " Granite State 
hotel," and to grade oft' the ground in front of the hotel 
and bank into a common, extending the whole distance 
from School street to North street, forming as fine a 
square as any village can boast. This arrangement of 
the buildings and common was brought about princi- 
pally by the active eftbrts of Mr. Upton, and to him are 
the people doubtless indebted a second time, in great 



2 
> 

r 
o 

> 
2; 



v. 



> 







GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 509 

measure, for a fine hotel. During the whole time, over 
forty-three years, that Mr. Upton has been in town, he 
has never lost a whole day from business by sickness, 
and even now retains his vigor and activity very little 
impaired, though, of necessity, showing some evidences 
of approaching age. He was m., in Townsend, Mass., 
by Rev. Stillman Clarke, June 28, 1S53, to Sarah Miller 
Duncan, b. July 8, 1S33, dan. of Hiram and Emeline 
(Cutter) Duncan, oif East Jaffrey, N. H. Their ch., 
all b. in East Jatlrey, are, — 

I. Mary Adelaide^ b. Nov. 4, 1S56; m., Dec. 25, 

1878, Walter L. Goodnow, son of William 
E. and Abigail (Beaman) Goodnow. They 
have one child, — Jessie Emeline, b. Nov. 
10, 1879. 

II. Hiram Duncan^ b. May 5, 1859, '^^ Oct. 14, 

1879, Annie E., dau. of Dr. Marshall and 
Harriet A. (Fiske) Perkins, of Marlow, 
N. H. He graduated from Dartmouth col- 
lege in June, 1879. 

III. Alice W hittemore, h. July 5, 1863. 



Ebenezer Upton, son of Jonathan and Nancy 
(Whittemore) Upton, was b. in Tyngsborough, Mass., 
March 17, 1819. He came to JaftVey in 1843, as a 
clerk in the store of V\'illiam Lacy, where he remained 
a year or more, when he became a clerk in the store of 
his brother Peter in East JaftVey, remaining in this 
capacity till 1S47, when he became a partner with his 
brother, remaining such as long as he lived. He was 
post-master under the administration of Gen. Taylor, 
and town treasurer at the time of his death, June 25, 
i860. He m., i"*', Paulina Cutter Rice, dau. of Laban 
and Esther (Cutter) Rice, Dec. 26, 1850, by Rev. Still- 
man Clarke. She d. Jan. 15, 1857. M., 2^, by Rev. 
E. W. Coffin, Eliza (Smith) Perkins, widow of Dr. R. 
R. Perkins, and dau. of Samuel and Elizabeth (Burt) 
Smith, of Winchendon, Mass., b. in Barre, Mass., Oct. 
7, 1826. Children : 

I. Paulina Cutter^ b. Jan. 15, 1857; d. Aug. 15, 
1857- 
By second wife : 

11. Frank Burt., b. March 7, 1859. 



510 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



lO 
II 

12 



13 



14 



William Upton, third son of Thomas Upton, of 
Peterborough, a descendant of John Upton, the emi- 
grant, was b. Dec. 31, 1792 ; m. Mary, dau. of James 
Taggart, of Sharon : settled in Jaflrey, on lot 22, range 
5 ; was the owner of a farm and saw-mill, where his 
son William now lives; d. June 2, 1S62. She d. June 
17, 1S67, a. 73. 

I. William, b. June 7, 1S20 ; m. Sally Upton, dau. 
of Jacob Upton. One child, — James, b. 
Nov. 28, 1S5S. She d. Nov. 16, 1874. 
II. Mari/ Ann, b. Oct. 24, 1829 ; m. Luke H. Nut- 

tinj^-, q. V. 
III. Priscilla M., b. Nov. 23, 1837 ; m. Charles Cor- 
ser ; r. Fitchburg. 

Thomas Upton, son of Eli, a brother of William, b. 
Aug. 31, I Si 8, in Peterborough ; m., i'*, Nov. 14, 1839, 
Marietta, dau. of Abel and Mary (Spaulding) Cutter, 
who d. Feb. 16, 1857, ^- 37 ! ^1 '^^1 J^'^Y Hi ^^57, 
Lucinda Sophia, dau. of Salmon Allen, of Rindge. 

I. Lucius, b. May 19, 1843 ; enlisted in the 44th 

Mass. Regt. ; afterwards in the i6th Mass. 
Batter}' ; d. at Washington, D. C, Aug. 7, 
1S64. 

II. Adelia Par Jeer, b. Jan. 14, 1847. 



VERDER FAMILY. 



3 

4 
5 

6 

7 



John Verder, b. iSoo, m. Sarah Smith, b. 1807. 
Six children : 

I. Sarah J., h. 1826; m. John B. Shedd. One 
child, — Frank E., b. 1867; a graduate of 
Dartmouth college. 

II. tTohti R., b. 1828. 

III. Mary C, b. 1830. 

IV. Albert S., b. 1831 ; m. Priscilla ; b. 

1 83 1. One child,— Sofy A., b. 1868. 
V. Myra J., b. 1834. 

VI. Charles W.,h. 1838; m. Sarah E. , b. 

1831. 



3 

4 

5 
6 



lO 

II 



12 
13 



H 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 5II 

WAKEFIELD FAMILY. 

Thomas Wakefield, b. in Reading, Mass., Jan. 12, 
1751- He was a descendant of Joseph Wakefield, of 
Welch descent, and a resident of Boston in ly^y* He 
m,, in 1772, Elizabeth Hardy, of HoUis ; settled in Am- 
herst, and in 1778 re. to Dublin, and in 1808 to Jaflrey. 
He paid taxes from 180S to 181 2, inclusive. He d. in 
1839. His wife d. in 1832. 

I. Thomas^ b. Aug., 1773 ; m., 1S05, Olive Hart; 

re. to Maine. 
II. Othaniel^ b. April 25, 1775 ; d. Sept. 5, 1800, 
in Seneca, N. Y. 

III. Betsey^ b. March, 1777; m., 1S02, Timothy 

Wakefield, of Reading, and d. 1S48. 

IV. Cyrus^ b. Sept. 16, 1779; m., 1803, Sally Ma- 

son ; d. 1810. 
V. James, b. Sept. 9, 1782; m. Oct. 11, 1S03, 
Hannah Hemmingway ; re. to Roxbury. 
His son Cyrus, b. in 181 1, by his own efforts 
in business rose from obscurity, built a 
large rattan manufactory in South Reading, 
accumulated a large estate, and was held in 
such high esteem by his fellow-citizens that 
the name of South Reading was, to his 
honor, changed to Wakefield. 
VI. Abigail, h. June 3, 1784; m. Jan., 1807, Rev. 
Amos Fetingal ; re. to Champlain, N. Y. ; 
d. 1810. 

VII. Petei\ b. April 16, 1786; m., 1809, Esther 
Whitcomb ; re. to N. Y. state. 

VIII. Martha, h. April, 1788; m., 1810, Rev. Peter 
Sanborn, Reading, Mass. ; d. 1849. 

IX. Dorcas, b. March 11, 1790; m. Horace Rudd ; 

re. to Ohio. 
X. Joseph, b. July 7, 1792; m. Sarah Sawyer, 
1813 ; re. to Ohio ; d. 1828. 



Amasa Wakefield was a resident of Jaffrey from 
1813 to about 1819 ; m., and had a son, George. 



Peter Wakefield was taxed in 1S08. 



512 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



WARREN FAMILY. 



2 

3 
4 



(2) 



7 
8 



Peter and Simon Warren were residents of the 
town when organized, in 1773, or soon after. In i775 
Peter Warren was chosen a member of the board of 
selectmen, and clerk of the military company organized 
that year. 

Simon came from Littleton, Mass., to Jaffrey, and 
settled on lot 6, range 8. He was b. Nov. 21, 1750 ; m. 
Martha Harper, b. in Harvard, Mass., Sept. 11, i749' 
He was in service as teamster during the Revolutionary 
war. He d. Nov. 22, 1803. His widow d. Aug. 2, 
1825, a. 76. Children: 

I. Oliver, h. April 26, 1776; re. to McDonough, 

N. Y., 1838.-I- 
II. John^ b. Sept. 3, 1779 ; r. in Brookline, Mass. ; 
had five ch. 

III. Simon, b. Nov. 7, 1781 ; m. Dolly, dau. of 

Caleb Brown. He was a saddle- and harness- 
maker ; re. to Chesterfield, and from thence 
to Woodstock, Vt., where he d. 

IV. Martha, b. June 8, 1788 ; m. Boynton ; re. 

to Stow, Vt., and d. there. 



Oliver Warren m., Sept. 17, 1801, Abiah Stanley, 
dau. of Jonathan and Lois (Moore) Stanley. He was 
an active business man ; was a farmer and a stone-cut- 
ter ; built the granite mansion-house of Jonas M. Mell- 
ville, Esq., now the summer residence of the Hon. 
Leonard R. Cutter, of Boston. In the war of 1812, he 
held the commission of captain, and when the rifle 
company was organized, in 1814, he was chosen first in 
command. In the spring of 1838 he re. to McDonough, 
N. Y., and d. April 12, 1842, a. 66. Children: 

I. Abiah Stanley^ b. May 11, 1805 ; m. Wm. Hil- 
ler, of McDonough, N. Y., May 18, 1842 ; 
d. Nov., 1863. They had two ch., — Phebe 
A., and Josephine. 

II. Almeda Lois^ b. Sept. 16, 1811 ; d. Oct. 8, 1811. 

III. Andrew Oliver, b. June 5, 181 7. He qualified 
himself for the study of a profession at Mell- 
ville academy, and commenced the study of 
divinity in 1838, with Rev. J. V. Wilson, 
of JaflVey, and completed it with Rev. 



lO 

II 

12 
13 



16 

17 
18 

19 
20 

21 

22 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 513 

Charles Woodhouse, of Westmoreland, N. 
H., in 1S40. He was first located at McDon- 
ough, Upper Lisle, and Smithville, N. Y., 
and in 1849 at Montrose, Pa. In 1S60 he 
commenced the study of law, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Susquehanna county 
court in 1862, and to the supreme court in 
1865, and has been successfully engaged in 
the practice of both professions. He m,. 
May 6, 1840, Sophia, dau. of Jereme and 
Nabby (Gage) Underwood, and had four 
children : 

1. Ella S., b. April 14, 1841 ; m. Milo J. 

W. Cram, attorney-at-law, Scran- 
ton, Pa, 

2. Jane M., b. Feb. 26, 1843 ; m. George 

L. Zerpes, a turner by trade. 

3. Charles A., b. Sept., 1846 ; an attorney- 

at-law, in company with his father 
at Montrose, Pa. 

4. Fred S., b, Nov. 25, 1853 ; a clerk in a 

store. 



Richard Warren, from Ludlow, Vt., b. 1797; m., 
June 19, 1823, Maria, dau. of Sewall and Ketura 
(Mayo) Gould ; settled in Jaffrey about 1836. Ch. : 

I. Prescott. 

II. LycUa 6\, b. 1828. 

III. Susan E.,h. 1830. 

IV. Cornelius W.^ b. 1831. 

V. John A.^ b 1833. 
VI. Sally M.,h. 1837. 

VII. Edgar F.^ b. 1839. 
VIII. Ann A., b. 1846. 
IX. Hichard P., b. 1849. 



WATERS FAMILY. 

George W. Waters, b. in 1809. His father dying at 
an early age he was bound out to service in the family 
of John Conant, Esq., with whom he lived till he 
attained his majority. His means of education were 
very limited, having the privilege of attending only the 

34 



514 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



district school, the terms of which were of short dura- 
tion. On attaining his majority he followed the busi- 
ness of farming, and m. Sophia M., dan. (by adoption) 
of Ebenezer and Mary (Thompson) Hathorn, of Jaftrey. 
Mrs, Waters's father was Sylvanus Chapin, of Windsor, 
Vt. After his death, his widow, her mother, m. Mr. 
Hathorn, and she, with her sister, Mrs. Charles Cutter, 
adopted his sir-name. Mr. Waters settled in the south 
part of the town, on the farm of the late Charles A. 
Cutter. He d. Aug. ii, 1S47, a. 38. His widow r. at 
Eastjaflrey. They had four children: 

2 I. Jonas C. 

3 II. Martha S. 

4 III. Sylvanus C. d. Sept. 17, 1S64 — killed in battle 
at Antietam, Pa. 

IV. Frances M. 



2 
3 

4 

5 



6 

7 



WELLINGTON FAMILY. 

George Willington was b. in Watertown, Oct* 
21, 1749. He was a descendant of Roger Willington, 
from England, an early settler in Watertown, Mass. 
He m., Dec. 24, i772» Lucy, dau. of Ephraim and 
Lydia White Pierce, of Waltham. He re. to Jaftrey 
about 1796, and settled on lot 16, range 6, now owned 
by Samuel W. Pierce. In iSoi he re. to Cavendish, 
Vt. He was a soldier in the Revolution. Children : 

I. Ephraim, b. Sept. 29, 1773. 
II. Lydia, b. Nov. 28, 1775; m. Richard Weeks, 
July 14, 1799; r. to Royalston, Mass. He 
was a hatter by trade. 

III. Lucy, b. Sept. 18, 1777; m., Nov. 15, 1800, 

David Gilmore, son of Roger Gilmore, 
Esq., of Jaftrey, q. v. 

IV. Leonard, b. March 5, 1780; m., 1°', Dec. 4, 

1805, Eunice Earle, who d. 1808 ; m., 2^, 
Sept. 6, 1809, Dorcas Priest, who d. 1S17; 
m., 3**, Jan., 1818, Lucinda, dau. of Abijah 
Page, who d. 1847. He d. May 22, 1849, 
in Rindge, N. H., where he settled in early 
life. He was the parent of fourteen chil- 
dren, — by first wife, two ; by second wife, 
four ; by third wife, eight. 
V. John. 
VI. George, Jr. 



8 



9 

lO 

II 



2 

3 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 515 

Enoch Wellington settled in Jaftrey on lot 20, 
range 5, in 1799 ; m., i'', a dau. of Aaron Colman ; m., 
2*^, Safly, dau. of John Wood. He d. 181 7. 

I. Charlotte. 

II. Ahhy m., Aug., 1S13, Uaniel Wood, of Jaffrey. 
III. Thomas^ re. to Ashley, Mass. 



WELMAN FAMILY. 

Elijah Welman came to Jaftrey at an early date. 
He settled on lot 22, range 2, and m. Jenny, dau. of 
Thomas and Jenny (Miller) Turner. He d. March 21, 
1848, a. 83. She d. June 4, 1837, ^- ^^• 

I. Elijah, d. Oct. 12, 1876, a. 81 ; unm. 

3 II. Louisa, d. Nov. 13, 1867, a. 69; unm. 

4 III. Thomas, d. Nov. 19, 1870, a. 69; unm. 

5 IV. Samuel T., b. 1808 ; m. Mrs. Mary J. (Butler) 
Wallace, May 3, 1877. 

6 V. Jane^ d. May 17, 1839, ^- ^^ ' ^i"'"'''- 

7 VI. Robert, date of birth unknown ; left town. 



WESSON FAMILY. 

Thomas and Eleanor Wesson; ch. birth record in 
Jaftrey. 



I. Isaac H., b. Nov.. 15, 1804. 
II. Sylvia, b. Jan. 14, 1805. 



WHEELOCK FAMILY. 

Luke Wheelock was an early resident of Jaffrey. 
He m. and had children : 

2 I. Lucy. 

3 II. Esther, m. Nathaniel Thomas, Jr., of Rindge ; 
re. to Jaftrey, and settled on lot 16, range 6. 
He afterwards re. to Hartford, Vt., where 
he d. Feb. 19, 1849, a. 74. He left a son, 
Harvey, buried in the Centre burying-yard, 
who d. Dec. 4, 1801, a. i yr., 11 mos., 2odys. 



5i6 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



4 

5 



7 
8 



lO 

II 

12 
13 



III. LuJce, a merchant in JaflVey in 1806 and 1807 ; 

store burnt. 

IV. Jonathan^ ?i merchant in Jaftrey in 1810, '11, 

and '12, in the Thorndike store, now owned 
by Dr. Phelps ; left town in 1816. 

Emery Wheelock, b. in Hubuardston, Mass. ; m. 
Martha Hill ; settled in Peterborough, and re. to Jaf- 
frey in 1S12 ; settled on lot 14, range 6, and afterwards 
re. to lot 10, range 6, where he d. May 2, 1841, a. 65 ; 
his widow d. Oct. 21, 1858, a. 73. 

I. John m. Miranda Divoll, of Winchendon ; d. 

in Boston. 
II. Stephen Franklin m., i", Eliza Snow, of Win- 
chester, N. H. ; m., 2*^, Augusta Capron, of 
West Swanzey, and d. there. 

III. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 2, 1809; '^•' i^S Ashley Lov- 

ing, of Peterborough ; re. to Medina, Ohio, 
wheie he d. ; m., 2d, Austin Badger, of 
Medina. 

IV. Niincy, b. Jan. 29, 181 1 ; m. John A. Cutter, 

q. V. 
V. George Boyden, d. June 9, 1822, a. i month, 
13 days. 



Timothy Wheelock, in Jaftrey from 181 2 to Jan. 
14, 1814. 

Ithamer, a brother, and a Revolutionary soldier, d. 
Feb. II, 1850, a. 90. His wife, Sukey Tucker, d. Feb. 
21, 1844, a. 73. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



WHIPPLE FAMILY. 

John Whipple was a resident of Jaftrey from 17S1 

to 1794. He m. Phebe , and left a record of the 

births of seven children : 

I. John, b. March 14, 1781. 

II. Sarah, b. Sept. 2, 1783 ; d. Sept. 27. 1783. 

III. Sarah, b. Sept. 15, 1784. 

IV. Jeremiah^ b. June 21, 1787. 
V. Joseph, b. May 14, 1790. 

VI. An7ie, b. June 12, 1793. 
VII. Jonathan, b. March 17, 1796. 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, 



517 



3 

4 



5 
6 

7 
8 



10 



(5) 



II 



12 

13 
H 

15 



WHITCOMB FAMILY. 

Simon Whitcomb was chosen fence-viewer March 
30, 1775- He m. Sarah, dau. of John and Bathsheba 
Combs, of JaftVey. He d. in Jaftrey. His widow was 
living in 1813. 



Ephraim Whitcomb, from Leominster, settled in 
Jaflrey, on lot 17, range 9. Li 1777 he was chosen 
auditor of accounts, and in 17S1, highway surveyor. 
He m. Elizabeth Carter, of Leominster; had eight ch. 
His last tax was in 1797- 

I. Elizabeth, b. March 8, 1776. 

II. Abigail, h. ]u\y 7, 1777; m. Abraham Priest, 
of Stow, brother of Daniel Priest, Sen'r, of 
Jaftrey. 

III. Ephraim, b. May 38, 1779; m., Feb. 10, 1S03, 

Lucy, dau. of John Leland ; r. from Jaftrey 
in 1804.-J- 

IV. Dorothy, h. Sept. 14, 1782; m., May 17, 1808, 

John Wilder, from Winchendon ; settled on 
lot 23, range 3. 
V. Oliver, b. Nov. 5, 1784; re. to the state of 

Maine. 
VI. Esther, b. Oct. 8, 1786; m., Feb. 27, 1810, 

Peter Wakefield. 
VII. Sally, b. Oct. 33, 1788; m., May 35, 1809, 
Nathan Hale, of Rindge ; had thirteen chil- 
dren. 
VIII. Relief, b. Dec. 3o, 1792. 



Ephraim and Lucy (Lealand) Whitcomb had chil- 
dren : 

I. George, m., i'', Sarah Smith, who d. Aug. 26, 
1830; m., 1^, Betsey Rolfe, who d. about 
185 1 ; m., 3*^, Betsey, dau. of Abel Smith. 
Children : 

1. Mary Ann m. N. P. Cummings. 

2. Rosina m. Peaslee. 

3. George L. m., and r. in Gardner, 
Mass. 

4. Charles S. m., and r. first in Rindge ; 
second in Orange, Mass. 



5l8 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

i6 5. Henry C. m. Angeline (Ward) Bald- 

win, of Winchendon. 

17 6. Albert H., b. 1S42 ; m., 1S63, Matilda 

Crouch ; r. Westminster. 

18 7. Julius, b. March 3, 1S4S. 

19 II. Irene m. Emery Carroll, of Winchendon ; he. d. 

in 1865. 

20 III. John m. and r. in Winchendon. 



4 
5 



WHITNEY FAMILY. 

John Whitney, in 1635, with his wife and five sons, 
emigrated from Ipswich, England, and settled in Wa- 
tertown, Mass. 

ZiMRi Whitney, of the fifth generation, was b. in 
Lunenburg, May 14, 1776; m., May 28, iSoi, Susanna 
Sanderson; re. to Rindge in 1S12, to JafiVey in 1814, 
to Peru, Vt., in 1826. He settled in Jaftrey, on lot 13, 
range 8, the previous residence of Dea. William Smil- 
ey, now (1876) uninhabited. He d. at Peru, Aug. 24, 
1862, a. 86 ; his widow d. about 1865. Ten children : 

I. Isaac S., b. April 7, 1S02 ; m., 1822, Maria 
Ovington, of Dublin ; r. in Jaflrey ; was a 
blacksmith by trade ; re. to Bethel, Maine ; 
eight children : 

II. Abraham, h. Jan. 19, 1804; m. Adeline, dau. 
of Rufus Sawyer, Nov. 23, 1829; r. Boston. 
In 1S67 he re. to Jaftrey ; settled on lot 12, 
range 6 ; re. from thence to lot 5, range 5, 
where he met with an accidental death by 
fiilling into the cellar, Feb. 22, 1872, a. 
68. He was a resident of Boston thirty- 
nine years, a police-officer twenty-one years ; 
kept a provision store several years. Ch. : 

1. Edward Sawyer, b. Oct. 17, 1S31 ; d. 

2. Frances Adaline, b. May 5, 1832 ; m., 
Nov. 22, 185 1, Daniel W, Farr, of Bos- 
ton. She d. Feb. 6, 1S67. He d. May 
13' 1S75. 

III. Charles, b. March 2, 1806; m. Adeline Strong. 
He d. in Charlestown, Mass., Feb. 26, 1851. 
Ten children. 



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9 

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12 

13 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 519 

IV. Alvah, b. June 27, iSoS; m., April 26, 1S38, 

Caroline Geer, He d. in Cambridge, Mass., 

1873. Three children. 

V. Susannah P., b. Aug. 22, iSio; m. Benjamin 

Penfield, of Gorham, Me. Seven children. 

VI. Hosea^ b. in Rindge, March 17, 1813 ; m. Char- 
lotte Sawyer, 1S37 ; d. in Charlestown. 
Mass., July i, 1861. Four children. 
VII. Thomas P., b. in Jaffrey, Aug. 29, 1816; m., 
April 26, 1838, Harriet A. Benjamin ; six 
children ; r. in Jaffrey. 
VIII. George S.^h. in Jaffrey, April 17, 1S19 ; m.. 
1844, Eveline Barnard. He d. at Glen's 
Falls, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1S63. 

IX. John /S., b. in Jaffrey, May 21, 1S22 ; m. Val- 
issa P. Johnson ; five children ; r. in Jaf- 
frey. 

X. Richard B.^ b. in Jaffrey, June 18, 1825. 



2 
3 



WHITTEMORE FAMILY. 
Benjamin and Sarah Whittemore. 

I. Rufus, b. May 28, 1778. 
II. Eusche^ b. Feb. 28, 1780. 



WILDER FAMILY. 

Joseph Wilder w^as chosen highway surveyor in 
1780, and purchased a pew in the meeting-house the 
same year. He settled on lot 8, range 6, now owned 

by Abraham B. Davis. He m. Rachel , by whoni 

he had four children : 

I. Elizabeth^ b. March 9, 1782. 

3 II. Joseph^ b. Feb. 28, 1784; m. Susannah Turner. 

4 III. John, b. Feb. 12, 1786. 

5 IV. Rachel, b. March 31, 1788. 

His wife d. May 6, 1788, a. 33 ; m., 2^, 1789, Lucy Saf- 
ford. The last tax paid by Ensign Joseph Wilder was 
in 1798- He was a soldier in the Revolution. 

Silas Wilder was paid for three months' service in 
the Revolution in 17S2 ; re. to Rindge; m. Abigail 
Page, and was taxed there till 1797. 



520 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



8 



Ezra Wilder was highway surveyor in 17S2, and by 
the state record was one of the men furnished by Jaf- 
frey in the Revolution ; m. Jerusha Welch Alexander; 
re. to Peterborough ; m., z'', Oct. 15, 1S04, Jerusha 
Hogg, of that town. His last tax was in 1809. 

Ezra Wilder, Jr., m. Polly, dan. of Joseph Hodge; 
last tax 1812. 

Oliver, a brother, m. Betsey, dau. of Joseph Hodge ; 
taxed iSoo. 



John Wilder came from Winchendon, Mass., and 
settled on lot 22, range 3 ; paid tax in 181 2 ; m.. May 
17, 1808, Dorothy, dau. of Ephraim and Elizabeth Car- 
ter Wliitcomb. His dau. Laura m , Sept. 27, 1829, 
George T. Betterly, of Brookline. His wife d. Feb. 
II, 1S55, '^* 73 ' ^^^ '^^ March 23, 1863, a. 90. 



Salmon Wilder, from New Ipswich, carried on the 
business of printing in Jaffrey in 1814, '15, and '16. 



William Wilder was agent of the Cheshire cotton 
mill in 1822. 



WINCHESTER FAMILY 



2 

3 

4 



William and Sally Winchester, birth recortl in 
Jaftrey. 

I. Stephen, b. Oct. 3, 1792. 
II. Cynthia, b. April 26, 1794. 
III. William, b. May 6, 1796. 



2 

3 

4 



WITT FAMILY. 

Zacheus Witt, b. in Stow, Mass., 1757, m. Han- 
nah Sawtelle, of Townsend, about i779' ''^' to Fitz- 
william, from thence to JafFrey ; first tax in 1793. He 
settled on lot 22, range 8. Children : 

I. Charles, h. Jan. 24, 17S3.-I- 
II. William, b. Feb. 14, 1784. 
III. Sewall, b. 1785. 



5 
6 



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9 



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12 

13 

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15 
i6 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 521 

IV. Samuel^ b. 17S7. 
V. Frederick^ b. 17S9. 
VI. Elisha^ b. 1790; m. Diademia Alexander, of 



Sh 



aion. 



Charles Witt m., Dec. 4, 1S05, Huldali Wood, 
dau. of Solomon and Lucy VVood ; d. Nov. 29, 1S4S. 
His widow d. July 16, 1S59, a, 78. 

I. Luther, b. Jul}^, 1807.-I- 
II. Nancy ^ b. 1809; '^^•' 1^*5 James Howe, of Peter- 
borough, by whom she had two children. 
M., 2^ John W. Poole, of JaftVey. He d., 
and she re. with her son to Wisconsin. 

III. Roanna, b. 1S12 ; m. Loren Woodbury, second 

wife. He d., and she re. to the West. 

IV. Mary d. 1S31. 



Luther Witt m. Betsey, dau. of Heniy and ]\Iary 
(Jaquith) Thompson ; settled, first in Jaflrey, second 
in Unity ; re. to Jatirev, and afterwards re. to Plymouth, 
Wis. 

I. Roanna^ b. at Jaffrey, 1832. 

II. Charles Granville, b. at Unity, 1833. 

III. Juda E., b. at Jaflrey. 

IV. Alpha. 
V. Sophira. 



WOOD FAMILY. 

Barnabas Wood was chosen highway surveyor in 
1782 and in 1785? and Solomon had his taxes abated in 
1784. 

John Wood was fence-viewer in 1780, tythingman in 
1782 and 1796, and highway surveyor in 1787. On a 
headstone in the Centre burying-yard is the record of 
the death of John Wood, who d. July 5, 1799, a. ^^. 
Kimball, his son, d. Oct. 12, 1804, a. 21. Mary Ann, 
his dau., d. Oct. 19, 18 10, a. 33, also four young chil- 
dren of Jonathan and Sally Wood. Wilkinson d. June 
25, 1806, a. 6 yrs., 7 mos. Moses W., d. Sept. 23, 
1S05, 3- 13 ""los, 27 days. John W. d. March 26, 1801, 
a. 38 days. A dau. d. Aug. 15, 1S06, a. 23 days. 



522 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



2 

3 
4 

5 



7 
8 



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12 

15 



(") 
16 
17 



Solomon Wood settled on lot 18, range 7 ; m. Lucy 
, and had 

I. Solomon. 
II. HuJda, b. 1786 ; m. Charles Witt, q. v. 

III. John., b. 1788. 

IV. Lucy., b. 1786; census 1850. 

Solomon Wood, Sen'r, d. Feb. 25, 1790. 



In the record of marriages of date Sept. 29, 1799, is 
the marriage of Isaac Jaquith to Hepsy Wood. 



John Wood settled on lot 21, range 6; m. Sarah 
, and had children : 



I. Sally m., Dec. iS, 1799, Enoch Wellington, 

q. V. 
II. John m., Feb. 21, 1804, Hannah, dau. of 
David Chadwick ; re. to N. Y. state. 

III. Kimball d. Oct. 12, 1804, a. 21. 

IV. Ehenezer T. m., Feb. 3, 1808, Rebecca Boyn- 

ton, dau. of Nathan. -{- 



Jonathan Wood m. and had children : 

I. Jonathan and a brother. 
II. Jeremiah., r. to Galena. 

III. Daniel m., Aug. i, 1813, Abby, dau. of Enoch 
Wellington. 



Ebenezer T. and Rebecca Wood, birth record 

I. Miriam^ b. Feb. 23, 1S09. ^ 

II. Artemas., b. March 16, 181 1. 



WOODBURY FAMILY. 

Samuel Thorndike Woodbury came from Beverly, 
Mass., and settled on lot 11, range 4, novv^ owned by 
Nehemiah Cutter, about i77S- He m. Sarah, dau. of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Martin) Lawrence, b. at Groton, 
Mass., Sept. 14, 1756; had six children, four sons and 
two daus. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



(7) 



8 
9 

lO 

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GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 523 

I. Betty, b. Aug. 8, 177S. 

II. Sala^ b. Nov. 18, 1779. 

III. tfacoh, b. April 23, 17S1. 

IV. /Samuel, h. at Beverly. 
V. Ehei\ b. at Beverly. 

VI. Loren, b. at Beverly. 4- 



LoREN Woodbury came from Beverly to Jaffrey 
about 1S21, and settled on lot 15, range 3, now owned 
by Peter Hogan. He m., i^', May 29, 1S23, Mary, dau. 
Capt. Alpheus and Elizabeth (Gilmore) Crosby, who 
d. Aug. 28, 1850, a. 58. M., 3^ Roanna Witt. He d. 
Feb. 28, 1862, a. 73. Four children: 

I. Mary E.^ d. Jan. 22, 1826, a. i day. 
II. Loren Eher, d. March 26, 1831, a. 3 mos., 18 
days. 
III. George A., b. 1832 ; left town 1866. 
IV. Clara,h. 1852; m. Churchill; r. in Ply- 
mouth, Wis. ; d. in 1874, ^- '^'^' 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



WORCESTER FAMILY. 

Moses Worcester re. from Tewksbury, Mass., to 
Jaffre}' about 1776 ; settled on lot i, range 8. He was 
a descendant of the Rev. William Worcester, who emi- 
grated from England and settled in Salisbury, Mass., 
about 1634. He m. Hepsibath Hardy, who d. Jan. 16, 
1732, a. 84. He d. Oct. 9, 1S33, a. 83. 

Mr. Worcester was a leading influential man. He 
held most of the important town ofiices, and was al- 
ways prompt and reliable in the discharge of his duty. 
They had nine children : 

I. Hepsihath, b. March 4, 1777; m., March 12, 
1801, Moses Rider ; r. Grafton, Vt. 

II. Molly, b. Dec. 31, 1778; d. Feb. 23, 1790. 

III. Moses, b. Jan. 22, 1781. 

IV. Nathaniel, b. Jan. 28, 1783. 

V. Abigail, b. March 2, 1785; m. Jonas Ross, 

q. v. 
VI. /S'araA, b. March 12,1787; m. Josiah Patten, 

of Fitzwilliam. 
VII. John, b. March 26, 1789.-}- 



524 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



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12 

H 
15 

16 

18 

19 
20 
21 



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32 

23 
24 

25 



27 
28 

29 

30 
31 

32 



(30 
33 



VIII. Jesse^ b. Feb. 12, 1792; d. Oct. 29, 1792. 
IX. Jesse, b. May 2, 1795. 



John Worcester m., Nov 24, 1815, Sally, daii. of 
Isaac and Sally (Cutter) Kimball ; re. to Medina, Mich., 
1854. Twelve ch. : 

I. Sally Maria, b. Dec. 22, 1816. 
II. John, b. Dec. 15, iSiS.-|- 
iii. George, b. Nov. 17, 1820; d. Dec. 6, 1820. 
IV. A daughter, b. Oct. 4, 1821 ; d. Oct. 5, 1821. 
V. A daughter, b. Oct. 4, 1821 ; d. Oct. 12, 1821 ; 

twin. 
VI. Harriet, b. Jan. 10, 1S33 ; d. June 9, 1832. 
VII. Mary Ann, b. June 19, 1825. 
VIII. Lydia Ayer, b. June 3, 1827. 
IX. A son, b. May 5, 1829. 
X. Sylvander, b. Nov. 28, 1830. 
XI. Harriet B., b. Dec, 1834; d. May 27, 1837. 



John Worcester, Jr., tn. Lucretia D. ; r. 

Medina, Mich. ; d. Dec. 13, 1879. 

I. Lysander, b. 1836. 
II. Jane S., b. 183S. 
III. Helen M. d. May 6, 1849, a. 1 yr., 8 inos. 



William Worcester, a brother of Moses, came to 
Jattrey about 1776, settled on lot i, range 9; m. Han- 
nah Frost. He d. Nov 5, 1828, a. 72. She d. Jan. 30, 
1858, a. 90. 

I. William, h. May 31, 1783; d. insane, Oct 10, 

1835- 
II. Hannah, h. Aug. 25, 1785 ; m. Jonathan Gage. 

III. Anna, b. Nov. 16, 1787. 

IV. Nancy, b. 1788 or '9 ; d. unm. 
V. Joshua, b. March 15, 1791. 

VI. Joel, b. June i, i793.-|- 
VII. Eldad m. Rebecca Stone : r. Mass. 



Joel Worcester m. Louisa 



One child 



I. Joel F. d. Dec. 9, 1837, a. 7 yrs., 7 mos. 



2 

3 

4 



(3) 



GENEALOGICAL REGISTER. 525 

WRIGHT FAMILY. 

Mathew Wright came from Londonderry, with 
Thomas Davidson, who m. his dau. Anna in 1757, and 
settled in Peterborough — the precise time unknown, 
probably 1757 or '8. Of his death no record has been 
found. In the Centre burying ground is a headstone 
bearing the name of Mary, relict of Mathew Wright, who 
d. Aug. 27, 17S5, a. 86. Mr. Wright was a man of great 
mental power ; of Scotch-Irish origin, in whom the char- 
acteristics of that race were strongly marked. Firm in 
his religious belief, and actuated by a strong sense of 
duty, lie felt it enjoined upon him not only to rebuke 
but punish the otiender for every neglect of Christian 
duty. An anecdote of him, illustrating tliis character- 
istic, was related by a neighbor of his, Mr. Jos. Horton, 
from his own experience. On his way home on one 
Jul}' afternoon, as he was passing by the house of Mr. 
Wright, he was overtaken by a thunder-storm, and he 
took refuge in his house. The storm continued : night 
came, and he was invited to spend it with him. Before 
retiring to rest family prayers were offered, and, in ac- 
cordance with their custom, the family knelt during 
their continuance. On closing the prayer Mr. Wright 
observed his neighbor standing, not having knelt. 
From a keen sense of duty he reprimanded him in the 
following strong terms, viz., "You are worse than a 
Papist, and if it did not rain so hard I would turn ye 
out of my house this very night !" 

Of his ch., Anna m. Dea. Thomas Davidson, of 
Peterborough, had a family of ten ch. ; Francis settled 
in Jafirey ; and Jane m. Lieut. William Turner, q. v. 



Francis Wright settled on lot 14, range 8. When 
the town was incorporated he was an inn-keeper, and 
the first meeting of the town was held at his house. 
The farm has long been known as the Wright farm, 
and remained in possession of the family till 1S35. It 
is now (1879) in possession of Dana S. Jaquith. He 

m. Anna . He d. Nov. 2, 1807, a. 65. His 

widow d. May 27, 1815, a. 70. 

I. Mary^ b. Feb. 13, 1773 ; m., May 19, 1794, 
Joseph Crumble, of Rindge, who d. at Jaf- 
frey, Oct. 31, 1847, a. 82. She d. July i, 
1849. Eleven ch. 



526 



HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 



6 II. Atm, b. 177*5 ; »i^- Samuel Patrick, Jj'., q. v. 

7 III. tTane, h. Nov. iS, 1777; m., Nov. 15, 1798, 
William Davidson, of Peterborough. Nine 

8 children. 

9 IV. F7'ancis d. Dec. 25, 1831, unm., a. 50. 
V. «7bA« d. Nov. 28, 1849, '-"itn-') ^- 64. Capt. 

Wright was an active business man ; was at 
different times engaged in farming, manu- 
facturing card-boards, boots and shoes ; was 
a merchant at Jaftrey Centre, Hartland, Vt., 
and East Jaftrey. Was highly esteemed by 
his fellow-citizens, and was a distinguished 
commander of the Jaftrey rifle company. 

10 VI. Sally, b. 1790; m. Samuel Adams, Jr., of Jaf- 
frey ; re. to Whitestown, N. Y., q. v. 

1 1 Leranus Wright w-as the owner of the farm after- 
wards owned by Francis Wright, lot 14, range 8. 



12 Joseph W^right was chosen fence-viewer when the 

town was incorporated in 1773- He was also a mem- 
ber of Capt. Thomas's company, of Rindge, in i775' 



APPENDIX 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL 



PROOEEDIISrGS 



OF THE 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 



ON THB 



ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY 



OF THE 



INCORPORATION OF THE TOWN OF JAFFREY, N. H., 



AUGUST 20, 1873, 



PKEPABKD FOB PUBLICATION BY 

THE COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 



35 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 



AT the annual town-meeting, March 8th, 1870, pur- 
suant to an article in the warrant, Voted, That John 
Fox, Joseph P. Frost, Addison Prescott, David C. Cham- 
berlain, and Rufus Case be a committee to collect facts, in 
reference to making preparations for a centennial celebration 
August 17th, 1873. And said committee appointed, as assist- 
ants, one person in each school district, — viz., Benjamin 
Cutter, Geo. A. Underwood, Addison J. Adams, Ambrus 
W. Spaulding, Lewis L. Pierce, FrankHn H. Cutter, Clar- 
ence S. Bailey, Joseph W. Fassett, John S. Lawrence, John 
Frost, Benj. Pierce, Benjamin Prescott, and Lewis S. 
Jaquith. 

At the annual town-meeting, March 12, 1872, consequent 
to an article in the warrant, a vote was passed to celebrate 
the one hundredth anniversary of the incorporation of the 
town, and chose John Fox, Addison Prescott, Benjamin 
Pierce, Lewis S, Jaquith, Julius Cutter, and Franklin H. 
Cutter a committee to carry the same into effect. 

Nov. 5, 1872, the town voted that the committee, chosen 
to make the necessary preparation for the approaching cen- 
tennial anniversary of the town, be authorized to fill all 
vacancies which may occur in said committee. 

Subsequently John Fox and Lewis S. Jaquith withdrew, 
and the vacancies were filled by George A, Underwood and 
Lewis L. Pierce. 



532 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

The committee organized by choosing Lewis L. Pierce 
corresponding secretary and clerk, FrankHn H. Cutter 
chairman, and Julius Cutter treasurer, — commencing their 
duties by engaging an orator and poet. 

At the annual meeting, March ii, 1873, the town voted 
to celebrate its centennial anniversary at the Centre of the 
town ; also, that the committee of arrangements and select- 
men be a committee to determine in what way the collation 
should be provided, — said committee deciding it should be 
furnished gratuitously ; and to carry the same into effect, the 
committee of arrangements appointed Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
P. Frost, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Fassett, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alfred Sawyer, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Cutter, Mr. and Mrs. 
John S. Button, Mr. Henry Chamberlain, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederic Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. Addison J. Adams, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ambrus W. Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. 
Adams, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall C. Adams, Mr. and Mrs. 
Levi E. Brigham, Mr. and Mrs. Abram B. Davis, Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin F. Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs. John E. Baldwin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lucius A. Cutter, Mr. and Mrs. Joel H. Poole, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Stearns, 
Mr. Samuel Jewell, Mr. Fred J. Lawrence, Mr. and Mrs. 
Michael D. Fitzgerald, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Crowe, Mr. 
and Mrs. Selah Lovejoy, Mr. and Mrs. Hosea B. Aldrich, 
Mr. and Mrs. David A. Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester P. 
Towne, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver H. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Lib- 
erty Mower, and Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Upton, as a soliciting 
and table committee, who performed their duties in a highly 
commendable manner ; and the result was, the multitude 
that came were bountifully supplied with substantial and 
delicate food, with an abundance of ice-water. Tea, coffee, 
lemonade, foaming soda, &c., were obtained by passing into 
side tents. 

The committee of arrangements appointed James S. Lacy, 
Austin E. Spaulding, and Benjamin Pierce to arrange a 
choir of singers for the centennial day ; also made choice of 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 533 

Franklin H. Cutter, Esq., President ; Dr. John Fox, Peter 
Upton, Esq., Col. Samuel Ryan, Ex-Consul Chas. H. Pow- 
ers, Capt. John A. Cutter, Henry C. French, Alfred Sawyer, 
Ambrus W. Spaulding, Col. James L. Bolster, Vice-Presi- 
dents ; Capt. George A. Underwood, Marshal, — he appoint- 
ing Joseph W. Fassett, Jonas C. Rice, Henry B. Wheeler, 
Esq., Aids, for the day. 

The expenses of the celebration were paid by subscription, 
as will herein be shown. 

A letter of invitation was issued by the committee, print- 
ed on eight hundred postal cards, copied as follows : 

"JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 

"The One Hundredth Anniversary of the Incorporation 
of the town of Jaffrey, N. H., occurs this year. It is pro- 
posed to celebrate the event on the twentieth day of August, 
with appropriate ceremonies. The Sons and Daughters of 
Jaffrey, and all former residents, are cordially invited to be 
present and take part in commemorating the day. 



FRANKLIN H. CUTTER,^ 
ADDISON PRESCOTT, 
BENJAMIN PIERCE, 
JULIUS CUTTER, 
GEO. A. UNDERWOOD, 
LEWIS L. PIERCE, 



Committee 
> of 

Arrangements. 



Jaffrey, July 26, 1873." 



This letter was, by the committee, sent to all parts of the 
country, to former residents of the town. 

As the one hundredth anniversary of the incorporation of 
the town occurred on Sunday, August 17, it was decided to 
celebrate on the Wednesday following. 

The day proved favorable. At an early hour, from all 
quarters, crowds assembled at the place of meeting, to the 
number of five thousand or more. Many friendly and 
hearty greetings were passed between those who had long 



534 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

been separated, and were now permitted to take each other 
by the hand. 

A mammoth tent, covering 150 by 60 feet of ground, was 
erected in close connection to the "old-town house." An 
ample platform, measuring forty by fifteen feet, was covered 
by a nice piano, large reporters' table, and settees for one 
hupdred and fifty persons, — the "auditorium" proper having 
seats for more than three thousand people. 

"THE DAY'S DOINGS." 

The component parts of a long and eye-pleasing proces- 
sion, — Captain George A. Underwood, chief-marshal ; J. W. 
Fassett, J. C. Rice, H. B. Wheeler, assistants, — formed at 
three different points. Having been brought together on 
time, it moved from the vicinity of J. T. Bigelow's store at 
9 A. M., in the following order: i. Peterborough cavalry 
company, Capt. D. M. White, fifty-five men; 2. East Jaffrey 
Cornet Band, G. W. Capen, leader, twenty pieces ; 3. Con- 
toocook fire engine company. Liberty Town, foreman, forty 
uniforms ; 4. President of the day, orator, toast-master, and 
chaplain; 5. The vice-presidents ; 6. Committee of arrange- 
ments ; 7. Invited guests expected to respond to sentiments; 
8. Choir, marshalled by J. S. Lacy, thirty strong ; 9. Loyal 
veterans, Lieut. Wm. Robbins, commander; 10. Four-horse 
wagon with four generations of the Rice family, and a ban- 
ner lettered "Mrs. Dorcas Rice, 104 yrs., the oldest lady in 
New Hampshire ;" 11. Twenty-three young ladies (conducted 
by John E. Baldwin), representing Cheshire county by carry- 
ing elegant banners, each respectively inscribed with the 
name of a single town ; 1 2. Teachers and scholars of thirteen 
district schools, with handsomely mottoed and numbered 
standards; 13. Citizens generally. Having marched and 
countermarched perhaps a half mile, the procession (except 
the cavalry, which left for East Jaffrey depot to escort soon- 
to-arrive members of the Boston city government) entered 






^4' #-'^==^ 









^^yh^^^-'f^A^^y^iy^ 




JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 535 

the tent, which proved of insufficient capacity for the occa- 
sion, many hundreds being obHged, nolens volens, to remain 
outside. Precisely at ten o'clock Chief-Marshal Underwood 
felicitously introduced Franklin H. Cutter, Esq., president 
of the day, who forcibly enunciated the subjoined 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : I congratulate you upon this 
eventful occasion — this celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the incorporation of the town of Jaffrey. I 
congratulate you at our re-union, under so favorable circum- 
stances, here at the foot of old time-worn Monadnock. 
Since that incorporation day, one hundred years ago, which 
bears the prominent place on the pages of our town's history, 
this earth has made thirty-six thousand five hundred and 
twenty-four daily revolutions ; and ofttimes has the morn- 
ing sun kissed the brow of Grand Old Monadnock, nature's 
pride, lighting up the hills with rosy glow, then beaming 
down into the valleys draped with shadows, till nature has 
changed her sable robe of night for that of the sun's molten, 
golden light. Then came the mid-day, with all its meridian 
glory, and as many times that sun has cast its evening 
shades on the hillsides, and left its last ray on that same 
mountain's brow, reflecting upon the sky most gorgeous 
hues of flame-color and crimson, imperceptibly deepening 
into the purple tinge of evening. 

To the sons and daughters of those who have occupied 
these granite hills in days gone by, — the statesman, the 
lawyer, the preacher, the doctor, — and to all those in every 
station of life, coming from the colder climes of the North, 
from the South, where the orange-trees in fragrance bloom, 
from the East, where the angry Atlantic lashes the rock- 
bound shore with its turbulent waters, from the broad 
prairies of the West, dotted here and there with mammoth 
fields of wheat, corn, and other grain, on to the shores of 



536 HISTORY OF JAFFKEY. 

the mighty Pacific, — we give you all a most cordial welcome 
upon this festival day to our hearths, where the fire goeth 
not out, and hospitality ever reigneth, — to the homes of 
your ancestors, the places of your childhood about which so 
many tender recollections cluster, as we sing, — 

" How dear to my heart are the scenes of my childhood, 

When fond recollection presents them to view ; 
The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood. 

And every loved spot which my infancy knew ; 
The wide-spreading pond, and the mill that stood by it, 

The bridge, and the rock where the cataract fell ; 
The cot of my father, the dairy-house nigh it, 

And e'en the rude bucket that hung in the well." 

We welcome you back to witness the beautiful scenery of 
Jaffrey ; to look upon our mountain in all its magnificence 
and grandeur ; to follow its winding streams, and from their 
pure waters catch the spotted trout suited to the most fas- 
tidious taste ; to walk in the old graveyard and gaze upon 
those tombstones which denote the spot where our fathers 
rest. 

Our neighbors and friends, we welcome j^?<! to participate 
in the festivities of this occasion. We give you all a friendly 
gripe of the hand, invite you to take part in this centennial 
celebration, and thank God that we are here to speak one to 
another of days gone by, and spend a short time together 
with the memories of Auld Lang Syne. May blessings 
rest upon this day and the town of Jaffrey, her sons and 
daughters, through all coming centuries. 

Applause having subsided, the band played " Keller's 
American Hymn " in good style, when Rev. Rufus Case, 
pastor of the First Congregational Church, at Jaffrey Cen- 
tre, offered an excellent prayer, after which the choir, led 
by Prof. George Foster, of Keene, harmoniously vocalized 
an original 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 53/ 



SONG OF WELCOME. 

BY MISS ALMEDA M. SMITH. 

Back from the prairied West, 
Dear kindred, welcome home ! 

This native soil you blest, 
Ere tempted far to roam. 

Welcome to Jaflfrey's granite hills. 

Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 

Back from the South's fair land, 
Back from the holly's shade, 

Welcome to join our band. 
From every hill and glade. 

Welcome to JafFrey's granite hills, 

Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 

O'er Ocean's waters blue 

We bid you come once more; 

Our hearts are faithful, true. 
As in the days of yore. 

Welcome to Jaffrey's granite hills, 

Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 

Come, join our festal throng, 
'Neath stern Monadnock's brow ; 

Our hearts to-day are strong 
In friendship pure, I trow. 

Welcome to Jaffrey's granite hills. 

Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 

A century ago 

Your fathers trod this soil; 
The gray old rocks we know 

Bear witness of their toil. 
Welcome to Jaffrey's granite hills, 
Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 

With thankful hearts we bow 
To God, our Father, Friend, 

That here we meet e'en now. 
And our glad greetings blend. 

Welcome to Jaffrey's granite hills. 

Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 



538 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

We welcome you again 

To your dear native land ; 
Join in our sweet refrain 

With voice and heart and hand. 
Welcome to Jaffrey's granite hills, 
Her rocky vales and sparkling rills. 

President Cutter then came forward and said, — 

Ladies and Gentlemen : It is with great satisfaction 
that I have the pleasure of introducing to you, as orator of 
the day, a native of Jaffrey. The venerable gentleman has 
lived nearly half a score of years more than the number 
allotted to man, and is thoroughly acquainted with the early 
history of this town. He has served his native state, New 
Hampshire, as chief-justice, for a series of years, and to him 
the jurists of our state have looked for counsel. He has 
also been a guiding star in the legal profession of our sister 
state where he now resides. Well can we afford to listen 
at this time to the Hon. Joel Parker, of Cambridge, Mass., 
whom I now introduce to you. 

CENTENNIAL ADDRESS. 

BY HON. JOEL PARKER, OF CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

Fellow-Citizens, Friends, Ladies, and Gentlemen : 

Some threescore years since, a favorite piece for declama- 
tion by the junior schoolboys commenced with this couplet: 

" You 'd scarce expect one of my age 
To speak in public on the stage." 

When I received the invitation of the committee of ar- 
rangements to deliver an address at the close of a century, 
more than three quarters of which I represent, so far as 
years are concerned, in my own person, I was forcibly re- 
minded of this schoolboy exercise, and strongly tempted, 
reversing its significance, to make it the basis of my reply. 




^^ 



"^"^^/^ i/T'-'l^^l--^ 



f//tr-t-t,^L<7 




O^e^ 




r^ 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 539 

But the afterthought was, that upon such occasions remi- 
niscences are generally acceptable, even if they are trivial ; 
and that, perhaps, urged by such a complimentary requisi- 
tion, I owed it to the town of my birth to waive my claim 
to exemption, make my "last appearance" on this occasion, 
and tell what I know, little though it may be, of its early 
history. 

Little enough it is, in fact, for the years of my early 
youth were passed in the remote seclusion of the north- 
eastern corner of the township ; and with only a few inter- 
vening years in the Centre, my personal knowledge respect- 
ing its people and its affairs has been only through occa- 
sional visits. 

If " sixty years since " I had had even a remote suspicion 
that I might stand here to-day to discourse respecting the 
first inhabitancy of this town and its incorporation, I would 
have come to you this morning with a portfolio full of nota- 
tions respecting its ancient history. Having no such pre- 
monition, many of the incidents of its early days have 
escaped from my grasp, and the sources from which alone 
information respecting them could have been derived are 
gone forever. The century which is commemorated has, in 
the course of nature, carried away the fathers who saw the 
inception of the settlement here, with those who immedi- 
ately followed and were conversant with things done and 
transacted within its borders. 

Even in regard to a much later date, a few only of that 
period seem to stand, somewhat like the servants of Job, 
who came from different quarters and said, one after 
another, " I alone am escaped to tell thee ;" and doubtful 
upon whom I should charge the duty of having greater 
knowledge than I ought to have respecting the first half of 
the century, and thereby release myself from the conscrip- 
tion by presenting a substitute, my conclusion, at last, led 
me, in obedience to the requisition, to come before you at 
the present time, and ask your indulgence for the deficien- 



540 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

cies which you will perceive in what I have to offer for your 
acceptance. 

The great antiquity of the township where we are assem- 
bled does not admit of a doubt. It seems to be the better 
opinion that, in the creation of the world, granite was first 
formed. We are assured that granite appears to be the fun- 
damental rock of the earth's crust, and that " wherever we 
reach the base of the stratified rocks we find them resting 
upon granite." This being so, it follows that New Hamp- 
shire is entitled to the credit of being part of the earliest 
creation. And that Jaffrey had a larger interest in that 
creation than any of her neighbors is shown by the fact, 
that on the subsequent partition the larger portion of the 
Monadnock was assigned to her. 

It is one of the jests about Father Sprague, as he was 
called, long the minister of Dublin, that, discoursing one 
day upon faith, and quoting the passage of Scripture re- 
specting its power to remove mountains, he turned his eye 
through the window to the mass of granite in full view, and 
expressed a doubt whether that applied to the Monadnock. 

If there have been any very great changes in the struct- 
ure of the earth here since the period of creation, they are 
not chronicled. The Monadnock exhibits no evidence of 
disturbance, by faith or by volcanic influences. The only 
fires have been upon its exterior surface. At the settle- 
ment of the township it must have been covered nearly to 
its summit with a dense forest. Some of my earliest recol- 
lections are of fires on its sides, which furnished pillars of 
smoke by day and of fire by night, sufificient to have guided 
the children of Israel, if their path to the Promised Land had 
lain in this vicinity. These fires left a tangled windfall, 
and a "bald rock," as it was called, at the top, which was 
perhaps bare before that time. Possibly they are responsi- 
ble, in some measure, for my inability to hunt up a re- 
spectable bear story, as a part of the minor history of the 
town. 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 541 

But if the mountain has not changed its local habi- 
tation, the town has its geologic and historic problem 
of a different character, in the meadow lying just east of 
this village. Some twenty years since, in one of my occa- 
sional visits to Jaffrey, I found Dr. Fox engaged in remov- 
ing large pine stumps, with roots of great size and length, 
from his portion of the meadow, on the westerly side ; and 
he showed me, at the distance of a rod or two from the up- 
land, small pieces of wood bearing evidence of having been 
cut by the beavers, and supposed to be parts of a beaver- 
dam, taken from a depth of some five feet below the surface. 
There were sticks of yellow birch and of alder, about three 
or four inches in diameter, cut at the ends by a grooved 
instrument. 

It was not surprising that the beavers should have had a 
habitation in that vicinity. In fact, recent inquiries show 
that this town must have been a favorite locality with them. 
But it was a mystery how, in the present conformation of 
the land, there could have been a beaver-dam in that spot. 
Recently it was determined to have a further examination, 
and it was soon ascertained that there had been a beaver- 
dam at the outlet of the meadow, on the south-east, near 
Mr. Cutter's tannery, in the place which any sagacious 
beaver might have designated for a dam ; and the conclu- 
sion was readily reached that what had been discovered by 
Dr. Fox was the remains of a beavers' cabin, on the west- 
erly shore of the pond which must have been formed by 
this dam. And so it proved. Selecting a spot a short 
distance from that opened by Dr. Fox, we struck another 
cabin, shown clearly to be such, by finding the beavers' bed, 
composed of small twigs, leaves, and grass, well constructed 
in layers, the general color being of a light orange when 
taken out, but becoming dark very soon on exposure to the 
air. Many of the leaves were of perfect form, so that the 
kinds could be distinguished ; and a small beech-nut was 



542 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

found between the sheets, probably not stowed away for 
use, but taken up with the leaves in forming the bed. 

All mystery about the formation of a beaver-dam was 
solved, but there was a marvel remaining. The beavers' 
bed was about seven feet below the surface, and when made 
must have been in a dry position, and above the surface of 
a pond. By what process of accretion had this pond been 
filled, and some seven feet of mud deposited above the bed ? 
On testing the depth of the mud with a pole, it was found 
to be about thirteen feet. In the centre of the meadow it 
must be much more. The surrounding hills, at the present 
time, do not give evidence that great aid in filling could 
have been derived from them, indicating that the basin 
must have filled itself, to a great extent, from its own 
resources. Sufficient material must perhaps have been 
washed in for the commencement of the process. 

Dr. Fox states, that, in clearing his meadow of these 
stumps and roots, he dug down into the mud in some 
places to the depth of ten feet ; and that he found three 
tiers of large pine stumps, perhaps none directly over the 
others, but on three different levels, — one at the surface, 
the second about a foot below the bottom roots of the first, 
and the third about the same distance below the second, 
bringing the third about on the level with the beavers' 
cabin. The trees were very large pines, generally three or 
four feet in diameter, and similar in the several tiers. 

This statement is supplemented by Benjamin Cutter, 
Esq., who says that in clearing his part of the meadow he 
dug cross ditches, and that at the intersection he found 
three large stumps in a perpendicular line — the upper one 
directly above the other two — the two upper of pines, one 
to two feet in diameter — the lower apparently of birch, and 
about one foot — and that there were pine stumps at the 
surface, near or quite four feet in diameter, within, prob- 
ably, ten rods. 

That trees grow and decay is no marvel. But three sue- 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 543 

cessive generations of them, so to speak, situated on the 
same spot, and attaining this gigantic size, and on such 
a wet soil, formed to a great extent by their own decay, 
are not often seen or heard of — never before, to my knowl- 
edge. 

Centuries seem to be comprised in this problem. Pine 
trees four feet in diameter do not grow in a short period, 
and when grown it requires some time to resolve them, by 
a natural process of decay, into good meadow mud, capable 
of sustaining another like growth. 

I can hardly assign less than five hundred years — perhaps 
it may be a thousand — as a time when this beaver's cabin 
was erected, and his bed made. How much longer, and 
how many tiers of pine trees there may have been below 
those discovered, is not very material. 

If any one is disposed to cavil about the exact period, I 
have no objection to discount a century or so ; but I cannot 
consent to give up any of the stumps, because, as they 
stand, or, rather, stood, the town may stump all the towns 
in the region round about to show anything bigger of that 
description. 

It needs not that I should say to you that it was perse- 
vering industry and diligent hard labor which subdued the 
forest here, and converted so large a portion of the township 
into reasonably fertile fields. 

It must be admitted that the surface is somewhat un- 
even : I should be unwilling to apply the term rough to the 
township, or to any body or thing connected with it. And 
there are some stones scattered here and there, notwith- 
standing the " heaps of 'em '•' piled up in the fields, in times 
past, by the boys, somewhat to their disgust when they 
wanted to "go a-fishing." 

But this is a world of compensations. Pure air, pure 
water, and good drainage are conducive to good health and 
good morals ; and it is but just to say that this is a place 
where a man, under ordinary circumstances may expect to 



544 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

"live out half his days," and even something more, if careful 
about his habits. 

A party to ascend the Monadnock, after " haying time," 
was one of the recreations many years since ; but who 
could then imagine that our beloved town, with its uneven 
surface, would become a celebrated resort for the seekers after 
health, and for the lovers of quiet and of the picturesque, 
and that the writers of prose, and eke of poetry, would come 
hither, not merely to get a larger view of the world than 
they ever had before, but to make it a dwelling and a habi- 
tation, and a shelter against the heats of summer, and per- 
haps the storms of adverse fortune.* 

Respecting the minor incidents of the early history of the 
town, little can now be known, for the reasons suggested. 
It is said that there were settlers here prior to seventeen 
hundred and forty-nine. If so, they were occupants without 
even color of title, and doubtless did not remain. If we 
desire to derive a title otherwise than from the original 
granite, we may trace it through the Right in the Crown of 
Great Britain by Discovery ; the grant of King James I 
to the Council of Plymouth, in the county of Devon, in 
England; the grant of that corporation to Capt. John 
Mason ; a devise by him to his grandson, Robert Tufton, 
who took the name of Mason ; thence as an entailed 
estate, through several descents, to his great-grandson, John 
Tufton Mason ; and after a recovery, his conveyance in 
1746 to Theodore Atkinson and eleven other persons, who 
afterwards became known as the " Masonian proprietors." 

Acting under a vote of these Masonian proprietors, passed 



*I note, however, that the inducements to the traveller to "stop 
over" may not, within the law, be in all respects quite as numerous as 
those held out by a poetical landlord who kept a tavern north of Keene 
village, some three quarters of a century since. They ran in this wise : 

''Why will ye pass by, both hungry and dry? 
Good brandy, good gin, please to walk in ; 
Good baiting, good bedding, — 
Your humble servant, Thomas Redding." 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 545 

June 1 6, 1749, Joseph Blanchard, of Dunstable, as their 
agent, on the thirtieth of November of that year, conveyed 
to Jonathan Hubbard and thirty-nine others all the right, 
possession, and property of the proprietors to this township, 
then called the Middle Monadnock, or Number Two, — sev- 
eral of the grantees taking more than one share, the number 
of shares being in fact fifty.* The deed contained a provi- 
sion by which the land should be divided into seventy-one 
shares, three shares being " granted and appropriated, free 
of all charge, one for the first settled minister," "one for the 
support of the ministry, and one for the school there forever,"! 
the grantors reserving for themselves eighteen shares, 
acquitted from all duty and charge until improved. And it 
was provided that each share contain three lots, equitably 
coupled together, and drawn for, at, or before the first of 
July next, in some equitable manner. 

One of the provisions of the deed was, that each of the 
grantees should, at the executing of the instrument, pay 
twenty pounds old tenor, to defray the necessary charges 
arisen and arising in said township.^ 

*See Note i, at the end of this address. 

fGrants of townships by the Governor and Council, outside of the 
limits of the Masonian proprietors, sometimes contained provisions 
giving shares to the Church of England, and to The Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, with a large share for His 
Excellency personally. 

JThe actual amount to be paid was but a small proportion of the 
nominal sum thus set down, — the old tenor being a paper currency 
issued long before, by the Province, which, not having been redeemed 
according to its tenor, had greatly depreciated. Massachusetts had 
three emissions of paper currency, which became known as old tenor, 
middle tenor, and new tenor. The old tenor had depreciated, in 1753, 
so that twenty shillings of it were worth only two shillings eight pence 
lawful money. It may be safely inferred that the currency of New 
Hampshire was not better. Probably it was worse. Belknap, speaking 
of a controversy between Governor Benning Wentworth and the 
Assembly, in 1749, respecting the representation of the towns, says,— 
"The effect of this controversy was injurious to the governor as v/ell 
as to the people. The public bills of credit had depreciated since this 
administration began, in the ratio of thirty to fifty-six, and the value of 
the governor's salary had declined in the same proportion." 

36 



54^ HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

There are conditions respecting clearing, building, and 
settlement, to be performed within certain specified times, 
by the several grantees, — a condition that a good, conven- 
ient meeting house should be built, as near the centre as 
might be with convenience, within six years from date, and 
ten acres of land reserved for public use ; another, that the 
grantees, or their assignees, by a major vote, in public meet- 
ing, should grant and assess such further sums as they 
should think necessary for carrying forward the settlement, 
with a provision for the sale of so much of any delinquent's 
right as should be necessary for the payment of a tax, by a 
committee appointed for that purpose ; and a further provi- 
sion, that if any of the grantees should neglect or refuse to 
peform any of the articles, he should forfeit his share and 
right to those of the grantees who should have complied on 
their part, with power to enter upon the right of the delin- 
quent owner, and oust him, provided they should perform 
his duty as he should have done, within a year. 

There were provisions by which the grantors undertook 
to defend the title, to a certain extent. 

We are interested in these conditions and provisions only 
as matters of history, serving to show the measures taken 
by the Masonian proprietors to secure the settlement of the 
townships which they granted, this among others. 

It seems probable that none of the conditions were strictly 
complied with. They could not well be at that time. But 
so long as there were attempts, in good faith, to make settle- 
ments, it was not for the interest of the grantors to enforce 
forfeitures. Their shares became more valuable as the 
others were improved, and the enforcement of forfeitures, 
when there were attempts to perform, would have injured 
themselves. 

I have procured, from the clerk of the Masonian proprie- 
tors, copies of the documents on file in his office relating 
to this township. A few items may perhaps be acceptable. 

The grantees held a meeting at Dunstable, January i6. 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 54/ 

1749 or '50, at which a vote was passed that each right be 
laid out into three lots, and to couple them fit for drawing, 
— to be done by the last day of May ; and that twenty 
pounds old tenor be raised to each right, to defray charges 
incidental thereto. 

A plan of the township, seven miles long by five broad, 
laid out into ten ranges, and twenty-two lots one hundred 
rods wide to each range, was finished in May, 1750. 

The meeting in January was adjourned to the first Tues- 
day in June, when it was again adjourned to the second 
Tuesday, at which time the lots were drawn. It is probable 
that some of the grantees abandoned their rights, as six 
shares were sold at this meeting, and the money ordered to 
be deposited with the treasurer, to be paid "to the first five 
men that goes on with their families in one year from this 
date, and continues there for the space of one year." There 
was a vote also for a committee to lay out a road from 
another Number Two (Wilton), through Peterborough Slip, 
to this township.* 

The meeting was then adjourned to November 8, at 
which time a vote was passed prescribing the method of 
calling future meetings, the provision for notice being the 
posting of notices at Dunstable, Lunenburg, and Hollis. 
A further vote appointed Joseph Blanchard, Benjamin Bel- 
lows, and Captain Peter Powers "a Committee to manage 
the Prudentials for this Society." 

These last votes give us a clue to the residences of some 
of the grantees. They, of course, belonged to the towns 
where notices were to be posted. Captain Peter Powers — 
who was the grantee of four shares, and the purchaser of 

* Lyndeboroujih, including the northerly part of Wilton, was laid out 
by Massachusetts under the claim of that colony, and granted to certain 
persons, mostly belonging to Salem, in consideration of their sufferings 
in the expedition to Canada. The residue of what is Wilton was grant- 
ed by the Masonian proprietors in 1749, and was called No. 2. Mason 
was called No. i. Peterborough Slip comprised the towns of Temple 
and Sharon. This gives us the general course of the road. 



548 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

four of the six sold at auction at the first meeting, and who 
was one of the Committee to manage the Prudentials — 
must have been the first settler of Hollis, in 1731, — one of 
the soldiers under the celebrated Captain John Lovewell, 
who fell in the Indian fight at Pigwackett in 1725. 

At a meeting of the grantees, August 4, 1752, a formal 
vote was passed to accept the title, with an acknowledgment 
that they held it under the conditions and limitations and 
reservations, by some of which there should have been 
clearings before that time. 

Copies of the deed executed by Blanchard, and of the 
plan, and a list of the proprietors, were filed in the office of 
the grantors, September 4, 1753. 

It is stated that a settlement was attempted in 1753 by 
Richard Peabody, Moses Stickney, and a few others, who 
remained but two or three years. The first native was a 
son of Moses Stickney, born in 1753. 

The first permanent settlement was made in 1758, by 
John Grout and John Davidson. 

There is in the files a paper containing, first, a list of 
settlers on the free lots, to the number of nine families ; 
second, a list of settlers that abide constantly on settling 
rights, — total, twenty-two; third, "some beginnings on set- 
tling rights, number, ten; also a memorandum, "no meet- 
ing-house built." This is certified as a true account of the 
settling rights, " carefully examined and humbly submitted " 
by John Grout and Roger Gilmore. There is no date to it, 
nor any memorandum when it was received, but pinned to 
it is a paper signed John Gilmore and Roger Gilmore, dated 
March 10, 1769, addressed to "Gentlemen Grantors," set- 
ting forth that they bought the right that was Paul March's, 
January, '68, and the improvements which they have made 
and intend, and concluding, — "Gentlemen, we beg the favor 
of you, as you are men of honor, that you will not hurt us 
in our interest, for we have done everything in our power 
to bring forward the settlement of this place." 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 549 

Roger Gilmore is the only one of the earlier settlers that 
I am sure of having seen. He lived on the hill east of the 
tannery of John Cutter ; was a man of large frame and dig- 
nified deportment ; was highly esteemed ; and was much 
employed as justice of the peace, surveyor, and in town 
offices and affairs. 

There is also on file "an accompt of the settlements in 
Monadnock No. 2," certified by Enoch Hale, stating the 
names of the settlers on the several rights, and the number 
of the rights (ten in all) appearing to be delinquent. It is 
without date, but was "received March 8th, 1770," and was 
probably made up within a short time previously. From 
this it appears that there were settlements on thirty-four 
rights, and twelve lots (additional, as I understand) im- 
proved ; and that mills were erected on right 15, and a saw- 
mill on 41. 

And here, near the close of its unincorporated existence, 
let us pay a deserved tribute to the enterprise and energy 
of the early settlers. Struggling against obstacles that 
were all but insuperable, and through hardships which 
might well have daunted the most determined courage, 
they have, in a few years, brought the township largely 
above the average of the settlements in the county, and to 
a position exceeded only by towns of a longer existence, all 
of which had much greater facilities for access. The partic- 
ular obstacles which they encountered j and the details of 
the hardships which they endured, we cannot know. Of 
their personal deprivations and sufferings we fail to form 
an adequate conception. It is difficult to gain even a 
general appreciation of them. 

There are, it is true, only forty miles intervening between 
the head-quarters, if we may so call them, at Dunstable ; but 
twenty or more of them are through a nearly trackless, 
dense forest, over a rough, rocky surface, with occasionally 
a small natural meadow. The pioneers make their slow, 
painful way, much of it through the thick underbrush, — 



550 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

the husband with an axe on his shoulders, and what he can 
carry of household appendages in a pack on his back, and 
his wife follows, somewhat similarly loaded, except the axe. 
Cheap land, within the reach of their scanty means, has 
tempted them to endurance. There may be a young man 
with them. God be thanked we do not see any young chil- 
dren. Weary, worn in spirit as well as in body, they reach 
the range and lot of their destination, and their first shelter 
is constructed of hemlock boughs, with the same material 
for a bedstead, and leaves for a mattress. 

A rude log hut follows,* and then comes the hard strug- 
gle with the forest and with privation, — with the winter, its 
deep snows, and its intense cold. There is no communica- 
tion with the outward world but by " rackets " (snow-shoes), 
and pioneers of longer duration are in other towns, miles 
away. It is not necessary to put wild beasts into this pict- 
ure. 

Is it wonderful that the settlers of '53 found this too 
great an endurance even for their brave hearts and strong 
•arms, and that they abandoned the settlement when re- 
maining threatened their lives .'' or, rather, is it not won- 
derful that they lived to abandon it .'' Surely, it was not 
light difficulties which would deter persons who had the 
courage to begin such a work from the prosecution of their 
purpose. 

But there is another attempt at settlement made under 
more favorable auspices. We may suppose that the few 
pounds voted to be raised to make a road from Number 
Two have been expended. The underbrush and some of 

* The log hut must have been an institution of short duration. So 
far as I have heard, there is little tradition of log-houses in the town. 
A grist- and saw-mill were erected in Peterborough as early as 1751 ; 
another saw-mill near the place of the south factory in 1758. Rev. 
John H. Morison, in his very interesting address at the centennial cel- 
ebration in Peterborough, says, — "At this period [1770] log huts were 
little used. Substantial frame houses, many of them two stories high, 
had been erected." And we have seen, from the return of 1770, that 
there were then two saw-mills here. 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 551 

the Stones are cleared away, and trees are blazed along the 
route ; and another small party of settlers start, with oxen, 
not in yokes but single file, with such loads as they can 
carry strapped upon their backs. And there is a cow there. 
The small patches of natural meadow furnish food for the 
animals, and the emigrants arrive with better means of es- 
tablishing themselves. The trees fall, the logs are drawn, 
piled, burnt, a small space is cleared, a shelter is built, seed 
is sown, and the vegetation, anxiously watched and tended, 
gives a scanty crop. But sickness comes. Exposure has 
produced its natural result : fever is in the household. 
There is no physician. The medicines are the few simple 
remedies brought in the luggage. Acts of neighborly kind- 
ness would be cheerfully rendered if there were near neigh- 
bors, but are of difficult procurement in this forest of "mag- 
nificent distances ;" and all the hours of attendance by the 
sick-bed are so much time withdrawn from what would 
otherwise have been essentially necessary for labor and for 
rest. Alas! the kindest care, the unslumbering watch, and 
the fervent prayer are unavailing ; and the sufferer, no 
longer such, is laid to final rest in some quiet corner of 
" the clearing." 

Out of this darkness comes a brighter dawn. Lumber 
can be had. The mills are miles distant, to be sure, and 
the transportation difficult, but perseverance overcomes 
obstacles. "The road" has been improved. There is a 
horse upon the path. The rider has a young child in her 
lap, and one somewhat older sits behind. Her husband 
drives "the stock." The way is not so toilsome: there are 
more articles of housekeeping in the luggage, more of en- 
couragement, more of hope, more of fruition, more of hap- 
piness. 

We have reached 1770, and there are several families 
here. The settlement is established on a firm basis. Let 
us never fail to do justice to the pioneers, men and women, 
who, with such resolute courage, fortitude, patience, and 



552 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

perseverance, established a civilized society in the midst 
of a trackless wilderness. We should do ourselves a great 
wrong if we did not express our deep admiration of them. 

In 1 77 1 the province was divided into counties. Prior to 
this time all the public offices were in Portsmouth or the 
vicinity, and the courts were held there. 

In an act for making a new proportion of public taxes, 
passed May 28, 1773, which included unincorporated places, 
Monadnock Number Two is set down at £2> S^- i" the 
;^i,ooo. The proportion for Cheshire county, which until 
1827 included what is now Sullivan county, was £117 S,s, 
There were twelve towns in the county rated higher than 
Jaffrey, and seventeen towns and places at less. This pro- 
portion of the taxation serves to show, in some measure, its 
relative importance at that time. 

The Masonian proprietors had and claimed only a right 
of property. Their title to the land passed by the deed 
authorized by them, as a deed passes the title to land at the 
present day, but there was no right of town government 
granted. The provision for taxing the shares and collect- 
ing the tax could only be made effectual through the laws 
of the province. The jurisdiction was in the governor and 
council and the assembly. 

The grantees of the lands acted like a corporation for the 
division and disposition of their lands and the performance 
of their duties as a proprietary, but for nothing beyond. 
When those things were accomplished, the proprietary was 
at an end, — dissolved. And this was true also of the town- 
ships granted by the governor, outside of the limits of the 
Masonian lines, unless incorporated. 

There was no provision in the general laws by which an 
assessment could be made upon the inhabitants of unincor- 
porated places, for which reason the act apportioning the 
public taxes, in 1773, contained a provision appointing per- 
sons, who were named, to call meetings of the inhabitants 
of such places ; and requiring the inhabitants at such meet- 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 553 

ings to choose the necessary ofificers for assessing and col- 
lecting the tax, and giving authority for that purpose. 

And so the time had come when the interests of the peo- 
ple required corporate powers of a general character ; and on 
the 17th of August, 1773, an act of incorporation was grant- 
ed, nominally by His Majesty George III, but in fact by 
the royal governor, John Wentworth, with advice of the 
council, the corporate name being found in the name of one 
of the Masonian proprietors, who was then secretary ; and 
Jajfrey was installed into the great brotherhood of political 
and municipal incorporations called towns, which have been 
of such incalculable benefit, not only to New England, 
where they originated, and of which they are the glory and 
the pride, but through it to the country at large. 

The centuries of which we usually speak date from the 
commencement of the Christian era, occasionally from the 
period assigned by Bibical theology as the time of the crea- 
tion of the world. But a century may have its beginning 
at any point of time. That of which we now witness the 
close had its inception with this incorporation. If the event 
be supposed to be one of comparative insignificance, it was 
one which has had a greater absolute force for the promo- 
tion of the happiness of those persons inhabiting within the 
limits of the town, than any of the greater ones which have 
astonished the world. 

If we should suspend, for a moment, the consideration of 
the local interests attached to this incorporation, and which 
entitle it to mark the commencement of a century, and its 
anniversary to a grateful recognition and celebration, and 
should turn our attention to the general history of the cen- 
tury which has followed, we should find that this century 
may challenge a comparison with any one which has pre- 
ceded it, whatever date may be assigned for the commence- 
ment of the latter. 

But we must not undertake the centennial history of the 
world to-day. On our recollection of it, however, we may 



554 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

surely be pardoned if we exclaim, Great has been the cen- 
tury which had its commencement in the incorporation of 
the town of Jaffrey ! 

These incorporated towns had their origin in Plymouth, 
Duxbury, and Scituate, in the Plymouth colony, followed 
by Charlestovvn, Salem, and Newton (since Cambridge), and 
Dorchester, in Massachusetts ; and by Portsmouth, Dover, 
Exeter, and Hampton, in this state. 

It has been suggested that the town organization had 
its origin in the Congregational church polity ; and, in fact, 
the organization of the church, in the earlier settlements of 
the Pilgrims and the Puritans, accompanied the organization 
of the town. 

But the town grew mainly out of the secular need, — out 
of the democratic principle of self-government, — as is shown 
from the fact that changes in the modes and forms of wor- 
ship, and in the different church organizations, have not 
affected the townships and the towns ; whereas Congrega- 
tionalism had no existence outside of the portions of the 
country where these townships existed. Instead of creating 
townships and towns, it has not itself been created to any 
extent where they have not existed. It cannot well exist 
without them. But they now exist in the Western country, 
where Congregationalism has as yet little foothold, — and 
but for them it would have been long since merged in 
Presbyterianism, which has been the prevailing form of 
orthodoxy in all parts of the country where these towns 
have been unknown.* 

Considering the principles and objects of the emigrants, 
the town system may be said to have been a necessity, in the 
existing state of things, in the early settlement of this part of 
the country. It was the only organization by and through 
which the settlers could best provide for their wants, and 
have the full enjoyment of the liberty which they prized so 
highly ; and they devised it accordingly. 

*See Note 2, at the end of this address. 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 55 5 

The early settlers of the Plymouth colony discovered 
that the grant of corporate powers to the small separate 
settlements, and the passage of general laws giving them 
such powers and privileges as would enable them to provide 
for their local needs, and subjecting them to the perform- 
ance of such duties as might be required by the government 
of the whole colony, was the best and fittest way for the 
transaction of the affairs of the different localities ; and they 
so provided. This conclusion was reached, not through 
any revelation which perfected the system at once, but by 
degrees, through their daily and yearly experience ; and the 
system, inaugurated at Plymouth, commended itself to the 
Massachusetts colony, so that it was adopted there at the 
outset. 

The earliest settlements in this state were commenced in a 
slightly different manner, Portsmouth, Dover, and Hampton 
being towns, independent of each other, with separate pow- 
ers of government, exercised by agreement, without any act 
of incorporation. But when the government of the colony 
of New Hampshire was organized, grants of townships were 
made, and towns incorporated. 

In this organization of towns, the settlements of New 
England differed from those of Virginia and other Southern 
states, and to these towns, providing for local wants and 
performing local duties. New England owes much of the 
prosperity of which she has had a reasonable share to this 
day. 

The early settlers in this place, like those of other towns, 
wanted religious teachers and institutions. This is shown 
not merely by the character of mankind, the nature of soci- 
ety, and the particular character of the parties, but by the 
provisions in the grant of the township giving one share for 
the first settled minister, and one for the support of the 
ministry, and by the condition requiring that a good, con- 
venient meeting-house should be built near the centre with- 
in six years. 



556 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

Whatever we may think respecting ourselves, at this later 
day, with our more dense population and our enlarged 
means, we may well conclude that at that period it was for 
the benefit of the civil state that the institutions of religion 
should be maintained through some organization having 
legal power to provide for the support of religious teachers. 
In fact, the authority of the towns to provide for the settle- 
ment of ministers and their support remained until 18 19, 
although the efficiency of the law was much impaired by 
religious divisions at an earlier day. The clergyman had 
then no need to spend his summer in Europe or the Adi- 
rondacks. His parish being the town, his parochial visits 
furnished him with sufficient "muscular Christianity" for 
all practical purposes. 

They wanted schools, and of course they needed school- 
houses, and for the erection of these, school-districts. The 
inhabitants of the town, with a full understanding of the 
local needs of all portions of the town, could arrange these 
districts ; the people of the several districts could then de- 
termine the situation and the size of the house required, 
with regard to their accommodation and pecuniary ability ; 
and the tax voted by the town for the support of schools, 
being divided in an equitable manner, could then be applied 
to the purposes of education in these districts with the 
greatest possible efficiency. The poor little school-houses 
would not make a great show by the side of some modern 
structures, but they did a work perhaps quite as useful as if 
the seats had had cushions and the desks had been of ma- 
hogany. 

They wanted highways. This need of facilities for inter- 
communication, and for intercourse with other portions of 
the country, must have impressed itself upon them, by the 
inconveniences which they suffered, in a manner to assure 
an energetic use of their powers in this respect ; and the 
town incorporation, with its power to divide into districts 
for this purpose, and by the appropriation of money or 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 557 

labor, to be expended under surveyors interested to do a 
good work, soon rendered travel safe and even convenient. 
The great rocks have disappeared, one after another, under 
the persevering application of the highway tax, until the 
" drives " have, as you know, become very attractive. 

The then existing modes of travel and transportation did 
not require roads of the most perfect construction. Chaises 
had not been introduced. The light Dearborn wagon had 
not been invented. The single horse had no difificulty in 
picking his way, and by skilful " hawing and geeing " the 
oxen and cart were enabled to avoid the more formidable 
obstructions. Personal transportation was mostly on horse- 
back, but the cart was made the carryall when several per- 
sons were to be conveyed. The side-saddle furnished a 
healthful means of locomotion for the women, and when it 
t)ecame necessary to ride double, the pillion — no longer 
known, alas ! — formed a very comfortable seat for the lady. 
As it was necessary, in order to keep the seat properly, that 
she should pass her arm around the side of the gentle- 
man, this was, in some cases, a very acceptable mode of 
transportation, to the junior portion of the community. 

No system of general legislation could provide for all 
these local wants and necessities accordins: to the exisen- 
cies of particular cases. But the general laws enabled these 
small communities, acting as municipal corporations, to 
provide each for itself, in relation to these and other mat- 
ters, according to its own views of what it needed and what 
it could perform, — it being premised that it had needs upon 
some subjects, to some extent, and 7nus^ perform to that 
extent, at least, with liberty to do more, which it usually 
did. Thus, it must raise a certain amount of money for the 
support of schools, and might raise more if deemed expedi- 
ent. 

The powers and privileges which the towns possessed 
were not talents to be wrapped in a napkin and buried in 
the earth, nor did the people belong to the class of slothful 



558 HISTORY OF JAFFREY, 

and unfaithful servants who seek to escape from their 
duties. 

There were other duties and rights attached to these 
incorporations. The duty of supplying the needs of the 
aged, infirm, and incompetent, who were unable to supply 
themselves, so that want and destitution should be allevi- 
ated and starvation unknown, was deemed a common duty 
of each community, and could best be performed by these 
incorporations. 

Through them, also, the inhabitants were primarily to 
enjoy such political rights as were conceded to the people 
in the days of the province, and the more extended and ex- 
alted powers which were conferred by the acquisition of 
independence, the organization of the state, and the adop- 
tion of the constitution of the United States. All the 
rights of suffrage were to be exercised within the towrr 
incorporation, the electors being summoned thereto by its 
warrants for such purposes. Again : the meetings held for 
these purposes gave opportunity for the full consideration 
and discussion of the measures required for the public 
good, and for the expression of the opinions of the inhabi- 
tants respecting them. How many of the specifications of 
the Declaration of Independence originated in the resolu- 
tions of the towns we cannot now know. Although no 
trace may be left, we knovi^ that there must have been 
arguments for and against the adoption of the constitution 
of the United States, when the delegates were chosen to 
attend the convention, which ratified it by a small majority, 
proposing divers amendments, most of which were adopted 
immediately afterwards. Some voted against the ratifica- 
tion, fearing that such amendments would not be made, — 
perhaps so instructed by their constituents. Nothing could 
have been better adapted to the execution of all these pur- 
poses than these "Little Democracies," as de Tocqueville 
has called them. 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 559 

The social privileges connected with the organization 
must not be overlooked. It made the inhabitants of the 
small tract of territory within its limits a brotherhood, — 
promoting the welfare of each other and of the whole com- 
munity, by the meeting-house, the school-house, and the 
highway, — and in these, and other ways, establishing good 
order, social intercourse, and a kindly feeling towards each 
other. 

The town was the ef^cient means which secured the 
prosperity of the household. The several families, farmers, 
mechanics, laborers, and professional persons needed for 
the development of their resources and the greatest enjoy- 
ment of their privileges something beyond their isolated 
households, something beyond even the mutual support of 
each other in their various neighborhoods ; and they found 
it in the town. It enlarged while it concentrated their 
sympathies, formed and moulded their opinions, and gave 
expression to their united will. Lastly, the military com- 
pany organizations were mostly within the town, two 
communities sometimes uniting to furnish an extra article 
in this line. From these companies the ranks of the army 
have been recruited in time of war, being liable to draft, if 
necessary. 

In the time of the Revolution, when the ordinary mode 
of supplying the army seemed likely to fail, requisitions 
were made upon the towns to furnish ammunition and pro- 
visions, and were promptly answered. They were often the 
storehouses of ammunition. 

If any one who does not know would seek an exemplifi- 
cation of the utility of the town incorporations, let him look 
at Jaffrey to-day, and study her history. 

An admirable result of the town organization was, that 
the Revolution, which followed almost immediately upon the 
incorporation of this town, did not place the country in a 
state of disintegration. The town organization remained, its 
efficiency necessarily somewhat impaired ; but the town 



560 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

officers, having been elected by the people, still retained 
their confidence and support. Such powers as could be 
exercised only in the name of the king, or under the royal 
authority, were at first suspended, and then abrogated, — but 
the same powers were immediately exercised under the 
authority of the people ; and the towns, during all the time, 
served to a great extent the purposes for which they were 
established. 

A revolutionary convention, called by the committee of 
correspondence, in 1775, recommended that those who had 
been chosen into office in the usual manner, should, as 
formerly, be considered the proper officers ; and that the 
town, selectmen, and other officers proceed in the usual 
manner in granting and collecting moneys, etc., unless some 
particular direction was given, — adding this significant para- 
graph : 

" If any, inimical to their country, or inattentiv'e to the 
ruin which must ensue upon a contrary conduct, should re- 
fuse, we trust that all friends of the country will effectually 
strengthen the hands of the selectmen, constables, and 
collectors." 

It is not supposed that any one here, by his refusal, ren- 
dered it necessary even to hint at a resort to the peculiar 
strengthening-plaster thus indicated. 

February 13, 1775, the town voted unanimously to visit 
Mr. Williams, of Keene — a very extraordinary civility on 
the face of the vote. Williams was a lawyer, but the call 
on him was not for professional advice. He was a tory, 
and this unusual demonstration had reference to that fact. 
The further proceedings in relation to the proposed visit 
are not of record. It is a fair presumption that there was 
no tory in Jaffrey, who might be visited with much less 
trouble. 

No other system could so well have supplied civil govern- 
ment, under such circumstances. 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 561 

It was more difficult to deal with matters of which the 
courts of justice had jurisdiction. The courts, on recom- 
mendation of the convention, adjourned. 

Justices of the peace could not 'well issue compulsory- 
process under the royal authority, in the existing circum- 
stances. The collection of debts by suit was suspended, 
and the natural consequences were, in one instance at least, 
exemplified here. In the files of the convention of 1775 is 
a memorial or representation address to the " Honorable 
Provincial Congress," signed by Jethro Baile}^ William 
Turner, and Roger Gilmore, committee of correspondence, 
setting forth that Benjamin Nutting, of Peterborough Slip, 
so called, had entered a complaint to them against John 
Davis, junior, of Jaffrey ; that upon the second day of Octo- 
ber, instant, as he came to the house of John Eaton on 
some business, he was assaulted by said Davis, and abused 
in the most "solem" manner, as appears by sundry evi- 
dences ; that notwithstanding Davis was notified to attend 
and hear the evidences examined, he refused ; that he had 
often been requested to settle the matter, but remained ob- 
stinate, and persisted in his villainy, with insolence. 

The committee enclosed the depositions, and earnestly 
desired the convention to take the matter into consideration, 
and either determine it between them, or invest the com- 
mittee with a proper authority to act, with instructions how 
to proceed in the case. It does not appear that any action 
was taken upon the subject. 

On the fifth of Januar}-, 1776, a "form, or plan, of civil 
government" was adopted by a convention, or congress, 
which met for the purpose, under which the affairs of the 
towns were again transacted in legal form. The form of 
government was limited by its terms to continue "during 
the present unhappy contest with Great Britian," but served 
as a state constitution for many years, and is said to have 
been the first state constitution. 

This caused no change in the organization of the town 
37 



562 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. • 

or in its proceedings, except that the latter were now con- 
ducted once more under what proved to be a sufficient 
legal authority. 

A few items in relation to the increase of the population 
and the rate of taxation may serve to show the comparative 
progress with the other towns. 

The convention of 1775 ordered a survey to be made of 
the people in the several counties, for the purpose of deter- 
mining the ratio of representation in the assembly, from 
which it appears that Jaffrey had 351 inhabitants. Of thirty 
towns in the county, ten or eleven had a larger number. 
She had sixteen men in the army. This was a very strong 
delegation for such a small community, just organized, — 
larger than any of the towns not having more inhabitants. 
Keene had 756 inhabitants; Chesterfield, Westmoreland, 
and Richmond a still greater number. 

The census in 1790 gives Jaffrey a population of 1,235. 
There were then only six towns in the county with a popu- 
lation greater than this, and these, with the exception of 
Keene, lay on the south border, or on the Connecticut river, 
and so were more easy of access. Keene had 1,314 inhabi- 
tants. 

In 1800 the population was 1,341. Eleven towns had a 
larger population, mostly much more favorably situated. 
Keene had 1,645. 

By an act of the assembly, in 1777, determining the pro- 
portion of each town for every ;!^i,ooo of the state taxes, 
Jaffrey's proportion was ^Cs 9s. S^^- There were nine towns 
in the county having a greater valuation, that of Keene be- 
ing ;^io 5^-. gd., twenty-two having less. 

When, in 1780, a requisition was made for a hundred and 
twelve thousand weight of beef for the army, the proportion 
of Jaffrey was 7,326 pounds ; the proportion of Keene, 
11,309. The same year a new proportion of taxes gave 
Jaffrey ;^6 10s. lOc/., Keene, ;^io is. iid. 

Another proportion, in 1789, shows a comparative in- 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 563 

crease favorable to the prosperity of Jaffrey ; that is, sup- 
posing that the duty to pay a larger proportion of taxes 
indicates in fact a larger ability to perform the duty, which 
probably is not always the case. Jaffrey is set at ^.y I2s. 
^d., Keene, £<^ i<^s. 6d. 

Another proportion, in 1794, gave for Jaffrey ;^7 9^-. 8^., 
Keene, ^9 14^". 6d. But in this year the valuation of Ches- 
terfield, Walpole, and Westmoreland, lying on the Connec- 
ticut river, each exceeded that of Keene. 

It is not my purpose to refer in detail to the proceedings 
of the town in the exercise of its rights and the perform- 
ance of its duties. This is the special province of the future 
historian, and to him, whoever he may be, I remit it. But 
a few brief notes, having reference to some of the subjects 
which have been mentioned, may find a place upon this 
occasion. 

The first meeting under the act of incorporation was for 
the choice of town officers only. It was called by Jonathan 
Stanley, specially authorized by the charter, August 27, 
1773, and was held September 14. 

Another meeting was held September 28, to raise monev 
for the building of roads and the support of the gospel. 

April 26, 1774, it was voted to build a meeting-house, 
and July 6, to build one of larger dimensions, to let the 
building at public vendue, that it should be raised by the 
middle of June next at the town's cost, with several other 
votes on the subject. 

It was voted in March, 1775, that the committee to build 
provide all things necessary to raise the house at the cost 
of the town. But March 30, 1780, there was a vote to make 
allowance to Captain Henry Coffin for the barrel of rum 
which he paid for, to raise the meeting-house. The captain, 
it would seem, intervened patriotically to supplement the 
deficiency of the provision made by the committee, and 
waited a long time for reimbursement. 

There is a tradition that the meeting-house was raised on 



564 HISTORY OF JAFFREY. 

the day of the battle of Bunker Hill, and that the guns of 
that battle were heard here. But this must be a mistake. 
When the matter is examined, the probabilities are against 
it. It is hardly probable that guns fired at Charlestown 
could be heard here, with the New Ipswich hills and the 
forest intervening, even on a quiet day, when there was no 
meeting-house to raise. Moreover, the battle was on Satur- 
day, which was as good a day for a battle as any other day, 
but would hardly be selected as the time to raise a meeting- 
house, lest there should be some work remaining which 
ought to be performed the next day. 

The conclusion to be derived from the improbabilities is 
fortified by direct hearsay evidence. I received a letter a 
few days since from Dr. Jeremiah Spofford, of Groveland, 
Mass., in which he says, — "My father, Jeremiah Spofford, 
as a master-carpenter, framed that church. He was em- 
ployed to do it by Captain Samuel Adams, whose wife was 
his sister. Jacob Spofford and Joseph Haskell went up 
with him to work on the frame. * * * ]y[y father often 
related, seventy years ago, that they raised the house, and 
that ending his job, they set out for home the next day, 
travelling " ride and tie," three men, with one horse to carry 
tools and ease the men in turn ; that coming down through 
Townsend, in the forenoon, they heard the roar of cannon, 
which proved to be the cannon of Bunker Hill, and coming- 
over the Westford hills, in the evening, they saw the light 
of Charlestown burning. * * * Captain Adams was 
one of the contractors to build the house, and was a carpen- 
ter himself." 

It may be objected that "unlucky" Friday was as little 
likely as Saturday to be selected as the day to begin such a 
work. But the explanation seems easy. The town had 
voted to raise by the middle of June. The contract would 
naturally specify that as the time of performance. There 
would be a desire and time enough for compliance. The 
fifteenth of June was Thursday. If we suppose that to be 



JAFFREY CENTENNIAL. 565 

the clay selected, and that there was some unfinished work 
to be done on Friday to complete the job, we shall have the 
carpenters on their homeward way on Saturday, in the 
localities in which Mr. Jeremiah Spofford placed them. We 
may give up the tradition without a sigh. Neither the 
meeting-house nor the battle will suffer by the loss of it. 

There was some delay in settling a minister. Several 
candidates were hired. There was a vote that young men 
supply the pulpit, and some others indicating that the ser- 
vices of some of the candidates were not quite satisfactory. 
But June i, 1780, it was voted to hear Mr. Caleb Jewett 
more if he can be obtained, and September 4, a vote to con- 
cur with the church in giving him a call. Why he did not 
accept does not appear : perhaps